Dickinson ND sees first June snowfall in 60 years

Backyard Snow in Dickinson, ND - Photo by WUWT reader Daryl Ritchison

Backyard Snow in Dickinson, ND - Photo courtesy WUWT reader Daryl Ritchison

Updated with a photo, Daryl Ritchison writes:

If you want pictures of the Dickinson snow, here are a couple of  pictures sent from a viewer of mine.  They reported 1.5″ as these pictures were being taken. The one with the lilac blooming (at right in photo above) is interesting  because most years the lilac have finished blooming three weeks ago,  but the spring has been so cold in this area that most phenological events are running about 2-3 weeks behind schedule.

More here from the TV station web site: http://www.kxma.com/weather

From the “weather is not climate” department, this report from TV station KXMC in North Dakota:

Jun 6 2009 2:49PM
KXNewsTeam

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) Snow has fallen in Dickinson in June, the first time in nearly 60 years the city has seen snow past May.

National Weather Service meteorologist Janine Vining in Bismarck says there were unofficial reports of a couple of inches of snow in Dickinson on Saturday.

Vining says snow in North Dakota in June is uncommon, though it’s not unheard of. She says other parts of the state have seen June snow within the past 10 years.

Williston and Bismarck had received only rain as of mid-Saturday, but Vining said snow was possible in those cities later in the day.

But wait there’s more snowy June weather worldwide:
See also: Schoolchildren rescued from hiking trip as June snow and cold hits California
http://www.modbee.com/local/story/732997.html
Twins Elizabeth (left) and Jeanette McGregor with snowman at AviemoreTwins Elizabeth (left) and Jeanette McGregor play in the snow in Aviemore
Snow “hanging on” at Pikes Peak:
Alberta and Saskatchewan get snow in June
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198 thoughts on “Dickinson ND sees first June snowfall in 60 years

  1. What about the southern hemisphere? Skiing in NZ is starting at least 5 weeks early.

  2. Snowing in June in huh. I am always curious about how the weather is like in the 60’s and 70’s while the average temperature was colder than today (I was bornt in the late 70’s). Last Christmas I made a trip to Seattle and Vancouver (from Denver), and I was cursing every minute as I struggled through that miserable snowy condition (the rental car company gave me a sports car, of all things). I later found out that 2008 was the first time Canada saw white Christmas from coast to coast in recorded history. Yes 2008 was one of the hottest years in record?

    We need more global warming, if it’s indeed happening, IMO.

  3. Good glad someone else got it in June-last year in NE Oregon it snowed down to 2500 ft….

  4. A couple of inches of snow fell in Lassen National Park in northern California a couple of days ago. The National Park service just got last winter’s snow cleared from the road thru the park and open to the public the same day. Let’s see, some of last winters snow still left on the ground and we’ve got new snow already. Looks like the start of a new glacial age to me. Damn that global “warming”.

  5. When it really gets cold I’ll have to sign off – can’t stand a bunch of cry-babies. I like snow, especially pictures of it from your place.

  6. No wonder the Arctic sea ice is melting so quickly in the past 2-3 weeks — all the cold air’s been sent south — let’s blame it on the funky jet stream — it’s gone goofy.

  7. Well, I just put this under the other thread, but it fits better here:

    Speaking of “watch the snow” from:

    http://www.cbs8.com/Global/story.asp?S=10487325

    we have:

    Chains in June? Snow blankets Sierra Nevada

    Associated Press – June 5, 2009 6:04 PM ET

    FRESNO, Calif. (AP) – Motorists might have to use chains in some parts of the Sierra Nevada this weekend after violent thunderstorms pounding Central California brought unseasonable snow above 5,000 feet.

    […]
    CHP officer Kirk Arnold advised drivers to behave “as you would if you were driving in December.”

    In Fresno, lightening knocked KSEE-TV off the air Friday morning. KFSN-TV’s camera at Sierra Summit ski resort shows trees boughs bending under heavy snow.

    Yeah, all that SUMMER snow from all the excess AGW HEAT is just going to burn me into an ice cube… /sarcoff>

    I’m sorry, I just can’t make my mind do that kind of contortion.
    Much easier is:

    PDO flipped, maybe due to sleepy sun, we’re getting cold and it’s snowing a lot more…

    Oh, and Mammoth too:

    http://www.mammothtimes.com/

    (though I don’t see a way to pick up a link to the particular article about june snow, so a few months from now who knows what story that link will point at…)

    Oh, and Lassen too:

    http://www.redding.com/news/2009/jun/06/rain-snow-make-for-unusual-june-weather/

    Repeat after me: I am not cold. I’m feeling warmer and warmer all the time. I am not going numb. White is the new brown. I am not cold. I’m feeling warmer and warmer all the time. Oh, forget it, I’m going to go make some hot cocoa and think about planting July kale, peas, and fava beans…

  8. Snow fell is the Sierra Nevada the last two days, even shutting down highway 120 over Tioga Pass in Yosemite. Unusual for June but not unheard of. Mammoth is still open for skiing and snowboarding…

  9. It came from here. The real oddity is that germination is way off for the crops this year. When the hell is Mr Gore’s surge in temperatures going to happen? We could sure use it right about now.

  10. OOOH, Weather talk!

    Freezing in Western Colorado. Unhappy, back in wool socks, pajamas, coats. A month of no sunshine to speak of. Friend in Billings MT reported snow also.
    We have never had so many cloudy days in the last 25 years , 3 years of this crummy cold, cloudy weather.
    I saw two tornadoes in 2007 over the Uncompaghre Plateau. No one to report them to, June 7 2007. We don’t have those nasty things over here.

  11. When all the Cap & Tirade gets passed and all the things the AGW True Believers think needs to be done to stop AGW are “started” it ought to be just about the time we’re getting Really Really cold.

    I’d like to propose that folks start planning to shout loudly and long at their government master, er representative, and the media that:

    “We gave you the tools to combat Global Warming, not make it Frozen!! You’ve made it too cold, you’ve over done it, turn the heat back up some!!
    It’s all Your Fault that it is cold and snowing, crops are failing, and my heating bill is too high!”

    Even if you fully well know that AGW is a crock.
    Even if you fully well know that the “corrective” actions have had no effect yet.

    They have asserted that if we give them our chicken they can examine the entrails and make it the right temperature. All I’m suggesting is that we hold them to their promise … especially since we won’t be having that roast chicken dinner to keep us warm…

    (Having been Director of Facilities for a hundred thousand square foot scale building, trust me, you do not want responsibility for the thermostat! You only know it’s right when the complaints are evenly split… So they want to control the thermostat: Fine. Start telling them what temperature you want and complaining about them having it set wrong… )

  12. Here in Kansas summer-like temps. are already here, 95 was the high here today with Liberal in the Southwest corner up to 98, we’re supposed to get a big cooldown but only to about 78 or so.

    Snow in North Dakota!? Are the trees still bare up there, seems like they would be dropping leaves trying to grow during what should be spring if that was the case.

    And what’s better usually, rapid ice melt because of the cold temps. being sent southward, or cold air being bottled up in the North slowing ice melt, but allowing northern heatwaves?

  13. New Zealand has just seen its firstly early ski season for some 10 years with May breaking many of the previous May min temperature records with the mean national temp well below normal – but its just weather folks!

  14. I’m surprised the Canadians aren’t more involved here. Kiwis I’m used to. I guess Canadians don’t have grandchildren.

    EMSMITH: well said, I’m too exhausted by the constant propaganda to say it anymore. I can’t write my congressmen, I’m speechless. This mass delusion is unbelievable.

    Pink dusty snow in the high mountains, blown in, it was in the news. MUD RAIN!! Wind blew away my worst weed problem (hare barley) like a gift from the Almighty. Sigh.

    Canadian letters from a century ago speak of the weather and the postal service. Now all they talk about is the postal service.

  15. Alan F. (21:55:52) : The real oddity is that germination is way off for the crops this year.

    What crops are you growing, watching? Where?

    Actually, germination is a fairly reliable thermometer. It isn’t odd at all that germination is “off” when it’s colder. For example, Purple Wonder (all purple pod brown seeded common beans, actually) germinate in cooler soils. I use them for early and late garden beans. Blue Lakes and Kentucky wonders are about 50F+ soil temp IIRC to germinate. Teppary beans (a desert bean) even warmer. I had a heck of a hard time getting soy and “southern peas” to germinate early enough to finish growing since I’m on the edge of their temperature limit. It is the seeds way of matching start of growth to optimal conditions for growth where it evolved.

    One could make a fairly reliable thermometer for soil temps by planting a known collection of seeds and seeing when each one germinates. It’s precise to a couple of degrees (you may get one or two “sports” that germinate early / cold, but the center of the bell curve is very sharp…)

    There are two other precise temperature measures a plant gives you:

    Temperature for pollination. Most tomatoes must STAY above 50F to set fruit. Some varieties are even higher. (The temps a known for each variety so you can choose the right one for your area.) Again, one can make a decent thermometer using fruit set. For example, Siberians set at about 40F, regular at 50F, and I’ve got a brandywine that doesn’t do anything until 60F. The gaps can be filed in with other varieties and you could probably use number of fruits set / day to get finer granularity.

