Snow falls in Sahara Desert – first time in 37 years

From Wire and Twitter reports:

We know the northern hemisphere has been getting colder, for example we reported earlier this week that the USA was colder than any time last year with an average temperature of 16 degrees F. It isn’t just the USA, in northern Africa, reports suggest that it is only the second time in living memory that snow has fallen on the Sahara desert. The last record is for February 18, 1979, when the snow storm lasted just half an hour.

Snow falling on the Saharan mountain ranges is very rare, let alone on the sandy dunes of the continent’s largest desert.

sahara-snowfall
Photo by Karim Bouchetata of Meteo Algerie

Amateur photographer Karim Bouchetata says he took the incredible pictures of snow covering the sand in the small Saharan desert town of Ain Sefra, Algeria, on December 19. The unforgiving red dunes looked pristine and picturesque.

“It looked amazing as the snow settled on the sand and made a great set of photos. The snow stayed for about a day and has now melted away.” he added.

Quote via The India Times

https://twitter.com/MiltonWolfMD/status/811272816280686593?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

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December 21, 2016 5:18 pm

so sorry. my suv is to blame i am sure. would it help if we cut fossil fuel emissions? we’ll also throw in $billions into the climate mitigation fund.
sorry so sorry.

Milly
Reply to  chaamjamal
December 21, 2016 5:37 pm

Still giggling over your comment….love it!!

Bryan A
Reply to  Milly
December 21, 2016 10:07 pm

Problem solved…all those poor unfortunate British Children will just have to visit the Sahara to find out what snow is

Reply to  Milly
December 22, 2016 2:16 am

Hi Milly
Nice photo. Two days ago I remarked on another WUWT thread (see here ) that the photo might be ‘f a k e d’. Another reader said it looks genuine. Subsequently I zoomed in and indeed it does look authentic (/sarc)
http://www.vukcevic.talktalk.net/SPB.jpg

urederra
Reply to  Milly
December 22, 2016 3:18 am

If the moon is made of cheese, Sahara is made of toffee. That white stuff is not snow, that is confectioners sugar. And if you zoom in, you can see a sleuth of gummy bears in state of postprandial somnolence after eating jawbreakers, which are hard to digest, just like global warming science.
http://oi63.tinypic.com/15me2ww.jpg

TRM
Reply to  Milly
December 22, 2016 4:44 pm

A fake photo? Maybe we should check with the authorities like snopes ….
Oh wait they seem to be having other problems. Never mind (Gilda Radner moment for me).
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-12-22/snopes-co-founder-embezzles-98000-drops-weight-leaves-fat-wife-and-marries-actual-wh

Lil Fella from OZ
Reply to  chaamjamal
December 21, 2016 7:34 pm

Nah, its the Russians again. They did it!

Hugs
Reply to  Lil Fella from OZ
December 22, 2016 2:04 am

It is freaking easy to say that from Oz.

Greg
Reply to  Lil Fella from OZ
December 22, 2016 2:07 am

Many photos of significant snow fall in Aleppo. I don’t know how unusual that is.
Better check with Gary Johnson.

Reply to  Lil Fella from OZ
December 22, 2016 5:10 am

“Greg
December 22, 2016 at 2:07 am
…Better check with Gary Johnson.”
I doubt Johnson/Weld with their choice of SoS could have done more harm than Obama and Kerry.

Reply to  Lil Fella from OZ
December 22, 2016 10:50 pm

Greg, I doubt that snow in Aleppo is unusual. January average is under 6C, not much variation needed to get snow.

theres hope yet
Reply to  Michael of Oz
December 21, 2016 9:25 pm

and this just in from the SMH http://www.smh.com.au/environment/weather/weird-weather-2016-year-of-melting-ice-monster-storms-and-australias-big-wet-20161220-gtfh0i.html
and a quoteable quote “Still, next year is likely to come in as third warmest, underscoring the warming trend in the climate as greenhouse gas concentrations climb ever higher”

Reply to  chaamjamal
December 21, 2016 7:54 pm

very sorry, blame me too.will give up my electric car for an suv. the extra co2 will warm the desert up again. very, very sorry.

Darrell Demick
Reply to  chaamjamal
December 21, 2016 8:00 pm

I do hate to correct you, but in actuality it is $trillions and not $billions.
Now THAT REALLY sucks!!!
And I love my SUV!!!!

usurbrain
December 21, 2016 5:18 pm

Pics are amazing.

tony mcleod
Reply to  usurbrain
December 21, 2016 8:07 pm

Parts of northern Algeria look like this in winter.comment image

SC
Reply to  tony mcleod
December 22, 2016 12:02 pm

Nice try. At 2,500 to 3,000 meters elevation they sure do.
http://www.skiresort.info/ski-resorts/atlas-mountains/
On the Sahara desert closer to sea level on the other hand not so much.

commieBob
December 21, 2016 5:18 pm

This is exactly why they switched from global warming to climate change.
The one thing experts are expert at doing is explaining why they weren’t actually wrong.

Robert B
Reply to  commieBob
December 21, 2016 5:53 pm
commieBob
Reply to  Robert B
December 21, 2016 6:30 pm

The video is Global Weirding with Katharine Hayhoe. I heard her on the radio. She’s frustrated talking with skeptics. She will think she has the skeptic cornered and the skeptic will raise another point. It’s like playing whack-a-mole.
She is indeed expert at proving that she’s not actually wrong … but she never puts two and two together … maybe the reason the skeptics can raise so many issues is that the mass of evidence points to the fact that CAGW is garbage … she’s too smart and educated to get that.

hunter
Reply to  Robert B
December 21, 2016 9:10 pm

I think of all of the climate grifters and hustlers, Hayhoe is one of the worst- she combines a religious veneer over her misrepresentation of the science and then tries to confuse Christians (while getting paid).
That video is a great example of her cynical style: Her claim about “weird weather” is simply a cheap and untrue assertion. The rest of her televangelist-style sales pitch goes downhill from there.

tadchem
Reply to  Robert B
December 22, 2016 12:00 am

The whole video smacks of an ad ignorantiam argument. “We dont have this in our records, so it must be new,” when the reality is that you simply lack sufficient records to have seen it before.
There is really no such thing as ‘unprecedented’ weather or climate. Climate shifts demonstrably (through the fossil record) occur on nearly geological time scales. Ice Ages, for example, are cyclic on a time scale longer than civilization has existed. Our records are short and our ‘living memories’ are even shorter.
Her ‘weird’ weather is definable simply as weather that lies slightly outside the accumulated database – a record temperature or rainfall or dry spell here and there.
As a mathematics major in 1969 I took a course in Numerical Analysis, the art of creating mathematical functions to fit data to varying degrees. I learned there is a theorem that proves one can fit any finite data set perfectly with any of an infinite number of functions, and that function will still be useless for extrapolating the next data point. In brief, forecasting physical world data is mathematically impossible.

Martin A
Reply to  Robert B
December 22, 2016 12:51 am

In brief, forecasting physical world data is mathematically impossible.
Er, not if you have a physical model that adequately represents the relevant aspects of physical reality, or even just its statistical characteristics. Of course, in the case of climate we don’t have such models. Hence, despite careful ‘parameterisation’, the failure of computer models of climate.

Greg
Reply to  Robert B
December 22, 2016 2:13 am

Thanks for the trigger warming, I just had time to click stop before smashing my computer screen.
Hayhoe , away we go, junket riding , junket riding …. flying to a junket.

JohnWho
Reply to  commieBob
December 21, 2016 5:56 pm

Exactamundo!
Could there be a white Christmas in the Sahara?
Tha’d be cooler than smoke on the water, something I’ve actually seen.

Reply to  JohnWho
December 21, 2016 8:06 pm

And fire in the sky?

Non Nomen
Reply to  JohnWho
December 22, 2016 1:35 am

Bad Moon rising? Fog on the Tyne??

taz1999
Reply to  JohnWho
December 23, 2016 1:03 pm

There’s a bathroom on the right…

henryp
Reply to  taz1999
December 23, 2016 1:08 pm

If there were no smoke on top of the water, there wouldn’t ever be any clouds
now
would there?

R. Shearer
December 21, 2016 5:18 pm

I must be dreaming of a white Christmas.

Leo Smith
Reply to  R. Shearer
December 21, 2016 11:14 pm

Racist!

Greg
Reply to  Leo Smith
December 22, 2016 2:16 am

Come on Leo, you know fine well there’s nothing racist about attacking ageing white males.

Reply to  R. Shearer
December 22, 2016 1:34 am

I’m posting from New Zealand. We’re having lots of cool
wet weather this summer, so…
I’m dreaming of a wet Christmas,
just like the ones I used to know
where the rainclouds gather and children glisten
with lotion for suntan’s glow.
I’m dreaming of a wet Christmas,
with every e-mail Hi! I send.
May your life be cool your dams be full,
and all your Christmases be wet.

December 21, 2016 5:20 pm

I wonder how the advocates will blame the snow on global warming, I mean climate change. They almost certainly will, I just don’t know how yet.

AndyG55
Reply to  Tom Halla
December 21, 2016 5:25 pm

Its because … global worming in the Arctic, which has slowed the growth of sea ice so that its extent is almost exactly the same as it was on this day in 2010. That means snow in the Sahara..
There.. close enough, I reckon.

commieBob
Reply to  AndyG55
December 21, 2016 5:38 pm

I’m guessing that the ice is pretty thin because the temperatures are way above average. link Want to guess what we’ll be hearing next summer?

AndyG55
Reply to  AndyG55
December 21, 2016 11:54 pm

Actually, there is more mid-thickness sea ice than any of the previous 5 years.
Its only the new ice that WAS struggling.
Just eyeballing tells you the blue/green area is more than previous 5 years.comment image

Greg
Reply to  AndyG55
December 22, 2016 2:19 am

Thanks Andy, useful insight. It will be intersting to see what Cryosat2 shows this year.

