Coldest Antarctic June Ever Recorded

Story submitted by Eric Worrall

Antarctica continues to defy the global warming script, with a report from Meteo France, that June this year was the coldest Antarctic June ever recorded, at the French Antarctic Dumont d’Urville Station.

According to the press release, during June this year, the average temperature was -22.4c (-8.3F), 6.6c (11.9F) lower than normal. This is the coldest June ever recorded at the station, and almost the coldest monthly average ever – only September 1953 was colder, with a recorded average temperature of -23.5c (-10.3F).

June this year also broke the June daily minimum temperature record, with a new record low of -34.9c (-30.8F).

Other unusual features of the June temperature record are an unusual excess of sunlight hours (11.8 hours rather than the normal 7.4 hours), and unusually light wind conditions.

Dumont d’Urville Station has experienced ongoing activity since 1956. According to the Meteo France record, there is no other weather station for 1000km in any direction.

http://www.meteofrance.fr/web/comprendre-la-meteo/actualites?articleId=8990197

h/t IceAgeNow

Translated version of the Meteo France page:-

https://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.meteofrance.fr%2Fweb%2Fcomprendre-la-meteo%2Factualites%3FarticleId%3D8990197

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Coldest Antarctic June Ever Recorded
————
How long has June been recording?

There shouldn’t be any sunlight in June in the Antarctic????

Louis

There are a couple of weeks, around the 21st of June when the sun does not shine at all. So how could they get an average of 11.8 hours a day of sunlight in June? Unless they mean a TOTAL of 11.8 hours for the entire month. I may have made a wrong assumption, since the wording isn’t explicit. In any case, why would the hours of sunlight vary that much from one June to another? Are sunlight hours on cloudy days not counted?

ConfusedPhoton

“There shouldn’t be any sunlight in June in the Antarctic”
The Antarctic is a large continent and depending where the station is located, will determine if there is sunlight in June
For example, http://www.antarctica.gov.au/about-antarctica/environment/weather/sunlight-hours shows the sunlight at a number of Australian stations.
Dumont d’Urville Station is is 66.39.49S – quite a bit away from the actual south pole.

Stephen Skinner

Steve B says:
July 12, 2014 at 12:05 am
There shouldn’t be any sunlight in June in the Antarctic????
Indeed. But I just checked their station blog and I understand/guess the 11.8 hours of sunlight is for the whole of June. And its sunlight and not sunshine.
http://www.gdargaud.net/Antarctica/WinterDdU.html
Winter over at Dumont d’Urville
“Midwinter party. To break the monotony of the winter, there is a traditional party on the shortest day of the year, June 21st, which in our case lasted for 8 days”
Some other quotes from this blog:
“Temperature in DdU is not bad: around 0 in summer, down to -37°C (-35°F) in winter. But the wind is a killer. I had 250 km/h (150 mph) and there has been recorded wind up to 315 km/h (200 mph) ! I’ve seen rocks and buildings fly, and I wasn’t even that drunk.”
And this description of a photo of the base..
“The small white buildings in the center are freezers (warmer than the outside air !),”

Louis

June this year also broke the June daily minimum temperature record, with a new record low of -34.9c (-30.8F).
=====
Does the June daily minimum temperature consist of an average of all June minimum temperatures or is it the coldest temperature recorded during June? I’ve been in Minnesota when the temperature was around -30F, so it doesn’t sound all that low for an Antarctic winter temperature.

Could this be the start of the little ice age predicted by Abdussamatov?

