One more thing to worry about – undersea supervolcanoes

From the National Science Foundation via press release:

Scientists explore origins of ‘supervolcanoes’ on the sea floor

Ancient goliaths blamed for multiple mass extinctions

“Supervolcanoes” have been blamed for multiple mass extinctions in Earth’s history, but the cause of their massive eruptions is unknown.

Despite their global impact, the eruptions’ origin and triggering mechanisms have remained unexplained. New data obtained during a recent Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) expedition in the Pacific Ocean may provide clues to unlocking this mystery.

To explore the origins of these seafloor giants, scientists drilled into a large, 145 million-year-old underwater volcanic mountain chain off the coast of Japan.

IODP Expedition 324: Shatsky Rise Formation took place onboard the scientific ocean drilling vessel JOIDES Resolution from September 4 to November 4, 2009. Preliminary results of the voyage are emerging.

“‘Supervolcanoes’ emitted large amounts of gases and particles into the atmosphere, and re-paved the ocean floor,” says Rodey Batiza, marine geosciences section head in the National Science Foundation (NSF)’s Division of Ocean Sciences, which co-funded the research.

The result?

“Loss of species, increased greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, and changes in ocean circulation,” says Batiza.

In fall 2009, an international team of scientists participating in IODP Expedition 324 drilled five sites in the ocean floor. They studied the origin of the 145 million-year-old Shatsky Rise volcanic mountain chain.

Located 1,500 kilometers (930 miles) east of Japan, Shatsky Rise measures roughly the size of California.

This underwater mountain chain is one of the largest supervolcanoes in the world: the top of Shatsky Rise lies three and a half kilometers (about two miles) below the sea’s surface, while its base plunges to nearly six kilometers (four miles) beneath the surface.

Shatsky Rise is composed of layers of hardened lava, with individual lava flows that are up to 23 meters (75 feet) thick.

“Seafloor supervolcanoes are characterized by the eruption of enormous volumes of lava,” says William Sager of Texas A&M University, who led the expedition with co-chief scientist Takashi Sano of Japan’s National Museum of Nature and Science in Tokyo. “Studying their formation is critical to understanding the processes of volcanism, and the movement of material from Earth’s interior to its surface.”

About a dozen supervolcanoes exist on Earth; some are on land, while others lie at the bottom of the ocean. Those found on the seafloor are often referred to as large oceanic plateaus.

Current scientific thinking suggests that these supervolcanoes were caused by eruptions over a period of a few million years or less–a rapid pace in geologic time.

Each of these supervolcanoes produced several million cubic kilometers of lava–about three hundred times the volume of all the Great Lakes combined–dwarfing the volume of lava produced by the largest present-day volcanoes in places like Hawaii.

Since the 1960s, geologists have debated the formation and origin of these large oceanic plateaus. The mystery lies in the origin of the magma, molten rock that forms within the Earth.

A magma source rising from deep within the Earth has a different chemical composition than magma that forms just below Earth’s crust. Some large oceanic plateaus show signs of a deep-mantle origin. Others exhibit chemical signatures indicative of magma from a much shallower depth.

The IODP Shatsky Rise expedition focused on deciphering the relationship between supervolcano formation and the boundaries of tectonic plates, crucial to understanding what triggers supervolcano formation.

Photo of the JOIDES Resolution departing from Yokohama, Japan, on  the Shatsky Rise expedition.
JOIDES Resolution departing from Yokohama, Japan, on the Shatsky Rise expedition.

A widely-accepted explanation for oceanic plateaus is that they form when magma in the form of a “plume head” rises from deep within the Earth to the surface.

An alternative theory suggests that large oceanic plateaus can originate at the intersection of three tectonic plates, known as a “triple junction.”

Shatsky Rise could play a key role in this debate, because it formed at a triple junction. However, it also displays characteristics that could be explained by the plume head model.

“Shatsky Rise is one of the best places in the world to study the origin of supervolcanoes,” says Sager. “What makes Shatsky Rise unique is that it’s the only supervolcano to have formed during a time when Earth’s magnetic field reversed frequently.”

