In light of radiation fears, I offer this repost

Going bananas over radiation

With all the worries over radiation leaks from Japan, and hoarding of Potassium Iodide tablets, I thought it valuable to repost a link to this story from last month which was very popular.

Many people in the USA would be surprised to learn that they will get more radiation from eating a single banana than they would from Japan’s nuclear reactors.

A banana equivalent dose is a concept occasionally used by nuclear power proponents to place in scale the dangers of radiation by comparing exposures to the radiation generated by a common banana.

Full story:

http://wattsupwiththat.com/2011/02/16/going-bananas-over-radiation/

UPDATE: My friend John Coleman of KUSI-TV in San Diego offers this explanatory video:

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Greg, San Diego, CA

I am “shocked” that the Greenies don’t want to outlaw bananas and Brazil nuts – or at least start a Banana/Brazil Nut Credit Exchange to replace the one that went down in flames in Chicago for carbon credits!

crosspatch

A few things people should note:
1. Japan’s radiation exposure limits are 1/5 of our limits here in the US.
2. Nobody at the plant has been killed due to radiation.
3. One person sent to the hospital for a checkup with “radiation exposure” received well under what would be considered a safe dose in the US and would not have resulted in medical attention.
4. Radiation levels today at the plant boundary are declining.
5. Power has been restored to reactors 5 and 6
6. Power may be restored to reactor 2 later today US time (Friday Japan time).
This was not a “nuclear accident” and had nothing to do with any maintenance procedure, faulty process, bad material, bad maintenance, etc. This is a natural disaster that wiped out the on-site generators. A single recirculation pump requires 4 megawatts of power (4160 volts 3-phase 60Hz 1000 amps). There are two such pumps per reactor. The mobile generators sent to the site could not deliver this sort of power. GE is sending 22 megawatt trailer mounted gas turbine generators to the site.
The electrical rooms and wiring were submerged in sea water and were damaged. The generators were submerged in sea water. The fuel tanks were swept away.
There is a good chance, if they can get power to unit 2 (and then to units 1 and 3), they can actually get the situation under control by Saturday.

crosspatch

http://www3.nhk.or.jp/daily/english/18_06.html
Note that it is currently 9am Tokyo time as I type this.

Too late… we’re all dead from the radiation of having wet the bed!

harrywr2

My mother called me this morning to encourage me to seriously consider evacuating .
I live on the West Coast, she lives on the East coast and she had read in the NY Times how I was in ‘danger’.
Sometimes I wonder if those panic mongers at the NY Times have any idea the stress they put the elderly through.

harry, thats called social security liability mitigation.
The average grocery store fruit section is a bigger source of radiation than anything people will see in their lives other than being treated for cancer. This won’t keep the fear mongers from shouting the chicken little mantra until the cows come home, the debate isn’t about facts or reason, its hysteria and delusional fear of technology, pure and simple.

Steve Inhof

HarryWR2: If they couldn’t cause stress in the population, how would they sell their ‘news’?

bubbagyro

NO no!
I am still scared about the Swine Flu and can’t carry this new scare, sorry!

Kenny Reede

I want to see data on the amount of radiation around the Japanese reactors compared to what an air traveller receives from a TSA scanner.

Hobo

A good article about radiation vs cancer, from one of my favorite pundits, of all people….ann coulter.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ucac/20110317/cm_ucac/aglowingreportonradiation
“With the terrible earthquake and resulting tsunami that have devastated Japan, the only good news is that anyone exposed to excess radiation from the nuclear power plants is now probably much less likely to get cancer.
This only seems counterintuitive because of media hysteria for the past 20 years trying to convince Americans that radiation at any dose is bad. There is, however, burgeoning evidence that excess radiation operates as a sort of cancer vaccine.”

