First Eastern Pacific tropical depression of the season

From NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an infrared image of the developing depression on May 28 at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT). The GOES image showed a circular center with bands of thunderstorms spiraling into the center from the northwest and southeast. Credits: NASA/NOAA GOES Project
NOAA’s GOES-West satellite captured an infrared image of the developing depression on May 28 at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT). The GOES image showed a circular center with bands of thunderstorms spiraling into the center from the northwest and southeast. Credits: NASA/NOAA GOES Project

The first tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific hurricane season formed during the early morning of Thursday, May 28, 2015, well southwest of Mexico. An image of the storm taken from NOAA’s GOES-West satellite shows the depression in infrared light as it was born in the early morning hours before sunrise. To the east of the depression, the GOES image shows the sunlight of dawn reaching Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula.At 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) the center of Tropical Depression One-E was located near latitude 11.0 North, longitude 110.4 West, ABOUT 685 miles (1,105 km) southwest of Manzanillo Mexico. The depression is moving toward the west-northwest near 15 mph (24 km/h), but a decrease in forward speed is expected to begin later today.

Maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph (55 km/h) with higher gusts and it is expected to become a tropical storm later today, May 28 and could become a hurricane by late Friday. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1005 millibars (29.68 inches).

NOAA’s GOES-West satellite captured an infrared image of the developing depression on May 28 at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT). The GOES image showed a circular center with bands of thunderstorms spiraling into the center from the northwest and southeast.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) forecast said that the depression should turn toward the northwest by tonight and the north-northwest by Friday night remaining over open ocean.

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H.R.
May 28, 2015 6:33 pm

Someone ask Gore which direction it should be spinning.

Janice Moore
May 28, 2015 6:48 pm

Thank you, Mister Weatherman!
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jones
May 28, 2015 7:15 pm

Oh my sweet Lord…..Just how bad is this?
Is it worse than we thought?

Mike McMillan
May 28, 2015 8:25 pm

Too bad. Drought-hit California could have put it to good use.

Svend Ferdinandsen
Reply to  Mike McMillan
May 29, 2015 10:19 am

Indeed, but California has reduced (tried to) their CO2, so the rain goes other ways where there are more CO2.

The Original Mike M
May 28, 2015 8:54 pm
masInt branch 4 C3I in is
May 28, 2015 8:55 pm

FINALLY
The Head of NOAA (Kathryn D. Sullivan, a masters student who did not defend her thesis to ph.d.) pounds her head into her oak-wood 19th-century desk and knows from the significance of the pain to her head that her phony-balony job is safe for another 12 obama fu#king months.
Ha ha ja ja

Phil B.
May 28, 2015 9:23 pm

At ~0200 UTC on May 28 the sun put out its first C-range solar flare in days and the sensitive electron flux, which was recovering from the sector boundary cross a few days ago, hit the floor again.
On an all quiet star, even piddly little flares have an amazing correlation with tropical storm formation.
http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/products/goes-x-ray-flux
http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/products/goes-electron-flux

toorightmate
May 28, 2015 9:39 pm

I hope there are no seafarers in the region experiencing those 35 mph winds. Scary stuff.
It could turn into a storm; it could turn in to a hurricane; it could turn into the tooth fairy.

charles nelson
May 28, 2015 10:36 pm

It’s been downgraded to an Irish Summer.

Reply to  charles nelson
May 28, 2015 10:56 pm

Maybe it shall be downgraded further to an Irish Spring.
“Manly, yes, but I like it too”
-algore

noaaprogrammer
Reply to  Mark and two Cats
May 29, 2015 7:02 pm

… but not another Arab Spring.

Admad
May 29, 2015 12:15 am

From where I’m sitting in London I’m in the middle of an extra-tropical depression (fed up).
High pressure should ease up by 6 p.m. (finish to go on holiday for a week).
Time for another coffee and my meds…

May 29, 2015 12:36 am

If it forms close to the continental shore, there is a good chance it will not make it to Hawaii.

May 29, 2015 1:14 am

Swiss cheese holes hiatus.
Scientists are baffled :the famous holes in cheeses like Emmentaler or Appenzeller have been getting smaller or disappearing completely over the last 15 years.

May 29, 2015 3:57 am

35mph?? In late May? Are they seriously telling us that in the ENTIRE OCEAN that nothing has got to 35mph until now in the month of hurricane season??

Mumbles McGuirck
May 29, 2015 5:42 am

BTW, it is now Tropical Storm Andres
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/graphics_ep1.shtml?5-daynl#contents
They upgraded it in time for Obama’s visit. /sarc

charles nelson
May 29, 2015 3:32 pm

Another spanner in the El Nino works?

Chuckarama
May 29, 2015 4:27 pm

It will be interesting to see what a Pacific tropical storm does to stir El Nino waters. I know they form a little far north, but may Bob Tisdale can keep an eye on it for us.

Boydo3 N. Albany
June 1, 2015 9:02 pm

It’s a cat 4 now and another behind it…..

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