A look at "eye-gore"

You say ee-gor, I say eye-gore, lets call the whole thing off.

Below, a look into the eye of hurricane Igor, right down to the ocean surface!

For some perspective, here’s the entire image, not just the eye:

Click image for full-size picture. Warning: 1.5 MB 4,096px × 4,096 pixels. Image from the Aqua satellite, Sept 13th, 1641Z

Here are some other views, not as large:

IR: http://ggweather.com/igor/igor_ir.jpg

Water vapor: http://ggweather.com/igor/igor_wv.jpg

Meanwhile, all the track models at http://moe.met.fsu.edu/~acevans/models/ point to Igor not making landfall on the CONUS:

h/t to Jan Null at Golden Gate Weather Service http://ggweather.com

Advertisements

57 thoughts on “A look at "eye-gore"

  1. Well now, there’s a bonanza for the off-shore wind turbines! Can’t wait to see the numbers as they harvest the energy from that!
    (Are there environmental protection rules mandating the recovery of wind turbine debris to protect ocean habitat, going from wreckage on the surface all the way to the sea bed? Just wondering…)

  2. If Hurricans are cooling the Atlantic, Igor dissipating ocean heat into the upper troposphere is a good thing, right?

  3. The name is pronounced EE-gore; think of Igor Stravinsky. Eye-gore is a character in Young Frankenstein, the movie.

  4. Dr. John M. Ware says:
    September 14, 2010 at 2:18 am
    The name is pronounced EE-gore; think of Igor Stravinsky. Eye-gore is a character in Young Frankenstein, the movie.
    ======================
    “Walk this way….. No, THIS way!”
    Weather is weather on the hurricane front – beautiful to watch though. From a distance.

  5. kadaka (KD Knoebel) says:
    September 14, 2010 at 1:46 am
    Well now, there’s a bonanza for the off-shore wind turbines! Can’t wait to see the numbers as they harvest the energy from that!
    According to the following excerpt from this ‘Offshore Wind’ article – August 27, 2010
    “It’s not windy
    The deals are being launched as it has become clear 2010 has been a bad year for UK wind speeds, perhaps the worse since 1821. Wind speeds clearly have a direct impact on energy MW yields from wind.
    A recent report from wind consultancy Garrad Hassan said UK wind yields have dropped this year to perhaps a 1 in 15 year event due to stable high pressure. Energy levels from wind dropped 27.8% in the first quarter compared with the average and 18.3% in the second quarter – compared with a 5% drop in the last quarter of 2009 and a 15.7% increase in the third quarter of 2009. The North Atlantic Oscillation index has been measured since 1821 and this correlates with the Garrad Hassan wind index which itself been in existence for 15 years. The NAO index numbers for the 4 months from December 2009 to March 2010 were the most negative since 1821.
    Unless something very odd is happening it is fair to assume wind yields will continue to vary quarter by quarter. ”
    Excerpt from: PFI Offshore Transfers Deals To Banks To Keep Financings on Balance (UK))
    http://www.offshorewind.biz/2010/08/27/pfi-offshore-transfers-deals-to-banks-to-keep-financings-on-balance-uk/

  6. ‘If Hurricans are cooling the Atlantic, Igor dissipating ocean heat into the upper troposphere is a good thing, right?’
    Michael~ my rough understanding of hurricanes is that they are part of the heat-redistribution system of the atmosphere. While not being anywhere near sure without looking it up (or waiting for an answer from someone else here 😛 ), I’d say that Was a good thing, yes. Because that heat is now that much closer to being redistributed into space.

  7. Dr. John M. Ware says:
    “The name is pronounced EE-gore . . . ”
    Perhaps Anthony is suggesting ‘Eye-gore’ as in we’re all gonna ‘Die-gore.’ in honor of the master of gloom and doom regarding **eeeeeeek!!!!** – CLIMATE CHANGE.
    eye/die . . . better fit ;p

  8. Fronkenshteen . . . “elevate me”
    Inga . . . . ” what . . . here?”
    Mind you I am seriously glad I am not at sea in a 40′ yacht in the Atlantic right now.
    What are the odds of Igor getting round as far as the UK?

