Arctic Sea Ice Appears to Have Reached Maximum And Other Ice Observations

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – click to view

Image Credit: National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC)

By WUWT Regular “Just The Facts”

Per the image above, Arctic Sea Ice Extent made a late season run, but it appears to have reached its maximum for the year. “NSIDC calculates daily extent using a five-day average of the data.” The “method takes the average of the previous five days, so that readers will see fewer “wiggles” in the tail end of the data series. The value of the trailing mean lags the actual data values, so sea ice values will appear lower when ice extent is increasing, but will appear larger when ice is decreasing.” NSIDC

JAXA’s Sea Ice Extent, which “is updated at around 3:00(UTC) every day” JAXA, shows a significant downward turn;

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) – International Arctic Research Center (IARC) – Click the pic to view

DMI’s Mean Temperature above 80°N has been running well above average;

Danish Meteorological Institute – Click the pic to view

and there is a another cold air outbreak headed into North America;

NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory – Click the pic to view

thus it is unlikely that we will see significant additional Arctic Sea Ice growth this season. Part of the reason for the relatively low Arctic Sea Ice Maximum this year is that several cold air outbreaks have occurred this winter, allowing cold air to escape the Arctic, e.g.;

Robert Hart and Ryan Maue – Coolwx.com – Click the pic to view at source

resulting in second highest Great Lakes Sea Ice Coverage on record reaching 92.2% on March 6th, i.e.:

NOAA Great Lakes Surface Environment Analysis (GLSEA) – Click the pic to view full size image

NOAA Great Lakes Surface Environment Analysis (GLSEA) – Click the pic to view full size image

In the Southern Hemisphere, Sea Ice Area reached it’s 2nd highest Minimum on record on February 23rd, 2014, and somewhere in there lost its January rabbit ears;

Antarctic sea ice

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – Click the pic to view at source

resulting in a large area of Sea Ice now floating in the Southern Ocean:

Antarctic sea ice

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – Click the pic to view

Antarctic sea ice

Cryosphere Today – Arctic Climate Research at the University of Illinois – Click the pic to view

Southern Hemisphere Sea Ice Area has now been above average for over 2 years and 4 months;

Cryosphere Today – Arctic Climate Research at the University of Illinois – Click the pic to view view

with the last negative anomaly recorded was on November 23rd, 2011, data here and graph below:

Cryosphere Today – Arctic Climate Research at the University of Illinois – Click the pic to view

Global Sea Ice Area has remained stubbornly average over the last year and a quarter;

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view view

and Global Sea Ice Area Anomaly is currently just .083 Million sq km above the 1981 – 2010 average:

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view full size image

For additional information please visit the WUWT Sea Ice Page, Northern Regional Sea Ice Page and Great Lakes Ice Page.

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John Eggert

Just a curiosity, but a cursory examination of the various charts on sea ice extent in the arctic seem to show the maximum has been moving later in the year. Any ideas as to if this is a statistically valid statement and if so, why the peak is happening later?

ren

Comparison of the geomagnetic field and the position of the polar vortex.
The observed magnetic field is highly asymmetrical.
Lines of inclination are highly elliptical, with the North Magnetic Pole situated near one end of the ellipse.
The strength of the magnetic field is no longer a maximum at the North Magnetic Pole. In fact, there are now two maxima, one over central Canada, the other over Siberia.
Magnetic meridians do not converge radially on the North Magnetic Pole.
http://www.geomag.nrcan.gc.ca/images/field/fnor.gif
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/stratosphere/strat_a_f/gif_files/gfs_z70_nh_f120.gif

william

Expect another round of gnashing of teeth as sea ice this summer dips to near record low levels. The fact that NH ice got to w/i .63 mill of the long term average was a miracle that happened mostly at the last minute. It had been trending at -1.2mill for most of the winter. That suggests that that the recent uptick ice is thin and wont last long.