Bob Koss

That station is located at 66.33S and receives 3 hours of daylight on June 1st. Drops to 1.2 hours around the 21st and by the end of the month it is up to 1.8 hours. Daylight probably isn’t considered the same as sunlight tho’.
Here is the online program I used.
http://astro.unl.edu/classaction/animations/coordsmotion/daylighthoursexplorer.html

Shona

“ConfusedPhoton says:
July 12, 2014 at 12:21 am
“There shouldn’t be any sunlight in June in the Antarctic””
The article does not discuss sunlight it discusses insolation, ie the amount of solar radiation received by an exposed surface.
I haven’t read the google translation, but I’m guessing it’s bad. Google translations are only rough guides for what has been said. Although they are probably more accurate than NOA GISS etc 🙂 /sarc off

ren

Solar Radiation
The Sun’s illumination is the ultimate energy source for the Earth’s biosphere, and the ultimate driving force for atmospheric, and oceanic circulations. The Sun is a variable star as one can see from sunspots recorded back to Galileo’s time in the early 1600s. Satellite observations over the past three decades show that the sunspot activity is associated with changes in solar output energy. The total solar irradiance (TSI), improperly called “solar constant” until a few years ago, has been found to change about 0.1% in an 11-year solar sunspot activity. The current most accurate TSI values from the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) on NASA’s Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment ( SORCE ) is 1360.8 ± 0.5 W/m2 during the 2008 solar minimum as compared to previous estimates of 1365.4 ± 1.3 W/m2 established in the 1990s.
Sun-climate research is an interdisciplinary field focusing on understanding solar variability and climate response on different time scales, and is critical for understanding and isolating human-induced climate change. Accurate and continuous observation of the TSI is required to monitor and understand the causes of the Earth’s radiation (im)balance, over time. Still, knowledge of TSI alone is not sufficient for understanding the physical processes in the Earth’s ocean and atmosphere system. Recent studies have shown that even for identical TSI variations, atmospheric and ocean temperatures responsd differently depending on the details of Spectral Solar Irradiance (SSI) variations. SSI observations from the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) instrument on SORCE revealed variations of SSI in the descending phase of solar cycle 23 that were not anticipated by some semi-empirical models. These groundbreaking continuous SIM observations of near full solar spectrum SSI are unprecedented in the history of Sun observations and have helped scientists to understand the important role on climate of SSI variations. Improved TIM and SIM instruments on an upcoming Total Solar and Spectral Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) mission, expected to launch in 2016, will provide even more accurate Sun observations for detecting yet unresolved solar variations, and for further strengthening our understanding the role solar variations have in a changing planet.
Sun-climate research activities in Climate and Radiation Laboratory focus on analyzing observed solar irradiance for understanding solar variability, and investigating observed and simulated climate responses to solar variations recorded in satellite observations in order to pin down the physical mechanisms in the Sun-climate connection. Recently a joint Sun-Climate Research Center (SCRC) between NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and the University of Colorado’s Laboratory for Atmosphere and Space Physics (LASP) has been formed to foster collaborative studies of Sun effects on Earth’s climate. The center provides opportunities for scientist collaboration, and is a means for post-doctoral scientists and graduate students in science, engineering, and mission operations to move between LASP and Goddard.
Contact: Guoyong Wen

Bob Koss

D’oh!
Forget that last comment of mine. The station is at 66.66S. That makes the the hours of daylight June 1st 2.6 hours. dropping to none JUne 15th through June 27th. achieving a whole 0.9 hours by June 30th.

ren

The XUV Photometer System (XPS) is one of four solar irradiance measurement experiments that was launched in January 2003 as part of the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE). Studies of the solar XUV radiation began in the 1960s with space-based rocket experiments, but the knowledge of the solar XUV irradiance, both in absolute magnitude and variability, has been questionable due largely to the very limited number of observations. With the launch of Solar & Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) in 1995, Student Nitric Oxide Explorer (SNOE) in 1998, and Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Energetics-Dynamics (TIMED) spacecraft in 2001, there is now a continuous data set of the solar XUV irradiance, and advances in the understanding of the solar XUV irradiance have begun. The SORCE XPS, which evolved from earlier versions flown on SNOE and TIMED, continue on these solar XUV irradiance measurements with improvements to accuracy, spectral image, and temporal change.

ren said:
“Recent studies have shown that even for identical TSI variations, atmospheric and ocean temperatures responsd differently depending on the details of Spectral Solar Irradiance (SSI) variations. SSI observations from the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) instrument on SORCE revealed variations of SSI in the descending phase of solar cycle 23 that were not anticipated by some semi-empirical models”
Yes, the spectral variations affect global albedo via cloudiness changes which alters the proportion of TSI entering the oceans.
Some of us have proposed models that acknowledge that fact and incorporate the consequences.