    Degree Days. This shows up in two flavors:

    1) Cooling degree days. Stone fruits like peaches, plums, etc. need a certain amount of cold to know winter has happened. No cold, no fruit. Again, varieties have specific numbers, so a field of them could be used to give a fairly accurate reading of number of cold days in a winter.

    2) Heating degree days. Grapes, for example, form sugar in direct proportion to the temperature x days. Any decent vintner knows how many degree days they’ve had, and how many they need, for optimum sugar. Yes, there are varietal difference here, too. So Germany grows low degree day whites and Italy has high degree day Chianti. One can use a brix gauge on the juice and know with fair precision how many degree days of heat have flowed into the vineyard for any given variety.

    It is kind of like a Galileo Thermometer
    http://www.howstuffworks.com/question663.htm

    each plant give you a cut off reading. My Siberian has been setting fruit, my 4th of July, not so much. Night time temps below 50F, above 40F. (I could be more accurate if I’d look up their actual fruit set limits… these are IIRC only…)

    I have a ‘fantasy garden’ I’d like to plant some day when I have a couple of million dollars to spare and a ranch (yeah, right…). It would have a planted sundial and a planted (rough climate) thermometer. By looking at the garden you would know the time, temperature range (roughly) and date. (There are sundials that give date information… size is precision… I’d need a large garden ;-) but certain flowers form in certain date ranges. Again a mixed planting would give more precision. There are also some flowers that only open at certain time / temperature points… but that’s getting a bit geeky ;-)

  16. Well last year my hometown of GEG received snow for the first June ever since records began at the local NWS there.

    Guess it’s not totally beyond possibility that it snows in June.

    But if it starts snowing in July and August, I’ll probably start wondering.

  17. Down on the Farm as Metrology

    I wear my Joe Sixpack roots and my Joe Sixpack mindset with honor. Keeps you more focused and grounded than most folks. Lets me know how the 75% outside the intellectuals bubble are going to act and think.

    I suppose I could add that my Grandpa could hit a hill outside the farm with a truck load of hogs, and based on where he had to downshift, tell you the tonnage and how much money they would fetch at market before reaching the top of the hill, even allowing for fuel and passengers on board.

    My dad taught me to look at the garden and gauge ‘days since planting’ with things like 25 days, you are harvesting radishes, 15 days the radishes are up and growing modest bulbs, 10 days they are babys, and, IIRC it was 5 days from planting to first green. We would plant part of a row each week and had a constant calendar of radishes… He could look at the garden and tell you the days since planting (and he planted off the solar lunar positions, so it was a calendar linked to the solar system… potatoes were only planted on a new moon, for example.) He knew to the day when first sugar corn would be ripe. (Hey, Iowa, what do you expect!)

    If temperatures change significantly, your local gardener and farmer will be the first to know. And they will be using a thermometer and heat flux integrator of full degree precision that can not be fudged.

    And that is why I’ve mumbled so much about my tomatoes. They have told me already that this is a cold year, it is not up for debate. That my purple pod beans are “slow” says it’s been a very cold year so far. That, too, is not up for debate. Over what size geography is the only free axis.

    And frankly, that was one of the first things to set off my BS-O-Meter about AGW. The limit to palms had not moved. The limit to Citrus was 20 miles north of my home town and had not moved. And the winter chill stone fruit orchards that were on the limit of ‘almost not enough cold’ down south still produced just fine. It wasn’t warmer in winter… and fruit ripened at the same time as before. It wasn’t warmer in summer.

    Oh, and first and last frosts were not moving out further either. This year they did move in, though… And being right on the edge of avocado survival, the frosts took a couple of avocado sprouts. (A large parent survived with frostbit leaves).

    So my garden has told me quite clearly: Global Warming has not happened to any significant degree. Cooling has begun, and it is colder than it has been in the last decade or so. Draw all the pretty pictures you want with all the fictional False Precision you want and dance around the May Pole all you want … my plants tell me immutable truths. So does the snow on the hill in June. In California.

    I’m not a “Skeptic”, I’m a DENIER. It Just Ain’t Happening and I’m happy to say that “loud and proud” and in mixed public.

  18. I’m replacing the transmission and clutch on my car this weekend, as well as the struts, shocks and all brakes.

    Trust me, I’m GLAD I’m in the garage all weekend. There was about an inch of snow on the ground (and cars) Friday night, and Saturday was a mix of rain and snow and sleet and fog and sun. I’m in Calgary (Alberta).

    No, this isn’t grossly unusual, but… it’s not the norm. Usually by June we can count on being done with snow and expecting hail, and in 4 more weeks we can almost bank on crop-damaging hail wandering the land.

    And for the occasional person wandering past wondering why this is important… yeah, it proves that in spite of the warmists’ best propagandizing efforts, 1) nothing is much different, and 2) if it’s different, it’s not going in the direction of warming.

  19. EM Smith, I was one of the testers some years ago for Siberian tomato seeds. Perfect dwarf bushes (16″ tall, max, in my garden), gorgeous fruit, outstanding performers in the <39-day growing season in NNNW Montana. The other one that handled cool temperatures pretty well (nothing was as good as Siberia) was Stupice, an ungainly potato-like tomato plant. The fruit aren't as lovely as Siberia's, but the plants are normal size and have an excellent yield. I covered them with newspaper during frosts and Reemay when a friend sent me a roll from civilization.

    Our seeding date for normal things like root crops and lettuce was May 25th. Usually didn't set out transplants for a few more weeks. Never, ever surprised by snow up there, let alone hard frost, but delighted in the rare "warm" year when we could get a small crop of string beans or maybe even some pickling cukes.

  20. Sure these are just all observations.

    BUT don’t the warmarlists like to use them everytime one of the 1,000’s of places on earch has a record high, or worse drought since blah blah blah….

    Now a weather observation from my part of the world: I live 60 miles up from Nice in the South of France and after the coldest winter in living memory the last of the snow is just about to disappear from the montain crags surrounding us here. (this is latest anyone can remember seeing snow still visible into the 2nd week of June!)

  21. “From the “weather is not climate” department,…”

    Is that anywhere near the “home office” where David Letterman gets all his Top 10 lists?

  22. My dad tells me that he remembers when he was in school snow banks were always high in winter and that everyone was required to have an orange ball at the top of their car antenna so it could be seen moving above the top of the snow banks and people knew a car was coming. He said there was always heavy snow in winter then. It hasn’t been like that since. He thinks we could head back in to a time like that.

  23. Yes, I saw the picture of the two girls + snowman on Iceagenow website. I am at least 90% sure that it is not in Aviemore (ht 1000ft.) but in the enclosure at the top of the nearby mountain railway at nearly 4000ft. You can see the panorama indicator behind the girl on the left. I live about 20 miles away at 750 ft. We have had temperatures down to around 3 C (37 F.) at night and one day a maximum of about 7 C. (44 F.) together with a cold unstable northerly aitflow. Such conditions is very likely to produce some snow on the scottish mountains – indeed it was forecast as a possibility. Snow (not usually lying for long) is a possibility in the scottish mountains at any time of the year.
    I am very much a sceptic re GW etc and do my bit to try to inform others of some facts (re ice, sun, sealevels etc.). However it is important not to overhype. There is no need. There is all the non-GW evidence one can want without using anything that can be criticised.
    Anthony – Excellent site.
    TG

  24. No, not “soft hail.” The AGW-correct term for snow is “crystallized warming.” Personally, I prefer “Gorefall.”

  25. Weather events are meaningless when discussing climate change, errr…unless of course the event is a hot one, like a new record high. Then it’s yet another sign of global warming!

  26. C’mon Anthony, this is nothing more than “natural variability”!
    Certainly you know that.
    But it sure seems like we’ve been having lots of natural variability lately. ;)

  27. Thomas Gough,
    You are absolutely right.
    But on the other side of the token, this weather event is unusually cold when compared to what was projected by them highly refined GC models. I mean, didn’t them models project that Scotland was supposed to be (or could be, would be, might likely be, very likely may well be,…) like the Caribbean by now?

  28. Yes, agree with Thomas, the photo must have been taken at the top of the funicular station (Ptarmigan), but not in Aviemore itself which is down in the strath. The snow level was down to 700m yesterday morning, and looks like it is about 1100m this morning – http://www.cairngormmountain.co.uk/ (and click on webcam2 which is located at the Ptarmigan).

  29. All I can say, is we’re experiencing pretty typical British weather.
    Last weekend was gorgeous, warm sunshine, 20-24C (But still dropped down to ~10C at night)
    This weekend, it’s back to cold & rain!
    The wife’s sat here, doing some paperwork, with a halogen heater on, we’ve lit our coal fire a couple of evenings too.
    “Flaming June”

  30. “you do not want responsibility for the thermostat! You only know it’s right when the complaints are evenly split”
    Sounds like the sort of thing Obama needs on his desk right now.

  31. Here in Kiwiland i purchased a season ski pass this year and its already had 6 days use. Funny thing is the season doesn’t normally start for another couple of weeks. In my town we’ve had several weeks of good hard frosts yet traditionally we get the first one in July. Bring it on global warming!

  32. I was in Austria in July 1981 when a famous snowstorm brought over a foot of snow to the Alpine valleys on the 15th of the month. Several thousand sheep up on their summer grazing grounds were lost and it was a prelude to one of the longest and hardest winters they had experienced (1981/2), when the snow arrived in the last week in October in the valleys and didn’t properly disappear until late April.