This process creates “magnetic stripe” patterns in the seafloor. “We can use these magnetic stripes to decipher the timing of the eruption,” says Sager, “and the spatial relationship of Shatsky Rise to the surrounding tectonic plates and triple junctions.”

Sediments and microfossils collected during the expedition indicate that parts of the Shatsky Rise plateau were at one time at or above sea level, and formed an archipelago during the early Cretaceous period (about 145 million years ago).

Shipboard lab studies show that much of the lava erupted rapidly, and that Shatsky Rise formed at or near the equator.

As analyses continue, data collected during this expedition will help scientists resolve the 50 year-old debate about the origin and nature of large oceanic plateaus.

###
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56 Responses to One more thing to worry about – undersea supervolcanoes

  1. Henry chance says:

    The general claim is that heat and CO2 come from man and not volcanoes. Of course for some odd reason these are not far from the Japanese current and it is just possible they can bring heat to the water.

  2. mrpkw says:

    One more thing that has a bigger impact than “C02″

    very interesting article.

    Still waiting for Yellowstone to blow before C02 does us in !!!

  3. Alan the Brit says:

    Fascinating & interesting article. It’s really amasing this old planet of ours. The experts really ought to say “We have a complete & utter understanding of absolutely nothing whatsoever, just when we think we know, it turns out we only know a small part of it!”.

    AND then there’s this – http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/8611771.stm

    What is the world coming to, all that heat & sulphur/CO2/CH4 etc billowing out of the ocean floors – must be caused by global warming!

  4. Greg, San Diego, CA says:

    Maybe all of the WUWT readers should convene a conference in Tahiti (UN funded, of course) to study the global impact of this new potential “threat” to the survival of the world!

  5. Kevin Kilty says:

    Geology is filled with ambiguous observations–made ambiguous by lack of adequate time resolution. Did an asteroid do-in the dinosaurs, or was it the super eruption that formed the Deccan Traps? Or did the asteroid impact, itself, cause the eruption of the Deccan Traps? Or was it climate change, or did the asteroid and Deccan Traps cause the climate change? Fun, isn’t it?

    What do you suppose the eruption at Shatsky Rise did to the pH of the ocean? A little acidic maybe?

  6. Gordon Ford says:

    We must fund more research into supervolcanoes and their connection with dangerous anthropogenic global climate change AKA Global Warming. The amount of dangerous carbon dioxide one of those babies releases would make humans blush.

  7. Tom in Florida says:

    Another example that Earth is NOT the steady state, perfectly utopian garden of eden that the Gaia worshipers believe it is. We should get rid of the worry and stress about what could happen in the future. Just get on with the pursuit of life, liberty and happiness, and enjoy the short time we all have here. It’s going to end some day, one way or the other, and there is nothing we can do about it.

  8. genezeien says:

    Greg, San Diego, CA (06:48:23) :

    Maybe all of the WUWT readers should convene a conference in Tahiti…

    Need to find a “taxable” entity to blame for super volcanoes, first ;-) Then, the funding for research to prove their guilt will flow freely.

  9. mareeS says:

    We sailed through the results of an undersea volcanic eruption in October 2007 between Fiji and Tonga.

    The sea was a floating mass of porphyry, I mean miles of this stuff.

    We knew what it was because we had been through the Mount Pinatubo eruption in the 80s, that washed up on our beach at home, and while we were sailing though the Great Barrier Reef. We have some nice rock samples in our garden.

    We learned after this new eruption that an island had started to build, like little Krakatoa is doing now quite actively, as is Karkar off the coast of PNG.

  10. kwik says:

    I wonder what one would observe at the surface, when a vulcano erupts 3000 meters below …….

  11. Sandy says:

    Ok you meteorologists, tell me what happens in the atmosphere with all that heat coming up through the water?
    A hyper-hurricane?
    Are there any simple hurricane modelling programs?

  12. Tom T says:

    mrpkw (06:18:22) : I hope Yellowstone waits until after my family and I visit this summer.

  13. Tom T says:

    What ever happens to the idea that California could break off and fall into the sea That was a good thing to worry about.