Angech

Several points
that big block of ice may appear to be floating freely but may in fact still be attached by ice to hyping to register on the satellite. It may week rejoin rather than floating off in the next few days.
Secondly most of the ice formation and melting is by the cold water underneath not the surface air temperature as evidenced by the ice taking no notice of those temperature anomalies.
While I would love to see another late rally it is unlikely but there may still be a slow move to the average for the 2000-2010 in the next 2 months as there is a lot of extra ice volume compared to recent years and the seasons seem to be 2-3 weeks late for melting and freezing recently

John Eggert, the day of maximum is kind of spread out
Year dMax Max
1987 52 16.21724
1996 52 15.42074
1991 56 15.58803
1998 56 16.02091
1982 58 16.27475
2008 58 15.30522
1995 59 15.32238
1979 60 16.56457
1994 61 15.72226
2009 61 15.16275
2000 63 15.44482
2001 63 15.66664
2012 64 15.25102
1980 65 16.25042
1989 65 15.72295
2011 66 14.67084
2002 68 15.57345
1986 69 16.11934
2007 69 14.78963
1988 70 16.24163
2004 70 15.25548
2006 70 14.73298
1990 71 16.21077
2005 71 14.94615
1992 72 15.53258
1993 72 16.00491
1981 73 15.71365
1983 73 16.33207
2013 73 15.14275
1985 76 16.11716
1984 78 15.76157
1997 79 15.63647
2014 79 14.96031
2003 80 15.58678
1999 89 15.55755
2010 90 15.28449

Jeff

Ice will be much thicker this year than years past. It was low for most of the year because ONE AREA of the arctic was warmer than usual (the north sea near Scandinavia). That area and that area alone has weak ice, but that area melts first anyway. The reason the ice began rapidly expanding recently is because the temperatures in the north sea have let up and the winds blew the ice in that direction.
People need to stop looking at arctic ice formation as some sort of contagion. If one area is weak, it doesn’t mean that all areas are weak. Ice forms where water is cold enough to create ice. It’s that simple. If conditions are right the ice will form rapidly, if not not the ice won’t form. The ice does catch a cancer which then prevents it from growing. The ice is just frozen water.
Look at the ice in the middle of the arctic and look at the ice near the Canadian coast and surrounding islands. That ice there is extremely thick. The Arctic Oscillation and the North Atlantic Oscillation are both in cold phases now, meaning that the warm gulf water is having difficulty penetrating and it is not warming that water. Ocean temperatures in that area is two degrees below normal. The north Atlantic is also below normal. When taken with the unusual thickness of MOST of the arctic ice, that suggests to me that the ice WON’T melt as easily (except for the area around Iceland and Scandinavia which has been warmer than normal all winter).
I predict this will be a bad year for the alarmists as it appears that rapid ice recovery is now well on its way.

Jeff

The line should be “the ice DOESN’T catch a cancer which prevents it from growing.”

MattN

Max ice also appears to be later than normal this year. Just sayin’…

Uh, the idea that we’ll see a record low sounds a little far fetched. Notice how little of the darkest purple shows up in the 2012 to 2013 extent maps vs the current maps.
Solid regions of 1~2 meter thick ice across the entire pole don’t melt away too quickly from what I’ve seen watching the ice over the last few years.

Alec aka daffy duck

Extent was suppressed because of AO being negative most of the winter; thicker ice did well and is in a good position not to be blow out into the Atlantic
http://www7320.nrlssc.navy.mil/hycomARC/navo/arcticictnowcast.gif
No one is going to be sailing through the Northwest Passage this year.
here is march 25, 2013 for comparison
http://www7320.nrlssc.navy.mil/hycomARC/navo/arcticict/nowcast/ict2013032418_2013032500_035_arcticict.001.gif

Kenny

I wonder what all this will look like after the melt season. Is it possible for the AO to stay negative through the summer? I read somewhere that a very strong possitive AO drove a lot of ice out of the Arctic Ocean several years ago. Could we see a repeat?

