Maryland, quite possibly even more la-la land than California

While California has committed economic suicide with their ridiculous carbon trading plan that nobody wants, Maryland seems to think that magically, green jobs and non baseload power sources will “improve reliability” of electric power. From my perspective, seeing how well such ideas have worked out elsewhere, they are living in la-la land. They should ask Texas how wind power works out for them in peak demand times.

The reliability projections don’t instill confidence:

Maryland Climate Plan Passes Key Tests in UMD Studies

Improves Electric Reliability; Negligible Impact on Manufacturers

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Maryland’s plan to cut greenhouse gas emissions 25 percent by 2020 meets a series of benchmark tests set by state lawmakers, concludes a new pair of studies by the University of Maryland Center for Integrative Environmental Research (CIER). The findings should help clear the way for adoption of a full Climate Action Plan next year, the researchers say.

Maryland’s 2009 Greenhouse Gas Reduction Act ordered independent studies to make sure that its provisions won’t hurt the reliability of the state’s electricity supply or damage the manufacturing sector of the economy. The CIER studies give State plans a passing grade on these scores and project some upsides:

  • Improves reliability of electric service for consumers and industry;
  • No expected loss of jobs;
  • May stimulate some “green” jobs;
  • No economic harm to Maryland’s manufacturing sector.

“We can allay critics’ fears,” says University of Maryland School of Public Policy Professor Matthias Ruth, the study’s principal investigator and CIER director. “Our studies confirm that sound environmental responses to climate change do not have to come at the expense of Maryland’s economy, or put a crimp in the availability of electricity in the State. To the contrary, we see net benefits.”

These reports come as part of an ongoing effort by the state to assess the impact of Maryland’s developing Climate Action Plan (CAP) on the manufacturing sector and the wider state economy. Future studies are expected to assess manufacturing-specific and economy-wide impacts.

For example, the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Act requires an additional independent study by 2015, with oversight from an industry-represented task force, evaluate climate policy effects on manufacturing.

Full Reports Available Here

“We expect manufacturing in Maryland, and its economy as a whole, to be agile enough to make the necessary changes in technologies and business practices to absorb what has been portrayed as a policy-induced shock on the economy,” concludes one of the new University of Maryland reports. “At worst, the CAP will become an indistinguishable part of a larger and longer-term trend of declining manufacturing employment in the state. At best, the CAP will generate new business opportunities and jobs.”

New “green” jobs would likely grow out of the work involved in emissions reductions, the study says. It does not forecast a specific number, but suggests the economic and policy atmosphere is ripe for green job growth: “Maryland stands to benefit from new employment opportunities that will support mitigation policies associated with the state’s CAP. Maryland must ensure that it continues to capitalize on its talented and skilled workforce and that policies and strategies are in place to support growth and attract new green jobs.”

The Maryland Department of Environment commissioned the studies. It is charged with submitting a tentative Climate Action Plan (CAP) to Gov. O’Malley by the end of 2011.

“These reports provide essential information about the early effects of implementing Maryland’s Climate Action Plan,” says Sean Williamson, CIER researcher and report co-author. “They should remove potential roadblocks and advance the process.”

Electric Report

Meeting Maryland’s Greenhouse Gas Reduction Goals: Electrical Reliability Impacts from Maryland’s Climate Action Plan

Manufacturing Report

Meeting Maryland’s Greenhouse Gas Reduction Goals: Manufacturing Costs, Employment and Economic Effects from Maryland’s Climate Action Plan

In their analyses, the CIER researchers, along with colleagues from Towson University’s Regional Economic Studies Institute and Johns Hopkins University Professor Benjamin F. Hobbs, analyzed the impact resulting from implementation of the following climate remediation programs, including:

SPECIFIC FINDINGS

Manufacturing Economic Impact

2009 Greenhouse Gas Reduction Act (GGRA) requires that cuts in emissions may not cause a significant increase in costs to the manufacturing sector.

Finding: No significant increase in capital or energy costs for the manufacturing sector. Large, electricity-intensive industries, such as chemical plants, will see the greatest energy cost increases – between 1 and 2 percent. Small, less energy-intensive industries, such as printing, could see cost savings as a result of participation in energy conservation programs, such as EmPower Maryland.

Jobs

GGRA says greenhouse gas reduction requirements may not cause reductions in existing manufacturing jobs.