binarymind

“The fact of the matter is that not all types of radiation are created equal. The body carefully regulates the amount of Potassium-40. It’s explained here:
The problem is that this system implies that all radioisotopes are created equal—That there’s no difference between 520 picocuries of Potassium-40 and a similar intake of, say, radioactive iodine. And that simply isn’t true. I contacted Geoff Meggitt—a retired health physicist, and former editor of the Journal of Radiological Protection—to find out more.
Meggitt worked for the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority and its later commercial offshoots for 25 years. He says there’s an enormous variation in the risks associated with swallowing the same amount of different radioactive materials—and even some difference between the same dose, of the same material, but in different chemical forms.
It all depends on two factors:
1)The physical characteristics of the radioactivity—i.e, What’s its half-life? Is the radiation emitted alpha, beta or gamma?
2) The way the the radioactivity travels around and is taken up by the body—i.e., How much is absorbed by the blood stream? What tissues does this specific isotope tend to accumulate in?
The Potassium-40 in bananas is a particularly poor model isotope to use, Meggitt says, because the potassium content of our bodies seems to be under homeostatic control. When you eat a banana, your body’s level of Potassium-40 doesn’t increase. You just get rid of some excess Potassium-40. The net dose of a banana is zero.
And that’s the difference between a useful educational tool and propaganda. (And I say this as somebody who is emphatically not against nuclear energy.) Bananas aren’t really going to give anyone “a more realistic assessment of actual risk”, they’re just going to further distort the picture.”
Source – http://www.boingboing.net/2010/08/27/bananas-are-radioact.html

PaulH

Paul Kedrosky breaks down the faulty NY Times radiation trajectory story
http://www.bloomberg.com/blogs/paul-kedrosky/2011/03/latest-japan-radiation-trajectory-models.html
…and he even mentions the banana equivalent dose! 🙂

Does anyone have any sources at the ready for how many rems were recorded outside due to venting?

binarymind,
Whoever wrote that is actually quite wrong, as anybody who suffers from excessive potassium levels can tell you (primary symptom is a darkening of skin on the legs and feet below the shin, and loss of hair from those regions).
So, it is you who got propagandized.

This being St. Paddy’s Day, here’s an old favorite that sure reminds me of the alarmist refrain…
SAID HANRAHAN by John O’Brien
“We’ll all be rooned,” said Hanrahan,
In accents most forlorn,
Outside the church, ere Mass began,
One frosty Sunday morn.
The congregation stood about,
Coat-collars to the ears,
And talked of stock, and crops, and drought,
As it had done for years.
“It’s looking crook,” said Daniel Croke;
“Bedad, it’s cruke, me lad,
For never since the banks went broke
Has seasons been so bad.”
“It’s dry, all right,” said young O’Neil,
With which astute remark
He squatted down upon his heel
And chewed a piece of bark.
And so around the chorus ran
“It’s keepin’ dry, no doubt.”
“We’ll all be rooned,” said Hanrahan,
“Before the year is out.”
“The crops are done; ye’ll have your work
To save one bag of grain;
From here way out to Back-o’-Bourke
They’re singin’ out for rain.
“They’re singin’ out for rain,” he said,
“And all the tanks are dry.”
The congregation scratched its head,
And gazed around the sky.
“There won’t be grass, in any case,
Enough to feed an ass;
There’s not a blade on Casey’s place
As I came down to Mass.”
“If rain don’t come this month,” said Dan,
And cleared his throat to speak –
“We’ll all be rooned,” said Hanrahan,
“If rain don’t come this week.”
A heavy silence seemed to steal
On all at this remark;
And each man squatted on his heel,
And chewed a piece of bark.
“We want an inch of rain, we do,”
O’Neil observed at last;
But Croke “maintained” we wanted two
To put the danger past.
“If we don’t get three inches, man,
Or four to break this drought,
We’ll all be rooned,” said Hanrahan,
“Before the year is out.”
In God’s good time down came the rain;
And all the afternoon
On iron roof and window-pane
It drummed a homely tune.
And through the night it pattered still,
And lightsome, gladsome elves
On dripping spout and window-sill
Kept talking to themselves.
It pelted, pelted all day long,
A-singing at its work,
Till every heart took up the song
Way out to Back-o’-Bourke.
And every creek a banker ran,
And dams filled overtop;
“We’ll all be rooned,” said Hanrahan,
“If this rain don’t stop.”
And stop it did, in God’s good time;
And spring came in to fold
A mantle o’er the hills sublime
Of green and pink and gold.
And days went by on dancing feet,
With harvest-hopes immense,
And laughing eyes beheld the wheat
Nid-nodding o’er the fence.
And, oh, the smiles on every face,
As happy lad and lass
Through grass knee-deep on Casey’s place
Went riding down to Mass.
While round the church in clothes genteel
Discoursed the men of mark,
And each man squatted on his heel,
And chewed his piece of bark.
“There’ll be bush-fires for sure, me man,
There will, without a doubt;
We’ll all be rooned,” said Hanrahan,
“Before the year is out.”