  14. PaulH says:

    The Eruptions blog has a brief look at the super-volcano article:

    http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2010/04/monday_musings_submarine_super.php

    They say, in part, “I would delve into this article from Live Science, but it sadly again does a dreadful job with a lot of this – remember, “supervolcano” is a made-up word by the BBC with no strict definition, so trying to say there are a dozen supervolcanoes worldwide is just silly.

    Paul

  15. Henry Pool says:

    I have always said that the amount of volcanism that goes on in the world (and that produces CO2) is not really known because most of it is underseas and therefore cannot be measured. I also don’t believe that it is possible to separate that caused by human activity and that caused natural. (since both come from earth). But since there is talk of trying to “bury” CO2, why don’t we first plug the holes where we know CO2 is blowing from down below?

  16. mikael pihlström says:

    Before you get too excited

    “The US Geological Survey (USGS) reports that human beings produce 130 times as much CO2 as volcanoes.”

    “Plimer tried to argue that the US Geological Survey only measured emissions from terrestrial volcanoes – not from submarine volcanoes. Jones, who had plainly done his homework, pointed out that a UK journalist (I think he was referring to the Guardian’s James Randerson) had gone back to the USGS and asked them whether or not submarine volcanoes were included in its calculations. They were.”

    I am citing a George Monbiot piece from The Guardian, I know he is on the
    wrong side, but complaints should be sent to USGS.

  17. James F. Evans says:

    These supervolcanoes did have a tremendous impact on Earth’s geology.

    From the post: “Shatsky Rise is composed of layers of hardened lava, with individual lava flows that are up to 23 meters (75 feet) thick.”

    As the article mentions there are a number of ancient supervolcanoes on land. The Indian subcontinent also has an ancient supervolcano:

    “The Deccan Traps are a large igneous province located on the Deccan Plateau of west-central India (between 17–24N, 73–74E) and one of the largest volcanic features on Earth. They consist of multiple layers of solidified flood basalt that together are more than 2,000 m (6,562 ft) thick and cover an area of 500,000 km2 (193,051 sq mi).”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deccan_Traps

    The Deccan Traps were truly massive and may have played a role in the dinosaur extinctions: “The Deccan Traps formed between 60 and 68 million years ago, at the end of the Cretaceous period. The bulk of the volcanic eruption occurred at the Western Ghats (near Mumbai) some 66 million years ago. This series of eruptions may have lasted fewer than 30,000 years in total. Although it has been suggested that the gases released in the process may have played a role in the Cretaceous–Tertiary extinction event, which included the extinction of the non-avian dinosaurs, the consensus among the scientific community is that the extinction was triggered by the Chicxulub impact event in Central America.”

    In Siberia, there is also a huge traps thought to be responsible for mass extinctions:

    “The Siberian Traps form a large igneous province in Siberia. The massive eruptive event which formed the traps, one of the largest known volcanic events of the last 500 million years of Earth’s geological history, continued for a million years and spanned the Permian-Triassic boundary, about 251 to 250 million years ago. It was essentially coincident with the Permian–Triassic extinction event, which is estimated to have killed 90% of species existing at the time. The eruption of the Siberian Traps is considered to be the likely cause of this ‘Great Dying’.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siberian_Traps

    These supervolcanoes are an example of catastrophic events in Earth’s geologic history which condradict the Uniformitarian perspective of geologic history as expressed and popularized by Charles Lyell, where “the present is the key to the past”.

    This complexity means there are many unanswered questions regarding Earth’s geology, the timing of events, and its relation to the pathway of life on Earth’s surface.

    As always in Science, there are more questions than answers.

  18. Leon Brozyna says:

    Let us just hope that scientists don’t have the opportunity to study first-hand the eruption of a supervolcano any time soon. Could make for a very bad day for quite a few people.