Finding: “Job losses in the manufacturing sector attributable to select CAP policies will be minimal and may not occur at all,” says the economic report. It notes that Maryland’s manufacturing sector has lost jobs since the 1970s, a trend expected to continue with or without the CAP.

Green Jobs

GGRA requires reduction measures to produce a net increase in jobs in Maryland, and encourage new employment opportunities in the State related to energy conservation, alternative energy supply, and greenhouse gas emissions reduction technologies – so called “green jobs.”

Finding: New jobs in each of these categories are expected to grow. Currently, green jobs make up about 3 percent of the state’s workforce. Green job opportunities will be available to those who enhance or modify existing skills.

Electric Reliability

GGRA requires the Maryland Department of the Environment to “ensure the plan does not decrease the likelihood of reliable and affordable electrical service and statewide fuel supply.”

The researchers define “electric reliability” as having adequate amounts of electricity to meet peak summer demand plus a safety margin. These needs can be met by either in-state generation capacity, power importation or by managing demand. Reliability does NOT pertain to disruptions in electricity service caused, for example, by downed wires from fallen trees and branches.

Finding: “We find electricity reliability in Maryland…will improve with the implementation of specific mitigation policies originally identified in the 2008 Climate Action Plan,” the report concludes. “Despite uncertainties in future electricity transmission in Maryland, electricity reliability in the state will be improved with the addition of the three climate mitigation policies.”

By the end of the decade, Maryland will have to import electricity because of the retirement of old generating plants, the researchers explain. Planned projects, such as the Mid-Atlantic Power-Pathway, will help satisfy the state’s needs, if brought on line by 2015. Climate Action planning can improve this picture due to conservation measures that will reduce peak-demand, the researchers say. Increases from renewable sources such as offshore wind will help too.

MEDIA CONTACTS

Matthias Ruth

CIER Director, Principal Investigator

(202) 701-6484 (cell)

mruth1@umd.edu

Sean Williamson

CIER Researcher, Co-Investigator

301-405-9436

srw46@umd.edu

Neil Tickner

UMD Public Affairs

301-405-4622

ntickner@umd.edu

Advertisements

  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Bob Diaz

The people in England saw their energy costs go up as a result of all the “green efforts”. Why should the USA be any different?

Gator

“While California has committed economic suicide with their ridiculous carbon trading plan…”
Freudian slip?

The USA is waaaAAaay different – for instance, here we use “Magical Mann Numbers” to prove our case, numbers invented from specious sources used creatively to “hockey stick” all estimates in the direction of positive or non-frightening results… Go Team USA!

Bloke down the pub

We shall see how long it takes for them to be disillusioned.

timg56

Makes me a bit embarrased to have grown up in Maryland and have graduated from U of M.
But then I remember that Maryland has been in competion with Massachusetts for most liberal state for decades.

harrywr2

Ohh well…they’ll play pretend for 2 or 3 years. What’s a few billion on windmills between friends.

vboring

The reliability claims are nonsense. Either that or the cost claims are. Or both.
The electric grid relies on the rotational inertia of controllable spinning machines to maintain frequency. Grid tied solar and wind plants don’t provide this rotational inertia.
This is what caused the San Diego outage a few weeks ago. When the first line tripped, San Diego was relying too much on renewables and was unable to maintain frequency. When the frequency problems got bad enough, the connection to the rest of Ca tripped and San Diego went black.
It is possible to fix this problem, but all of the solutions are expensive and unpopular: put real generation closer to loads, add storage, or add more transmission lines.
This is why utilities only install renewable energy when mandated to do so. The externalized costs are prohibitive.

David

You know, I could write a law that said that all white PVC pipe in residences must be replaced with blue PVC pipe and then make an argument that it would create jobs. Doesn’t mean it’s a good idea though.

geography lady

This has been going on for some time. We have the most liberal of politicians in the country. The Governor is pressing “Smart Growth” so that there doesn’t have to be any new infrastructure such as roads, utilities. He has planned for his office to do the planning (zoning) for the entire state (the locals be damned). This will help him to have everyone live in denser cities (heat islands) that will be self-sustaining. He is building a very large array of solar panels at a college in the western part of the state for green energy. He is planning to build a massive wind turbine farm off shore of Ocean City. Meanwhile he promotes “smart cars” in all electric cars.
I will add not all college professors/teachers/lecturers agree with this policy.
Touched on a hot button, sorry…

kadaka (KD Knoebel)

Note: Virtually everything after the “Neil Tickner” contact info is in an un-displayable font on my Linux box.
Checking against the Character Map, they’re in the “Common” script set, “backspace” and “acknowledge” characters are in there. I’d wager they were control characters for an output device.
What are you seeing on your end?