M Courtney
Reply to  AndyG55
December 22, 2016 4:32 am

AndyG55 December 21, 2016 at 11:54 pm,
That sort of implies that the reason the Arctic ice extent has declined is that it’s been piled up in the centre.
That may wel be part of the reason but it is warm up there.

Reply to  AndyG55
December 22, 2016 7:59 am

In the Arctic sea ice maps, I see no upward trend in green thickness or anything thicker. Blue/cyan has more area now, but seems to be somewhat thin.

Reply to  AndyG55
December 22, 2016 10:55 am

Actually, that may be exactly right. The ice worms are eating all the ice pack. There are so many undiscovered species it’s almost a sure bet that the only reason ice worms haven’t been found is nobody is looking for them. With all sizes, from microscopic to a meter long, they could be everywhere, causing our doom.

2hotel9
Reply to  philohippous
December 22, 2016 1:43 pm

As Senator Nanny Pelosi explained, there is no evidence until you search for it.

Chimp
Reply to  AndyG55
December 22, 2016 11:24 am

M Courtney
December 22, 2016 at 4:32 am
Warmer than normal in the Arctic means, for example, at Barrow, AK a December average of perhaps -10 degrees F rather than -13.8 F average. So in any case still well below freezing. Next week, the low and high will be much colder than normal, forecast for -14 F high (v. -1.8 ave.) and -19 F low.
Clearly, air temperature isn’t the reason why sea ice extent is slightly below average so far this winter. It will return to the normal zone in Jan if not this month.
http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/charctic-interactive-sea-ice-graph/

commieBob
Reply to  AndyG55
December 22, 2016 2:08 pm

philohippous December 22, 2016 at 10:55 am
Actually, that may be exactly right. The ice worms are eating all the ice pack. There are so many undiscovered species it’s almost a sure bet that the only reason ice worms haven’t been found is nobody is looking for them. With all sizes, from microscopic to a meter long, they could be everywhere, causing our doom.

Au contraire mon ami. Ice worms are real! The way they will lead us to our doom is that they are the basis of a cocktail. When you stumble over an ice worm what do you do? You make a cocktail. More ice worms == more hangovers. A bucket of ice worms is really quite bad news.

Chimp
Reply to  Tom Halla
December 21, 2016 5:26 pm

The old standby excuse is more moisture in the air. Colder air has nothing to do with making snow, don’t you know?
Examples of almost unprecedented cooling are also just weather. Unlike heat waves, which prove catastrophic man-made climate change.
I hope we are not returning to the climate of 1944-77. Brrr!

Hivemind
Reply to  Chimp
December 21, 2016 9:27 pm

I think you mean the climate of 1984.

Chimp
Reply to  Chimp
December 22, 2016 11:25 am

Hive,
Oops! The Ministry of Truth will be on my case now. I’ve lost the love of Big Brother.

JohnWho
Reply to  Tom Halla
December 21, 2016 5:58 pm

C’mon Tom –
it is warm snow, don’t you know?
/grin

noaaprogrammer
Reply to  JohnWho
December 21, 2016 7:42 pm

Global warming has actually raised the freezing point of water – or is lower? – whichever the case, it’s going to wreck havoc on us. /sarcoff

Reply to  Tom Halla
December 22, 2016 6:00 am

I wonder how the advocates will blame the snow on global warming, I mean climate change. They almost certainly will, I just don’t know how yet.

Oh, that’s easy — hidden heat in the Earth’s crust, accumulating in deep layers of the dessert, after decades of repeated, daily warming of unprecedented degree-higher temperatures suddenly reached a tipping point at which time the cumulative volume of heat initiated spontaneous emissions of green house gases trapped in the subtrata, pushing the gas into the lower toposphere, where it now absorbed more upwelling long-wave radiation at a rate that slowed its re-emission to outer space, thereby increasing the temperatures below to cause more evaporation that formed snow higher up, coinciding with the now-cooler immediate surface caused by increasing upwelling radiation at the interface of ground and air that allowed the snow to stick to the otherwise hot sand.
Totally physically impossible, you say? … Well, I didn’t say it was a sound scientific argument; I just said it was easy. (^_^)

AndyG55
December 21, 2016 5:22 pm

Sort of looks like peach sorbet with cream. 🙂

Reply to  AndyG55
December 21, 2016 5:24 pm

It must be molten snow.

AndyG55
Reply to  Eric Simpson
December 21, 2016 5:27 pm

no bubbles… can’t be from CO2 !

Reply to  AndyG55
December 21, 2016 9:30 pm

It’s a beautiful picture for texture and color contrast. I would like to see a picture of the blooming flowers that should follow.

December 21, 2016 5:22 pm

Of course, global cooling is caused by global warming.
😉

Tadpole
Reply to  Allan M R MacRae
December 21, 2016 5:46 pm

“War is peace”, “freedom is slavery”, “Ignorance is strength,”, Cooling is warming.”

tony mcleod
Reply to  Tadpole
December 21, 2016 8:29 pm

“global cooling is caused by global warming”
Nearly had it right Allan.
Should have been – localised cooling is caused by global warming. There, fixed.

Reply to  Tadpole
December 21, 2016 10:00 pm

@ tony…can you explain the interactions behind the process where global warming will lead to any level of cooling?

AndyG55
Reply to  Tadpole
December 22, 2016 12:03 am

“localised cooling is caused by global warming. ”
THANK YOU… !!! Except you got it the wrong way around, and totally mixed up…
Its an alarmist trait.. CONFUSED IDIOCY !!
Localised warming from El Nino events is the ONLY thing that has caused any “Global Average Temperature” warming.
Nowhere that missed out on the El Nino or AMO effects has had any warming at all.
There is absolutely ZERO CO2 warming signature in the whole of the satellite data.
Something you will eventually have to admit.

tony mcleod
Reply to  Tadpole
December 22, 2016 12:36 am

Certainly goldminor.
The much warmer Arctic has resulted in a weakening and disruption of the polar jet. This has allowed cold air usually confined to the Arctic to increasingly be pushed south and anomalously warm air to flow north.
This explains it pretty well.
http://apps.startribune.com/blogs/user_images/pauldouglas_1424795650_polarvortexNOAA.jpg

Ian W
Reply to  Tadpole
December 22, 2016 2:47 am

@ tony mcleod December 22, 2016 at 12:36 am

The much warmer Arctic has resulted in a weakening and disruption of the polar jet. This has allowed cold air usually confined to the Arctic to increasingly be pushed south and anomalously warm air to flow north.

Tony that is circular reasoning. The warm air got there because the Arctic temperatures were higher with the warm air?
The energy for the entire convective cycling of heat to the poles where it vents to space is input at the equator from the Sun. The Hadley Cell convection abuts the Ferrel Cells and there is a jet formed by the Coriolis forces where they meet. There is a similar jet formed where the convective Ferrel cells meet the polar air. If the heating from the equator is lower the Hadley cells shrink and the jets form Rossby waves and become latitudinal. If the convection weakens more then the Rossby waves become even more extreme. Indeed recently the polar jet in the Northern Hemisphere has been crossing the pole. Winds at lower levels have been blowing from as far South as the Azores up to the pole. This ‘warm’ air has displaced the polar air into Siberia and the Middle East and down over Canada into the Northern USA where cold extremes are being noted.
Yes the Arctic air has warmed but it is in reality an extreme cooling event for the world as the heat energy radiates to space in the continuous polar night both from the air and from the open sea without ice cover..

Patrick MJD
Reply to  Tadpole
December 22, 2016 2:58 am

“tony mcleod December 22, 2016 at 12:36 am”
Can you show how this is driven by the emissions of CO2 from human activities?

M Courtney
Reply to  Allan M R MacRae
December 22, 2016 2:57 am

Tony Mcleod, you have fallen for the rubbish they printed in the Guardin earlier in the week. That’s understandable as it sounds very plausible – that the polar jret stream has been weakened by a warming Arctic and thus warm air and cold air have got muddled up.
It sounds like a good just-so story but that’s all it is, without observations.
And we do have observations. See here.
The polar jet stream hasn’t weakened and that hasn’t happened.
What has happened is weather.

Gerald Machnee
Reply to  M Courtney
December 22, 2016 9:12 am

And in 1979 it was the opposite – the cold caused the vortex,etc and the cold down south.
Today they made it up Tony to suit the occasion. In 2000 Dr David Viner said kid will not see snow in England. Now they said the warming is causing the snow. Sure, sure.

Auto
Reply to  M Courtney
December 22, 2016 1:59 pm

M
Chanel Tapper
I know you have noticed, but – for the benefit of passing Mann-ians or others of like beliefs – we have had some weather the last months/years/decades/centuries/millennia.
Sometimes a little warmer, and sometime a little cooler.
Weather does that.
Auto, looking forward to some weather tomorrow – and the next day.
PS – Not jousting with the railway ‘service’ until the weather gets to 2017! Huzzah! What a result!

Auto
Reply to  M Courtney
December 22, 2016 2:02 pm

The perils of cut and paste.
My last post – apologies – should have started: –
“M
December 22, 2016 at 2:57 am ”
No reference intended to the – doubtless delightful – Chanel Tapper.
Apologies again.
Auto.
[Hangs Head.]

tony mcleod
Reply to  M Courtney
December 27, 2016 4:58 am

Don’t read it M.
There is some evidence: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2012GL051000/abstract;jsessionid=55762A19B2A8A1CD56B9CA1ADCD45AA6.f02t04
Probably too early to say for sure but it is a plausible explanation.

tony mcleod
Reply to  M Courtney
December 27, 2016 5:00 am

“And in 1979 it was the opposite – the cold caused the vortex…”
Gerald… are you just making that up?