  9. Sandy says: “Will this give the Atlantic the blues like the Pacific?”
    And
    Michael Schaefer says: “If Hurricans are cooling the Atlantic, Igor dissipating ocean heat into the upper troposphere is a good thing, right?”
    It would take a lot for the tropical North Atlantic to drop into negative ranges, Sandy, so you shouldn’t expect the maps will be turning blue there.
    The impacts of this year’s hurricanes on the SST anomalies for the entire tropical North Atlantic Ocean aren’t noticeable, Michael, though they do cool the ocean directly below the hurricane:
    http://i55.tinypic.com/2lacx0n.jpg

  10. kadaka (KD Knoebel) says:
    September 14, 2010 at 1:46 am
    (Are there environmental protection rules mandating the recovery of wind turbine debris to protect ocean habitat, going from wreckage on the surface all the way to the sea bed? Just wondering…)

    Kadaka, you shouldn’t worry a bit about such matters like that, the government will handle it. And no, that would burden the economy but it seems that’s already fixed up real good in that one line fine print buried at the bottom of page 27524 of the health bill that indemnifies all wind power companies of any possible losses similar to that. But the majority speaker assures there is a very bright side that any damages to our environment whatsoever will be fully handled through funds supplied by supplimentary provisions through the premiums of your now much improved health insurance. /sarc/sarc/sarc/off
    Now, does that not relieve your worry?

  11. Werner Weber says:
    September 14, 2010 at 1:25 am
    > ‘…Igor not making landfall…’ but it will hit Bermuda…
    Better context: “… Igor not making landfall on the CONUS”
    About that spaghetti graph, Bermuda is around 32.2N 65W – it’s on the graph, buried under all the forecast tracks.
    … Igor not making landfall on the CONUS, but this is a bad week for a Bermuda vacation.
    ———————-
    Dr. John M. Ware says:
    September 14, 2010 at 2:18 am
    > The name is pronounced EE-gore; think of Igor Stravinsky. Eye-gore is a character in Young Frankenstein, the movie.
    Yes, but consider that people may think of this Igor as a monster, not as a firebird.

  12. A decade or so back I was looking to buy a home in Rhode Island (job offer…). The realtor said they occasionally got hurricanes, but none in many years.
    Now we have E-gore headed on a swoop North and the prior set had some headed North…
    Is there any tendency for more North East landing hurricanes in “cold phase” of ocean cycles? (PDO / AMO / ??) Will we be more likely in the next 30 years to have a NYC or Boston Cat 4 ?
    Things in The Gulf seem a lot quieter than in prior years with a flat jet stream path… (and that implies fewer opportunities for an oil price spike on hurricane worries and THAT has implications for the oil Hurricane Trades… so less ‘long oil – sell on hurricane arrival; and more ‘short property insurers – cover on landfall’)

  13. ” Keith Battye says:
    September 14, 2010 at 3:51 am
    What are the odds of Igor getting round as far as the UK?”
    Small. Models suggest ridging or even blocking around Iceland, reinforced by upper air warmth advection by then extratropical Igor. Looks like the remnants of that system will die out over Labrador or Greenland.

  14. Something I hadn’t noticed before and clearly evident in the full Aqua visible view are the the little intense mesocyclones on the periphery of the main swirl on the left side of the swirl. There are several, like little eyes. Mind you, small is relative – from the altitude of the shot, they’d seem pretty big if you were under them.

  15. As a Louisianan, I have to say that this year’s hurricanes rock! They seem to be avoiding the Gulf like the plague, which is fine by me. Sorry, Bermuda :(.

  16. When I see an eye that big I have to think of Marty Feldman … so Eye-gore for me. So much the better if this storm develops a hump (what ‘ump?)

  17. “…what hump?!”
    @Paul Coppin – I see them really well in the next comment’s video… WOW!
    @Richard Holle – Thanks for that YouTube, that is just amazing. The eye is so well defined. I love looking at images like this, as opposed to being in it. Though, as Kevin says, sorry Bermuda.