As a Maryland resident who has watched the political career of our Governor, Martin O’Malley, you have to understand he has presidential ambitions, probably for about the 2016 to 2020 time frame. On the state level, we are essentially a one party state althoug there are a couple of Republican congressional districts. He is subjecting the state to all sorts of Gerrymandering to try and pick up one more Democratic house rep in Congress. He is head of the Democratic Governors Association and he is primming himself for national office by taking positions that make deep pocketed liberal donors happy. So he’s getting his green cred together. We’ve been in RGGI for quite a while and fortunately the allowances are so large the price for carbon emissions is only $1.87 a ton, the minimum. We have a “flush tax” for people with septic systems that he is looking at tripling. He’s taxed the rich by passing a millionaires tax that have resulted in revenues from the wealthy drop substantially as they moved their permanent residences to their second homes in other states. Since that didn’t work, they had to raid the transportation trust fund and put the money in the general fund and has raised all the states tolls by 50% with more to come two years hence. But that’s not enough, he is looking at increasing gasoline taxes by $0.15 per gallon and he wants to do this three times over the next few years because he’s got the replenish the transportation trust fund he raided. This is a beatiful state that has been spared the worst of the recession because of all the Federal governement jobs but suspect the next three years are going to be very painful for average citizens because of our governors political ambitions.

Philip Bradley

I’ve just heard from someone who works on it (and I won’t be more precise than that because someone’s job is involved) that one of the largest wind farms in Western Australia has been out of commission for the last month because mice chewed through the electronics cabling.

kadaka (KD Knoebel)

Re previous post:
Yup, that stuff is gone now. Thanks.

DirkH

Is the NSA back to mechanical computers?

Mike

I work in the energy business in Alberta and am very familiar with the requirements for balancing eleictricity grids. Everything in the nonsense they call “Findings” is false. It gets tiresome trying to argue rationally with these true believers. At some point in the not too distant future their unicorn powered electricity generaton and balancing schemes are going to cause real harm and death. I truly hope these people are held entirely accountable when the inevitable happens.

One other thing I forgot to mention, Maryland with the Chesapeake bay is one of the best states for sailing and most of my friends who sail, do it primarily in the spring and the fall. In the summertime (when electricity demand is highest) the weather is hot, sticky and the wind is still. Wind power will be just like our millionaires, they vanish when the state needs them most.

Steve Schuman

Center for Integrative Environmental Research, now there’s the organization you should ask if you want an impartial answer to environmental questions. What not get solar and wind companies and ask them if alternative power is a good idea. These hucksters are shameless. In Maryland you can buy wind power from a company called Clean Currents. Their pitchwoman gave a presentation at our Quaker Meeting. It was misleaing and full of factual errors. When asked if windpower killed birds, she replied, “occasionally a few are caught up in the blades.” I believe the estimate a few years ago by the U.S. Fish and Wild Life Service was 440,000 a year. I guess everyone has their own definition of what a few means.

Jay Davis

As a Maryland resident I have a few comments to enlighten the readers of WUWT about Maryland. First, the current Governor, Martin O’Malley, who is slightly to the left of Lenin, has ties to the firm proposing a wind farm offshore. Not that that would influence him in pushing for all this legislation. Second, Maryland has been losing private sector jobs, especially manufacturing, steadily for years. I believe in 2010 we led the nation in private sector job loss. The main force driving Maryland’s economy is government and large non-profits, not the private sector. Maryland has a disproportionately large number of people who are public sector workers (Federal, state, local government and public school) or who work for very large liberal leaning non-profits. So because Maryland manufacturing is such a small part of the Maryland economy, any electricity shortages would have a minimal effect on that sector. Third, a proposal for a third nuclear generating plant at Calvert Cliffs has been stalled (probably because of the push for “green” energy). The addition of this plant would, of course, alleviate any electricity shortages, but to the “greens” that means nothing. Fourth, since the leftist democrats control the Maryland government and therefore the University’s purse strings, do not expect any objective study to come out of the University of Maryland with regards to the impact of the “green” energy Climate Plan proposal. To the leftists running this State, what happened when similar plans were implemented in other locations does not matter. All they care about is that their friends will benefit financially and they will score points with their leftist base.