1DandyTroll

The bananas will only get you laughter never understanding I believe.
I always found it amazing when people in my country worried over Chernobyl fallout, when pretty much most of em lived in houses and apartment buildings, all built with “radon” contaminated building materials and/or sited above “radon” sites (solid rock), that was radiated by too high levels of radon radiation (which is a natural by-product from uranium but no less dangerous in higher doses.) Up until we joined the EU, pretty much everyone lacked proper ventilation to get rid of the excess radon, and today EU has set the bar way down for the fear of the potential danger of radon radiation.
It’s amazing and a wonder that people survived for decades and decades before they properly ventilated their homes at the same time when the average life span went up and up. :p

Theo Goodwin

Could some please give me a link to a map on the internet that shows how much water covered what parts of Japan as a result of the tsunami? I am looking for something like a topographic map, not a map of political boundaries?

u.k.(us)

crosspatch says:
March 17, 2011 at 4:54 pm
===========
This incident will be be studied for years, it is too dangerous to even begin collecting the data to be studied.
Every weld, pump, electrical connection, will undergo extensive study.
Won’t they???

Best wishes, thoughts, and hope to the survivors in Japan.

Matthew

I wonder what it would be in “tanning minutes on a miami beach”?

Update:
Apparently radiation is not decreasing. One cooling pool (apparently) still has no water in it. And reactor #3 and #4 are getting water dumped on them from helicopter. But because of the radiation level the helicopters are not coming close. Because of the height the helicopters are at wind is blowing some water away.
Also power lines from the grid still has not reached the site to power water pumps for cooling.
I had hopes yesterday that there was real progress and it was only a matter of 24 hours until rods were cooling toward a level to bring relief. But those were false hope.
I can only hope the international community will intervene and get water everywhere necessary.

I have a question–maybe it was answered here–I’ll go look again.
I am 72 so “Yucca Flats” (indeed “Bikini Atoll”, and “White Sands” havwe meaning to me.
From those years, I seem to recall that Iodine was a specific prophylactic for strontium.
It that recall is correct, does the escaping material contain strontium 90?
For that matter, what is the makeup of the escaping stuff?

Japan Does Not Face Another Chernobyl (The Wall Street Journal, March 14, 2011)
Inconvenient Truth: Wind Energy Has Killed More Americans Than Nuclear (NewsBusters, March 17, 2011)

David44

Due to the combination of extensive readership of WUWT, our national allergy to all things nuclear, and our national obsession with health concerns, I’m shorting banana company stocks tomorrow.

The unfortunate sex life of the banana.

To make clear, I say apparently the cooling ponds don’t have water in them. But there is no way to be certain. They could be full at this point. But apparently radiation level on site is dangerous to human health. The American government is right to be getting Americans out. They are right to be asking everyone to get more than 50 miles away. Their reaction is likely not an overreaction.
It could be that the Japanese are overwhelmed with the unbelievable circumstances following the earthquake and cannot focus only on Fukushima.
In my opinion the American military should be called in to get water pumped into critically needed areas. The job needs to be done and it needs to be done immediately!

sHx

It is highly doubtful that any of the commenters above downplaying the incident would want to be within 50 Km radius of Fukushima nuclear plant at the moment.

Doug Badgero

From http://www.iaea.org/newscenter/news/tsunamiupdate01.html
Note one sievert=100Rem. Therefore, 80 to 170 microsievert per hour is 8-17 mrem/hr.
“In some locations at around 30 km from the Fukushima plant, the dose rates rose significantly in the last 24 hours (in one location from 80 to 170 microsievert per hour and in another from 26 to 95 microsievert per hour). But this was not the case at all locations at this distance from the plants.
Dose rates to the north-west of the nuclear power plants, were observed in the range 3 to 170 microsievert per hour, with the higher levels observed around 30 km from the plant.
Dose rates in other directions are in the 1 to 5 microsievert per hour range.”
These dose rates are not immediately dangerous to humans. You could stand there for a week and not get a harmful dose of radiation but I wouldn’t want to live in this area. Unfortunately that means these areas will be uninhabitable for some time period depending on the isotopic mixture of the radioactive contamination present. It seems counter intuitive but we should be hoping it is primarily I-131 because it has a half-life of only 8 days. Some other short lived isotopic mixture would be even better.

David S

Given the choice between eating a banana or some plutonium dust I think I’ll take the banana.