  19. John of Cloverdale WA says:

    Tom T (07:29:21), I remember being told by a Texan once that California wasn’t part of the United States. So would it be missed anyway?
    Only joking of course!
    If anyone is interested in the geology of ocean basins, and want an alternate view to the current Plate Tectonic Theory, they might read this paper by a continental drift sceptic, N. Christian Smoot, who refers to the large igneous outpourings in the Pacific Basin during the Cretaceous.
    http://www.tags-21.info/Mission/Documents/Smoot_OSP_Bathymetry_History.pdf

  20. Pascvaks says:

    Ref – kwik (07:13:28) :
    “I wonder what one would observe at the surface, when a vulcano erupts 3000 meters below …….”
    _______________
    Today? Not a thing. (I wonder if it was the result of an impact.)

    http://modis.higp.hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/modis/modisnew.cgi

  21. Henry Pool says:

    mikael pihlström (07:54:14) :

    Before you get too excited

    “The US Geological Survey (USGS) reports that human beings produce 130 times as much CO2 as volcanoes”

    Surely this is rubbish. How was this measured? CO2 is good for life and without it, you would not have anything to drink (apart from water) or eat. The CO2 scare scam is the biggest hoax of this century. CO2 and H2O are like your father and mother . If you say anything bad about them, then what are you saying about yourself?
    Look what Wikipedia says:the amount of energy trapped by photosynthesis is immense, approximately 100 terawatts:[3] which is about six times larger than the power consumption of human civilization.[4] As well as energy, photosynthesis is also the source of the carbon in all the organic compounds within organisms’ bodies. In all, photosynthetic organisms convert around 100,000,000,000 tonnes of carbon into biomass per year.

    So just plant some trees and plants around you and be satisfied that all will be just as it was planned to be….

  22. mrpkw says:

    Tom T (07:26:44) :

    mrpkw (06:18:22) : I hope Yellowstone waits until after my family and I visit this summer.
    ================================================

    Have fun !!
    You definitely don’t want to be there when she blows !!!!

  23. DesertYote says:

    Gawd, who writes this crap. Obviously not the researchers doing the study. Its pretty apparent that this pieces author did not have a clue about what they were writing about. I guess its deliberate, would not want to give the public anything that they might be able to learn from. And the dumbing down of science continues …

  24. Whether it’s super volcanoes, planet-killer asteroids, or sudden reversion to an ice age, there are nasty things that can happen….low in likelihood in the short run, highly likely in the long run. I am with Stephen Hawkings, who has been speaking about the desireability for the human race to colonize the Moon or Mars, so that should such a low probability event occur, Mankind will not be extinguished. Given the timescales involved, we can do this in a deliberative, rather than panicky, manner.

    KW

  25. D. King says:

    OT
    Forget volcanoes, the world will be saved from Cancun.
    You should all thank god for resort towns!

    Yvo de Boer

    “He said officials will meet at least three more times before a final meeting of ministers in Cancun, Mexico at the end of the year where it is hoped the world will finally reach an agreement on the best way to stop catastrophic warming.”

    http://tinyurl.com/y7odn83

  26. D Alan says:

    @Henry Pool (08:52:25) :
    mikael pihlström (07:54:14) :

    “Before you get too excited”……

    Yes.. stop… please.

    I believe that an article I posted on Climate For All might shed even more light on the subject of Super Volcanoes, Carbon, and yes, climate change.
    After some research and a few clicks here and there, I came to the conclusion that skeptics of global warming may have more information at their disposal because of this discovery.
    That discovery is carbonic acid:

    The general assumption is that CO2 is on a runaway course, that will ultimately destroy our way of life, if humans do not curb their desire for fossil fuels.

    What I would like to convey is that terrestrial forces play a much larger role in the amount of carbon or carbonic acid distributed in our environment and the atmosphere.

    I would like to see more on the discussion of subduction, super volcanoes, carbonic acid and the roles they possess in our ever changing environment.

    I think the better equipped we are with the facts of geology and meteorology and climatology, just that much better off everyone will feel about how very little our planet might or might not be effected by our existence and/or
    our use of fossil fuels.

    Have a Great Day !

  27. David Middleton says:

    The correlation between massive flood basalt eruptions (Deccan & Siberian Traps, North Atlantic Igneous Province, etc.) is fairly strong…

    Flood Basalts and Mass Extinctions

    Regular old, run of the mill super-volcanoes, like Yellowstone & Toba, seem almost innocuous when compared to major flood basalt events. Fortunately for the human race, there hasn’t been a major flood basalt event in about 20 million years.

