Friday Funny – The Times Atlas of the world, it is a changing

Josh writes:

There has been a considerable fuss about the feel-good 14th Edition of the Times Atlas of the World even in the Guardian, which did elicit an apology from the Times.

Subsequently James Delingpole wrote a delightful spoof which did not go down too well in the Maldives government.

Comment and cartoon at BishopHill too, of course.

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41 thoughts on “Friday Funny – The Times Atlas of the world, it is a changing

  1. “We are the best there is. We are confident of the data we have used and of the cartography.”

    Remove your blinders, spokeswoman. You got caught, plain and simple. All your authoritative consensusizing will get you nothing but ridicule. Even your data source says so, so back to the pulpit with you.

  2. The Maldives should be careful. Cameron may decide that a Falklands/Maldives rerun is the the only thing which can save his government…

    …the only thing causing hesitation is the assessment from MI6 that Maldives would probably win.

  3. “if a 15% loss in 10 years were true, it would mean that all of the key climate change models would have to be drastically redrawn.”

    Oh, so the climate models are exactly right, huh? Science’s convenient little crystal ball, the unassailable tidbit of truth, the immutable smoking gun…(crumble,creak, groan….)

  4. Wait a minute.

    Where is Gilligan’s Island?

    I know it was somewhere 40 years ago. Has it washed out too? Hopefully it will reappear on the next publication with all the newly rediscovered ones.

    We are in need of some good maps as the one used by the ‘adventurers rowing to the pole’ could not even find the north pole with a compass. Has it been covered by rising sea levels? No wonder soo much of the population is lost and can’t seem to find their way..

  5. Oh well. Any chance of finding a snark in there? Or a boojum? With that kind of map I would be severely disappointed if there wasn’t any of those creatures :)

    The Bellman himself they all praised to the skies–
    Such a carriage, such ease and such grace!
    Such solemnity, too! One could see he was wise,
    The moment one looked in his face!

    He had bought a large map representing the sea,
    Without the least vestige of land:
    And the crew were much pleased when they found it to be
    A map they could all understand.

    “What’s the good of Mercator’s North Poles and Equators,
    Tropics, Zones, and Meridian Lines?”
    So the Bellman would cry: and the crew would reply
    “They are merely conventional signs!

    “Other maps are such shapes, with their islands and capes!
    But we’ve got our brave Captain to thank:
    (So the crew would protest) “that he’s bought us the best–
    A perfect and absolute blank!”

    See? :)

    Piotr

  6. Sorry, this is just too funny not to share:
    Posted by MMPadre (http://ricochet.com/Profile/58202) at http://ricochet.com/main-feed/How-I-Sank-the-Maldives

    Forget AGW: what’s Al Gore got to say about wind-turbine-sourced free roton emissions? Notice all the tornadoes this past summer? Direct correlation. Yet federal roton-emission standards are tied up in committee hearings.

    From Wikipedia:

    . . . the science remains sketchy, occupying the no-man’s-land between Newtonian physics and quantum mechanics. In basic terms, a free roton is a quantum –a packet—of angular momentum, released from any unshielded rotating mass (a barber pole; a merry-go-round). Nearby ungrounded objects can absorb these until a tipping point –the Spinner Threshold*—is crossed. Free rotons are mostly absorbed by the circumambient air, resulting in wind vortices of varying size. Effects on exposed human subjects were first observed in Holland (for obvious reasons) and can range from dizziness to “augering”.

    *Named for James Spinner 1881-1919, who made the first measurements of free rotons. It is believed that Spinner himself succumbed to a fatal dosage (>100 whirlies) while conducting experiments with a ceiling fan, causing him to auger through the floor of his home in Devonshire. His body was never recovered.

    Hey, if Al Gore’s allowed to make stuff up, then so am I.

  7. I see they did not mark out the top floor of the ivory tower on their map, tsk tsk.. I’m sure that would still be above water.