    The other way round, in 1989 in Scotland, the winter was a total wash-out. Almost no snow until March, then it hung around until May up top and then, in June, significant snowfall down to 1500ft. Why it happened I don’t know, but it was just a blip in a very mild 24 month period.

    These things happen every so often.

    And it’s clear that the Arctic is very much warmer than average just now, so clearly what we are seeing is an odd distribution of temperature variations across the NH………

  33. Odd, there are 4 newly active volcanoes on this report this week:

    http://www.volcano.si.edu/reports/usgs/

    For a total of 20 active (that meet their criteria for inclusion) .

    That seems rather like a large percentage increase (and maybe like a large total number…). Does anyone know if they have any trend or anomaly maps?

    Having 20 volcanos active just might have some cooling effect…

  34. Speaking of tomatoes EM Smith many years ago I worked with some agricultural scientists and one of these chaps visited the US and became particularly interested in a variety of toms grown in your fine country. He was dead keen to get some seeds back to NZ to start a breeding program however stringent quarantine regs. put a kybosh on that happening anytime quickly. The solution – he swallowed them. Very novel I thought.

  35. Wikipedia gives a helpfully long view, about Japan:-

    The Early and Middle Jōmon periods saw an explosion in population….during the prehistoric Holocene Climatic Optimum (between 4000 BC and 2000 BC), when temperatures reached several degrees Celsius higher than the present. …. After 1500 BC, the climate cooled, and populations seem to have contracted dramatically. Comparatively few archaeological sites can be found after 1500 BC.

  36. I can attest to the plummeting temperature in NW England. One day 23C and the next 10C dropping even lower in the evening. From T shirt to sweat shirt in less than 24 hours. But then, that’s fairly typical of British weather. No wonder it’s a popular topic of conversation when breaking the ice (sic) with strangers.

  37. Sorry my link to the ohulu cosmic ray monitor doesn’t seem to work properly

    If you go to the site http://cosmicrays.oulu.fi/

    There’s a widget – fill in a start date, 1964 is the earliest and shows how unusual this is. Then tick the box for a graph – et voila

  38. Here in Northern Ireland June has gone from scorch to shiver in a couple of days. Temperatures reached 27C (31C in my walled in garden) on 2nd in Lisburn, Co. Antrim but failed to reach 14C on 6th. The hot days were accompanied by comparitively low relative humidity (around 40%) which made them very pleasant.

  39. I don’t mean to suggest that entries like this should not be made here on WUWT, because I do find them interesting, but please let us all acknowledge that this is anecdotal. One weather event or system, no matter how extreme, is not climate. I get enough of this from the alarmist in the MSM who really don’t know the difference.

  40. “…halogen heater on, we’ve lit our coal fire…”
    Egads! Climate criminal!

  41. E.M.Smith (02:23:33) :

    The volcanoes that appear to be the ones most likely to change atmosphere conditions are Chaiten, http://www.seablogger.com/?cat=22 and Redoubt. http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/2009/06/dome_grows_waiting_continues_a.php

    OTOH, these fissures in Saudi Arabia have opened recently, http://scienceblogs.com/eruptions/ and there was an earthquake in South Wales yesterday. http://www.iris.edu/seismon/bigmap/index.phtml

    Man proposes, nature disposes, usually with ice, though sometimes with fire.

  42. And it is interesting to note where much of that temperature variability comes from. Where I am in Europe, it gets much warmer during the day than the night, in a cycle that seems to be linked to the Sun rising.

    So solar forcing is not in the AGW models – right?

    .

  43. You can’t tell the difference between climate and weather, silly fools.

    If it warms, its climate. If it cools, its weather.

  44. …I have a ‘fantasy garden’ I’d like to plant some day when I have a couple of million dollars to spare and a ranch (yeah, right…). It would have a planted sundial and a planted (rough climate) thermometer. By looking at the garden you would know the time, temperature range (roughly) and date. (There are sundials that give date information… size is precision… I’d need a large garden ;-) but certain flowers form in certain date ranges. Again a mixed planting would give more precision. There are also some flowers that only open at certain time / temperature points… but that’s getting a bit geeky ;-)..E.M.Smith

    Here is a reference to a time-measuring ‘floral clock’…http://scienceblogs.com/clock/2007/05/carolus_linnaeus_floral_clocks.php

  45. E.M.Smith (02:23:33) :
    Odd, there are 4 newly active volcanoes on this report this week:
    http://www.volcano.si.edu/reports/usgs/
    For a total of 20 active (that meet their criteria for inclusion) .
    That seems rather like a large percentage increase

    Full moon tomorrow. Second most distant lunar Apogee of 2009 is on wednesday 10th.
    This may just be coincidence, but I’ve found quite a few coincidences between lunar orbit maxima/minima and siesmic/volcanic events going back through the records.

    For example the Asian Tsunami occurred at full moon one day before the second most distant apogee of 2004.

  46. My parent’s home in Vermont (southern part of the state) had a freeze in mid May. That has not happened in the 23+ years we have had the place.

    At what point does enough of a patter develop that its no longer ‘weather’ but instead ‘climate’?

  47. I have been snowed upon every month of the year. Summer snows were in the mountains so not really that strange, but to have to return home on a July 4th camping trip because of a blizzard is not a lot of fun.

  48. I have been stationed here in Okinawa Japan, a subtropical Island south of Mainland Japan,for quite a few years. I know what hot and humid is after living here, usually June brings mid 80’s to lower 90’s temperatures. This year it is still in the mid 70’s to low 80’s during the day, at night it drops into the low to mid 60’s(Brrr). Not bad, but I am a big fan of hot weather. This past week was filled with low thick gray clouds that would release tons of rain evry other hour or so. When it was nhot raining the air was to chilly to be comfortable. I do not understand why winter persists here,(this is typical for winter time, sometimes we get really cold days lower 40’s in the winter, but usually on average it is between upper 50’s to lower 70’s. Maybe the Earth’s seasons are changing to occure at different months, something to look into, sort of doing what we do every year moving our clocks forward and backwards. Maybe we had an extra leap year somewhere in nature, but our calender did not pick up on it? I dunno anything is possible.

  49. Andrew P (02:03:20) : and Thomas and Rys Jaggar

    Okay, so you corrected the altitude by 400m and yes Rys you are desperately reaching for the historic record to show that June snow all over the world is really just normal. Normal is a word your sect is generally loathe to use these days and it is definitely a synonym for notably below normal that your leaders order you to use only as a last resort. The blow up of Krakatoa in the late 19th Century, too was normal but its part of the folklore in the “East Indes” and gave the whole world pink sunsets for 20 years. I’m predicting your faithful will be spouting the word normal and be talking about the slipping jet stream a lot more in the coming years. After all a million years of ice age is also normal and I suspect the jet stream had slipped south too.

    Incidentally, I’ve been waiting in vain for the World Glacier Monitoring Service to get out something later than preliminaries for 2006 and 2007:

    http://www.geo.unizh.ch/wgms/

    How hard can it be to do this. You must have all the numbers for 2006 and 2007 and even for 2008. If not your data would be buried in the 2009 snows.

  50. Despite the general global warming fear, everybody I know (even those who believe in AGW) is hoping for a nice warm summer.

  51. A year or three back, I read a news release by on or another AGW group from the UK which remarked to the effect that ‘global warming’ would result in —get this— ‘global cooling.’

    The thrust of that screed was such that because Man had caused the Earth to get warmer than it was ~supposed~ to get, that the result would be that at some point the Earth would get colder that it was ~supposed~ to get.

    Of course, they didn’t say what the climate was ~supposed~ to be …

    Now, I can just hear the dire proclamations issuing forth from their frothing mouths that because of all that CO2, we are going to get way, way cooler as a result.

    Got that? CO2 got us into this mess BOTH WAYS!!

    Bwaaaa HAAAAA! HAAAAA! HAAAAA! HAAAAAAAAAAA!

    :-))

    Stand by for some idiot theory which defines a ‘break-over point’ where the quantity of CO2 causes a reverse effect, i.e., ‘global cooling,’ and no matter what you can’t stop it — unless of course Man resorts to a complete cessation of industry. Got that?

    [snip – ad hom]

  52. There was 3.2 cm of snow in Calagary, Canada, this past week -end . This is a rare event as the last time this happenedwas in 1951. There are frost warnings in many parts of Alberta .

    My own analysis shows that the combined low or cool readings of the PDO , AMO and the pattern of the polar jet stream are identical to those cold periods of 1950,1956 and the 1970’s when similar cold conditions existed. The SST anomalies along the western and eastern coasts of North America are 0.5 C degrees cooler.

  53. Don’t you know? It is cold because of global warming! And they AGW blind sheep even have some convoluted logic to prove it. It has something to do with the arctic sending melting and thus spreading colder air south. Seriously, I’m not making this up about them.

    In short, this is the AGW stand: If it is too warm = proof of global warming. If it is too cold = proof of global warming.

  54. We had snow in the Pennines in Derbyshire this week (above 600m) …

    I have just switched on the heating (Cambridge, uk) tp chase away the chill. I’m now reading up on the predictions by the MET office that we were heading for a hot “barbecue” summer.