Mike T

This should read “coldest ever June for Dumont d’Urville” not Antarctica. As for “hours of sunlight” I’d suggest it’d be the same as “hours of sunshine”. They’d be measuring it with a special Antarctic model of the Campbell-Stokes sunshine recorder or the French equivalent.

norah4you

Reblogged this on Norah4you's Weblog and commented:
It takes two for tango, and it’s better if the musicians playing a tango at the same time…. is it possible that politians and left-media at last realise that true fact(music) is to be taken seriously if the dancing contenders(read politians and so called experts) have intention to score in the long run…… 😉

ren

Currently, the sea ice around Antarctica abruptly stopped. This means the weakening of the polar vortex in the lower stratosphere.
http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/antarctic.sea.ice.interactive.html
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/stratosphere/strat_a_f/gif_files/gfs_t100_sh_f00.gif

Brisbane, Australia has had many cold nights last month and a half. Call it weather or call it climate — the earth could be entering a mini ice age. Interesting to read that the cold in Antarctica is associated with a cloud-free sky. The cold nights in Queensland also tend to be cloud-free.

Gerard

Just heard on the ABC (Australia) News that Brisbane and many areas of Queensland had their coldest overnight temperature ever recorded. Many inland areas of Queensland had morning temps down to -5 celsius

ren

The weakening of the polar vortex is visible in the form of rising temperatures in the stratosphere above the polar circle (the temperature of the stratosphere is still below normal).
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/stratosphere/strat-trop/gif_files/time_pres_TEMP_ANOM_JAS_SH_2014.gif
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/precip/CWlink/blocking/real_time_sh/1panel_ghgs_obs_sh_nrm.gif

Old Ranga

Gerard says:
July 12, 2014 at 1:38 am
Just heard on the ABC (Australia) News that Brisbane and many areas of Queensland had their coldest overnight temperature ever recorded. Many inland areas of Queensland had morning temps down to -5 celsius.
———————-
Measured and observed data. Hindcasting not forecasting. No computer modelling anywhere. The ABC warmists must be really sweating about this. What will Robyn Williams from the Science Show have to say?

Gerard says:
July 12, 2014 at 1:38 am
Just heard on the ABC (Australia) News that Brisbane and many areas of Queensland had their coldest overnight temperature ever recorded. Many inland areas of Queensland had morning temps down to -5 celsius (sic)
*****************************************************************************************************************
Yep it is pretty darn cold. Also I guess the sun peaks its head above the horizon for a few hours total in June. I guess the days have been clear.

Steve Jones

It can’t be the coldest. A certain Mr Mann cut a tree down at the South Pole last week and a quick glance at the rings show it was the warmist ever. That is called climate scientific proof.

ren

Stary Ranga
Look at blocking polar vortex at a height of less than 30 km. Click Earth.
http://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/isobaric/10hPa/orthographic=142.65,-37.42,553

ren
ren
KenB

Yes it was actually nice to hear the weather girl announcing the coldest July record for 100 years, hard to deny the cold weather and the effect of sun and clouds, the minute a cloud obscures the sun it’s damn cold here in Melbourne Australia and lately at night the clouds clear so that little UHI effect remains over the city.
It was also reported that substantial snow is falling at Mount Macedon to the North of Melbourne, I sort of recall that happening back in 1961. I guess this is all new for the kids born in the recent warmalogical decades.

ren

Gerard
Just heard on the ABC (Australia) News that Brisbane and many areas of Queensland had their coldest overnight temperature ever recorded. Many inland areas of Queensland had morning temps down to -5 celsius
I’m living through it 🙂 – not much fun enduring freezing conditions in a house which is designed for tropical conditions!

ren
Santa Baby

Sky clears and little wind means probably high pressure. And if it was more high pressure than normal of course it means very dry and cold weather?

jones

Just where is the heat hiding?
Eh?…Eh?
Is it in the deep ice-core?