    To me, it appears that plate tectonics periodically accelerate… It might explain the apparent punctuated equilibrium nature of evolution in the fossil record.

  28. D. King says:

    D Alan (11:48:56) :

    “That discovery is carbonic acid:”

    Here, try this!

    http://www.hawkfish.org/infoctr/buffer/bakingsoda.jpg

  29. D Alan says:

    @D. King (12:17:49)

    tried that link, but nothing doing. Something about don’t steal our bandwidth?

    Don’t get too hung up on my mention of carbonic acid though. The article I posted on Climate for All is more about the ‘Inconvenience of History’ than carbonic acid.

    You should go read my article at :

    http://climate4all.wordpress.com/2010/04/12/the-inconvenience-of-history/

    Cheers.

  30. Jordan says:

    Do you seen the size of that drill! I hope those guys know what they’re doing.

    Better get outta there PDQ at the first sign of bubbles at the surface .. or if there is a farty smell about the place with nobody admitting responsibility.

  31. Tim Clark says:

    mikael pihlström (07:54:14) :
    Before you get too excited
    “The US Geological Survey (USGS) reports that human beings produce 130 times as much CO2 as volcanoes.”

    “Plimer tried to argue that the US Geological Survey only measured emissions from terrestrial volcanoes – not from submarine volcanoes. Jones, who had plainly done his homework, pointed out that a UK journalist (I think he was referring to the Guardian’s James Randerson) had gone back to the USGS and asked them whether or not submarine volcanoes were included in its calculations. They were.”

    The reference to GHG’s was the obligatory alarmist drivel. Massive volcanic eruptions ( a more appropriate term would be VEI 5) emit infinitely greater sulfates, soot and other cooling mechanisms. The result of one of these blowing would be global cooling.

  32. mikael pihlström says:

    Tim Clark (13:38:08) :

    The reference to GHG’s was the obligatory alarmist drivel. Massive volcanic eruptions ( a more appropriate term would be VEI 5) emit infinitely greater sulfates, soot and other cooling mechanisms. The result of one of these blowing would be global cooling.

    It is Plimer’s claim; that underwater volcanoes release more CO2
    than man. US Geological Survey thinks differently. Do you mean that
    our strategy to cope with warming is to hope for frequent volcano
    eruptions? They might not deliver.

  33. mikael pihlström says:

    D Alan (11:48:56) :

    @Henry Pool (08:52:25) :

    Things we don’t disagree on: carbon is the basis of life – CO2 is the
    currency of photosynthesis and breathing – CO2 is not toxic – CO2
    is loveable
    Things we probably don’t disagree on: there is a carbon cycle on earth -
    huge amounts of Carbon are locked in soil, deep rocks, sediments –
    large amounts are locked for 100 years in forests – considerable amounts
    immobilized for shorter times in plants, animals. It is natural that
    carbon is exchanged between these compartments through the air.

    The problem is that the CO2 molecule has, in itself harmless, spectral
    properties, which cause a GH effect when too large amounts are released
    too quickly into the atmosphere. What results is AGW, unfortunately.

  34. Bill Parsons says:

    Another view of the Shatsky Rise.

    http://maps.nationalgeographic.com/maps/atlas/pacific-ocean-geophysical.html

    Shadowed relief atlas of ocean floor.

  35. DirkH says:

    “mikael pihlström (07:54:14) :
    [...]
    I am citing a George Monbiot piece from The Guardian, I know he is on the
    wrong side, but complaints should be sent to USGS.”

    I wouldn’t call him a reliable source. He’s written a lot of mindless drivel and he posed at COP15 with Ecocide Polly.

  36. Peter S says:

    We have these “super volcanoes” under the sea, and they are supposedly responsible for mass extinctions an the like.

    So, we take a place where a weakness in the earth’s crust has already let the insides of the earth out in the past, and somebody goes “Hey, I have an idea, lets drill holes here.”