RayG

Re crosspatch says:
“March 17, 2011 at 4:54 pm
A few things people should note:”
Thank you for the explanation of the difference in allowable radiation exposure and the steps needed to gain control. How sad yet how typical that the only source for this kind of rational explanation is blogs such as WUWT. I doubt that an analysis such as crosspatch’s would see the light of day in the NYTimes, WaPo, MSNBC, etc. Apologies for editorializing but the MSM must be held to account.

I am now reminded that iodine was a prophylactic against iodine 131, not strontium.
The rest of my questions stand.

John Stover

When I was an Army officer, active duty and reserve, one of my duties in time of war if nuclear weapons were deployed would be to create nuclear fallout pattern predictions. I served several times in Korea and we had maps, lots of radiation sensors, and specialized software to plug in the necessary parameters and could quickly generate a downwind radiation danger cone. We were supposed to have them created and transmitted within ten minutes of a burst in order to warn friendly trips and use for planning.
What I find interesting is that I have not seen any of those types of specialized map products being produced and distributed to the Japanese populace. There have been some “Sunday Supplement” depictions of vague winds carrying fallout in the papers but nothing serious. I wonder why that is?
The US Air Force and Navy, as well as the JASDAF, have reconnaissance aircraft that can fly monitoring missions which can automatically collect the radiation readings and capture the particulate samples that are needed to understand the exact nature of the fallout. That information combined with ground measurements and meteorological data should make the process very reliable. Has anyone seen any real figures on dosages, particulates makeup, trends by hours/days, or such?
Oh, and I was also stationed twice in Japan and have been to Sendai and Hachinohe and other of the affected cities in Tohuko so I am genuinely concerned for friends and colleagues that live in the affected areas.
Thanks,
John

John Stover

When I was an Army officer, active duty and reserve, one of my duties in time of war if nuclear weapons were deployed would be to create nuclear fallout pattern predictions. I served several times in Korea and we had maps, lots of radiation sensors, and specialized software to plug in the necessary parameters and could quickly generate a downwind radiation danger cone. We were supposed to have them created and transmitted within ten minutes of a burst in order to warn friendly troops and use for planning.
What I find interesting is that I have not seen any of those types of specialized map products being produced and distributed to the Japanese populace. There have been some “Sunday Supplement” depictions of vague winds carrying fallout in the papers but nothing serious. I wonder why that is?
The US Air Force and Navy, as well as the JASDAF, have reconnaissance aircraft that can fly monitoring missions which can automatically collect the radiation readings and capture the particulate samples that are needed to understand the exact nature of the fallout. That information combined with ground measurements and meteorological data should make the process very reliable. Has anyone seen any real figures on dosages, particulates makeup, trends by hours/days, or such?
Oh, and I was also stationed twice in Japan and have been to Sendai and Hachinohe and other of the affected cities in Tohuko so I am genuinely concerned for friends and colleagues that live in the affected areas.
Thanks,
John

BFL

A part of the prediction problem is that these types of high power reactors are not tested to full meltdown, and in a Google search I could not find any reactors of more modern design with full containment that have had more than a partial meltdown. So much like NASA’s past statistical guesses on shuttle reliability, the results of a full meltdown may be different from paper calculation prediction. The Japan reactors are already seeing unforeseen failure modes, especially the overheating/water loss of the cores in the storage pools with resultant high local radiation levels; according to Gregory Jaczko, Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, potentially lethal doses:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20110316/ts_nm/us_japan_nuclear_nrc_4
As for iodine tablets I would think that a better source would be Nodosum Kelp which is also lays claims to being a circulatory system”deplaquer”. However oral ingestion would have no effect on radioactive particles breathed in. I am also surmising that some are looking forward to radiation protection doses that cannot currently be legally obtained with EPA/FDA approval:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiation_hormesis
Perhaps a prudent and discrete entrepreneur could take advantage of this with some treatments sold via the internet (from foreign soil of course), perhaps thorium or uranium salts supplements.

National Radiation Map
“…depicting environmental radiation levels across the USA, updated in real time every minute.”

sHx says:
March 17, 2011 at 7:13 pm
It is highly doubtful that any of the commenters above downplaying the incident would want to be within 50 Km radius of Fukushima nuclear plant at the moment.
I think they also wouldn’t volunteer to go on site and be the ones to run hoses to the reactors and cooling ponds for supplying water.

