A note from Bob Tisdale

My shortest post ever. Please click

Advertisements

37 thoughts on “A note from Bob Tisdale

  1. I clicked and got:
    “Not Found
    Apologies, but the page you requested could not be found. Perhaps searching will help.”

  2. I clicked and got
    “Not Found
    Apologies, but the page you requested could not be found. Perhaps searching will help.”
    me no understandy???

  3. 404?
    Not Found
    Apologies, but the page you requested could not be found. Perhaps searching will help.
    🙂

  4. Not Found
    Apologies, but the page you requested could not be found. Perhaps searching will help.

    Not kidding. Was it meant to be quite that short? 😉

    REPLY:
    Amazing how Firefox has taken a good browser and hosed it with the stupid http:// removal for addresses in the address bar. which then fail in cut/paste – fixed – Anthony

  5. Bob- been there done that-understand fully the consequences..
    Caregiving really sucks at times but is infinitely rewarding…….

  6. Bob, your parents raised a wonderful son…
    …you were all blessed to have each other
    Good luck on your new adventure

  7. Thanks Anthony. They whacked that through quickly given all the 4.0 beta testing didn’t they?
    Bob, as one with second-hand experience of what you’ve been through, my hat is truly doffed. All the best.

  8. Bob,
    Suggestion, look at skeptical focused NGOs that might have some good thoughts for you as an employee.
    Personal Note: I empathize with you. I retired from a +30 yr engineering career in SJ CA to move back to my hometown in the Adirondack Mtns in upstate NY to settle my aged parent’s final years. It was the right thing. But once back here I did go back to work (remote working) within a year; so that I could do both. : ) However, it is getting a little cold here for my older bones though . . .
    Good luck.
    John

  9. If I was still running a team, I would have snatched you in a heartbeat! Alas, I have been retired for some time and my team has moved on.
    Anyone involved in process troubleshooting or analysis, should be hammering, at your door, not to mention, a dozen other fields. Stand at ease, the right opportunity/solution will present itself shortly. Condolences on your parents. My sincere best wishes – good luck. GK

  10. I have uninstalled Firefox and then installed version 3.6 which you can do be searching for the version number. That was the last version of Firefox that was any good.

  11. Originally I was going to mention that my Facebook Icon turned blue, Microsoft sent me a check for $100,000, and I had good luck all day after clicking that link, but then it was fixed and I realized it was serious.
    I myself am currently helping look after my dad who has Alzheimer’s. It’s been a rough, challenging, frustrating road. My dad was the tech guy, the camera guy, the one people came to for answers. Now he can’t remember how to turn the TV on, cameras mystify him, and he spends several minutes per day trying to find light switches.
    I can’t help but wonder, if there is a creator, what the purpose was of this. Perhaps character building? Humbling? A not-so-subtle reminder of what I’m likely to be like in 30 years?
    Anyway, best of luck, Bob, hope things work out well for you. At least I’m not dealing with out-of-pocket medical here in Canada.

  12. You have to dive under the covers of Firefox to turn the long urls on again. Here’s how –
    1. Type about:config in the url bar and hit return.
    2. You will be warned about voiding the Firefox warranty. Click on the “I’ll be careful” button to continue.
    3. Scroll down the list to “browser.urlbar.trimURLs”
    4. Double click on the line to change value from true (default) to false (what you used to have)
    You should see long urls immediately after. Cheers –

  13. From CodeTech on November 8, 2011 at 2:26 pm:

    I can’t help but wonder, if there is a creator, what the purpose was of this. Perhaps character building? Humbling? A not-so-subtle reminder of what I’m likely to be like in 30 years?