SMC
December 21, 2016 5:24 pm

CO2, the magic molecule. It can do anything.

jimmy_jimmy
December 21, 2016 5:26 pm

Ahhh a white Christmas for the camels…how much wool would I need to make a sweater to cover those humps?

Sweet Old Bob
Reply to  jimmy_jimmy
December 21, 2016 5:31 pm

What a nice thought ! After all…..it is hump day , isn’t it ?

R.S.Brown
Reply to  jimmy_jimmy
December 22, 2016 12:15 am

Camel-colored sweaters are always appropriate covers for those humps… no matter
what hemisphere you’re in.

December 21, 2016 5:27 pm

“it is only the second time in living memory that snow has fallen on the Sahara desert.”
Sounds like a sweeping claim. Has it been closely monitored?

Reply to  Nick Stokes
December 21, 2016 5:39 pm

Roger Pielke Sr on snow in the Sahara, 2012.

John F. Hultquist
Reply to  Nick Stokes
December 21, 2016 5:43 pm

One can closely monitor her or his own little spot of turf. In that regard I can say each and every year I can remember – since “I like Ike” buttons – has had snow.
Thus, my question would be, What does a person think at age 40 or so that encounters falling snow for the first time?
For context, this past September (on a trail crew in Mt. Rainier N. P.) we had to instruct visitors to stay on the trail until the trail and the snow intersected. There was no need to scramble across the scree, we said, but it was a tough sell to a few folks that had never touched snow.

Chimp
Reply to  Nick Stokes
December 21, 2016 5:47 pm

It should have said on Aïn Séfra and environs.
Other parts of the Sahara have had snowfall in other recent cold years. But the point is that snow was more common there from the late ’40s to ’70s, and in this decade has once again become more common.
This shows yet again that the surface “data” sets are bogus works of anti-science fantasy, whose corrupt perpetrators should be perp walked.

tony mcleod
Reply to  Chimp
December 21, 2016 7:57 pm

“This shows yet again that the surface “data” sets are bogus works of anti-science fantasy”
Not even close to being true Chimp. Says more about you.

AndyG55
Reply to  Chimp
December 22, 2016 12:06 am

““This shows yet again that the surface “data” sets are bogus works of anti-science fantasy”
Gee , how accurate is that statement
Nearly half the land surface data is a total fabrication, and the quality of most of the rest is totally unknown.
Its a FARCE… at the very BEST.

Chimp
Reply to  Chimp
December 22, 2016 9:49 am

tony mcleod
December 21, 2016 at 7:57 pm
It has been repeatedly demonstrated that the so-called “data” sets are totally corrupt.
This has been obvious since at least the 1990s, when the 1930s started magically to cool and the 1960s and ’70s to warm. All you have to do is look at NOAA’s own temperature averages from the 1970s and ’80s to see how consistently the “record” has been manipulated to fit the CACA fantasy.
The decades of cooling that looked so scary in 1977 hardly exist in the “record” in its present adjusted out of all connection to reality state.

Robert B
Reply to  Nick Stokes
December 21, 2016 6:04 pm

“Snow falling on the Saharan mountain ranges is very rare, let alone on the sandy dunes of the continent’s largest desert.”
Bechar is 2,400 feet or 750m in elevation.

DonM
Reply to  Nick Stokes
December 21, 2016 6:43 pm

“Has it been closely monitored?”
Yes, there are 23 snowfall monitoring stations situated throughout the Saharan desert. 40% of the stations are located so remotely that they are occupied 24 hours per day by an on site monitor/caretaker. The remaining 60% of the stations are close enough to urban areas that the persons monitoring the stations do not live at the stations … they are monitored by shift workers.
These stations have been monitored consistently and without fail (except for 5 times when a caretaker at one of the respective remote sites had died … in these case the monitoring data was missing for an average of 32 days). The stations were initially establishment in the summer of 1846 (although questioned, it has never been determined why the program was initiated in the summer months).
The record data from the stations show that the claim “… only second time in living memory …” is not valid. There was snow in 1979 at 3 of the monitoring stations. In 1944 one station had record of snow precipitation, but no accumulation. In 1882 there was snow recorded at 7 of the stations with up to 2 cm of accumulated snow, which lasted for 3 days on the ground.
Nick, you were very astute to question the validity of the very misleading and sweeping claim … good job, keep it up.

G. Karst
Reply to  DonM
December 22, 2016 9:40 am

It is also snowing in Aleppo, Syria today. Pity the people trying to cope in a ruined city. GK

tomwys1
Reply to  Nick Stokes
December 22, 2016 12:31 pm

Not so for the Eastern Sahara, as you can see from 2013:comment image

Latitude
December 21, 2016 5:28 pm

..that’s like saying it snowed at Disney World
glad it’s rare!

December 21, 2016 5:28 pm

Haven’t seen this on CNN, which is the only news channel I get on DISH here in the Baja….

December 21, 2016 5:28 pm

For 6 out 7 continents including Africa the record for the hottest day was set before the record for the coldest day: http://www.space.com/17816-earth-temperature.html
Years Hottest & Coldest Day Record Were Set:
The World : : Hot 1913 Cold 1983
Europe : : Hot 1977 Cold 1978
Africa : : Hot 1931 Cold 1935
Australia : : Hot 1960 Cold 1974
South America : : Hot 19o5 Cold 1907
North America : : Hot 1913 Cold 1947
Asia : : Hot 1942 Cold 1933
Antarctica : : Hot 1974 Cold 1983
On the wide-scale continental level, after a century of runaway warming the record hot days should have been set very recently, and the record cold days set way in the past. Not so. It’s the opposite.
And btw that’s one kind of data that NASA can’t manipulate! And it’s that data that belies the leftists on global warming.

Chimp
Reply to  Eric Simpson
December 21, 2016 5:34 pm

NASA and NOAA are working to disappear old records, however, as they did with the former world record. And they set up a new recording station opposite a south-facing cliff in Death Valley to try to kill the US record, too.
Swine. Let’s hope that Trump beats them back away from the slop trough.
Elevation of Aïn Séfra is 1081 m (3547 ft).

Janice Moore
Reply to  Eric Simpson
December 21, 2016 6:09 pm

Great observational evidence, Eric. Thanks for sharing that.
Bottom line on AGW:
CO2 EMISSIONS WAAAAY UP. WARMING — NOT!
#(:))
Bwah ha, ha, ha, ho, ho, HO, HO, HO, HO, HOOOOOOOOOO!
“Meeeeerry Christmas! MEEEEERRRRRYYYYY CHRISTMAS!”

(youtube)
It was looking kind of bleak on The Island of Science Realist Misfit Toys there for awhile, but,
the good guys won..

Reply to  Janice Moore
December 21, 2016 7:10 pm

Thanks for the nice Christmas video, Janice. 🙂
And good points, Chip. We’ll see if the cold record gets broken in Antarctica. Regardless, even with all the new instrumentation I think the hot record in Antarctica is going to stand.

Chimp
Reply to  Eric Simpson
December 21, 2016 6:27 pm

Now that more of Antarctica has been instrumented, its cold records are liable to fall.

Reply to  Anthony Watts
December 21, 2016 9:48 pm

I’ll just chalk that up to “backlash”, Anthony:
https://twitter.com/brandonrgates/status/811742156670930944

lee
Reply to  brandonrgates
December 21, 2016 8:13 pm

Children won’t know what snow is.

Reply to  brandonrgates
December 21, 2016 9:20 pm

The proof is still waiting for CAGW or AGW to prove that CO2 affects temperatures as claimed by the alarmists.
1988 – 2016: 28 years of claims about runaway warming along with every kind of alleged disaster because of CO2.
• Hottest year evah! Hottest day evah!
• Cold is because of CO2, The Polar vortex is caused by global warming.
Climate change is such an overused metaphor by the alarmists. It was cold, It was hot, it’s Climate Change
Duh!! The climate always changes and always will, even in your CO2 foggy future.
• The Polar regions will melt, The Arctic is vanishing, The Antarctic is growing; all because of CO2.
• Fish are dying, shrinking, getting lost; all from CO2.
• Tornadoes are more common, frequent, more powerful; no tornadoes have not shown any trends up.
• Hurricanes will be more frequent, bigger and more powerful; we need a Category 6! Nope, longest period in modern history without a major category hurricane striking mainland USA. Hurricane index is not rising.
• Penguins are in danger of extinction! Nope, bird brain researchers are scaring penguins off their roosts and then failing to follow them.
• Polar Bears are in danger of extinction! Not even the world’s greatest polar bear activists are making that claim anymore.
• Butterflies, birds, bats, picas, marmots, frogs, amphibians, etc., etc. are facing extinction!
No, again bird brained researchers spread the diseases endangering the amphibians, frogs, and bats. Nor are they good at tracking pica and marmot movements.
• We are facing the sixth extinction and half of the world’s wildlife is endangered!
Maybe from encroaching civilization, but there are darn few extinctions for all of the hype!
But those bird, bat and insect frying solar arrays are darned efficient at wiping out local wildlife.
Not forgetting the bird and bat avian-matic chop-all wind farms.
So predictable!!
What was predicted from the very beginning of the 2014 El Nino hints, was all of the lame “Hottest year/day Evah” alarmist stories. Months of waiting for the inevitable shoes to drop where alarmist desperately try to prove their favorite fantasies about the Earth responding to Man’s emissions of CO2.
The El Nino is gone. What do you plan to do next year!?
Tell Trump, he must wait till the next El Nino!?
So predictable, and so sad. The tired alarmist cries. The distressed and despondent depressed prophets of CO2 doom.
Have a Happy New Year Brandon! maybe…

Frans Franken
Reply to  brandonrgates
December 22, 2016 12:04 am

Al Gore was there?