Glenn

sHx says:
March 17, 2011 at 7:13 pm
“It is highly doubtful that any of the commenters above downplaying the incident would want to be within 50 Km radius of Fukushima nuclear plant at the moment.”
At least downwind. A wind direction change could occur fairly rapidly, as did the earthquake and tsunami, as could a fire or explosion caused by a criticality, which are all very real possibilities.
In conclusion, I doubt that those downplaying this incident would also subject themselves to eating a thousand bananas in one day or to reading Madame Curie’s cookbook in the buff.

John F. Hultquist

Theo Goodwin says:
March 17, 2011 at 6:01 pm

I haven’t seen a topo map yet of the flooded area. However, there are many ‘before-and-after’ photos, some with sliders to view the one changing to the other. Just search.
However, the areas involved are sediment filled river mouths near coastal bays. Being somewhat fan shaped and very flat AND very densely populated these lands do not cover a large area. Steep nearby hills are not populated to any extent. Look here:
Google Earth Lat./Long.
38.432568, 141.323232
Just left of this location is a blue/gray photo button. Make sure the Photos box is checked in the Google Earth Layers panel. Click on a few other photos – try the one on the ‘far end’ of the bridge up-&-left of the first site. This one confirms the steepness of the hills.
The quake was off this shore and sufficiently close that there was little time for folks to evacuate these locations. Using the before and after photos mentioned above, one can trace out the area of almost total destruction, thousands of deaths of people, pets, and other animals.
If I see a map, I’ll post a link.

sHx

“I doubt that an analysis such as crosspatch’s would see the light of day in the NYTimes, WaPo, MSNBC, etc.”
It would be perfectly justified if crosspatch’s ‘analysis’ never saw the light of the day in the mainstream media. Crosspatch reckons it is just a ‘natural disaster’ with a few broken equipment that will be fixed anytime now.
Move on folks! Move on 30 Km away if you are Japanese, 50 Km away if you are American! Nothing to see here! Nothing whatsoever! Just a few broken generators!
Even the owner of the Fukushima nuclear plant doesn’t underplay the seriousness of the event, as much as crosspatch’s armchair analysis does.

crosspatch says:
March 17, 2011 at 4:54 pm
This was not a “nuclear accident” and had nothing to do with any maintenance procedure, faulty process, bad material, bad maintenance, etc.
It only had to do with inadequate planning. The new plants built now are safer but will also fall victim to inadequate planning. No human, or group of humans, is smart enough to foresee every possible scenario of disaster.
Coal, oil, and natural gas do not need such a high level of precaution in the plaThat boggles the mind. It makes one head shake their head. Doesn’t it? Sure.
I know, I know, some will say no. So no need for sarcastic replies. All who want to try to correct me please, first, get on a plane to Japan, go on site, and personally run hoses up to where water is needed to cool fuel rods.
After that, look everyone in the eye and tell them a situation similar to Fukushima will never happen in any ‘new’ nuclear power plant.

vigilantfish

@ Smokey,
Thanks for the link to the very informative article and update on the banana’s sex life. The media picked up the (alarming) story of the fungal blight threatening the banana a few years ago, but then dropped it in its usual ADHD fashion. (Short attention span – except when peddling alarmism – but such is hard to maintain about a still distant threat to bananas.)
In the meantime, thanks to the media hype over Fukushima, some of the alarmed citizenry near the Pickering Ontario nuclear reactor have been causing a run on iodine tablets at the local pharmacies, and unfortunately, even needlessly dosing themselves. The MSM is recklessly irresponsible. Of course, the media is now also focussed on the local nuclear station, where a small leak in the secondary cooling pipes caused a non-radioactive leak into Lake Ontario this week. Ordinarily, this would be completely ignored. (Sighs and rolls eyes)
Anthony, this information about bananas when first posted was a source of wonderment to family and students. Thanks!

a segment was inadvertently deleted.
correction
Coal, oil, and natural gas do not need such a high level of precaution in the plannin and building stages. But some will still say nuclear is a better way to go. That boggles the mind. It makes one head shake their head. Doesn’t it? Sure.