    If only ….

  55. For those under a June snow, lets not forget that the days begin to shorten again in about 2 weeks.

  56. ” Where I am in Europe, it gets much warmer during the day than the night, in a cycle that seems to be linked to the Sun rising.”

    Correlation is not causation.

  57. Get a load of this article, full of alarmism, and inaccuracies. If you can stand to read this, you see a point made by a guy named Plimer in a book that he published, about the Medieval Warm period being warmer than present. But the writer of the article is quoting the IPCC’s AR4 2007 saying the Medeival warm period was not so warm.
    OT I think, but I thought it interesting especially since record low are being reported globally, this article was posted 11 hrs ago, Hhhhhm. More propaganda. The writer also stoops so low as to say the “skeptics” are like the Church when they were persecuting in masse any one that oppsed their views. The skeptics is the old church now????

    http://webdiary.com.au/cms/?q=node/2861

  58. Snow here in the UK, this link is for a picture of Hartside Pass at around 1900 feet.

    Remember weather is not climate, but snow in England in June even at 1900 feet is not normal.

  59. I wonder how this will effect the summer wheat there. Here in Northern Indiana, a cool, very wet Spring has forced many farmers to forgo corn planting, and instead plant beans. However, many fields still have standing water, which means they will likely remain fallow this year.

    With the dollar falling, many investors will seek out commodities to hedge thier portfolios. Corn prices could begin to creep-up again. Perhaps we’re in the beginning of a commodities bubble similar to the one we saw in 2006- to mid 2008.

  60. This area (which includes Minnesota, Montana and the Canadian Prairie Provinces) has been well below normal for six months now – it would certainly rival the coldest 6 month period on record.

    Here is Bismarck’s temperatures, just down the road from Dickinson, over the past year.

    If you want to see the same charts for your location over the past year, 90 days or 30 days, you can probably find a city close by at this page.

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/global_monitoring/temperature/global_temp_accum.shtml

  61. “I am always curious about how the weather is like in the 60’s and 70’s while the average temperature was colder than today (I was bornt in the late 70’s). ”

    Well, young whippersnapper, I was in highschool during the ’60’s (not, I hasten to add, for the whole decade), and we were good here in Jersey for two or three foot+ snowfalls during a typical winter. I recall reading that the ’60’s was the snowiest decade of the twentieth century in the US.

    PDO and AMO both deeply negative, which is where we would seem to be headed in ten or so years.

    The coldest winters I can remember here were in the late ’70’s. In January of 1977, Newark Airport hit -10 F on two successive mornings (normal low is 23). Interesting that this was right after the PDO shifted positive, the AMO remaining in the tank.

  62. ” Hell_is_like_newark”

    I can only assume you are referring to Newark, Delaware, or one of the 19 other Newarks in the US, not to mention the two in England.

    Humph! I can criticize Newark, NJ, just like I can criticize my family members. But if you’re an Outsider, you’re gettin’ on the fightin’ side of me.

    If you’re ever in the vicinity, I can take you to some excellent Spanish and Portuguese restaurants; also to a classic Jewish deli that has pastrami to die for.

  63. Same storm in the headline article bringing snow to WY & MT this AM also. Looks like we will be running 5-10 deg below normal all week here in Denver.

  64. It snowed in Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, southern Alberta (including Calgary) and southern Saskatchewan. ALL-TIME June minimum temperature records were set at several stations in southern Alberta, Canada. These are at stations with 50-100 yr + of data, and by “June,” I mean for any date in the month.

  65. smallz79: The timing of the seasons are not changing astronomically – believe me: astrophysicists understand these things.

  66. Chris (00:52:43) :
    “Kashmir Valley…. first time in four decades that the Valley has experienced snowfall in June…. Hotels in Sonamarg are bustling with tourists who are enjoying their holidays and the unexpected snowfall has added to the fun. Mushtaq Ahmed, owner of Sonamarg Glacier Hotel said his hotel is fully occupied.”

    http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/002200906061502.htm

  67. Smallz79
    Maybe we had an extra leap year somewhere in nature, but our calender did not pick up on it? I dunno anything is possible.

    There is a cyclicity to these things. Perhaps the moons 18.6 year cycle plays a part, along with the sun’s hale cycle.

    I liked your post on CP yesterday in support of Anthony’s surface stations project by the way.

  68. Hell_is_like_newark (04:39:19) :

    “At what point does enough of a patter develop that its no longer ‘weather’ but instead ‘climate’?”

    Silly question. When it is warmer, that is Climate. Otherwise, weather.

    CodeTech: I’ll be in Calgary this week. So fire up all the SUV’s and BBQ’s, and warm the place up a bit. I hate cold weather. My parka won’t fit in my carry-on.

  69. Also here in southern Alberta … yesterday’s high was a blistering 7°C and it went down to zero last night. (Norms for June 6 are 22°C and 8°C.) Heavy snow in Waterton National Park and it snowed on the east side of the Rockies. Last week we went for a drive near Waterton and there were still some old-winter snow drifts in coulees and shady areas out on the plains.

    Been a long winter and the days start getting shorter in 2 weeks. ☺

  70. It is all due to AGW, and we denialists are just too wicked to recognize this enlightened truth.

  71. Rain, sleet, snow and sunshine all in one day – yesterday here in Southern Alberta. Near-freezing temperatures, but our plants will survive. Not so sure about the people though; it’s been a very long, very cold winter.

    It’s called ‘weather’ when you are cold.

    It’s called ‘climate’ when everybody is cold.

    Well, everybody has written to Wattsup from all over the planet, and this is sounding more like ‘climate’ than ‘weather’.

    Has serious global cooling arrived? ( I think not. This is just a little taste of the real cooling to come by 2020-2030. Hope I’m wrong.)
    _______________________

    Ever notice how almost everything the IPCC and friends have written in the past has turned out to be false (it’s not just the hockey stick), whereas the work of climate skeptics has stood up quite well?

    Here’s an example from 2002:
    http://www.apegga.org/members/Publications/peggs/WEB11_02/kyoto_pt.htm

    Notice how the Pembina Institute authors, relying on the IPCC, have failed the test of time (I am abiding by the rules of professional courtesy; I could use much stronger words).

    In contrast, the article written by Sallie, Tim and me has stood up pretty well.

    Enjoy your day. It’s sunny out there, and must be above freezing by now.

    Regards, Allan

  72. Yet more linked at Drudge

    ‘Global warming is baloney’ signs put the heat on Burger King

    “The [restaurant] management team can put the message up there if they want to. It is private property and here in the US we do have some rights. Notwithstanding a franchise agreement, I could load a Brinks vehicle with [rights] I’ve got so many of them. By the time the Burger King lawyers work out how to make that stick we’d be in the year 2020.”

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/jun/05/burger-king-global-warming-us

  73. Now if we could only get Drudge to link a story directly from WattsUpWithThat!!

  74. That should be a strange news for the AGWers. Here in Metro Manila, rainy season this year started mid-April vs June or July several years ago. We’ve had 9 days straight of dark skies and rains until yesterday, today I was very happy to see the Sun! We’re near the equator but the Sun is hiding too often!

  75. I sent the Kashmir Valley snow story to the Drudge tip box (scroll 3/4 way down in right column there to find it). If enough people alert them to the story link maybe they’ll add it to their global warming links.

    As Anthony posted in his Green Bubble thread—the word is getting out and the bubble is bursting!

    Kashmir Valley link :

    http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/002200906061502.htm

  76. Gary Pearse (05:26:04) :

    Andrew P (02:03:20) : and Thomas and Rys Jaggar

    Okay, so you corrected the altitude by 400m and yes Rys you are desperately reaching for the historic record to show that June snow all over the world is really just normal. Normal is a word your sect is generally loathe to use these days and it is definitely a synonym for notably below normal that your leaders order you to use only as a last resort

    Well Mr Pearse, I would appreciate you withdrawing a few things here.

    1. Please spell my name right, it is RHYS, not RYS.
    2. ‘My sect’ does not exist – I am NOT an AGW proponent, nor am I an ‘ice age fanatic’, as you would be aware of if you had read my contributions to the blogosphere more widely.
    3. I did not use the word ‘normal’ to describe snow in June. I pointed out two other occasions it had happened over a 30 year period – hardly ‘normal’. Not unheard of is what I would say.
    4. I have NO leaders, as I am sure the neocons would be happy to confirm, give my somewhat vigorous and unorthodox resistance to bombing the shit out of Iraqis; global warming fanatics in the UK Press who I have given some fairly vigorous dressings down to; nor climatologists who believe that they have an inalienable right to tens of millions of research funds to build dodgy computer models.

    YOU have interpreted my words and turned it into what you wrote.

    That doesn’t mean that I meant what you said I meant.

    Sir……..

  77. rip warming (20:54:24) :

    “The word snow is no longer allowed, pls refer to it as merely ’soft hail’.”

    I’m afraid that conjures up too cold of an image to make it past the AGW compliance filters. How about “condensed crystalline water vapor”?