R. de Haan

I think the dear people of Maryland should try to get rid of Martin O’Malley ASAP and hold the masterminds behind the green energy revolution personally responsible for the consequences.
This plan has DISASTER written all over it.
Also read: Agenda 21 in rural Maryland
http://canadafreepress.com/index.php/article/41959

Gary Turner

Wouldn’t you expect such silliness from a state bordering Dizzy City. That is what D.C. stands for, isn’t it?

Austin

T Boone Pickens likes Wind because it requires lots of natural gas turbines to balance out wind power’s variability. Natural Gas is Picken’s primary business and he sells a lot of it. Imagine that.
Texas has a huge amount of generating capacity in other sectors and is working on connecting to the national grid so it can sell it.

marose

“…By the end of the decade, Maryland will have to import electricity because of the retirement of old generating plants, the researchers explain. Planned projects, such as the Mid-Atlantic Power-Pathway, will help satisfy the state’s needs, if brought on line by 2015. Climate Action planning can improve this picture due to conservation measures that will reduce peak-demand, the researchers say. Increases from renewable sources such as offshore wind will help too.”
(1) Maryland will import electricity because they won’t have enough native generation to cover peak demands. (2) The Mid-Atlantic Power Pathway is a transmission project to accomplish (1), but only if done by 2015. Fat chance, the enviros are lining up to file suit. (3) Which leaves us with BINGO!!!…conservation. For those of you Marylanders let me explain…that’s a fancy three letter word for another three letter word called “rationing”. Oops, I forgot the offshore wind. Yeah, right.

Maryland should then invest in the spinning wheels at http://beaconpower.com/
Any reason not to?

vboring says on November 2, 2011 at 2:35 pm
The reliability claims are nonsense. Either that or the cost claims are. Or both.
The electric grid relies on the rotational inertia of controllable spinning machines to maintain frequency. Grid tied solar and wind plants don’t provide this rotational inertia.
This is what caused the San Diego outage a few weeks ago. When the first line tripped, San Diego was relying too much on renewables and was unable to maintain frequency. When the frequency problems got bad enough, the connection to the rest of Ca tripped and San Diego went black.

Any chance you could share your information channel with us – or is the above conjecture?
The info I have seen indicates ‘an accident on the North Gila-Hassayampa transmission line in Arizona’ but perhaps there was too little rotational inertia on-line at the time and the grid experienced ‘voltage collapse’
.

“Wouldn’t you expect such silliness from a state bordering Dizzy City. That is what D.C. stands for, isn’t it?”
And hear I thought it stood for ‘Didactic Criminals’.

Austin

The wind map for Maryland is not very good. I do not even see any Class 5 spots. This is not good at all.
http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/images/windmaps/md_80m.jpg
Compare to TX which is great.
http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/images/windmaps/tx_80m.jpg
BTW, ERCOT will not allow more than 10% from IRR on the grid in TX.

Austin says on November 2, 2011 at 3:51 pm
T Boone Pickens likes Wind because it requires lots of natural gas turbines to balance out wind power’s variability. Natural Gas is Picken’s primary business and he sells a lot of it. Imagine that.
Texas has a huge amount of generating capacity in other sectors and is working on connecting to the national grid so it can sell it.

Really!??
How?
a) Texas is NOT connected to the rest of the nation, b) there is no ‘national grid’, it’s true about Pickens though …
Why Texas Has Its Own Power Grid

The fantasy of a U.S. super-grid

.

TomRude

Ask Spaniards about green jobs…

Dr A Burns

What is the IRM ?

JamesD

“By the end of the decade, Maryland will have to import electricity because of the retirement of old generating plants, the researchers explain. ”
Ha ha, what a joke. I guess if you can just import it, you’ll have it. Of course that will cost a lot, AND you have to assume someone has it to sell to you.

ChE

Mike says:
November 2, 2011 at 3:17 pm
I work in the energy business in Alberta and am very familiar with the requirements for balancing eleictricity grids. Everything in the nonsense they call “Findings” is false. It gets tiresome trying to argue rationally with these true believers. At some point in the not too distant future their unicorn powered electricity generaton and balancing schemes are going to cause real harm and death. I truly hope these people are held entirely accountable when the inevitable happens.

Nope. When the grid comes crashing down around them, they’ll say that it’s because of all the old dirty technology that the Republicans installed, and it’s the Republicans’ fault that they didn’t pass stimulus XVII to rebuild the infrastructure with modern smart green tech.
As they freeze in the dark.