Jeff

The thinner ice exists entirely on one side, along the north sea. The north sea was warmer than usual all winter. Relative to the whole arctic ice, it’s a small area in all. I’m not even a little worried about the ice this summer, it’ll likely expand beyond last year given all the other conditions. The northwest passage has MUCH MORE ice and the “sliver” of thick 5+ meter ice we see every winter in much wider than usual.
I have no idea what “William” is talking about. I think it really comes from the Al Gore “An Inconvenient Truth” explanation of ice melt that confuses so many people. Gore’s explanation was completely wrong. Gore made it seem as if there would be some point of no return with the ice which was ridiculous. Ice is just frozen water. Think of it this way, if one keep an ice tray full of water out of the freezer it would never turn to ice. Yet, once you put it back into the freezer (assuming it worked normally) it would instantaneously turn to ice no matter how long it was kept in its water state.
Why would arctic ice be any different? Once the conditions exist for water to freeze, you get ice. There are three main reasons why ice will expand: 1) The arctic ocean is below normal and is in its negative phase; 2) the North Atlantic now seems to be following suit and appears to be turning cold as well; 3) the area of arctic ice that is thickest is the area that melts last. The area of the arctic ice which is thinner (North Sea, which is what was keeping the ice from expanding outward all winter) is the area which melts first anyway.
This summer minimum will have a larger ice extent than last summer.

R. Shearer

I predict that sometime in the next 200 years, the climate in Greenland will become more habitable as during the settlement by Vikings.

Whoops – Wrong image for PIOMAS volume! Try this one instead:
http://GreatWhiteCon.info/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/piomas-20140228.png

rogerknights

Anthony: Let’s have an minimum extent prediction thread!

RE: Jeff says:
March 25, 2014 at 6:49 am
I think you are right. A lot of the arctic is ice-free by the end of the summer every year. You are paying attention to the ice that matters, next September.
One reason for the low extents of recent summers is that the PDO was warm, which has warmer than normal waters up in Bering Strait. Since it turned to a cold PDO, which has colder than average waters in Bering Strait, the ice has increased on that Pacific side of the Pole. If you look at the map of recent summers you’ll see the Chukchi Sea was basically ice-free, and that those ice-free waters extended north into areas covered by “Central Arctic” maps and graphs. We are talking well over a million km2 of water that was ice-free and now may have ice, next September. It would make a big difference to the extent graphs.
On the Atlantic side there is much less ice. For example, in Barents Sea the ice failed to “recover” much at all this winter, and set a record for least ice-cover (since 1979.) However that will not matter much in September, because Barents Sea rarely has any ice at all in September.
Having Barents Sea open all winter would have an obvious effect on the waters entering the Arctic Ocean via that route, The water is is less able to stratify into a colder,fresher “lens” on top, with slightly warmer and saltier water beneath, due to churning storms. Also lots of heat is lost when -30 Siberian air pours over the open waters. The question is: Was that cooling balanced by above-freezing North Atlantic air passing over those waters? The answer is unknown, but perhaps can be deduced by the way the edge of the ice retreats on the Atlantic side, and along the Siberian coast, this summer. My guess would be the water is colder. The Northeast Passage will be very open to the west, but I have my doubts about how open it will be towards the east, once you get past the Laptev Sea into the East Siberian Sea.
The Northwest Passage looks like it will be a tough go, this summer, especially towards the east.
I expect more ice this September. I don’t know why people call that a “recovery.” It seems more like a “debacle,” if you want a mild start to next winter.

Leon Brozyna

It has been a cold winter, starting with November and continuing through to March, with about 1\3 of the time the high temps in Buffalo were at or below average lows … I’m more than ready for this pattern to break.

Gary Pearse

Here in Ottawa, Canada, they sawed keys in late February in the Rideau R. ice to hasten break-up and prevent flooding but it all froze up solid again. They are out there doing it again and breaking the ice right now and it is thick and no easy chore. Its still pretty frosty and might start to freeze up again. We had -19C overnight the day before yesterday and it was -16C this morning at 7:00 – they claim ridiculously we were a fraction of a degree warmer than the record – the warmists in theweathernetwork.com are still fighting the good fight. Its hard to believe there is any melting in the Canadian Arctic 2000km north of here.