  78. Its snowing this morning in Wyoming too, even in the desert (3,600 Ft) Bighorn Basin. The cold wet weather in multiple places such as Western Europe and Southern Canada sounds very similar to what has been described before in times of very low solar activity, times associated with widespread crop failure. The argument is often made Climate verses Weather but what we are seeing looks more like a pattern shift to a pattern of southward expansion of the Westerlies with high amplitude ridges and troughs and blocking highs. This is the same type of pattern that was associated with the 1993 floods in the midwest after the cooling caused by Pinatubo and the blizzards in the Eastern USA in the late 70’s that prompted Hanson and company to cry “Global Cooling”. I wonder what Joe Romm will say if the much vaunted coming El Nino fails to produce record high temperatures. He’ll probably say something like “Aerosols”.

  79. “Allan M R MacRae (08:19:51) : In contrast, the article written by Sallie, Tim and me has stood up pretty well.”

    Could I have the link to the article? I’d like to read it. TIA

  80. Nonoy Oplas (08:27:31) :
    Is that you in the photo with President Vaclav Klaus at the link to your name?

  81. Arthur Glass

    Referring to Newark, NJ. Though the Ironbound section is decent, I developed a deep resentment for Newark… mainly due to the profound incompetence of its government. Not to go into detail, but I had to go to court twice because Newark thought I owned property there. Both cases were due to corruption or incompetence. That damn city put me through Hell twice.

  82. This an exciting thread. It seems moving from global warming to climate change is a good PR stunt.
    I am still laughing how the warmers claim the rest are deniers. Claim the deniers are anti science. Nothing is more anti science than to blame global warming for a weather incident flight air france before information was gathered, Troo scientists go over dat and check it twice or more. Soothsayers are alive and well and make blind claims.

  83. It looks like my reply to afore mentioned site/article is being denied after attempting 2/3 times. That site is definately onesided and will do anything to avoid a debate. Hhhhmmm.

  84. Hell_is_like_newark

    Well, if you have experience in Newark, NJ, then you do have grounds for criticism.

    The deep-seated corruption, stupidity and incompetence in the city government is indeed bind-bogling. Sharpe James, the myor for two decades, is now a guest of the Federal government for a couple of years, joining two of his three predecessors in that distinction. The current mayor, Corey Booker, is smart and articulate, but he has generations of a ‘this is the way we have always operated’ mindset to swim against.

    Despite all this, the downtown section at least is much better in every way than it was twenty years ago, and the Ironbound still draws folks from NYC and elsewhere looking for good food at non-exorbitant prices.

    Stop back and visit some day, if you can.

  85. Re; the Burger King flap.

    No one has the ‘right’ to own a Burger King franchise, and my first reaction is that it is the company that has every right not to associate its name with sentiments it cares not to be associated with.

  86. tallbloke (07:54:26) :

    Thanks.

    lulo (07:43:20) :

    smallz79: The timing of the seasons are not changing astronomically – believe me: astrophysicists understand these things.

    I know my thought was greatly far fetched, but curiuosity killed the cat.
    At this point I am just frustrated, buy these people that say climate is not weather on the AGWers side, I understand there is a difference, but does not the weather have an impact on climate? I would think so.

    I am also frustrated that that blog I was trying to reply to will not post my comments.
    They were very simple

    “Kudos to publishing this article just as reports of record breaking lows are being reported for the month of June. Got to keep those “Skeptics” on thier toes.
    LMAO…………

  87. “The timing of the seasons are not changing astronomically – believe me: astrophysicists understand these things.”

    What about the precession of the equinoxes?

  88. Just want results,

    Yes, it was me. I attended the 2nd ICCC in NYC last March. I was the only Filipino there. But I’m not a scientist, I’m an economist. Now I send some shivers to AGWrs here. After attending the Heartland conference in NYC, i’ve given 3 talks already. More talks coming. regards.

  89. Cue Flanagan to comment that it isn’t particularly warm in Belgium.

    Hmm, a new “non-cold” name for snow?
    Steamstars?
    Fluffywater?

  90. smallz79 (06:28:52) :

    “Get a load of this article, full of alarmism, and inaccuracies. If you can stand to read this, you see a point made by a guy named Plimer in a book that he published, about the Medieval Warm period being warmer than present. But the writer of the article is quoting the IPCC’s AR4 2007 saying the Medeival warm period was not so warm.

    http://webdiary.com.au/cms/?q=node/2861

    From the article, conclusion #4:

    “4.The motivation of those who continue to disseminate dangerous untruths which can only result in the continuous rise of atmospheric CO2 levels and temperatures, shifting the atmospheric state during which humans evolved over the last 2.8 million years, defies contemplation.”

    There you are folks! You defy contemplation!

  91. Summer is welcome to start here in western Colorado anytime now. It’s 11am, 55F, and lightly raining. ‘Normal’ for here would be 80-85F, and no rain until August, or perhaps the last week of July. This would not be so unusual, but it has been going on for over two weeks now, and we’ve had only one or two days that hit 80 this year. Whoever has their hand on the climate dial, please set it back to warming. Thank you.

  92. lulo (08:12:52) :
    They always have a good explanation, don’t they.
    But when it’s warm, it’s yet another ominous sign of manmade warming.
    You’re absolutely right – “It’s the sun, stupid!”

  93. tallbloke (04:18:05) :

    “E.M.Smith (02:23:33) :
    Odd, there are 4 newly active volcanoes on this report this week:
    http://www.volcano.si.edu/reports/usgs/
    For a total of 20 active (that meet their criteria for inclusion) .
    That seems rather like a large percentage increase”

    Full moon tomorrow. Second most distant lunar Apogee of 2009 is on wednesday 10th.
    This may just be coincidence, but I’ve found quite a few coincidences between lunar orbit maxima/minima and siesmic/volcanic events going back through the records.

    For example the Asian Tsunami occurred at full moon one day before the second most distant apogee of 2004.

    Tides. The crust itself moves almost 40 cms as the bulge of the moon’s pull goes around. Metastable states could be affected by this at faults, where enough energy has built up and just needs a trigger.

  94. OT, but it fits. This was on Fox news web site:

    One in Seven Scientists Say Colleagues Fake Data
    Friday, June 05, 2009

    Print
    ShareThis
    Faking scientific data and failing to report commercial conflicts of interest are far more prevalent than previously thought, a study suggests.

    One in seven scientists says that they are aware of colleagues having seriously breached acceptable conduct by inventing results.

    Around 46 percent say that they have observed fellow scientists engage in “questionable practices,” such as presenting data selectively or changing the conclusions of a study in response to pressure from a funding source.

    However, when scientists were asked about their own behavior, only 2 percent admitted to having faked results.

    Daniele Fanelli, of the University of Edinburgh, who carried out the investigation, believes that high-profile cases such as that of Hwang Woo-Suk, the South Korean scientist disgraced for fabricating human stem cell data, are less unusual than is generally assumed.

    “Increasing evidence suggests that known frauds are just the tip of the iceberg and that many cases are never discovered,” he said.

    The findings, published in the peer-reviewed journal PLoS One, are based on a review of 21 scientific misconduct surveys carried out between 1986 and 2005. The results paint a picture of a profession in which dishonesty and misrepresentation are widespread.

    REPLY: Thanks, I’m working up a blog post on this, citing the original story in the Times. – Anthony

  95. Sylvia (23:40:42) : The other one that handled cool temperatures pretty well (nothing was as good as Siberia) was Stupice, an ungainly potato-like tomato plant. The fruit aren’t as lovely as Siberia’s, but the plants are normal size and have an excellent yield.

    Thanks! I’ll go looking for Stupice. A good friend is of Czech extraction and I know he’s growing some this year. Maybe I’ll score some seeds off of him… (Stupice is a Czech heirloom)

    Somehow I think I’m going to need to specialize in cool tolerant tomatoes… My Siberia has nice fruit set, my Sweet 100 has lots of flowers… The 4th of July has a few fruit set, but small and sparse.

    FWIW, the limit on cold tolerance is the rate of growth of a little tube from the pollen into the ovum. It is quite possible that the few fruit set on the “4th of July” are from pollen of the adjacent Siberia … It is by this kind of “selection” that new varieties are created or that Darwin gradually gets more cold tolerance into a random collection of tomatoes in an open pollinated garden.

    I’ll be saving seeds from the ‘first fruit’ on each plant to enhance earliness and cold tolerance in my stock. I typically save first and last fruit for seeds. My way of pushing to faster earlier start and longer season cold tolerance. Last year my “last fruit” was seeded out in January after a mild frost… This is the first year I’ve trialed “4th of July” – it is supposed to be a very fast short season variety, but the cold has slowed it down enough that the Siberia is beating it handily.

    That’s one of the other ways a plant is a thermometer. It has a direct proportional growth with temperature. The cold tolerant grow rampantly when the ones that need warmth sulk and grow slowly.

    http://tomclothier.hort.net/page11.html

    Has a wonderful chart of the growth rate vs temperature of germinating seeds on the same graph as germination vs temperature.

    It surprised me somewhat to see so many varieties with the same optimal germination temperature. The “days to germination” seem to vary more than the optimal center point. Almost everything seems to center on about 72-75 F, the same temperature people like… Wonder what the optimal Global Average Temperature might be… (it isn’t snow…)

    There are a few cold tolerant types (that I’ve tended to focus on and have biased my expectation of a wide range of germination temps). It’s going to be harder to calibrate my “plant soil temperature garden” in that I’m going to need to base it off of “days since planting” per seed type rather than absolute temp per seed type. In retrospect, my Dad always talked about days since planting…. hmmm … wonder if The Old Man knew something that The Kid didn’t quite pick up on.