    Wait for the point when you realize they are no longer there. If you don’t notice it, you’re in denial. When you notice, perhaps you’ll also notice how long ago you should have realized it.
    This is a self-inflicted problem of modern society. We can extend life, as in the functioning of the body, but we don’t want to have the conversation about when we should let them go. For my father, it was long, drawn out, I noticed the point. I said no to a feeding tube. I… acknowledge… that it is better when government does not forbid such a choice.
    A few years before, and before I became a full-time caretaker, he had a raging infection. My mother called me to their house, I could feel the heat pouring off of him, I drove him to the hospital. I should have let him go then. I wish I had been allowed that choice. Yet then I still saw him there.
    Not that long ago, the medicine wasn’t there, the infection would have claimed him. That would be a natural death. In the time of my ancestors, such as my father may have been left in the woods to die. I can no longer view that as cruelty.
    It is a test of faith. If we know a better existence awaits, why do we keep them here so long, let them linger until the body fails? It is selfishness, wanting to keep them with us, even when they’re not there. This is true even without faith, they become a possession we are loathe to discard no matter how broken. With faith, we should notice when it is we who are holding them back. Their time on Earth is past, they will never be as they were in this life, let them go to see what awaits. Funerals have become a mockery of faith for me. If people will cry for me, then I do not want one. Why mourn someone who has won the lottery? As we had discussed several years before, I insisted my father have a direct burial as he wanted, no preservation, no viewing. There was only a brief funeral, casket waiting at the cemetery for interment, only because my mother and relatives insisted on it. As we both knew, afterwards what matters has moved on, what’s left is a disposal of meat.
    In thirty years medicine should advance considerably, rapid dementia may not be an issue. I plan on having an ironclad living will. I will be true to my faith and not fear the passage. I want nothing done to forestall it, especially if I am no longer there. If the circumstances happen, I would prefer to live alone, away from the “protective” arms of the state. If I am unable to think about caring for myself, then that should be it, no matter if the state thinks otherwise.
    I will tell you this for when your father passes. Don’t be surprised if your reaction is not sadness, but relief, and wanting to cry out “Finally!” My father died while his body was still living, I did my mourning while what remained still breathed. And didn’t realize I had already done so until later, when I accepted I had no sadness left to find.

  14. Sincerest of thanks, Anthony, and to those who have visited my website and have commented here.
    I just posted an update on the post that reads:
    UPDATE (November 8, 2011, about 10:15pm eastern): Sincere thanks to the blog hosts who have provided links here; to those who have spent the time to read my post; to those who have shared their humor, thoughts, suggestions, experiences, and well-wishes, all of which will be considered and drawn upon as I continue my search; and to those who have contributed to the tip jar.
    Sorry that I have not replied to your comments, but rest assured they have all been read and will be considered many times in the coming weeks and months. Also, I have managed, up to now, to keep my personal information from becoming general internet information, and I will attempt to continue to do so, so the requests for my email address or copies of my résumé will go unanswered. Thank you for the interest, though.
    The traffic here has been unbelievable. It’s been less than 12 hours since Anthony Watts linked to this post, and the referrals to it from WattsUpWithThat are, in that ½ day, about 10 times my normal daily page views for all pages at both of my websites. Amazing. The links to this post from blogs other than WUWT have provided twice my normal volume. Remarkable.
    Again, thanks to all.

  15. Could I ask why the moderators deleted my comments.They were congratulatory of Bob Tisdale and could not be construe as being critical of Bob in any way?

  16. Correction: My apologies, there appear to be two separate pages of comments but the second is hidden behind a link – why is this the case?

  17. From Ninderthana on November 8, 2011 at 10:27 pm:

    Correction: My apologies, there appear to be two separate pages of comments but the second is hidden behind a link – why is this the case?

    Could be because your comments were at Bob Tisdale’s blog, which the link went to, which is a completely different and separate entity from Anthony Watt’s blog.

  18. Bob, sorry to hear of the passing away of your parent. I and I am sure very many others hope that your unique insights on the oceanography of ENSO will continue. May you be richly rewarded both for your care of your parents and also your educational and enlightening blogs. I wish you the best for the future.

Comments are closed.