crosspatch

Iodine 131 undergoes both beta and gamma decay. Cesium 137 is gamma decay.
I131 has a half life of 8 days You are quite unlikely to experience any ill effect from the levels so far seen even if you licked the dew off the perimeter fence of the site.
I personally know folks, now in the late 70’s, who spent all their lives in Southwestern Utah and Northwestern Arizona. These people were pelted regularly with VISIBLE fallout from nuclear tests happening above ground only a hundred miles away. My mother-in-law tells me of being out in the yard barefoot and the stuff falling on the tops of her feet and causing a rash and later causing the skin to peel (probably alpha radiation “sunburn”).
We are talking some nasty stuff … strontium, iodine, cesium. We didn’t exactly have front-end loaders scooping up the bodies in towns across the Western US.
Also, there is the interesting data that survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki seem to have a lower incidence of cancer than the general population. One unlucky gentleman who survived BOTH blasts only recently passed away.

crosspatch

“now in the late 70′s”
Meant “now in their late 70’s”

crosspatch

sHx
“Even the owner of the Fukushima nuclear plant doesn’t underplay the seriousness of the event, as much as crosspatch’s armchair analysis does”
I am not “underplaying the seriousness” of anything. I am simply not being irrationally hysterical when it comes to radiation. First of all, these are not “critical events” in that the reactors were not critical when the events occurred. That makes a HUGE difference. Secondly, the overplaying of the seriousness of this event is rampant.
Also, I think I was stating fact more than presenting any analysis.
FACT: Nobody at Fukushima Dai-ichi has died from radiation
FACT: Nobody at Fukushima Dai-ichi has been exposed to a dangerous dose of radiation.
FACT: Radiation levels are currently declining at Fukushina Dai-ichi
17 March, 4.00pm
0.64 millisieverts per hour
17 March, 9.00am
1.47 millisieverts per hour
16 March, 7.00pm
1.93 millisieverts per hour
16 March, 12.30pm
3.39 millisieverts per hour
FACT: units 5 and 6 now have electrical power
FACT: once the other units are able to circulate water, the event is pretty much over.
These units are now producing a fraction of 1% of the power they were producing when they were running. In fact, the power they are generating now wouldn’t even run their own recirculation pumps if they were able to. You can obtain portable generator sets that are producing more power than those reactors are now.
That said, the heat they are producing still needs to be removed, that is currently being done by boiling water and venting steam. The current problem is the spent fuel rods. If they can get power to the site and refill the spent fuel pool, that problem is gone.
Once they get water circulating in the other reactors, that problem is gone.
Now there MAY be some damage to cladding, probably isn’t any fuel melt but if there is, it would be a tiny amount.
Unlike Chernobyl or Three Mile Island, this event did not happen to a reactor that was running. These reactors had already been shut down before the event occurred.

Doug Badgero

I do not take this event lightly but need to respond to some who say nuclear can’t be made safe because humans are fallible. Nuclear is and will continue to be one of the safest forms of electrical generation by any objective metric. 26000 people died due to dam failures in China, this is another example of human fallibility in design considerations. It is nothing for China to kill 2000-6000 coal miners annually. Should we stop coal mining and dam building? (If you say yes because wind and solar can provide all of our energy needs you are not qualified to answer the question.) Meanwhile by all indications this event will result in exactly zero deaths from acute radiation exposure. I’m sorry, there is no comparison.

I had never heard the word Fukushima until Saturday. Funny how life can change so fast.

rbateman

This story might have relevance in regards to the behavior of the reactors in the Fukushima plant:
http://starbeacon.com/local/x789958596/Perry-Nuclear-Plant-monitoring-defective-control-rods
The thing is, if the plant is not safe for inspection to ascertain whether all the control rods sucessfully inserted into the cores, then it’s an educated guess.
Marathon Control Rods manufactured by GE-Hitachi.

sHx

One can understand the reason why CAGW cultists like George Monbiot would seek to downplay the nuclear disaster in Japan. They don’t want the reputation of nuclear energy to hit rock bottom –again!-, because the new bogeyman on the block is CO2, and that ought to remain so, as far as warmists are concerned.
What’s puzzling is the attitude of climate skeptics. Some of them have made common cause with the likes of Monbiot on the nuclear issue. Why? Was Monbiot correct afterall in claiming that CO2 is the greater evil? Is it because coal is really worse than uranium? Are the dangers of GHGs really greater than the dangers of the radiation and nuclear waste?
The way the nuclear disaster in Japan has been downplayed in climate skeptic blogs is shameful. Absolutely shameful!

Theo Goodwin

John F. Hultquist says:
March 17, 2011 at 7:39 pm
Thanks much.