  18. “kadaka (KD Knoebel) says:
    September 14, 2010 at 1:46 am
    Well now, there’s a bonanza for the off-shore wind turbines! Can’t wait to see the numbers as they harvest the energy from that!
    (Are there environmental protection rules mandating the recovery of wind turbine debris to protect ocean habitat, going from wreckage on the surface all the way to the sea bed? Just wondering…)”
    Had not thought of that one. Excellent point. Would be fun to see how fast those blades could turn before they took off for the Kennedy compound. Oh! I forgot, no turbines allowed within sight of there.

  19. Eye-Gore is changing climate as it goes, making it’s own gravy.
    The policy for combatting Hurricanes is the same as should be for all climate change: Adapt or get out of the way.
    There’s a lesson to be learnt there.

  20. Well I vote for EE-gore because I love Mizzourah and mules & donks.
    Found some stuff on stratosphere warming some were wondering about a while back.
    http://www.ozonelayer.noaa.gov/science/basics.htm
    …Stratospheric ozone (sometimes referred to as “good ozone”) plays a beneficial role by absorbing most of the biologically damaging ultraviolet sunlight (called UV-B), allowing only a small amount to reach the Earth’s surface. The absorption of ultraviolet radiation by ozone creates a source of heat, which actually forms the stratosphere itself (a region in which the temperature rises as one goes to higher altitudes). Ozone thus plays a key role in the temperature structure of the Earth’s atmosphere. Without the filtering action of the ozone layer, more of the Sun’s UV-B radiation would penetrate the atmosphere and would reach the Earth’s surface…
    We received 6″ of rain from the t-storm that went into Texas. Some north-bound armadillos went through too.

  21. How could anybody that had anything to do with supervising the maintenance on wind generators allow them to be placed with in the distance salt spay would drift downwind from the sea is beyond me.
    To place them out in the open waves is going to be a massive corrosion problem, that will shorten the usable life time more than half, not to mention the problems of the ever increasing constant maintenance preformed from boats tossing in the waves.
    I have been involved in the ongoing maintenance of many types of electronics and motors, for many years, and I would not apply for the job due to the huge amount of stressful work needed to done soon. (Not a job for the Maytag mann)

  22. rbateman says:
    September 14, 2010 at 9:55 am
    Adapt or get out of the way
    There’s a lesson to be learnt there.

    You are a sage, but they won’t like it, mommy taught them not to go outside to avoid catching a cold.

  23. kadaka & Jim G.,
    I live near The Wild Horse Wind Farm:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wild_Horse_Wind_Farm
    You can walk upright in a wind that will shut it down. See the end of the first paragraph at the above link. They shut down at sustained wind speeds of 56 mph (90 km/h). That seems to be standard procedure.
    http://www.suite101.com/content/wind-turbines-designed-to-operate-over-range-of-wind-speeds-a274396
    “Cut-out speed of 25 m/s – a 56 mph gale-force wind
    Braking System Stops and Parks the Rotor
    At cut-out speed the generator is disconnected from the grid, rotor blades are pitched to feathered position (parallel to wind flow), and the braking system is actuated to stop and park the rotor.”

  24. “John F. Hultquist says:
    September 14, 2010 at 12:22 pm
    kadaka & Jim G.,
    I live near The Wild Horse Wind Farm:”
    I have heard that the base of one of these wind turbines is a good place to collect eagle feathers. Any truth in that? The green people will not like that, but the less raptors the more sage chickens, something else they have not figured out!

  25. Enneagram says:
    You had asked about what the spring in South America would be like, take a look at the lunar tidal effect pulling air over the Andes, at the same time as the tropical air mass sweeps down the East side. In the USA the mixing of this rapid influx of the tropical air mass produces the peaks in tornado production.
    It is in the lee of these high mountain ranges, the Andes and Rockies, that the lunar declinational effects are most noticeable, repetitive and assistive in forecasting severe weather that results. Scroll down for SA;
    http://www.atmos.washington.edu/~ovens/loops/wxloop.cgi?wv_east_enhanced+12+-update+3600

  26. Does anyone know the instrument resolution of the Aqua satellite? In the banner on the large image is has a “qkm” …whatever that means. I know, on Polar & Geostationary metsats, the Visible channel is 1km. Now, on the upcoming GOES-R, the Visible resolution will be 1/4 km with much faster normal update times.
    Jeff

  27. Richard Holle says:
    September 14, 2010 at 12:43 pm
    Thanks, I’ve just seen it crossing the andes in two points, at about -2 SL and about -12. These systems rarely cross the high altitudes of this mountain chain.