Gail Combs

Gary Turner says:
November 2, 2011 at 3:40 pm
Wouldn’t you expect such silliness from a state bordering Dizzy City. That is what D.C. stands for, isn’t it?
_________________________________
And here I thought it was District of Criminals.
I say GO FOR IT Maryland. Cut ALL electric lines going into the state and make it 100% GREEN Power. OH and make sure every Congress critter and lobbyist pushing GREEN Power has to live there. In other words it is time to put up or shut up!
If you do live in Maryland perhaps it is time to think of moving? I am So glad I escaped from MA 16 years ago. Now I wish there was a country I could go to to escape the insanity.

“the CAP will become an indistinguishable part of a larger and longer-term trend of declining manufacturing employment in the state.”
That is stunning.
Translation–“We’re covered when it kills jobs.”
Only an ivory-tower academic could say something that obtuse.

Curiousgeorge

I’m sure the state could save many megawatts if they just outlawed those plugin air freshener things. And they’d get used to the natural smells eventually. 🙂

kadaka (KD Knoebel)

DirkH said on November 2, 2011 at 3:16 pm:

Is the NSA back to mechanical computers?

There are times when I wonder if “secure” brief communications could be done over ancient terminals using proprietary character sets with 101 to 300 baud acoustically-coupled analog modems, or with emulators of them, simply because the tech is so obsolete that no one would expect it.

ew_3

If we keep going the way we are, we are going to have a nation of states that produce power and states that need power.
This is a recipe for disaster as a nation.

So, they expect manufacturing to leave, as it has been, probably mostly due to high taxes, and think the effect of CAP will blend in with this, so it’ll be okay.
Do they have any clue that green jobs are mostly maintenance and repair? They are not jobs that anybody who want s to have a career other than being a glorified janitor/repairman. Solar panels need to be cleaned daily and the wind generators need care and cleaning virtually every day, depending on the season. Bugs and ice and even a film of dirt can impair a wind turbine blade.
They talk about job opportunities as if there are known developments. When we build a real power plant we know exactly what jobs it will create. As wind and solar suck, as well as suck money, they are blowing smoke up the public butt with the jobs fantasies.

Dave Wendt

Sounds like they have the perfect plan. They are exactly on the glide path to that point in time where we all work for the government providing government services to each other, of more accurately monitoring and hectoring our fellow citizens to insure compliance with the Kafka x10*22 rules and regs of the Library of Congress sized Federal Registry. Although they may have to get a bit more enthusiast with the offshore wind farms. All that porn surfing on the Internet sucks up a lotta juice.

Frizzy

Gail Combs says:
November 2, 2011 at 6:28 pm
“If you do live in Maryland perhaps it is time to think of moving? I am So glad I escaped from MA 16 years ago.”
Uhhhhhm, what does your escaping from Massachusetts(MA) have to do with Maryland(MD)?

crosspatch

Maryland is way different from California. Maryland can have hurricanes which could possibly take out a large number of turbines over a wide area, even blizzards there in winter can have hurricane force winds. Also, particularly in the summer, Maryland can have a week or more of very hot, humid, sticky weather without so much as a breath of breeze. Unless they are planning on installing these at Ocean City (good luck with that), they are likely to get into a situation where the times they need electricity most will be the times when they have the least wind. Same goes for cold winter nights when the air is still.

RACookPE1978

Frizzy says:
November 2, 2011 at 9:57 pm
Gail Combs says:
November 2, 2011 at 6:28 pm

“If you do live in Maryland perhaps it is time to think of moving? I am So glad I escaped from MA 16 years ago.”
Uhhhhhm, what does your escaping from Massachusetts(MA) have to do with Maryland(MD)?

From her previous remarks, you would realize that (1) MA is much more liberal (and much more poorly run by the liberal elites) than MD .. and (2) She is very happy to have left MA when she did.
Your warning, then, is that you should NOT make her mistake and stay in MD.

Austin

Jim said:
“a) Texas is NOT connected to the rest of the nation, b) there is no ‘national grid’, it’s true about Pickens though …”
Yes, Texas is connected to the Eastern and Mexican grids.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_Interconnection
And a new interconnect is planned to connect TX, Western, and Eastern.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tres_Amigas_SuperStation
Texas has around 80,000 MW of capacity now and another 30,000 is on the books, Texas has the lowest wholesale electricity prices of any deregulated market. Large consumers of electricity pay very low rates. This makes it very attractive for data centers and other large users of electricity.
In comparison, California has around 55,000 MW.