  8. Is it just me or is there a subliminal message in the map? I can see the word “ICE” in the paler shading.

  9. Didn’t somebody find a Greenland map on wikipedia that matches the new one in the Atlas?

    We all know wiki is an unimpeachable source in these matters…………..the best there is??

  10. A Lovell says: “We all know wiki is an unimpeachable source in these matters…………..the best there is??”

    ‘Wiki’ is not synonymous with Wikipedia, any more than Web is shorthand for Webster’s.

  11. jorgekafkazar says:
    September 23, 2011 at 12:33 pm

    ‘Wiki’ is not synonymous with Wikipedia, any more than Web is shorthand for Webster’s.

    My apologies. The only reason I used ‘wiki’ instead of the full term was a matter of form, as I had already used ‘wikipedia’. I blame my English teacher!

  12. I suggest to the ‘Times Atlas of the World’ staff that they get with the early 21st century and do their maps with Riemannian geometry and linked topology instead of their currently old Euclidean mapping.

    To manifoldness.

    John

  13. is this a metaphor for the crash of the CAGW narrative?

    23 Sept: CBS: NASA’s UARS satellite falls toward re-entry
    NASA’s decommissioned Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, out of gas and out of control, is not descending toward re-entry as rapidly as expected, officials say, likely delaying the satellite’s kamikaze plunge to Earth by a few hours to late Friday or early Saturday…
    No more fuel is available for maneuvering and the satellite’s re-entry will be “uncontrolled.”…
    But computer software used to analyze possible re-entry outcomes predicts 26 pieces of debris will survive to impact the surface in a 500-mile-long down-range footprint…
    “We looked at those 26 pieces and how big they are and we’ve looked at the fact they can hit anywhere in the world between 57 north and 57 south and we looked at what the population density of the world is,” he said. “Numerically, it comes out to a chance of 1-in-3,200 that one person anywhere in the world might be struck by a piece of debris. Those are obviously very, very low odds that anybody’s going to be impacted by this debris.”

    http://www.cbsnews.com/network/news/space/home/spacenews/files/uars_decay.html

  14. It’s tempting (but at £150 a shot not that tempting) to buy a copy of the Atlas in order to search for other ‘tiny errors’ that may have crept in to support the AGW religion.

    At the rate they’re falling, we soon won’t have one credible source of information left in the UK.

  15. @ZT .. Cameron may decide that a Falklands/Maldives rerun is the the only thing which can save his government……the only thing causing hesitation is the assessment from MI6 that Maldives would probably win.

    Unlikely. For some time now intelligence assessments from SIS have followed the style of the accountant who was asked to add 2 and 2…or indeed UEA…

    “What would you like it to be?…”

  16. This is dangerously funny! I laughed so hard that I started choking. After a couple minutes an office buddy asked me what was wrong. Doubled over in laughter, I could only manage to say “warmists… they’re such idiots…” as I wiped a tear from my eye.

    I’ll be hanging a framed laserprint of this on my cubicle wall. Genius! Not for sale in the Maldives, hahaha stop it hahahahaha!

  17. Wasn’t there a book written about a society, which had an entire bureau, dedicated to removing facts from reference materials, and new “facts”? GK

  18. G. Karst says:
    September 23, 2011 at 2:37 pm

    Wasn’t there a book written about a society, which had an entire bureau, dedicated to removing facts from reference materials, and new “facts”? GK

    —————-

    G. Karst ,

    Animal Farm?

    Brave New World?

    1984?

    Fahrenheit 451?

    We The Living?

    Clockwork Orange?

    . . . . .

    John

  19. Politically correct flood waters, hmmm.

    It wouldn’t flood anywhere that would affect people, so it would be isolated high ground areas, since high ground is most often forests and reserves. But it couldn’t adversely affect the environment either, it would have to be arid and desert regions. But then that would cause erosion problems and it sure can’t affect the pristine nature and harsh beauty of those areas. Ah, the only politicly correct place it could flood would be off shore, probably outside the international zone line.

  20. The Atlas seems to be one of the few things not available for a price (=”for sale”) in the Maldives, then. It’s a land with lotsa luxurious liquidity!

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