    I know the article was mainly about the effects of eruptions on climate (so this is a bit off topic), but all I ended up thinking about was the old poem Albert and the Lion- about the dangers of poking a sleeping lion to see why it is not “acting all ferocious and wild.” (http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/albert-and-the-lion/)

    I have to wonder about humans at times. A thirst for knowledge is admirable, but I am not sure that we don’t let our enthusiasm override our common sense.

  37. mikael pihlström says:

    DirkH (14:10:49) :

    “mikael pihlström (07:54:14) :
    [...]
    I am citing a George Monbiot piece from The Guardian, I know he is on the
    wrong side, but complaints should be sent to USGS.”

    I wouldn’t call him a reliable source. He’s written a lot of mindless drivel and he posed at COP15 with Ecocide Polly.

    Sorry, I forgot it’s a new thread. GM is on WUWTs wrong side, perhaps. I agree with him on most points

  38. mr.artday says:

    An undersea non-supervolcano was erupting S. of Japan post WWII. A Japanese oceanic survey vessel sailed there to investigate and disappeared. A search vessel found only some floating debris belonging to the vessel. The best guess was that the volcano discharged a huge gas bubble as the survey vessel was over the vent and the ship fell into the bubble and the ocean closed over it. I don’t know how deep the vent was but it was probably quite shallow.

  39. RoHa says:

    Supervolcanoes?

    We’re doomed!

    Doomed, I tell you!

    DOOMED!

    (And “has a different chemical composition than magma” is just plain wrong. It should be “has a different chemical composition *from* that of magma”. Bad grammar encourages the AGW gang.)

  40. pyromancer76 says:

    There are many large igneous provinces — Earth exporting its material from the interior to the surface, whether on land or under sea. There is a great site studying these phenomena by the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth — The Large Igneous Provinces Commission. At the end of each month research is published focusing on a new area of Earth — I recommend checking on these. Their basic statement:

    “What are Large Igneous Provinces?

    Earth history is punctuated by events during which large volumes of mafic magmas were generated and emplaced by processes unrelated to “normal” sea-floor spreading and subduction. These Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs) are best preserved in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic where they occur as continental flood basalts, volcanic rifted margins, oceanic plateaus, ocean basin flood basalts, submarine ridges, and seamount chains. Felsic rocks may also be represented.”
    http://www.largeigneousprovinces.org/index.html#what

    Maybe once we understand that these kinds of eruptions are “normal” processes of Earth’s evolution we will not have to be so awed by terms such as “Super Volcano”. On the other hand, it would suck to be located close to one of these events — most do not have “global” consequences except peripherally, e.g., cooling for a time. Some, we know, do. But they appear to be “common” during most of Earth’s development. We simply need to extend the time frame of our thinking (e.g., glaciers today, a Holocene story). Where are the geologists when we need them most to tell the hysterical AGWists to give it a rest?

  41. Phil's Dad says:

    “Each of these supervolcanoes produced several million cubic kilometers of lava–about three hundred times the volume of all the Great Lakes combined.”

    So you’d naturaly want to drill a hole in it.

  42. Russell Seitz says:

    Numerate readers are invited to compare

    1 the heat content of a supervolcano magma chamber and the thermal mass of the Pacific ocean.

    2 the crustal heat flux and the solar energy flux at the Earth’s surface.

  43. Monique says:

    ““The US Geological Survey (USGS) reports that human beings produce 130 times as much CO2 as volcanoes”

    While volcanoes are not as large a source for greenhouse gases one would think them to be, the bigger picture comparison – and the one to keep in mind – is this:

    Man produces 6% of all greenhouse gases on Earth.

    Mother Nature produces 94% of all greenhouse gases.

  44. Fitzy says:

    Well, we’ve just solved Glo-balling Weathering and the AAAS desire for atomic powered-toaster-oven-flying-jet-chairs.

    Since volcanoes give off heat, and heat makes steam and steam can make electricity, why not just plug the Obama 3000 Molten Power Plant straight into one of these babies.

    We can syphon off the CO2, and pump into into huge vats of Soylent Green Mega algae, which will capture the suns heat and convert it into Alcohol, a near perfect food!. (Might come unstuck with the sulphur tho’…)

    Once equiped with abundant energy and booze, mankind will enter a new era of joy and plenty, now where’s my damn UN grant!