FerdinandAkin

william says:
March 25, 2014 at 6:15 am
… It had been trending at -1.2mill for most of the winter. That suggests that that the recent uptick ice is thin and wont last long.

william,
I believe the term you are looking for is:
Rotten ice
http://wattsupwiththat.com/2009/12/14/a-look-at-sea-ice-compared-to-this-date-in-2007/

Ron Clutz

Just for comparison MASIE showed day 73 as this year’s maximum. They include satellite imagery and operational data along with microwave sensor results, so the amount of ice extent is different. Usually the numbers are close at the annual maximums, but MASIE will show much more ice than the others in the summer.
According to MASIE, this year’s NH max ice extent on day 73 (March 14) was 15,523,208 sq. km.

dudleyhorscroft

A couple of small quibbles:
ren says: March 25, 2014 at 6:07 am
“Magnetic meridians do not converge radially on the North Magnetic Pole.”
I find it exceedingly difficult to think of them going around the pole. To my way of thinking, if you keep on following north as indicated by your magnetic compass you must end up at the pole. If you start on a different meridian, you still end up at the pole.
Jeff says: March 25, 2014 at 7:17 am
“Think of it this way, if one keep an ice tray full of water out of the freezer it would never turn to ice. Yet, once you put it back into the freezer (assuming it worked normally) it would instantaneously turn to ice no matter how long it was kept in its water state.”
No way can you extract the energy from the water “instantaneously”. Quickly, if cold enough, slowly if not very cold. Even if your freezer is at absolute zero it will still take time for the heat to leak out.

outtheback

Looks like it that I have to put my plans to start farming in Greenland for another year on ice.
Ever since profit Gore made his predictions I have been working on reclaiming the ancestral farm there.
When oh when.

Ron Clutz

I can also observe that since the max on March 14, MASIE shows increases in ice extent in the Central Arctic and Barents Sea, offset by losses in Baffin-Gulf of St. Lawrence, Bering Sea and Baltic Sea.

Richard M

One of the main components of ice extent is the wind. For much of the winter the winds have been pushing ice towards land areas. This thickens the ice but also leads to lower winter time extents. The most recent extent increase was due to a change in the wind that pushed some of it towards ocean areas.
The winds will also be a major factor in the summer minimum. Unless they start pushing ice out into the N. Atlantic we will likely see a higher minimum due to the overall increase in multi-year ice from last year as well as the increases in thickness over the past winter.

Alec aka daffy duck

“Kenny says: I wonder what all this will look like after the melt season. Is it possible for the AO to stay negative through the summer? I read somewhere that a very strong possitive AO drove a lot of ice out of the Arctic Ocean several years ago. Could we see a repeat?”
THREE MONTH running mean through Feb 2014
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/precip/CWlink/daily_ao_index/month_ao_index.shtml
Here is the Daily through the winter
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/precip/CWlink/daily_ao_index/ao_index.html

John S.

Great Lakes “Sea” Ice?

RE: Caleb says:
March 25, 2014 at 7:38 am
Sea ice in the Arctic probably hasn’t reached maximum volume yet though. What do you make of this PIOMAS estimate from February 28th?
http://GreatWhiteCon.info/2014/03/the-arctic-sea-ice-recovery-vanishes/#PIOMAS
What relevance (if any) will that have regarding September’s minimum?

Ron Clutz

For comparison for previous years, MASIE shows these NH ice extent Maxes:
2014 15.52 MsqKm March 14
2013 15.64 Feb. 28
2012 16.10 March 04
2011 15.38 March 18
2010 15.92 March 14
2009 15.91 March 08
2008 16.04 March 24
2007 15.81 March 15
I don’t see anything alarming here.

ren

In the south of the ice is increased the fastest from the side of Atlantic and from this side most decreases ozone in the stratosphere.
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/stratosphere/strat_a_f/gif_files/gfs_o3mr_10_sh_f00.gif

kent Blaker

Richard M. You have got it right about the effect the wind has on the sea ice area/extent numbers. Multi year sea ice is all about the wind.( Even the formation of sea ice is very dependent on the wind and the creation of White caps .) You never get 5 meter thick sea ice without the wind pushing it together. The numbers change more daily because of the wind than because of the temp.