Stephen Skinner says:
July 12, 2014 at 12:21 am
http://www.gdargaud.net/Antarctica/WinterDdU.html

Thanks for that link. The stuff was fascinating.

sleepingbear dunes

ren
I think you meant the Antarctic sea ice extent stopped growing. Based on your graph, it looks the same thing has happened many times before.

JimBob

Y’all check around and see if Algore is visiting.

KWG1947

On http://earth.nullschool.net/ , I have been tracking the various areas of Antarctica for temperature using that sight at the surface level setting. So far for July I have been able to locate temperatures of about -71.9C or -97.42F. It will be interesting to see what the record coldest day becomes this year with the last record being set at -135.8F on December 10, 2013 by NASA Satellite. The same satellite data recorded -135.3F on July 31,2010. The coldest thermometer temperature was -128.6F at Vostok on July 21, 1983. Got mittens?

Eliza

The trend in Antartctia has not stopped. it would have to drop another 1.2 millions square km or MORE and stay there for it to “drop”. Its just fallen to its trend line now and will probably resume its expansive growth within weeks.

Brisbane and many areas of Queensland had their coldest overnight temperature ever recorded over the last few days, despite the fact that the Sun rises at 6.27AM and sets at 5.09PM at present, and it is often sunny for over 10 hours, right through the day.

Dave

It’s worse than we thought.

pat

posting from south of Brisbane…..brrrrrrrr….
10 July: Local France: Alps get summer snow as wet weather to stay
Holidaymakers in the Alps in recent days would have been forgiven for thinking they had come in the wrong season after the region was hit by some very unseasonal snowfalls. There was bad news for sunseekers too with the sun set to stay away for much of July.
Parts of the Alps looked like a winter wonderland on Thursday as summer snow continued to fall, disrupting the usual holiday activities…
The only place you’ll be guaranteed sun is down on the Mediterranean the forecaster says, as well as along parts of the Atlantic coast if you are lucky.
Thankfully the weather forecaster says things should improve in Autumn and September, but nothing is guaranteed.
http://www.thelocal.fr/20140710/in-pictures-french-alps-get-summer-snow
10 July: CBS: Polar Vortex Part II: Record Low Cold Possible Next Week
Meteorologist Megan Glaros reports the polar vortex will be shooting a pocket of cold air our way in the middle of next week, possibly resulting in record low temperatures all across large portions of the Midwest and upper Great Plains, including Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota, Michigan, and Ohio…
http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2014/07/10/polar-vortex-part-ii-record-low-cold-possible-next-week/

jones says:
July 12, 2014 at 2:57 am
Just where is the heat hiding?
Eh?…Eh?
Is it in the deep ice-core?
*********************************************************************************************************************
No, it is that big yellow thing in the sky 🙂 🙂

tonyM

Sometimes it is a bit annoying reading magazine articles.
http://www.gaisma.com/en/location/dumont-durville–permanent-station-of-france.html
From that site I certainly can’t see how it could be interpreted that there were more than a few hours of sunlight rather than the excess of 11.8 hours quoted for June. Even the average quoted seems far fetched unless they stretch the elastic to include dusk and dawn and then some.
Perhaps someone has an explanation for what exactly is meant.

Mike T

I’d suggest the 11.8 hours of sunshine quoted is a monthly total. Australian stations normally give a monthly average, but then we have plenty of sunshine and a daily average for the month would be more meaningful. I’m not a great fan of Stokes-Campbell sunshine recorders but they’ve been used for a very long time. They do require a manned station, because paper cards have to be changed daily (preferably after sunset, although they can be changed at the same time daily and sunshine hours apportioned to the correct day, giving cards split over two days). Given the automation of weather stations one wonders whether measurement of sunshine is another element that’ll have a patchy record for the future.