M Courtney
Reply to  brandonrgates
December 22, 2016 3:03 am

More like “How can AGW be a significant problem if it’s snowing in the Sahara?”
The actions required to deal with something so imperceptible are incredibly expensive.

Reply to  M Courtney
December 22, 2016 5:01 am

Excellent concise summation M Courtney!

M Courtney
Reply to  M Courtney
December 22, 2016 5:10 am

Thank you, ATheoK.
And may I take this opportunity to recommend (and highlight) your comment on the ‘Obama enacts’ thread.
The fact that there is precedent for reversal is most informative.

Reply to  M Courtney
December 22, 2016 11:48 am

> More like “How can AGW be a significant problem if it’s snowing in the Sahara?”
1) Weather != Climate
2) Sahara Desert != Entire Planet
HTH

Reply to  M Courtney
December 22, 2016 2:06 pm

> His smug self-assuredness of his own assumptions about why the article is here (and shouldn’t be) are entertaining both here and at Twitter.
It’s interesting what you consider “interesting weather event[s]”, Anthony:

We know the northern hemisphere has been getting colder, for example we reported earlier this week that the USA was colder than any time last year with an average temperature of 16 degrees F. It isn’t just the USA, in northern Africa, reports suggest that it is only the second time in living memory that snow has fallen on the Sahara desert. The last record is for February 18, 1979, when the snow storm lasted just half an hour.

Emphasis mine. No particular reason for it — I just think it’s … interesting.
[It would not matter what I posted, you’d disagree with it, or find something smug to say like you did on Twitter. But please, feel free to feel “interested” all you want, while I feel free to ignore your whining -Anthony]

Mickey Reno
Reply to  brandonrgates
December 22, 2016 6:27 am

When we climate realists chortle about these things, Brandon, we do it with a sense of irony. When you alarmists say stupid stuff like “this snow in the Sahara is more evidence of man-caused global warming,” or “the Polar vortex never got all loopy before SUVs” are spoken in earnest. Yes, we’re laughing at your understanding of climate, yes, we’re mocking your hubris. But we have good reason.

weltklima
December 21, 2016 6:05 pm

…… nothing unusual: Two polar bears walked in the Sahara desert. One said: Plenty of
ice around here. The second said: Where is the ice? the first bear replied: See, how
they sanded everywhere to make sure, nobody slips out.

Reply to  weltklima
December 22, 2016 3:00 am

Couldn’t see the the other one.

Admin
December 21, 2016 6:08 pm

Hilarious – “end of snow”, anyone?

Janice Moore
Reply to  Eric Worrall
December 21, 2016 6:15 pm

Lol.
— “millions of degrees,” anyone?
— “planetary emergency,” anyone?
— “missing heat,” anyone?
— “it’s a travesty,” anyone?
Cheers, Phil! lololololol

Jimmy Haigh
December 21, 2016 6:19 pm

I was in Algeria in March 2004 and it had snowed overnight before I landed. I’ll write more after I get back home after my walk on this tropical beach.

Jimmy Haigh
Reply to  Jimmy Haigh
December 21, 2016 7:43 pm

Here’s my comment Thursday March 4th 2004 from my diary: “To Gatwick at 05:00. Flew to Hassi Messaoud at 07:00 – 10:00. Flew Hassi to Ghardaia 12:00 Drove to rig 8 hours – it had snowed for the first time in 25 years the night before!”
I remember flying over the desert and seeing water everywhere. I thought it was kind of strange… We were due to land near the rig site on a temporary strip but were diverted to Ghardaia. The temporary strip was mud: It had snowed overnight. All the local guys at the rig had built snowmen and had snowball fights because they had never seen snow before. They had loads of photos. I should have taken some copies.
So instead of a 30 minute trip from the temporary landing strip I had to endure an 8 hour trip through the desert with my military convoy. The ex-SAS guy in charge wouldn’t let me stop and get out and crawl over the fantastic surface geology!

Reply to  Jimmy Haigh
December 21, 2016 7:56 pm

In fact, Algeria has at least one ski resort. And only about 400 m higher altitude than this location.

Archer
Reply to  Nick Stokes
December 22, 2016 12:54 am

Only 400m makes a huge difference, nick.

Reply to  Nick Stokes
December 22, 2016 1:06 am

Some snow resort that would be with snow every 37 years. 400m altitude does make a difference (evidently).

Patrick MJD
Reply to  Nick Stokes
December 22, 2016 1:53 am

“Nick Stokes December 21, 2016 at 7:56 pm
In fact, Algeria has at least one ski resort. And only about 400 m higher altitude than this location.”
Nick, you should know that with each ~1000ft increase in elevation results in a ~1c drop in temps. So 400m is ~1200ft. Still clutching at alarmist straws Nick.

Nick Stokes
Reply to  Nick Stokes
December 22, 2016 2:21 am

“So 400m is ~1200ft. “
Yes. And I would expect that a site 400m lower than a ski resort would likely see snow every few years.

Patrick MJD
Reply to  Nick Stokes
December 22, 2016 2:52 am

“Nick Stokes December 22, 2016 at 2:21 am
Yes. And I would expect that a site 400m lower than a ski resort would likely see snow every few years.”
In a world with an ever increasingly warming atmosphere heated from the surface that is heated from the air (CO2) above it. Sure!

John Harmsworth
Reply to  Nick Stokes
December 22, 2016 2:51 pm

Wow! I hope the skiers who went up 37 years ago were ready for this!

Resourceguy
December 21, 2016 6:20 pm

The comparison with the “coming ice age” era of the late 70s is interesting.

Reply to  Resourceguy
December 21, 2016 10:18 pm

That was at the end of a cooling period. This is at the start of one.

December 21, 2016 6:23 pm

Another AGW prediction comes true. They predicted more extreme weather events, and this is one of them.

Janice Moore
Reply to  Steve Heins
December 21, 2016 6:30 pm

Wrong. They never predict them. AFTER they occur, every time, they make the completely unsupported by any evidence or proof of causation claim that the event was “caused by AGW.”
That’s it.
Ask them for evidence and proof and you get nothing of meaningful substance. NOTHING.

Reply to  Janice Moore
December 21, 2016 6:40 pm

Janice says: “They never predict them.”

The EPA says: “But climate change is increasing the odds of more extreme weather events taking place.”

https://www.epa.gov/climate-change-science/understanding-link-between-climate-change-and-extreme-weather

Janice, I guess you don’t understand what “increasing the odds of” means.

JohnWho
Reply to  Janice Moore
December 21, 2016 6:44 pm

Well, they did predict warmer, and that snow is trapping the heat of the sand under it …
/grin

Janice Moore
Reply to  Janice Moore
December 21, 2016 6:46 pm

I guess you don’t know what “predict” an “event” means.

Janice Moore
Reply to  Janice Moore
December 21, 2016 6:47 pm

Further, check out tornado and hurricane landfall stats. EPA loses.

JohnWho
Reply to  Janice Moore
December 21, 2016 6:49 pm

@Steve Helms –
Note the did not predict “global warming” would increase those odds, the said “climate change”. They didn’t change to “climate change” until after “global warming” wasn’t happening.
Janice has it right.

Janice Moore
Reply to  Janice Moore
December 21, 2016 6:51 pm

And again: that there was an unusual cold event in the Sahara doesn’t = “increas{ed} … extreme weather events taking place.”
That is, Mr. Heins, your assertion was a non sequitur — as well as being intrinsically incorrect.

Reply to  Janice Moore
December 21, 2016 6:57 pm

JohnWho & Janice:
.
Snow in the Sahara is an “extreme weather event”
.
The EPA predicted the odds of extreme weather events would increase”
.
PS Janice, the subject here is snow in the Sahara, not tornadoes or hurricanes. Please try to stay on subject.

Joe Schmoe
Reply to  Janice Moore
December 21, 2016 7:05 pm

Steve, too bad you don’t know what “more extreme weather events” means.

JohnWho
Reply to  Janice Moore
December 21, 2016 7:30 pm

One more @Steve Heins:
I’m curious – when did the EPA become a weather or climate predicting authority?

Reply to  Janice Moore
December 22, 2016 1:14 am

Janice
This reminds me of the comical “Asterix and the soothsayer” (a con artist) who’s farourite saying was “this I had also foreseen”.
https://goo.gl/images/olcW7r

Patrick MJD
Reply to  Janice Moore
December 22, 2016 1:56 am

“Steve Heins December 21, 2016 at 6:57 pm
Snow in the Sahara is an “extreme weather event“”
Says who?

Reply to  Janice Moore
December 22, 2016 12:00 pm

The warmists have a perfect negative predictive track record. Every one of their scary predictions has failed to materialize.

Chimp
Reply to  Janice Moore
December 22, 2016 2:20 pm

Steve,
Snow in the Sahara was not predicted and it’s not an extreme event. Just fairly rare weather.
“Predictions” of “extreme weather” without specificity or statistical significance are not science. It’s just another way to try to lie out decades of failed predictions. When the liars even bother actually to predict, rather than “project”.
Think how “extreme” WX must have been when CO2 levels were 20 times higher than now! Cold makes for high winds, not warmth.

joelobryan
Reply to  Steve Heins
December 21, 2016 6:43 pm

They “predicted” everything, which to say they predicted nothing.
CAGW fail.

JohnWho
Reply to  joelobryan
December 21, 2016 6:55 pm

You know Joel, I believe you nailed it:
They predicted “something” would happen, and then, lo and behold, “something” did happen.
Can’t fail there – when discussing weather, something is happening everywhere all the time so predicting that something may happen in the future is probably, maybe, could be, true.
/grin

AndyG55
Reply to  joelobryan
December 21, 2016 7:08 pm

And when they miss the side of the barn.. they just build a bigger barn. !
If they predict EVERY possible weather event.. maybe, eventually, they will get one correct.
And won’t it be a hullabaloo when they do !!! 🙂

Mark
Reply to  joelobryan
December 21, 2016 8:35 pm

“PS Janice, the subject here is snow in the Sahara, not tornadoes or hurricanes. Please try to stay on subject.”
Actually Steve, you’re the one that changed the subject to extreme weather events (@6:23 pm). Don’t you read your own posts.
And Janice, I owe you an apology. When you responded to Steve Heins, I thought, “oh come on Janice, he obviously forgot the sarc tag.” Imagine my surprise when he tried to defend his original post. But, of course he’s right – the EPA said something might happen somewhere, sometime, and it did. Are they psychic?