Jack

You think Maryland is bad, try the UK.
Shipping should turn to sail to cut carbon. The Committee on Climate Change has called on the shipping industry to turn to wind power to cut the country’s carbon emissions.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthnews/8864854/Shipping-should-turn-to-sail-to-cut-carbon.html
It is only a matter of time before the UK converts it’s naval fleet to sails.

Billy Liar

Andres Valencia says:
November 2, 2011 at 3:59 pm
Maryland should then invest in the spinning wheels at http://beaconpower.com/
Any reason not to?

It went into Chapter 11 a few days before your post?
…After careful consideration of all available alternatives, our Board of Directors determined that filing for Chapter 11 on October 30, 2011, was a necessary and prudent step…

Shevva

Do you think digging holes then filling them in again is a green job because you give me enough subsidy and I’ll cut the US unemployment figure like you wouldn’t believe.
And the only new skill you need to learn is how to use a shovel.
‘Green job opportunities will be available to those who enhance or modify existing skills.’

Pull My Finger

We lived in Maryland during the reign of William Donald Sheaffer, Lord of Baltimore, Sovereign of Mary’s Land, and states don’t come too much more liberal. It’s an interesting alliance, much like DC, of the tradional blue-collar, poverty Democratic voters teaming up with the Liberal Egghead Federal Gov’t workers and educators Progressives to dominate the state. Lovely state though, even though the summers, as noted, are brutal. The Eastern Shore of the Cheasapeke is about as bucolic as they come these days as long as you stay out of the rat hole that is Salisbury.

Bill Marsh

Bob Diaz says:
November 2, 2011 at 2:07 pm
The people in England saw their energy costs go up as a result of all the “green efforts”. Why should the USA be any different?
==================
Because we adhere to our own economic ‘1984’ doublespeak economics. What they will do if jobs are lost and the economy turns south in Maryland is ‘reclassify’ the jobs into a different economic category and proclaim, “See, we told you that we wouldn’t lose jobs because of the ‘Green’ policies and we didn’t. We lost them for different reasons, so its all good. Besides, we’ve been losing these jobs since 1970 so it isn’t our fault.

Gail Combs

Frizzy says:
November 2, 2011 at 9:57 pm
Gail Combs says:
November 2, 2011 at 6:28 pm
“If you do live in Maryland perhaps it is time to think of moving? I am So glad I escaped from MA 16 years ago.”
Uhhhhhm, what does your escaping from Massachusetts(MA) have to do with Maryland(MD)?
________________________________
Massachusetts is another liberal state with idiotic GREEN laws. We gave up in disgust and moved when they passed two laws making it illegal to put store bought vegetable peelings in your compost heap and another law saying no ground water for ten feet below your septic system. The last law saw 80 to 90 percent of the homes that came up for sale condemned. Those are just two of the “Green Laws” At the time we left they were looking at making 3/4 of the state the Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge the original draft included farmers having a written plan approved by the state for the crops grown, trees you cut down and even every fence post you put in!
This purposed law in Maryland is another idiotic GREEN law. You vote against it by leaving if you can not stop it from passing. If you are a liberal then fine stay there and reap what you sow.

LarryD

Well, when reality rears its ugly head, CEIRs’ credibility should be completely destroyed.
“Experience keeps a dear school, but fools will learn in no other.” (anon. I believe)
Maybe we should build a new Yankee Clipper or two, and see if UK shipping will bite. 🙂

Gail Combs

Jack says:
November 3, 2011 at 3:13 am
You think Maryland is bad, try the UK.
Shipping should turn to sail to cut carbon. The Committee on Climate Change has called on the shipping industry to turn to wind power to cut the country’s carbon emissions.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/earthnews/8864854/Shipping-should-turn-to-sail-to-cut-carbon.html
It is only a matter of time before the UK converts it’s naval fleet to sails.
___________________________________________________
OH good!
Now they can impress all those immigrants living on welfare. They should probably consider chaining them to rowing benches to provide power when there is no wind too. Little kids can be used on tread mills for providing electric power for instrumentation like radar and communications….
Maybe we can get Delingpole at the telegraph to write up the proposal?? Call it the “Modest Proposal” perhaps?