Today, March 25 on day-of-year = 85, both the Arctic sea ice extents and Antarctic sea ice extents are exposed to the sun for very close to the same number of minutes per day. (We are just past the spring equinox of 12 hours sunshine, 12 hours darkness.)
Top of Atmosphere radiation levels are very close to the yearly average at 1368 w/m^2. In January, TOA radiation is at its yearly maximum at 1410 watts/m^2, but Antarctic sea ice extents is still retreating towards its yearly minimum in late February-early March. ( Now, Antarctic sea ice extents has passed its minimum and is expanding.)
Total earth sea ice extents is meaningless and actually is very, very misleading!
Today, the edge of the Antarctic sea ice extents is exposed to 348 watts/m^2 at noon on a clear day. Antartic sea ice extents is 5.73 Mkm^2, but total Antarctic ice area (continental ice, permanent ice shelves + sea ice extents) = 23.2 Mkm^2. The edge of the Antarctic sea ice is at latitude -65.4 – much closer to the equator than the edge of the Arctic sea ice extents.
The Arctic sea ice extents today is at its yearly maximum of 15 Mkm^2, just higher than the 2012 maximum extents of 14.8 Mkm^2, and higher than the 2010, 2011 or 2013 levels also! At 15 Mkm^2 sea ice extents, the edge of the sea ice is at latitude 70.5 – further from the equator than the Antarctic sea ice. (This year, Arctic sea ice extents is right at the -2 standard deviations from the 1970-2000 means levels. Low, but within 2x std deviations. Unfortunately, high spring Arctic sea ice maximum tend to lead to low September minimums – which are the ONLY advertisement accepted by the CAGW religion. And nearly the only remaining evidence for CAGW.)
Over the past 7 months, the Antarctic sea ice edge has been exposed to more radiation every day than the Arctic sea ice edge – The Antarctic sea ice edge receiving as much as 5x MORE radiation on every horizontal square kilometer than the edge of the Arctic sea ice. (Today, the Antarctic sea ice edge is radiated by 348 watts/m^2, the Arctic only 321 watts/m^2. By March 28, both will receive 340 watts/m^2. The Arctic will continue tilting towards the sun through the summer, but the TOA radiation levels will continue to decline to their yearly minimum of 1315 on July 5.
By day-of-year 241, on 28 August, the Antarctic ice edge will once again be receiving more radiation on a clear day than the Arctic sea ice.
Then by the fall equinox, when both are exposed to the same HOURS of sunlight, the Antarctic sea ice is RECEIVING 5 TIMES the sunlight that the Arctic sea ice receives. You CANNOT determine the next earth albedo by “measuring” total sea ice, just Arctic sea ice, NOR just Antarctic sea ice.
You MUST calculate the energy received at each horizontal surface of the sea ice extents during each hour of the day, the albedo of the sea ice at that day-of-year (Yes Virginia, the arctic sea ice is much, mush “darker” in mid-summer than in fall, mid-winter, or spring!), the actual open ocean albedo and actual atmospheric absorption each hour of the day for that day-of-year, AND the solar elevation angle every hour of that day-of-year.
Only then can you predict how much energy is absorbed by the sea ice and by the open ocean water, and how energy is reflected from the sea ice and from the open ocean water. All the while, every 24 hours, more energy is lost from the Arctic under today’s conditions of sea ice minimum when the sea ice is melted, than is gained when open ocean water is heated by the sunlight over 12 hours.

Tom in Denver

WIth the blocking this winter there has been a lot of cold air pouring across Hudson’s Bay. As a result the ice looks much thicker than normal. I predict that it will take a much longer time to melt the bay this spring/summer.

william

Having watched sea ice extent data every day this winter here at Watts Up it looked like sea ice extent was going to recover to at least within the std dev of the 1979-2000 monthly average. That recovery stalled. Probably as others pointed out it was a result of the “polar vortex” we experienced a few times here in Chicago. I will stand by my prediction that sea ice extent at the summer low will be similar to the last few years. It will remain substantially below the 1979-2000 monthly average. As a result, warmists will have their typical field day pointing to the lack of ice as proof of our impending golbal warming doom.