Patrick MJD
Reply to  joelobryan
December 22, 2016 1:58 am

“AndyG55 December 21, 2016 at 7:08 pm
And when they miss the side of the barn.. they just build a bigger barn. !”
No, the barn is the same. What has changed is the “weapon” (Alarmist propaganda) used now is much bigger to spread the muck wider. It’s bound to stick.

Reply to  joelobryan
December 22, 2016 3:38 am

This is the one I always go to first. To predict change in a system which is pretty much defined by the fact that it always changes is like predicting that eddies will be observed in a waterfall. it is voodoo non-science of a kind so unprecedented it literally defies belief.

RoHa
Reply to  Steve Heins
December 21, 2016 7:02 pm

Did they ever tell exactly what extreme weather events would occur, and where and when they would occur?
If they said “on 19 December 2016, snow will fall on the desert around Ain Sefra”, that would be pretty impressive.
Saying “in the next few years, you’ll get some unusual weather somewhere in the world” is a little less impressive.

Reply to  RoHa
December 21, 2016 10:17 pm

“Ain Sefra” ? I blame Rommel.

Chris Hanley
Reply to  Steve Heins
December 21, 2016 9:46 pm

“The EPA predicted the odds of extreme weather events would increase …”.
========================
I have no idea if they did nor any interest in finding out for sure, but if they did, they surely didn’t mean that increasing an atmospheric GHG would cause more extreme cold events.
That would be totally counterintuitive and absurd.

Chris Hanley
Reply to  Chris Hanley
December 21, 2016 10:10 pm

… unless of course the EPA hold that the net climate feedback effect of increasing CO2 is negative.

Reply to  Steve Heins
December 22, 2016 1:45 am

The kinds of extreme weather events they were predicting not having materialised,
I’m left wondering just WHO predicted THIS weather event.
I don’t remember anyone ever saying “Thanks to CO2 there will be more snow in
the Sahara”. One reference can prove me wrong, of course.

Logoswrench
December 21, 2016 7:05 pm

Let me guess Al Gore was going to speak at the Sahara Desert. Isn’t that what usually happens wherever the blowhard has a speaking engagement?

December 21, 2016 8:01 pm

This is an unexpected weather event. Climate, nope per definition.
Lets all go back to whatever.

Reply to  ristvan
December 21, 2016 10:24 pm

Unusual comes to mind as a good way to describe it.

AndyG55
Reply to  goldminor
December 22, 2016 12:22 am

Unusual only in the VERY short time we have had the ability to observe these sort of NATURAL events.

John Harmsworth
Reply to  ristvan
December 22, 2016 2:57 pm

It’s starting to melt. 5 bucks says they call the resulting dampness “sea level rise”! Lol

Phil B
December 21, 2016 8:21 pm

Record cold in the continental USA. Record cold in India. Snow falling in the Sahara.
But you know what story Australian papers ran with today? “Arctic is 50 degrees above average”. Though I think they are relying on people seeing the headline and not reading the article because the article says that models predict it will be 30 degrees above average in January.

JMH
Reply to  Phil B
December 21, 2016 9:23 pm

I saw a similar story with the headline written in the present tense on to find on reading that it’s a prediction of 2030. It’s the new media. There is no such thing as reality anymore.

John F. Hultquist
Reply to  Phil B
December 21, 2016 10:20 pm

In the Arctic, Polar bears and ice are increasing. Temperture moves up and down in a jagged pattern. It was higher 3 weeks ago, dropped sharply, bounced up, and will be going down again.
This up and down thing is frequent. However, it has been below freezing for the last 100 days or so.
Go here: http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/meant80n.uk.php
The table on the left: Arkiv (archive) – retrieves a chart for each year. Try a few and see the rapid changes, more so in some years than others.
For example, in 1990 at the end of the year (right side) there was a big up from a very cold day – maybe day 348 or 349.
It is hibernating time. Wake me if something strange happens.

Griff
Reply to  John F. Hultquist
December 22, 2016 12:36 am

No, the ice isn’t increasing over time, the polar bears are in trouble and at the Pole (in the dark) it is just around freezing now instead of 20 C below.
Here’s the current ice extent – still a record low.comment image
The ice arrived late in Hudson Bay and has not yet reached Svalbard. you look up what that means for bear populations… see also recent reports on the scavenging of S Beaufort bear population – why are they on shore not on the ice?

Archer
Reply to  John F. Hultquist
December 22, 2016 12:59 am

Bull. That scavenging is taking place because the bears find it easier to forage in human waste than hunt – a common issue in multiple environments. Their biggest problem right now is that they’re getting overweight from the glut of food.

Patrick MJD
Reply to  John F. Hultquist
December 22, 2016 2:03 am

“Griff December 22, 2016 at 12:36 am
why are they on shore not on the ice?”
As with any wild animal, as soon as they find an easy source of food, it is preferred to hunting. It’s easier for a bear to open a garbage can than hunt seals on floating ice. So, bear eating habits *ARE* changing due to opportunistic food source sources. So, we could say we are changing the way hears hunt/eat, but it is nothing to do with ice loss due to AGW.

Reply to  John F. Hultquist
December 22, 2016 3:49 am

@ Patrick MJD: I really do think we should be incinerating more than dumping. Lots of luverly co2, potential for hot water supplies plus less mess with dramatically lowered scavenger populations and decreased impact on wildlife feeding patterns.

Patrick MJD
Reply to  John F. Hultquist
December 22, 2016 4:40 am

“cephus0 December 22, 2016 at 3:49 am”
Yeah I agree! Here in Aus we don’t get too many Johnny Polar Bear invasions but we do get natives in our bins, possums (Protected animal in Aus) etc rooting through waste, and sometimes if the “spoils” are good, they can be really aggressive. I can understand it, get between me and my lunch, I may take your arm off, esp if it is free!

hunter
Reply to  John F. Hultquist
December 23, 2016 2:12 am

Wowzers, Grif is stuck not only on stupid but irrelevant.

Jon
Reply to  Phil B
December 21, 2016 11:27 pm

The same story said GISS expected it to be 0.14 degrees hotter than last year.
Makes you wonder where they get their average from.

Roger Knights
Reply to  Phil B
December 22, 2016 12:04 am

“But you know what story Australian papers ran with today? “Arctic is 50 degrees above average”.”
I saw that in WaPo. Toward the end of the story there was a hint that by “arctic” they meant above 80 degrees latitude. That’s only part of the arctic. Maybe equivocation was employed.

Joseph Holman
December 21, 2016 8:27 pm

Just a thought here from a climate skeptic. Wouldn’t snow be a very rare event in the Sahara primarily because it is very dry most of the time? For all I know, it might get cold enough for snow maybe twenty, fifty, or a hundred times and be humid enough on only one of those occasions? I dunno. Just asking.

DWR54
Reply to  Joseph Holman
December 21, 2016 8:36 pm

Very good point. Temperatures in the Sahara region are currently above average for the time of year: http://pamola.um.maine.edu/fcst_frames/GFS-025deg/DailySummary/GFS-025deg_WORLD-CED_T2_anom.png

Reply to  DWR54
December 21, 2016 10:32 pm

Temps are above average in areas south of where this happened, as shown on your link. Ain Sefra is in an area that is shown to be having average temps according to your link. Also note that further west in the Atlas Mountain range that there is a below average streak of temps which runs down the spine of the Atlas Mountain range. Here is Ain Sefra’s location…https://www.google.com/maps/@32.7586526,-0.6189257,7z

DWR54
Reply to  DWR54
December 21, 2016 11:26 pm

I stand corrected. The place where the snowfall occurred is having ‘average’ temperatures for the time of year. As a region, most of the Sahara is ‘warmer than average’ for the time of year.

old construction worker
December 21, 2016 8:29 pm

Snow falls in Sahara Desert – the first time in 37 years or snow falls in the Sahara Desert for the second time in 38 years. Take your pick.

December 21, 2016 9:08 pm

It isn’t just the USA, in northern Africa, reports suggest that it is only the second time in living memory that snow has fallen on the Sahara desert. The last record is for February 18, 1979, when the snow storm lasted just half an hour.
Snow falling on the Saharan mountain ranges is very rare, let alone on the sandy dunes of the continent’s largest desert.

Well these photos are from Ain Sefra, Algeria which is in the Atlas mountains not the Sahara desert. Snow in the atlas mountains is not that uncommon, in fact there are ski resorts there!

RayG
December 21, 2016 9:42 pm

@ ATheoK December 21, 2016 at 9:20 pm says “• Polar Bears are in danger of extinction! Not even the world’s greatest polar bear activists are making that claim anymore.”
N0, no, you are wrong. There is a front page article in the NYTimes attesting to the alleged fact that polar bears are reduced to scavenging in garbage dumps and we all know that the NYTimes is a peer reviewed journal so what they say must be true. See: wattsupwiththat.com/2016/12/18/claim-rubbish-dump-polar-bears-are-climate-refugees/ for clarification if you have any doubts. If the NYTimes experts said that up is down it must be true, dontcha know?

Roger Knights
Reply to  RayG
December 22, 2016 12:06 am

The NY Times: Piper of record.

R.S.Brown
Reply to  RayG
December 22, 2016 12:26 am

The NY Times: All the News that Fits.