    Either that, or I’m going to need more varieties from more exotic ranges with greater variation in optimal germination temp…

    Oh, and notice that the germination percentage has a very well defined peak. One could make a decent thermometer out of a patch of seeds mapped onto a percentage density of germination / time to germinate nomograph…

    Conversely, the germination and harvest dates of crop records would make a dandy cross reference on assertions about temperature trends…

  96. smallz79 (10:18:43) : …changing the conclusions of a study in response to pressure from a funding source.

    they just want gr$$n results

    ;-)

  97. Friday/Saturday south of Calgary we received about 6 cm of the wet stuff(melted mostly on contact). Last night -2C (normal 7C). However, this is not Climate Change/AGW, but just wait until this summer when we get a hot spell and we will get a different story I bet! I thought Al Gore flew into this area for a speech….

  98. It is interesting how people from both sides of the coin either want:

    to stop the warming or see the cooling.

    Suppose in mathmatics it would be:

    (- -) = +

    On noes! We want the same thing! Cooling?!

    1. Stop the warming because its bad!
    2. Start the cooling because it’ll make them shutup! Hah!

  99. Many of the comments refer to personal insights into their local temperatures. If you from the USA, you can create a graph of a temperature station in your state.
    Scroll down to the State Map. (not the one on top)
    Click your state. Pick a location.
    Choose mean temperature vs. year
    Choose mean temperature, and plug in the years.
    Click Get Plot.
    http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/epubs/ndp/ushcn/usa_monthly.html

    Mine from Penna are here, scroll down 1/2 page
    http://www.nofreewind.com/climate.html
    I cherry picked 1998 to start and you can see the downward trend. Temperature have gone up slightly from 1890 to 2006. The temp trend line increased from 52.2F to 53.6F or 1.4F, that is in 120 years.

    Note: the graph says 2008 but data is only through 2006. Why? A few years ago I was able to go the Penn State Univ. climatology site and research historical climate data, however it is no longer publicly accessible without a special request. I don’t know where to get Pa. climate data from 2007-present. I suppose that link above is for data before the change in policy, unless I am missing something.

  100. Winnipeg has had five consecutive months below normal. Currently the daily highs are riding just slightly above the normal lows! I have coined a new word for this: SPRINTER – a poor excuse for both winter and spring!

  101. The last two years, several varieties of plants in my yard have died over the winter…. varieties that ordinarily thrive here….so, when does weather cease to be weather, and become climate? :-)

  102. James Allison (02:33:46) : The solution – he swallowed them. Very novel I thought.

    Egads man! The “recovery” would be, er, um, nevermind…

    I presume it worked? Many seeds are “designed” such that a bird can eat them an poop them out elsewhere ready to go with fertilizer “packet”. But we are not birds… Just remember not to chew! I’m gonna need to remember that one…

    FWIW, it is easy for small seeds to get caught in a pants cuff and / or stuck to a sock that just happened to get turned inside out for making a sock ball while packing… Accidentally, of course… Always check thoroughly to assure that you are not violating seed import rules by inspecting such places…

    Seed Savers Exchange is a great way to get “odd” varieties. There is often someone already “inside” a geography that has the variety already…

    http://www.seedsavers.org/

    It is basically a “peer to peer” network of heirloom gardeners preserving varieties. Kind of F.451 ish in a way… you pick a seed (or a few seeds) “to be” and propagate / preserve them… I have a ‘seed freezer’ on the porch, with a deep archive of a few dozen types, so I don’t quit fit the mold. I’m still searching for which “one” to be… At the moment I’m thinking maybe a fodder beet or an open pollinated sugar beet (both severely near extinction) but next month, who knows… (Focus, come on, focus, pick ONE to stick with and reliably offer to the world… ;-)

    One could probably get a global warming metric off of the varieties offered by folks in a given geography each year. “Crop Failures” sometimes make varieties scarce in a region…

  103. Oh, Cool!
    This site also gives you yearly precipitation totals from the early 1900’s through recent. I just did about 10 states throughout the US and can see the ENORMOUS yearly variability, but NO CLEAR TREND over the past 80’s. There are MANY years where precipitation is well above or below the mean.
    Flood and Droughts are regular occurrences….how convenient…and us chumps will pay!

    http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/epubs/ndp/ushcn/usa_monthly.html

  104. Dodgy Geezer (04:12:50) : Here is a reference to a time-measuring ‘floral clock’…http://scienceblogs.com/clock/2007/05/carolus_linnaeus_floral_clocks.php

    Thanks! I needed that! (I’d vaguely remembered seeing a story like this somewhere but had lost the pointer…)

  105. VERY sorry for multiple posts, but after reading the comment above on why the glaciers index has not been updated since 2006. I impelled to say the same about the NOAA Atlantic Hurricane indexes. How hard can it be to add a few numbers to a table for 2008?
    Here is through 2007, note 2005 was a big Major Hurricane year, but less than 1950 and tied with 1961(approx).

    Now for Accumulated Cyclone Index or “energy” of the storms.

    Here is the RAW Data.
    http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/hurdat/original_revisedHURDATtable_mar09.html
    Here is the Global & Northern Hemi Accum Cylcone Index, another source.

    And for a Sunday afternoon, here is the best IPCC dropout denier story of all.
    http://sciencepolicy.colorado.edu/prometheus/archives/science_policy_general/000318chris_landsea_leaves.html

  106. To everyone, if you want warm weather go to Asia right now, plenty warm in many areas according to the world forecast maps from Intellicast, mainly north of the Himalayas and the Middle East

    And we’re supposed to get up to 96 today before seeing a sizable cooldown so we’re getting our first really summery bout of weather, in the paper they show some Kansas towns forecast to have temps. only in the low 80’s and upper 70’s and 60 miles away other towns in the 90’s. So lots of temp. variation over North America and possibly other places right now.

  107. Allan M R MacRae (11:32:19) :

    You’re right, it did work. It’s that I expected to see your name at the top. I didn’t scroll down.

  108. JP (07:10:41) : I wonder how this will effect the summer wheat there. Here in Northern Indiana, a cool, very wet Spring has forced many farmers to forgo corn planting, and instead plant beans. However, many fields still have standing water, which means they will likely remain fallow this year.

    Thanks for that ‘on the ground’ info. I was betting on it, but had not gotten confirmation and was a bit nervous …

    With the dollar falling, many investors will seek out commodities to hedge thier portfolios. Corn prices could begin to creep-up again. Perhaps we’re in the beginning of a commodities bubble similar to the one we saw in 2006- to mid 2008.

    A bit early for talk of a ‘bubble’. At present it’s more of “off a bottom”. For those “home gamers” not into futures contract, there are Exchange Traded Notes ( ETN ) and Exchange Traded Funds ( ETF ) that neatly package these things into a “stock ticker” you can buy in your IRA or stock account. They also handle all the mechanics of rolling contracts forward into new months and managing expirations, delivery, all that stuff.)

    In exchange for the information about “facts on the ground”, I offer a bit of info as to what you can do with it. My typical “go to” tickers are MOO, JJG, COW, and sometimes DBA. I’m familiar with them. “New hot ideas” are a couple of Chinese hog farmers (doing better than SFD Smithfield or HRL Hormel by a long shot right now) but speculative.

    MOO is an “inputs basket”. Monsanto, Mosaic, Potash, etc. (I sold mine last week. I think the inputs may have “topped” for a little while probably on the fallow percent rising… but I’m trading not long term investing. I’ll be back into it when the price is moving up again.) For details on holdings see:

    http://finance.yahoo.com/q/hl?s=moo

    DBA is an ag basket. A mix of wheat, soybeans, corn, sugar. For details see:

    http://finance.yahoo.com/q/hl?s=DBA

    JJG is a similar grains basket, but minus the sugar.
    JJA purports to be a broader basket (perhaps with animals included?) but I have not investigated it. It seems to move like DBA.
    SGG is sugar. Rose, now gone flat at the higher level.
    NIB is Cocoa. Presently looks like a “flat roller” suitable for cycle trades.
    JO is coffee. Presently doing about the same as DBA.

    The tropicals (NIB, JO, BAL – cotton ) don’t show much response to cold in the N.H. and seem to mostly be moving on $ changes and a bit of local rain issues. I’m not following them closely at the moment, but JO is interesting to me.

    So what AM I actively watching and trading?

    COW is a basket of cows, pigs, and chickens. (goes DOWN on first grain price rise as farmers clear out animal inventory that wants feed, THEN goes UP LATER). A bit early now – still in a down trend, but watch if for the upturn after cattle and hogs have been sold off on rising feed costs.

    HOGS is a slightly speculative Chinese hog farmer. A bet on prosperous Chinese getting more Sweet & Sour Pork and Mushu Pork in their diet. On a rocket ride at the moment, so don’t put in large money. Just a tiny bit of Las Vegas money… FEED is a similar Chinese Hog company, but also processes feed grains. Also on a rocket ride and speculative. Small position (like 1% of holdings) only… I don’t own any yet .