MikeP

Snow White … PIOMAS is a model that has a number of critics … I don’t think I’d use it rather than the CryoSat data …

son of mulder

Looks like 2 – 3 weeks later than usual. Should I be scared?

Resourceguy

I would expect a later turn in the peak in the presence of a declining PDO and now plunging AMO.

MikeP – All models have a number of critics don’t they?!
Unfortunately CryoSat doesn’t have a whole lot to say about the volume of sea ice in the Arctic just at the moment, unless you can provide a link to some data that I’m unaware of?

Wonderful post and analysis, Anthony. Great overall info but wow, look at how we all tend to gravitate toward the ARCTIC sea ice extent. Just what the global warming alarmists probably want.
And do you think the powers that be have fudged sensors or numbers or records over the years (ask Dr. Easterbrook about this, or better yet see his testimony to Congress on youtube). After closely following the Lake Michigan ice extent and mid-continent temperatures this winter, I REALLY feel for you folks trying to go on govt data concerning sea ice extents. I grew up on Lake Michigan and am an old geologist – it just seemed to me that numbers, records, publicity photos, and sensors experienced a lot of chicanery.
The strong trend in Antarctic sea ice growth is intriguing. Maybe we should concentrate more on that. I used to hope for a degree or so of warming as I think that would be nicer temps to deal with in the northern hemisphere population and agricultural centers. But now I don’t – I hope for a Little Ice Age return because the ruination of science’s reputation is really pissing me off. Thank you to all who are major contributors here, but I would encourage us to be about the science and not a political position. Both the right and the left have obfuscated info throughout history – not one more than the other.

Stephen Skinner

Every time I have looked at the NRL Ice Thickness gif there is always ice flowing out of the Arctic via the Fram Strait:
http://www7320.nrlssc.navy.mil/hycomARC/navo/arcticict_nowcast_anim30d.gif
It looks like significant volumes of ice are transported out via this strait continuously.

Bruiser

I am betting on another record year for Antarctic sea ice. The AWS at Dome A has already recorded a record low temperature of -92C and has dipped below -80C on several other occasions. The Australian bases at Casey and Davis have had above average mean maximums for Jan and Feb but are rapidly getting back to the average mean maximum for March. Meanwhile at Mawson, they had an above average Jan, average Feb and if the current trend continues, will set a new record low average maximum for March. The CAGW alarmists have a host of half plausible explanations for the record levels of sea ice (provided you don’t apply the same rationale to the Arctic) but for me the temperature has it.

JBJ

Gary Pearse says:
March 25, 2014 at 7:46 am
” Its hard to believe there is any melting in the Canadian Arctic 2000km north of here.”
– 31 degs Celsius in Iqaluit this morning 🙂 No signs of melting here yet!

By my reckoning the average Arctic maximum date has shifted by decade (starting with the 1980’s) from Mar 9 to Mar 4 to Mar 8 to Mar 13… So this decade is the latest but not by much.
Meanwhile the Antarctic minimum, which occurs slightly before the Arctic maximum, has been remarkably stable and shifting ever so slightly earlier, with the 80’s-10’s averaging: Feb 26 / Feb 25 / Feb 24 / Feb 24.
Hard to say if any of that is significant tho.