Reply to  RayG
December 22, 2016 5:07 am

RayG:
Good sarcasm RayG!
Just to pile on:

“NYTimes is a peer reviewed journal”

Well, that sure defines what the leftist elites think is “peer reviewed”; research by brandished press release!
As Susan Crockford pointed out the other day, well fed fat polar bears are feasting in a Russian town’s dump.
The article’s text doesn’t match up with the photograph.

December 21, 2016 10:06 pm

It isn’t just the USA, in northern Africa, reports suggest that it is only the second time in living memory that snow has fallen on the Sahara desert. The last record is for February 18, 1979, when the snow storm lasted just half an hour.
Snow falling on the Saharan mountain ranges is very rare, let alone on the sandy dunes of the continent’s largest desert.

Well these photos are from Ain Sefra, Algeria which is in the Atlas mountains not the Sahara desert. Snow in the atlas mountains is not that uncommon, in fact there are several ski resorts there!

December 21, 2016 10:11 pm

Thirty seven years ago – near the end of a cooling period. Today – near the start of a cooling period.
Expect more snow in the Sahara over the years.

Reply to  M Simon
December 21, 2016 10:35 pm

And heavier periods of fog along the coast of California as was seen back in the 1950s through the early 1970s.

joelobryan
December 21, 2016 10:29 pm

And it never rains in Southern California….
http://i63.tinypic.com/nf027c.png

Mike the Morlock
Reply to  joelobryan
December 21, 2016 11:10 pm

joelobryan December 21, 2016 at 10:29 pm
“And it never rains in Southern California….”
Hi joel, I live southeast of L.V. right under the green area of your map. Yeah its still raining, it was light out when it started. Desert is going to green up nicely.
michael

AndyG55
Reply to  joelobryan
December 22, 2016 12:25 am


It POURS !!!

Mike the Morlock
Reply to  AndyG55
December 22, 2016 12:58 am

AndyG55 December 22, 2016 at 12:25 am
Hi Andy, just for yuks did anyone notice it also snowed in Saudi Arabia, a few days ago? Also last month…
http://www.arabnews.com/node/1027236
http://indianexpress.com/article/world/world-news/saudi-arabia-desert-kingdom-partially-covered-under-snow-with-extreme-temperature-drop-4402712/
One could begin to wonder….
also last January’s snow was the first in 85 years. Hmmm..
michael

Pat Kelly
December 21, 2016 10:46 pm

If this isn’t an example of hell freezing over, then I guess the chances of remotely occurring events is still pretty remote.

Leo Smith
December 21, 2016 11:20 pm

I have noticed an effect from global weirding: as more and more mainstream newspapers close their comments because the election results didn’t work out the way they wanted them, and abandon climate change because it doesn’t sell adverts, so the trolls are descending like a flock of locusts, on Watts Up with That and other similar places….

Griff
December 22, 2016 12:41 am
Matt Bergin
Reply to  Griff
December 22, 2016 5:55 am

So what Griff the arctic average above 80 degrees north is still 0 degrees F. So the arctic is still way below freezing. Take a look.
http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/meant80n.uk.php
They have records going back to 1958. Compared to all of their records this year looks pretty normal.

jsuther2013
Reply to  Griff
December 22, 2016 7:50 am

I take a look at the temp at Iqaluit, a settlement just north of Hudson Bay, every day. Minus 28 C for almost the last month doesn’t look that warm to me. I guess the Weather Network may retire that station soon. It’s too bloody inconvenient to show perspective like that.

2hotel9
Reply to  jsuther2013
December 22, 2016 7:57 am

I check the live video feed from an Arctic research station that routinely shows temps below freezing, even in summer months. Oops, more of those pesky facts and what not.

Frederik Michiels
Reply to  Griff
December 22, 2016 2:55 pm

meanwhile on Greenland….comment image
oh ice accumulation that’s 3 months ahead? an all time record accumulation? sounds fishy…..

hunter
Reply to  Griff
December 23, 2016 2:17 am

Grif the polar bear expert knows all and tells all, as fast as he can make it up. Question, wise Polar bear expert: where does heat go once it gets to the poles?

Moderately Cross of East Anglia
December 22, 2016 1:10 am

I know I’m being pedantic here but is 400ppm of CO2 deserving of the term “concentration” of gas. Anyway, at least polar bears can move to North Africa.

Griff
December 22, 2016 1:25 am

you all do know that temps cold enough for snow are not uncommon in the Sahara – it’s just there isn’t usually enough moisture to produce the snow ?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sahara#Temperature
“Still, it is true that winter nights can be cold as it can drop to the freezing point and even below, especially in high-elevation areas. The frequency of subfreezing winter nights in the Sahara is strongly influenced by the North Atlantic Oscillation, with warmer winter temperatures during negative NAO events and cooler winters with more frosts when the NAO is positive. This is because the weaker clockwise flow around the eastern side of the subtropical anticyclone during negative NAO winters, although too dry to produce more than negligible precipitation, does significantly reduce the flow of dry, cold air from higher latitudes of Eurasia into the Sahara.”

ren
December 22, 2016 1:44 am

No need for mascara! Russians enjoy an Arctic blast with temperatures plunging to a bone-crushing minus 62C leaving their eyelashes frozen over.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4057686/No-need-mascara-Russians-enjoy-Arctic-blast-temperatures-plunging-bone-crushing-minus-62C-leaving-eyelashes-frozen-over.html

December 22, 2016 1:45 am

Heat/cold & local weather change constantly. If its colder somewhere on earth it will be warmer elsewhere. That’s called natural variability. Who cares about the N Pole? It has been ice free several times in history and the ice bears survived it. If that is to come again, be it.
Does the record ice low in november tell us anything apart from heat transport from another place somewhere on the globe? It can’t be CO2 directly because that is not heating and insulating specific places, especially those like the N Pole. The heat over there must come from somewhere else, being it heated air over land (probably partly by CO2) or solar heated water transported by ocean currents. So what are those N Pole record lows and highs are telling us? Nothing at all!

hunter
Reply to  paulclim
December 23, 2016 2:23 am

paulclim, you are asking questions climate kooks don’t like to be asked. And hate to answer. In the moronic obsession of the climate apocalypse true believers, heat magically lingers forever. And for them anomalies = temperature. Their world is essentially superstitious, but covered in a thin cheap layer of sciencey words.

henryp
December 22, 2016 1:49 am

It is worse than I thought…

December 22, 2016 2:18 am

The same variability is the reason for the snow in the sahara. Record warm in Arctic, record cold in sahara. So what does it tell us? Nothing. Once we have a good picture of ocean heat content we can judge the whole system. Up to then local wheather change will be interpreted as climate change. Global surface temp data, regardless whether adjusted or not, are meaning nothing without having the ocean heat content monitored at the same time because surface temperatures can always have the root cause in the ocean! The ocean is the dog, surface is just the tail and IR radiation has no big impact on this dog. For me that is the main reason why CO2 has no big global effect in the long run.

DWR54
Reply to  paulclim
December 22, 2016 4:59 am

paulclim
“Record warm in Arctic, record cold in sahara. So what does it tell us? Nothing.”
______________
No one has suggested that temperatures in the Sahara are anything other than normal for the time of year; in fact, they are mostly ‘above’ average across the region currently: http://pamola.um.maine.edu/fcst_frames/GFS-025deg/DailySummary/GFS-025deg_WORLD-CED_T2_anom.png
Snow is unusual because there usually isn’t sufficient moisture in the atmosphere; but temperatures are nothing unusual. A strong wind has been blowing southward across N Africa from the Med. lately. Likely this is the source of the moisture.

mountainape5
December 22, 2016 2:32 am

You can clearly see mountains in the background, did you forget to post the coordinates? It doesn’t look like Sahara desert.

Patrick MJD
Reply to  mountainape5
December 22, 2016 3:04 am

Mountains? What I see looks like hills at or around 1500m.

Reply to  Patrick MJD
December 22, 2016 4:29 am

1500 meters is higher than mountains in the UK. If 1500 meters is not a mountain, Snowdon and Ben Nevis are relegated to hills.

Patrick MJD
Reply to  Patrick MJD
December 22, 2016 4:33 am

“Gareth Phillips December 22, 2016 at 4:29 am”
Where I live now, yes. If I lived there, probably not. Perspective.

Reply to  Patrick MJD
December 22, 2016 7:26 am

Well it’s in the Atlas mountains which go as high as 13,000′.

2hotel9
Reply to  Phil.
December 22, 2016 7:34 am

It is just over 1000 meters above sea level with higher mountains around it.

M Courtney
December 22, 2016 3:08 am

This is weather, not climate.
I see Nick Stokes thinks it’s not extreme weather – and he makes a good case.
I see Steve Heins thinks it is extreme weather and that the IPCC predicted it. Not sure I agree with that. If a warming world is indicated by snow in the Sahara then it implies that everything is predicted, when it has happened.
Now if they could have said when the snow was likely to become more common (if it has) then that would be evidence of expertise.

December 22, 2016 4:27 am

Meanwhile, back in the Arctic the temperature relentlessly climbs. Looks like, if things continue as they are, there will be little ice left at the end of next years summer melt. A lack of ice in the Arctic may well facilitate unusual weather patterns in the Northern hemisphere.
http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/meant80n.uk.php

ren
Reply to  Gareth Phillips
December 22, 2016 4:40 am
observa
Reply to  Gareth Phillips
December 22, 2016 5:29 am

Ah well the Antarctic is growing and so is the world’s third largest store of fresh water so 2 out of 3 aint bad, not that we have any say in it-
http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/perito-moreno-glacier

Matt Bergin
Reply to  Gareth Phillips
December 22, 2016 6:02 am

Sorry Gareth that statement is a “So What”. The average above 80 degrees north is still way below freezing on that chart and not much different from most records going back to 1958 if you would check the history also posted on the same site page.

hunter
Reply to  Gareth Phillips
December 23, 2016 2:29 am

Ya, that warmth is going to pile up and man, they’ll be growing banana trees up there in a few more years. Amazing how all that heat lingers and hides forever, dude

ren
December 22, 2016 4:58 am

We pay attention to the temperature of the surface of the southern oceans.
http://www.ospo.noaa.gov/data/sst/anomaly/2016/anomnight.12.19.2016.gif

observa
December 22, 2016 5:19 am

Meanwhile in Oz the natives are getting restless-
http://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australia/hard-left-members-of-the-greens-have-formed-a-new-faction-called-left-renewal/ar-BBxqWav?
The more their catastrophic global warming meme falls on deaf ears the more apopleptic and lunar they become. One thing’s for sure, it aint about the science for these people.