Tom J

Did Al Gore visit the Antarctic in June?

ren

sleepingbear dunes says
ren
I think you meant the Antarctic sea ice extent stopped growing. Based on your graph, it looks the same thing has happened many times before.
Course. But the weakening of the vortex means that the cold air will go now to the north. See temeprature sea.
http://weather.unisys.com/surface/sst_anom.gif

ren

The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant mode of tropical variability on interannual timescales. It is well known to have significant influence on the Walker Circulation in the tropical Pacific. Large perturbations to the circulation as well as resulting changes in water vapor can change ozone concentrations in the lower atmosphere. The largest changes in ozone from ENSO are seen near the tropopause which is a particularly sensitive region of our climate system. Ozone is an important greenhouse gas and changes in its amount especially in the upper troposphere influence radiative forcing at the surface. Ozone is also an important source of the hydroxyl radical (OH) which can impact the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere and the lifetimes of some greenhouse gases. Observations of the ozone sensitivity could provide a useful way to evaluate the representation of processes such as ENSO in chemistry-climate models. .
http://aura.gsfc.nasa.gov/images/science/20121108.jpg
http://aura.gsfc.nasa.gov/science/feature-20121108.html

Bill Illis

Official monthly temperatures at Dumont Durville Antarctica since 1958. Actually June 2014 was the coldest month on record (including the months of July and August which are typically colder than June).
http://www.antarctica.ac.uk/met/READER/surface/Dumont_Durville.All.temperature.txt
Amundsen Scott station at the south pole was warmer than average in June 2014 at -54.6C versus the mean June temp of -58.5C. Farday on the Antarctic Peninsula was also warmer than average.
http://www.antarctica.ac.uk/met/READER/surface/Amundsen_Scott.All.temperature.txt
http://www.antarctica.ac.uk/met/READER/surface/Faraday.All.temperature.txt

ren

To investigate the 2011 Arctic ozone loss, scientists from 19 institutions in nine countries (United States, Germany, The Netherlands, Canada, Russia, Finland, Denmark, Japan and Spain) analyzed a comprehensive set of measurements. These included daily global observations of trace gases and clouds from NASA’s Aura and CALIPSO spacecraft; ozone measured by instrumented balloons; meteorological data and atmospheric models. The scientists found that at some altitudes, the cold period in the Arctic lasted more than 30 days longer in 2011 than in any previously studied Arctic winter, leading to the unprecedented ozone loss. Further studies are needed to determine what factors caused the cold period to last so long.
“Day-to-day temperatures in the 2010-11 Arctic winter did not reach lower values than in previous cold Arctic winters,” said lead author Gloria Manney of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., and the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in Socorro. “The difference from previous winters is that temperatures were low enough to produce ozone-destroying forms of chlorine for a much longer time. This implies that if winter Arctic stratospheric temperatures drop just slightly in the future, for example as a result of climate change, then severe Arctic ozone loss may occur more frequently.”
http://www.nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/arctic20111002.html
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/stratosphere/strat-trop/gif_files/time_pres_TEMP_MEAN_ALL_SH_2014.gif

Alan Robertson

tonyM says:
July 12, 2014 at 5:50 am
Sometimes it is a bit annoying reading magazine articles.
http://www.gaisma.com/en/location/dumont-durville–permanent-station-of-france.html
From that site I certainly can’t see how it could be interpreted that there were more than a few hours of sunlight rather than the excess of 11.8 hours quoted for June. Even the average quoted seems far fetched unless they stretch the elastic to include dusk and dawn and then some.
Perhaps someone has an explanation for what exactly is meant.
____________________
Shifting atmospherics… the hours of sunlight vary because the sunlight is refracted through thick layers of atmosphere due to the sun’s low angle above the horizon and local sunrise/sunset can occur before/after actual sunset.