    But Seriously, why preface volcano with MEGA? Every one i’ve seen is impressive, I find the tendancy to hype nature tedious.

    Whats next? Ultra Volcanoes, Hyper Volcanoes, and of course Quantum Volcanoes. Or, if you’re cosmologically inclined, Dark Volcanoes, powered with Dark Magma.

  45. Sandy says:

    “Dark Magma.”
    That has got to be a heavy metal band!

  46. maelstrom says:

    no comment, except that wikipedia doesn’t know what “consensus” actually means, as usual. “a chemical composition different than” or “of a different chemical composition from that of” is largely a matter of taste, not grammar, at this remote point in time with competing dialects on both sides of the Atlantic.

  47. mikael pihlström says:

    Monique (20:39:10) :

    Man produces 6% of all greenhouse gases on Earth.

    Mother Nature produces 94% of all greenhouse gases.

    Most of the 94% would be water vapour I guess, which keeps the globe from
    freezing (was it -18 Celsius GMT without). So, thank god for the greenhouse effect, but a trifle too much seems to be critical.
    Is man-made water vapour from e.g. irrigation included in 6%?, it is hardly
    ever mentioned in this context.

  48. Policyguy says:

    Hey Mikael,

    So 6% of less than 400 parts per million or 24 parts per million drive global anything??

    You’ve apparently drunk the cool aide. Try some research into the glaciation cycle of the current ice age.

  49. Spector says:

    RE: “To explore the origins of these seafloor giants, scientists drilled into a large, 145 million-year-old underwater volcanic mountain chain off the coast of Japan.”

    Given the catastrophic impact of any supervolcano eruption, I am a little leery of disturbing the slumber of these dormant monsters. I hope they fully resealed all their bore-holes to prevent seawater intrusion.

  50. Pressed Rat says:

    Oh, my goodness! Underwater volcanoes and magnetic reversals being embraced by “legitimate” scientific research in relation to climate change. We are witnessing the vindication of Robert W. Felix. Congratulations, Bob!

  51. kwik says:

    mikael pihlström (11:39:52) :

    “Man produces 6% of all greenhouse gases on Earth.”

    This is typical AGW propaganda. Very misleading, and very typical.

    The greenhouse effect from man is about 0.28% .

    Then you can, after that start discussing feedback effects.

    And logarithmic effect. And saturation.

    Here;
    http://www.geocraft.com/WVFossils/greenhouse_data.html

  52. mikael pihlström says:

    kwik (12:43:04) :

    mikael pihlström (11:39:52) :

    “Man produces 6% of all greenhouse gases on Earth.”

    This is typical AGW propaganda. Very misleading, and very typical.

    Please note; I was quoting Monica or Monique, scroll up. The amount
    of GHG; you talk about something else. No issue here. She was saying
    that 94% of GHG are natural, an argument you would like. It is a good
    reflection, but in the end doesn’t have explanatory power.

  53. DirkH says:

    “mikael pihlström (11:39:52) :
    [...]
    Is man-made water vapour from e.g. irrigation included in 6%?, it is hardly
    ever mentioned in this context.”

    How insane can that get? Next thing we’ll hear is that man-made water vapour stays in the atmosphere for a 1000 years like man-made CO2…

    “Man-made water vapour from e.g. irrigation”???????? ? ? ? ? ? ?

    Hello? Did i miss some sarcasm here? Is this a benchmark for liberal stupidity? Will Polly Higgins next start a campaign “stop man made moisture”? (Or the globe will be burning…)

  54. kwik says:

    Okay, got it.

    OT; Vulcano onshore;

    Airspace over northern Norway now closed because of Ash.

  55. mikael pihlström says:

    Dirk H

    “Man-made water vapour from e.g. irrigation”???????? ? ? ? ? ? ?

    This issue has no value for you since it is quite neutral to your war.
    It is an academic question for the curious. If 6 % of Greenhouse gases
    are man-made- it means that 94 % are natural. Forget that you understand
    the question and shout IPCC is 94 % wrong.

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