December 22, 2016 5:38 am

now in Sahara before Christmas! A Limerick.
It snowed in Sahara last night!
Ain Sefra’s, Algeria delight.
It did last for a day.
Cold. What more can I say?
A wrench in the Climate Change fight.
It is the first time since February 1979 it has snowed in Ain Sefra, located on the edge of the Sahara Desert. That snow lasted for about an hour, and it was mid-winter. This time the snow lasted for a whole day, and it was on the last day of fall!
I guess this is why the alarmists changed from calling it Global Warming to Climate change. Snow that lies doesn’t lie.
It is getting cold. https://lenbilen.com/2016/12/22/snow-in-sahara-before-christmas-a-limerick/

Reply to  lenbilen
December 22, 2016 7:01 am

lenbilen December 22, 2016 at 5:38 am
It is the first time since February 1979 it has snowed in Ain Sefra, located on the edge of the Sahara Desert. That snow lasted for about an hour, and it was mid-winter. This time the snow lasted for a whole day, and it was on the last day of fall!

Otherwise known as Midwinter’s day.

Reply to  Phil.
December 22, 2016 7:11 am

Funny how that is, that official winter starts at the winter solstice.
Personally I prefer the meteorological delineation – Winter = Dec Jan Feb.

Peter
December 22, 2016 6:14 am

In the 1960s I recall water buckets at Kano Airport in Northern Nigeria being frozen almost solid during the Harmattan (this time of the year) when the air can be very dry and the temperature drops like a stone. Later the same day you could swim in the pool but come out shivering when the temperature was 90f because the humidity was so low, 10 per cent or so, and the skin on your hands could crack.

Tom O
December 22, 2016 6:44 am

I hadn’t realized that the Sahara got cold enough to be able to sustain a snow coating like that. I would have expected that the sand would have to be at least no more than low 40s, probably upper 30s for the snow to accumulate to the amount in these pictures. Does anyone know how long it lasted before it melted?

2hotel9
Reply to  Tom O
December 22, 2016 6:46 am

Don’t know how long till it melted. I can tell you that it gets cold in deserts. Very. Cold.

2hotel9
December 22, 2016 6:45 am

Damn you, Globall Warmining, DAMN YOU!!!!!! Just felt it needed to be said.

December 22, 2016 6:55 am

@Gareth
Since researchers first located the magnetic pole back in the early Nineteenth Century, it has meandered over 600 miles.
[more north]
Back in the early Twentieth Century the pole was moving at just 10 miles per year, but that rate has accelerated up to around 40 miles per year.
Thinking of earth’s inner core like a magnetic stirrer it makes sense to me that a shift in the sun’s inner core just pulls the earth’s inner core with it.
That explains my results: no warming in the SH and the arctic melt.
You realize this elephant in the room when you go down 1km into a gold mine here….
hence
there is no man made global warming
agreed?

Toneb
December 22, 2016 9:06 am

“I hadn’t realized that the Sahara got cold enough to be able to sustain a snow coating like that. I would have expected that the sand would have to be at least no more than low 40s, probably upper 30s for the snow to accumulate to the amount in these pictures. ”
It depends at what time the snow fell. If during the latter part of the night then the sandy surface could easily have fallen to 0C with a thin layer of snow then able to settle. As someone said it is because very little moisture gets down there normally that makes the precipitation unusual. The town is at 3500ft, which equates to around 8-10 C at SL with a standard DALR for that part of the trop.
“Although the air is dry and evaporative to an extreme, in the winter strong polar fronts from the Mediterranean can occasionally produce rain, and, in this case, snow,” Parker said. “It is not unusual for temperatures to dip below freezing in the winter.”
Though it isn’t a common occurrence, snow does fall in the Sahara about once every decade or so when conditions are just right…
https://www.wunderground.com/news/snow-blankets-sahara-desert-sands-in-algeria

James Loux
Reply to  Toneb
December 22, 2016 2:28 pm

Although temperature is obviously important, snow is about humidity. Mauna Kea is in the foreground and Mauna Loa (of CO2 monitoring fame) is in the background. The snow has been there now for two weeks, but snow on those mountains is not unusual, since Mauna Kea means White Mountain. Even so, at 19N lat and 13,000 ft high, the snow has not been lasting very long for the last 30 years. In the 1980s, the snows often lasted steadily through the winter months and snow depths reached 10 ft after a good storm. Not so much after that. Temperatures weren’t all that warmer, but at that high altitude and the typically very low humidity, the snow actually sublimes. Now the snow is lasting again. The cold PDO is having the expected effect of more rain and more snow. The islands are green down below and white on top.
http://louxeng.com/pictures/mkcam%2012-21-16.jpg

2hotel9
Reply to  James Loux
December 22, 2016 8:44 pm

Yea, people are having a conniption fit over snow falling on mountain tops where it ROUTINELY falls. F**king morons.

Johann Wundersamer
December 22, 2016 9:55 am

Here in the Pre-Alps we were warned not to stay longer in Nature / in the open during the holidays Christmas until New Year’s Eve –
From 7° outside temperature and above the ticks become active.

henryp
Reply to  Johann Wundersamer
December 22, 2016 9:59 am

Pre Alps
Where is that?

Chimp
Reply to  henryp
December 22, 2016 12:09 pm

All along the Alps. Like the foothills of the Rockies:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpine_foothills

Frederik Michiels
Reply to  Johann Wundersamer
December 22, 2016 3:09 pm

is that why 2 days ago i had to wear hat, big coat and had to ride on my bycicle through icy conditions? and where i live it’s not that far from the prealps…. at least when you speak in global contexts

Bruce Cobb
December 22, 2016 12:06 pm

Sure that isn’t butterscotch pudding with Cool Whip mixed in? Yum! Oh, and the dark spots could be chocolate chunks. Double-yum.

brians356
December 22, 2016 12:53 pm

“I can’t get over how cold it gets in the desert.”
George C. Scott (as “Gen. George S. Patton Jr.”)

Philip Mulholland
December 22, 2016 4:10 pm

On 7th January 2008 Météo Algérie published the following report:-

> La neige couvrant les monts du hoggar
>
>
> Le lundi 7 janvier 2008 est tombé à l’Assekrem ( 2700 m altitude) en
> plein cœur du Sahara, environ 3 cm de neige entre 13h40 et 15h20 TU. La
> neige a été observée sur tous les monts proches de l’Assekrem jusqu’au
> plateau de l’Akarakar. Le lendemain mardi 8 janvier, la neige était
> visible sur le mont de Tahat à partir de Tamanrasset. Cette situation a
> été accompagnée par des températures très basses avec -5.6°C de
> température minimum la nuit et une température maximale de + 2.7°C.A
> signaler que la veille, la journée du dimanche 6 janvier, un vent
> glacial a soufflé durant toute la journée sur la région avec des pointes
> de 25 m/s ( 100 km/h ).


Froid et Neige sur (Tamanrasset).

Snowfall on the Hoggar Mountains in the centre of the Sahara during January 2008 was not that long ago.
Assekrem Tamanrasset Province, Algeria

December 22, 2016 4:29 pm

I have one remaining prediction written in 2002:
Global cooling will commence by 2020-2030.
Maybe sooner.
Hope to be wrong.
Warm good.
Cold bad.
Best wishes for the Holidays, Allan

Reply to  Allan M R MacRae
December 22, 2016 4:55 pm

All my 8 other predictions from 2002 have since come true.
None of the warmists scary predictions have happened.

tony mcleod
Reply to  Allan M R MacRae
December 23, 2016 3:34 am

“Hope to be wrong.” I hope you’re right.
What were your predictions Allan?

Reply to  Allan M R MacRae
December 23, 2016 10:08 pm

Travelling on iPhone so references are not easily available.
We said:
The alleged global warming crisis was false;
Warmist alarmism would waste billions that shd be spent on real needs like clean potable water, etc.;
Warmist policies wd harm economies;
Green energy would not work – not green and produces little useful energy;
Manufacturing wd move to pollution havens like China;
Etc.