    I presently own JJG as a long term hold through this season and I’m looking at a “tiny” of HOGS and / or FEED as a mad money gamble. I’m trading MOO on a faster chart as a cyclical economy / farm economy barometer.

    So yes, I expect there to be rising food prices driven by rising grain prices. First in grain based products, then in meat a bit later. Oh, and FUD is a “food basket” per the advertizing, but I don’t know much about it… JJG is rising a bit faster and FUD is thinly traded, so I’ve just stayed with JJG

    The chart shows JJG as rising nicely off a bottom. HOGS rocket ride. MOO rising into a flat moment. Commodities can be very volatile, so don’t put on a large position in any of these unless you are fond of the bucking ride… These are more trade vehicles than 5 year investments.

    i.e. a futures contract will never “grow” into a world dominating Google. Next season it will be starting over at neutral again…) So HOGS is a company, you can own a little and hope for Chinese prosperity and pork dinners. MOO is a basket of companies and will also grow as agriculture grows (and lets a farmer own a bit of “the other side of the contract” to hedge their position against the folks trying to suck all their money out of them ;-) JJG is a futures contract basket and will oscillate, but not much else.

    http://bigcharts.marketwatch.com/charts/big.chart?symb=jjg&compidx=aaaaa%3A0&comp=dba+moo+hogs&ma=4&maval=25&uf=7168&lf=2&lf2=4&lf3=1024&type=4&size=3&state=15&sid=2913190&style=320&time=7&freq=1&nosettings=1&rand=6542&mocktick=1

  109. Clive, Allan M R MacRae, and others in Alberta:

    Many (not all, but many) people who live to the South of us believe that we live in an eternal winter climate… we’re Canada for crying out loud, don’t we live in igloos and get to work with a dog sled?

    However, this IS unusual. I recall the big May blizzard in 86 and the snowfall in August in 92 (Pinatubo weather), and 2005’s June was pretty much all rain… but not real accumulation of actual snow in June!

    I don’t like cold. If it were up to me we’d have 100 degree days and 80 degree nights, year round. I’d rather use the air conditioner than the heater. I’d rather watch girls in bikinis than winter coats, and I’d rather fish in my lake than skate on it.

  110. Northern Europe is very cold too just now. We had a few very nice days at the end of May, and then the bottom dropped out. Night before last there was widespread frost in central and southern Sweden, which while not unique is quite rare in June. Norrköping (where the Swedish Meteorological Service (SMHI)) is situated hit +0.2 degrees centigrade. SMHI was very careful to point out that this was not a record, because June 12 1962 was even colder, which is probably true. Still, something that only happens every 50 years must be considered decidedly unusual.

  111. Arthur Glass (07:16:27) : I was in highschool during the ’60’s (not, I hasten to add, for the whole decade),

    Braggart!

  112. Okay, oh wow (the article linked below) O.o
    http://www.accuweather.com/news-story.asp?partner=netweather&traveler=0&zipChg=1&article=9

    So it says here some areas in the Northern US to the Northeast will have a ‘year without a summer’!?

    If I’m reading that right and it does happen, it could have some implications here in Kansas as well if we get cold fronts dropping out of those areas because the Northern US is directly north a ways from us.

    I guess we’ll be saying hello to rollercoaster temps. if it means cold fronts all Summer from the Northern US and 90/100 degree heat popping up between fronts from Texas and the desert Southwest. O.O

  113. Retired Engineer (07:58:10) : My parka won’t fit in my carry-on.

    WEAR IT onto the aircraft (Unbuttoned and flapping open to stay cool enough).

    Once aboard, ask the cabin attendant to hang it in the closet, please. Most aircraft have a hanging up place. In The Old Days one of the tricks was to carry on a “suit bag” with hanger and hand it to the attendant on boarding. Then take the briefcase with you to the seat. Don’t know if present rules still let you do that, but it was a nice “cheat” to get 2 carry ons and only deal with one ;-)

  114. I think AlGore should devote his time to freeing those two reporters over in North Korea….a new job and maybe another “Nobel,” (like Arafats or something).it’s obvious his Global Warming Religion is in the tank now. Messiahs never came (Millerites, Armstrong-ites, &c), and Al’s GW and rising oceans ain’t comin’ either.

    I got my 4th load of wood in yesterday. One load is Western Larch, highest BTU’s we have in our area per cord…I need 3 more loads to fend off the Electrical Company this coming “Global Cooling” (oops, winter). It’s 50 degrees outside right now. Isn’t going to make 80 until late this week (but the weatherman has been way off all “spring”).

    Another thing we’ve had this season is incredible infestations of bugs…aphids making my Plum tree look like it has Leprosy. Everyone is complaining about the
    proliferation of bugs. So what? Weak plants invite infestations…

  115. Don’t develop your economies or create jobs! Destroy both and live on carbon credits!

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/8083706.stm

    So our pompous savetheworldists want poor nations to live on welfare that may not even be received by all those who would become jobless. What are those people supposed to do with their lives?

    The solution should be to ask them to grow new trees specifically for palm oil and leave most of their traditional forests intact, or at least create a sustainable cycle of seeding, cultivation and harvesting. That isn’t even suggested as an idea but putting the brakes on human development is.

  116. Arn Riewe (08:33:55) : How about “condensed crystalline water vapor”?

    No… “condensed” sounds too much like solids…. and water vapor brings up images of rain.

    Clearly “crystalline steam” gives a much better image… and it sounds scary too!

  117. anna v (10:14:21) : Tides. The crust itself moves almost 40 cms as the bulge of the moon’s pull goes around. Metastable states could be affected by this at faults, where enough energy has built up and just needs a trigger.

    I’ve actually made a “minor prediction” some time ago of higher quake risk for my area for the next major tide date of June 2x or so here:

    http://chiefio.wordpress.com/2009/03/09/are-we-quaking/

    I’d also pointed out that May 2x, 2009 was almost as high. That’s when we had the big quake in Honduras… Timing was good, location was off a bit ;-)

    The tide chart shows the “new moon” as a bit higher than the “full moon”.

  118. Just on the news here in the UK: the MET office issued a “prognosis” for the year 2080 (yes, 2080) stating that summer temperatures in Devon could by then go as high as 41 C, at least 10 degrees C higher than the highest ones expected now.

    In the meantime people are wrapping themselves in warm clothes to ward off the blimming cold … It appears that the more evidence for a cooling world, the more outrageous become the predictions. I observe a clear anti-correlation there.

  119. CodeTech (12:12:56) : Many (not all, but many) people who live to the South of us believe that we live in an eternal winter climate… we’re Canada for crying out loud, don’t we live in igloos and get to work with a dog sled?

    How silly of them, and how rooted in an image of a long gone past. Everyone knows that times have changed and you now use snowmobiles ;-)

  120. Everyone knows that times have changed and you now use snowmobiles

    Translation: Good day, everyone knows that times have changed and you now use snowmobiles, eh.

  121. As you will have read elsewhere in this thread, the weather in the UK has been variable recently. After a very welcome few days of hot weather last weekend things began to change – as they do – this is England after all. I work at a University and on Friday I did not take a jacket or coat as it had been so pleasant and the Met Office did not predict rain until Friday evening. Imagine my surprise (or not) when the rain started on my journey to work at 8am!
    The rain was so heavy at lunch time that I only managed to dash out quickly to check out the World Environment Day effort in the Quad. No sign of the promised barbeque (not sure if it was charcoal-free or not) but a few students hurriedly rushing past the marquee en route to more interesting destinations (exams almost finished).
    Meanwhile tonight BBC TV programmes such as ‘Countryfile’ which I used to enjoy can’t let any report go without mentioning the horrors of climate change – CO2 was given a break briefly as they reported on methane from household food waste – ‘hundreds of times more DANGEROUS’ than CO2. Surely someone is going to seriously question this **** soon? (My own asterisks)……… Thank you for this blog Anthony. I log on several times a day and welcome every new report and comment. Nick.

  122. Aron (12:21:45) :
    Ed Zuiderwijk (13:04:53) :
    “…the MET office issued a “prognosis” for the year 2080…”

    The Met can’t even get it right for the current year.

  123. Warmer in the Artic than usual and cooler in the US, Europe, and NZ than usual. It’s that Russian HAARP thing.

    That’s the ticket.

  124. Ed Zuiderwijk (13:04:53) :
    It appears that the more evidence for a cooling world, the more outrageous become the predictions. I observe a clear anti-correlation there.

    It appears that they are trying to ‘name it, claim it’, or wishing upon a falling star.
    The Sun does NOT smile for them.
    I wouldn’t either. “Always with the Negative waves, Moriarity, always with the negative waves. Have a little faith, baby”.
    One has to wonder how such fatalistic prognoticators got mixed up with the “Audacity of Hope”.

  125. E.M.Smith (12:11:57) :
    According to David Archibald there is/will be, “a temperature100 kilometre equator-ward shift in growing conditions”
    Is this happening already in the NH?

  126. Anthony – you know that photo doesn’t prove anything! (at least, that’s what Joe Romm’s supporters would say)…

    REPLY: It proves there is snow on the ground, in June. – Anthony

  127. Hit a lot of places including Calgary, where I must travel tomorrow. That damn AGW!

  128. Nick
    the weather in the UK has been variable recently

    Not to mention the forecasts! The Met Office got into hot water over the recent Bank Holiday, when they forecast thunderstorms (that failed to materialise), thus sending visitors at some South coast resorts back home a day early, taking their spending money with them!