RE: Stephen Skinner says:
March 25, 2014 at 1:44 pm
“Every time I have looked at the NRL Ice Thickness gif there is always ice flowing out of the Arctic via the Fram Strait:
http://www7320.nrlssc.navy.mil/hycomARC/navo/arcticict_nowcast_anim30d.gif
It looks like significant volumes of ice are transported out via this strait continuously.”
No, it isn’t continuous. It is fairly regular, but there have been interruptions this winter. Also not as much ice came from the Pole via the Transpolar Drift, but came along the ice-edge north of Svakbard to the east.
Keep paying attemtion and you’ll see what I mean. The ice seems to come through Fram Strait in bulges and pulses. There was a big one at the end of last week. Often it creates a sort of bulge “down-stream,” and the ice-extent will curve away from Greenland and be “above normal” (across the orange line) in the NSIDC map on the “Sea Ice Page.” This sort of “increased extent” is actually a loss to the Polar Total, in the long run, as it is heading south to melt. However if a lot heads south it can actually chill the waters of the North Atlantic. In 1817 so much ice flushed out that bergs were beaching in Ireland, and the chilled Atlantic may have contributed to the “Year Without a Summer.”
The opposite occurred last summer. The flow through Fram Strait was reduced, as ice was pushed over towards Beaufort Gyre. The extent below Fram Strait was below normal even as sea-ice increased up at the Pole. It makes me wonder if that means the Atlantic waters were chilled less than normal last summer, which may have been part of the reason Barents Sea froze up less last winter.
Recently a lot of ice has flushed out and traveled all the way through Denmark Strait to Cape Farewell at the bottom of Greenland. Also lots of ice has flushed south in Baffin Bay, and passed into the Atlantic off Newfoundland Island. (The top of Baffin Bay was ice-free at times in the depth of winter, so much ice was exported south.) I imagine the Atlantic has had a good chilling due to the addition of all this ice.
The more you watch the ice the more you see about twenty things are going on at the same time. I don’t claim to understand it, but it is fun to witness, if you have the time.

JBJ

Caleb says:
March 25, 2014 at 6:24 pm
“In 1817 so much ice flushed out that bergs were beaching in Ireland, and the chilled Atlantic may have contributed to the “Year Without a Summer.””
Hi Caleb … this ice would have come from the Newfoundland side (i.e. come down with the Labrador Current)

SIGINT EX

LOL
Yet another year, another example of the “Catastrophic Warmers” Catastrophic Failure. Surely His Majesty Ship Of The Realm That Floats The Mighty Seas Mark Serreze The Vietnam Vet Agent Orange Drinker of the NSIDC will commit suicide Oh Happy Day and leave this Earth for the more emotionally stable to comfort and those gifted with the ability of comprehension more that he being estranged at the level of the 8th Grade English Language.
Ha ha Ha ha

climateace

SIGINT EX and numerous other posters, above
Shakespeare had it right, IMHO. This blog post is Much Ado about Nothing much.
You Skeptic Memers are all in such a hurry for your catastrophes! You want extinctions now! You want the Arctic to be ice-free now! You want the oceans to be acid now! You want coral reefs bleached now! You want every species that is extending its range or changing its phenology to be there already! You want the consequences to be terrible already! You want the air to be hot now!
Why is it so?
Warming, loss of global ice mass balance, changes to species ranges and the consequences, sea level rise, and chemistry changes to the ocean will take decades, centuries, millenia. No need for one-day-in-the year-annual or seasonal frenzies about anything, really.
A year here or there is neither here nor there. A bit more sea ice here or there, or a bit less sea ice here or there in any given year is neither here nor there. Unless you are a Memer, of course.
AGW is like the old saw, slowly, slowly catchee monkey. No need for you to hang on to your hats. It is going to be a slow ride. It is your grandchildren who are going to be in a position to make some real, hard judgements about our so-called risk management and one-off planet experimentation.
This year’s sea ice minimum and maximum, what day in the calendar year it happens, how much sea ice volume there is on a given day, where it is thick, where thin, what the air temperature is on a given day, what the water temperature is on a given day, are all statistically meaningless, is it not so?

RE: JBJ says:
March 25, 2014 at 9:01 pm
Caleb says:
March 25, 2014 at 6:24 pm
“In 1817 so much ice flushed out that bergs were beaching in Ireland, and the chilled Atlantic may have contributed to the “Year Without a Summer.””
“Hi Caleb … this ice would have come from the Newfoundland side (i.e. come down with the Labrador Current)”
Hi JBJ — You could be right, or it could have involved both sides of Greenland. We should get Dr. Tim Ball to comment. He was the one who put me on the trail of the huge post-Mount-Tamboro discharge of ice into the Atlantic. Apparently that volcano threw things out of balance, and rather than any sort of zonal flow around the Pole there was some sort of bizarre meridianal flow that had the Arctic Sea surprisingly ice-free,
See more at: http://wattsupwiththat.com/2013/07/08/1815-1816-and-1817-a-polar-puzzle/

Michael Jennings

Hey climateace, you just got seriously OWNED. LOL