Reply to  Allan M R MacRae
December 24, 2016 9:36 pm

THE NEW ICE AGE HAS STARTED
http://business.financialpost.com/fp-comment/lawrence-solomon-proof-that-a-new-ice-age-has-already-started-is-stronger-than-ever-and-we-couldnt-be-less-prepared
“The New Little Ice Age Has Started.” This is the unambiguous title of a new study from one of the world’s most prestigious scientific institutions, the Russian Academy of Science’s Pulkovo Observatory in St. Petersburg. “The average temperature around the globe will fall by about 1.5 C when we enter the deep cooling phase of the Little Ice Age, expected in the year 2060,” the study states. “The cooling phase will last for about 45-65 years, for four to six 11-year cycles of the Sun, after which on the Earth, at the beginning of the 22nd century, will begin the new, next quasi-bicentennial cycle of warming.”
Habibullo Abdussamatov, the head of space research at Pulkovo and the author of the study, has been predicting the arrival of another little ice age since 2003, based on his study of the behaviour of the Sun’s different cycles and the solar activity that then results. His model — informed by Earth’s 18 earlier little ice ages over the past 7,500 years, six of them in the last thousand years — led to his prediction more than a decade ago that the next little ice age would occur between 2012 and 2015. Unlike the global warming models of scientists, which were soon disproved by actual measurements, Abdussamatov’s models have been affirmed by actual events, including the rise of the oceans and the measurable irradiance sent earthward by the sun. This record of accuracy — which he has repeatedly demonstrated in studies between 2003 and now — leads him to now confidently state that in 2014–15, we began our entry into the 19th Little Ice Age.
An underheated planet is a real threat humans have actually faced
Abdussamatov was once a lonely voice in the view that Earth could be embarking on a prolonged cooling spell due to solar, not manmade, factors. No longer. Because sunspots are eerily disappearing from the face of our sun — just as they disappeared during the Little Ice Age in the late 1600s — speculation of another cooling period has been widespread by bodies such as the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and the Riken research foundation. Last year, a team of European researchers unveiled a scientific model at the National Astronomy Meeting in Wales predicting a “mini ice age” from 2030 to 2040 as a result of decreased solar activity.
For one thing, we can deep freeze dreams of economically exploiting the vast energy wealth of the Arctic Ocean, which geological surveys indicate is the richest in petroleum of all the oceans. The conventional belief that global warming would soon melt the Arctic, and make economic the large-scale infrastructure needed to operate in its inhospitable environment, had many in the oil industry — and in governments — gearing up to claim their share of this new frontier. Their dreams will now need to be set aside for the cold century ahead.

tony mcleod
Reply to  Allan M R MacRae
December 24, 2016 10:51 pm

Pretty disappointing list of “predictions” there Allan. looks like the only one that is correct is the “manufacturing moving to China” one – hardly a revelation.
Looks like a plunge is due…. any tick of the clock.comment image
What’s your prediction for Arctic sea ice in Sept? I’m going for ice free.comment image

tony mcleod
Reply to  Allan M R MacRae
December 24, 2016 11:05 pm

Habibullo Abdussamatov, the head of space research at Pulkovo and the author of the study, has been predicting the arrival of another little ice age since 2003, based on his study of the behaviour of the Sun’s different cycles and the solar activity that then results. His model — informed by Earth’s 18 earlier little ice ages over the past 7,500 years, six of them in the last thousand years — led to his prediction more than a decade ago that the next little ice age would occur between 2012 and 2015. Unlike the global warming models of scientists, which were soon disproved by actual measurements, Abdussamatov’s models have been affirmed by actual events, including the rise of the oceans and the measurable irradiance sent earthward by the sun. This record of accuracy — which he has repeatedly demonstrated in studies between 2003 and now — leads him to now confidently state that in 2014–15, we began our entry into the 19th Little Ice Age.
“predicting since 2003….that the next little ice age would occur between 2012 and 2015”
About as wrong as you could possibly be. Even more inaccurate than your own so called predictions Allan.
Something else from Habibullo:
Abdussamatov holds that Earth’s atmosphere does not produce a greenhouse effect, stating “Ascribing ‘greenhouse’ effect properties to the Earth’s atmosphere is not scientifically substantiated”.
.
Might be time for him to change focus.
BTW, please do not try the old El Nino dunnit excuse for the rapid rise in global temperature and melting of the sea ice.

2hotel9
Reply to  tony mcleod
December 25, 2016 4:47 am

The “globe” is not warming, sea ice melts each spring and refreezes each fall. Science, you try it in place of your kooky religion.

Reply to  Allan M R MacRae
December 25, 2016 6:35 pm

Utter nonsense by you Tony. And utterly predictable too.
Only scoundrels and imbeciles believe global warming alarmism.
[Please do not insult scoundrels and imbeciles in public by comparing them to fanatics about global warming. .mod]

tony mcleod
Reply to  Allan M R MacRae
December 27, 2016 5:24 am

Which bit exactly was nonsense Allan?

James at 48
December 22, 2016 6:55 pm

There has been some cold weather in Syria. The timing could not be worse.

jdmcl
December 22, 2016 11:06 pm

It’s been obvious for some time that the Global Warming story was just a “snow job”.

jdmcl
December 22, 2016 11:11 pm

Remember the song by UK group The Police, “Tea in the Sahara with you”? it will have to be rewritten as “T-bar in the Sahara with you”.

Simon
December 23, 2016 12:44 am

“We know the northern hemisphere has been getting colder,”
I am a bit puzzled by this. Does this statement mean this month, this year, this decade? According to the latest from NOAA it would be hard to convince anyone it is colder this year than last, or that the NH is cooling at all.
https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/201611

2hotel9
Reply to  Simon
December 23, 2016 3:38 am

Let me help you out here. The “globe” is not warming, humans are not destroying the “environment”, you are not all that important. Take a breath, sit down and wake up.

Simon
Reply to  2hotel9
December 23, 2016 7:27 am

You did look at the data/link before opening our mouth…. right?

2hotel9
Reply to  Simon
December 23, 2016 5:48 pm

Again, for the apparently terminally stupid.” Let me help you out here. The “globe” is not warming, humans are not destroying the “environment”, you are not all that important. Take a breath, sit down and wake up.” That means you, snowflake. Now toddle off to your “safe space” and buy a clue.

Simon
Reply to  2hotel9
December 24, 2016 12:31 am

“2hotel9 December 23, 2016 at 5:48 pm
Again, for the apparently terminally stupid.” Let me help you out here. The “globe” is not warming, humans are not destroying the “environment”, you are not all that important. Take a breath, sit down and wake up.” That means you, snowflake. Now toddle off to your “safe space” and buy a clue.”
So you didn’t read the information that clearly says you are wrong. And still you open your mouth and demonstrate to the world you have not a clue. And you call me stupid.

2hotel9
Reply to  Simon
December 24, 2016 3:59 am

You can believe whatever fantastical religious crap you want, that does not change reality. The “globe” is not warming, humans are not destroying the “environment”, you are not all that important. Get over yourself, everyone else is already over you.

2hotel9
Reply to  Simon
December 24, 2016 4:04 am

And want people to accept anything coming out of any governmental agency? Prosecute and jail all the scumbags who have been falsifying data and lying. That would be a start. Till then it is all just religious hokum.

Simon
Reply to  2hotel9
December 24, 2016 6:50 am

2hotel9
Mr Twit. I’m assuming that is your name as you signed off with it. No one mentioned religion. I think you will find your weird ideas are not supported by anyone in the field. You wont find a scientist who doesn’t accept the increasing of man made CO2 will result in increased temperatures. That includes skeptical ones. So go ahead stick you head in the sand Mr Twit…. but it wont change anything.

2hotel9
Reply to  Simon
December 24, 2016 7:27 am

Your silly religion is safe in my care, you can pray to Gaia as many times per day and facing whatever direction you please, we all just laugh at you. And again, since repetition appears to be the only way you figure anything out, the “globe” is not warming, humans are not destroying the “environment”, you are not all that important.Oh, and I guess we have to add that CO2 is not a pollutant, it is plant food, and the Sun drives temps, not your fantastical and silly little religious maunderings.

Simon
Reply to  2hotel9
December 24, 2016 9:56 am

2hotel9
How about you have a little lie down……

2hotel9
Reply to  Simon
December 24, 2016 11:41 am

Why are you such a frightened little man regarding your religion? So what that people laugh at you, its a free country and you can believe any fantastical religious crap you want. Please feel free to spew whatever nonsensical stupidity it pleases you to spew, all the rest of humanity will simply laugh and point at your mentally retarded blather. Really, the majority of us find it amusing, and come middle of January we will chuckle at you even more. So what? You entertain us, that should be enough for you.

2hotel9
Reply to  Simon
December 23, 2016 5:50 pm

Oh, and 0.0092 C is not “globall warmining”. Twit.

Simon
Reply to  2hotel9
December 24, 2016 12:35 am

2hotel9 December 23, 2016 at 5:50 pm
Oh, and 0.0092 C is not “globall warmining”. Twit.
Ha ha where did you get that figure from for your “globall warmining”. T
Let me guess…. from the “globall warmining” D team handbook no doubt. Why don’t you do yourself a favour and actually read the information produced by those who know what they are talking about …. not from the back of your cereal box. Twit!!!!!

tony mcleod
Reply to  2hotel9
December 24, 2016 11:14 pm

Remarkable how the most ignorant, kool-aid soaked uber-zealots who uncritically parrot out the same debunked lies over and over are the first to play the “religion” card.
Irony will be lost unfortunately.

2hotel9
Reply to  tony mcleod
December 25, 2016 5:09 am

Yes, the irony that you have fallen for a religious cult that rejects the reality that is all around you is lost on you. Wake up and smell the science.
Simon? You keep putting out links to agencies who are, and have been, falsifying data, redacting past data and outright lying in order to continue receiving government money. Its your religion and you will never forsake it. Worse than muslims, you know what you embrace is a lie.

Simon
Reply to  2hotel9
December 25, 2016 12:46 am

Tony
Couldn’t agree more which is why I have given up on him. I have no idea why he kept bringing religion up. I never did. I’d rather point him to facts, which I did and he came back with more nutty religion bollocks.

observa
December 23, 2016 2:07 am
Tony Favero
December 30, 2016 10:05 am

Snow falling in the Sahara? You bet. Even the Smithsonian… http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/snow-falls-sahara-first-time-1979-180961545/ is reporting it. CNN – our dear Global Warming guys also concede the same. Forget naysayers like Mr. Gummy Bears above. Yes Martha there is perhaps Global Cooling taking place…..a far more desperate development to mankind (oh sorry Libs, ‘personkind’ perhaps?) than warming. Far more people suffer and die from cold temps than warm—-a convenient fact ignored. Plants fail to grow well or at all in cold….duh!

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