  28. Enneagram says:
    September 14, 2010 at 1:21 pm
    Reply;
    What I find most interesting is the transfer of the Pacific air mass over the top of the mountains from about -12 degrees to -30 degrees, these flows mostly only occur during declinational culmination when the extent is around 22 to 25 degrees, both on the down side like now, or on the upside of the increasing angle of the 18.6 year period.
    This tends to increase the total zonal flow component of the global circulation, and may be one of the patterns to study, in the process of further defining the increase and decay of the polar vortex intensities.

  29. I’ve been in the eye of a typhoon when I lived on Okinawa, back in the ’60s – beautiful, calm weather, cloudless blue skies! A lot of typhoons go through there, though I don’t remember any as strong as a Cat 4 (IIRC, 100 knot winds were considered quite strong).

  30. As for eagle feathers, they do come down from time to time when hit by a turbine. But its usually with the whole bird. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xe85OaacwB8
    Its very sad. But greenies, like climate people have a religion about it. I mentioned it on a nephew’s post on facebook, and some guy comes back and says they’ve designed them to avoid that. I don’t see how they could. Solid rotating item hits bird at normal speed is going to result in very hurt bird. So I posted a link to the above video. Anyway, the video and the gif of Igor is magnificent.

  31. E.M.Smith says:
    September 14, 2010 at 5:01 am

    Is there any tendency for more North East landing hurricanes in “cold phase” of ocean cycles? (PDO / AMO / ??) Will we be more likely in the next 30 years to have a NYC or Boston Cat 4 ?

    I think the answer is no. New England was hit a few times in the 1950s which was toward the end of the warm AMO.
    In general, we’re more impacted by nor’easters. Some bring lots of snow.

  32. Fascinating picture.
    Eyes that present multiple swirls like this, are indicative of the most violent hurricanes.
    Sort of like the reverse of it smaller cousin the tornado: In the rare EF4s and 5s, you will see multiple suction vortices rotating at break neck speed around the center of the cyclone.
    In this type of cyclone, in the violent CAT 4’s and 5’s multiple swirls or “vortices” can be seen within the real estate of the eye itself.
    Interesting….though my my point may be simplistic here.
    Regardless, Igor is a monster and a beast!
    Chris
    Norfolk, VA, USA

  33. Now Julia’s up to a Cat 4, too! Unique!
    The power of a storm depends on having a small, tight eye, not a big one.
    Dumping heat is a bad thing. Warming is good for man and beast. Bring it on!
    Cooling increases the contrast between tropics and poles, causing wilder weather. Warming reduces the gradient, and makes for bland weather and climate.
    So Igor and Julia are signs that Catastrophic Non-Anthropogenic Cooling is under way (CaNAC)! “Make up the fires, and buy another coal-scuttle before you dot another i, Bob Cratchit!”

  34. Richard Holle says:
    September 14, 2010 at 2:17 pm
    I was wondering what would it mean as today it is showing (part of it at -14) a counterclockwise direction.(westward).

  35. Enneagram says:
    September 15, 2010 at 12:50 pm
    Reply; at that time of day you may be seeing the primary pressure of the solar wind pushing the atmosphere ahead of it (if so will stop in late afternoon, and the moon goes over head) Just as the compressive pressure of the daily solar wind drives the trade winds East to West. The moon and the southern jet stream are both South of that position, making this possible.

  36. If on the other hand if the moon is starting back from Maximum South already, it will cause a Northward flow up the lee side of the Andes, for the next few days, maybe it is starting already.
    I’ll just watch and learn, most of my focus has been the USA and the NH by extension, with occasional glimpses South here when I notice big changes.

Comments are closed.