    Still, as long as they know what it’s going to do in 60 years’ time… :-)

    BTW, it’s currently 6 deg.C on my back fence, and I live in the Isle of Wight.

  129. For the record, Michael H. Anderson, there is no snow in Calgary, it was gone in a short time… but it was insulting that it piled up in the first place.

    Snowmobile? Y’all must be using your weird American terms. Up here we use a SkiDoo.

    :)

  130. Very pleased to see an extended discussion of plants, germination, latitude limits yada yada, from E.M.Smith and others. Can’t fake that stuff, because plants is plants.

    And enough Anecdotes, and there is Data….

    As Leonard Cohen once sang (Anthem)

    ‘There is a crack in everything. That’s how the light gets in’.

    Keep up the agricultural references, one and all.

  131. AllenCic (21:31:24) :

    A couple of inches of snow fell in Lassen National Park in northern California a couple of days ago. The National Park service just got last winter’s snow cleared from the road thru the park and open to the public the same day. Let’s see, some of last winters snow still left on the ground and we’ve got new snow already.

    Hmmmmmn.

    At what point in the year does spring end and the next season (fall obviously) begin?

    Is a crystalized steam storm falling on June 20 in the previous winter, but the same storm still falling on June 23 a sign of the next winter?

    (What if they declared a global warming and the temperature got colder?)

  132. Robert A Cook PE (17:19:57) : …At what point in the year does spring end and the next season (fall obviously) begin?
    There has been a shift in the actual temperatures start and end of seasons in both hemispheres, but David Archibald´s “temperature100 kilometre equator-ward shift in growing conditions” which could be translated for the SH in a similar equator ward temperature shift it seems it has not happened.

  133. If you haven’t seen a condition in 60 years, and tomorrow it happens, what would be your first reaction?
    1.) Oh, that’s happened before.
    2.) Wow, where did that come from?

    It’s human nature to go with #2.

    It’s also in us to breathe easier when a group has been calling for hellish heat but instead the place is cooling off.
    All, that is, except for those who are belching the flames.
    Be a good samaritan, offer them a RollAids.
    Hey, don’t they give Polar Bear Cubs an ice cold Coke(r) for a 30 below heatwave?

  134. Adolfo Giurfa (17:51:06) :

    Ah, but many of us are noticing a change in what grows, as opposed to what we have come to expect. A marked difference year on year for my NW. Ca locale.
    How about yours?

  135. I like these threads, I understand they are just a bit of fun and because of this they infuriate the [opponents]. This is good.
    Nothing to report from SE Queensland Australia, just a month of rain causing flooding and mayhem. All normal Aussie weather.

  136. rbateman (18:10:06) :..How about yours?T
    There is no change at all in my city except for the late start of summer, and consequently its late end. But as you can see here:

    Temperatures here if plotted and smoothed would be almost a straight line, however we clearly feel differences as humidity is very high. In “winter” it oversaturates producing a drizzle. We live in front of el Nino, so if you go to the beach and dip a finger in the pacific ocean waters you won´t need to see all those oranges and reds in some agencies charts. That´s why I said “there are no ninos around…la nina just went to the toilette to arrange herself and she´ll be back soon”. Red ink can not warm up any ocean.
    I think Ian Wilson´s theory is closer to what really happens:
    http://users.beagle.com.au/geoffsharp/wilsonforum2008.pdf

  137. How about simply Crystalline Vapor?
    When PC started too long ago to exactly remember a clever scientist described to me a particular situation as the Native North American in the combustible resource.

  138. Adam from Kansas (12:31:16) :

    Okay, oh wow (the article linked below) O.o
    http://www.accuweather.com/news-story.asp?partner=netweather&traveler=0&zipChg=1&article=9

    So it says here some areas in the Northern US to the Northeast will have a ‘year without a summer’!?

    ______________________________________________

    Here is the quote:
    “According to Long Range Expert Joe Bastardi, areas from the northern Plains into the Northeast will have a “year without a summer.” ”

    How are our grain supplies? Should I be panicking and stocking up on corn and wheat right now?

    What about all that corn needed for fuel ethanol? Should I sell my dual-fuel car?

    Will the price of beer and scotch go up? Now THAT would be a global crisis – Al Gore better head for the hills if that happens!

    But we can always rely on wind power to keep us warm, can’t we? …Can’t we? …CAN’T WE?

  139. “All wealth comes from the earth”
    Thomas Jefferson

    Grain is one of the unique commodities that is not existing.
    I’m afraid that only the tiny remnant of an agrarian society and a few
    other souls understand the meaning of this.

    Strategic petroleum reserve? Petroleum is an existing commodity, you can extract it when you desire.
    Strategic Grain reserve sounds much more comforting to me.

    Climate change is a fact. The error is vastly overestimating man’s power to effect the earth.

    A lesson in humility may be coming, I HOPE NOT but just in case, how about we
    store some grain?

  140. “Stuart Huggett (20:59:28) :

    What about the southern hemisphere? Skiing in NZ is starting at least 5 weeks early.”

    And too in Australia. Unfortunately, the politial damage is, or about to be, done. Nothing will be made in Australia, the UK, the US etc, it’ll all be made in India or China (Hummers now will be made in China) and you will pay, not only the price for the goods, but an import duty and a carbon tax on that import duty. Here in Australia we import frozen food from…..China. Give that a miss!

  141. farmersteve (19:52:11) :

    “A lesson in humility may be coming, I HOPE NOT but just in case, how about we
    store some grain?”

    ************************

    Excellent idea Steve. Instead of foolishly making corn ethanol we could start by storing all that corn – we may need it. But can we actually eat that stuff?

    I predicted (well actually Tim Patterson did when I asked him) global cooling in year 2020-2030 in a ~2003 newpaper article – but hope I’m wrong and the warmists are right – there’s always a first time… :^)

    Should we also be doing more work on frost-resistent crops? Not a subject I know much about – would appreciate comments from knowledgeable people.

    *************************

  142. Gary Pearse (05:26:04) :

    Andrew P (02:03:20) : and Thomas and Rys Jaggar

    Okay, so you corrected the altitude by 400m and yes Rys you are desperately reaching for the historic record to show that June snow all over the world is really just normal. Normal is a word your sect is generally loathe to use these days and it is definitely a synonym for notably below normal that your leaders order you to use only as a last resort

    Gary, I too would also appreciate a retraction. Like Rhys, I am also not an AGW proponent (or member of any sect), as you would know if you read some of my other posts e.g. https://wattsupwiththat.com/2009/06/05/rss-global-temperature-anomaly-also-down-in-may-halving-the-april-value/ at 08:08.

    All I did was confirm the correct location of where the photo was taken, something which should be welcome by everyone on a scientific blog. Somehow, you managed to infer from my comment that I suscribe to the totally unproven and increasingly discredited AGW hypothesis. As I said, a polite apology or retraction would be welcome.

  143. Same happened in Finland, some snow in June. Won’t see that often, once in 100 years.

  144. Hi Anthony , and thank you again for wattsup.

    Apologies in advance for the following rant.

    Some contributors (here and elsewhere) have said that certain global warming alarmists are not dishonest, just incompetent.

    When so many in the media are writing alarmist nonsense about alleged catastrophic humanmade global warming, and Earth is actually cooling, it is probably immaterial whether the alarmists are liars or mere incompetents.

    These climate alarmists are all engaged in a huge costly deception which will place excessive, almost limitless political power in the hands of the ruling elite, at the expense of the average human being, democracy and freedom.

    The climate alarmists advocate massive misallocation of scarce global resources to address the false crisis of global warming, when real crises that kill tens of millions every year, like poor sanitation, malaria and poverty, go wanting.

    This is a highly immoral act of historic scope, and whether its proponents are scoundrels or mere imbeciles is of little consequence.

    Regards, Allan

  145. Allan M R MacRae wrote, “”Should we also be doing more work on frost-resistent crops? Not a subject I know much about – would appreciate comments from knowledgeable people.”

    Allan (from down here near Lethbridge where it froze once again last night … -1°C at 3 AM! … a record low for June 7.)

    Frost resistance is most complex. One of the key factors is the prevention of ice crystal formation in individual cells. (Simplistically, if crystals poke through the cell walls, they die.) Whereas, we grow a lot of GM crops in North America (canola and corn for example), the eco-weenie crowd shut down development of GM technology in many crops. For example, there are no GM potatoes grown anywhere in the WORLD because of idiotic “Frankenfood” nonsense from the green weenies. Almost certainly GM technology could make a significant contribution toward frost resistance. Most annual crops are frost resistance to some degree … say -0.5°C to -2°C. Seedling corn can withstand -3 or -4°C if it is young and the growing point is still below ground. The growing point of crops like canola are above ground from time of emergence and I htink canola can only withstand about -2°. I doubt of we could add more than one or two degrees of protection against frost with genetics anyway.

    Many years ago there was work being done on spraying crops with a bacteria that somehow prevented ice crystal formation. I’ve no idea where that ended up. Tissue ice crystal formation can be prevented with irrigation and this is used extensively on high-value crops like citrus. But this can’t be done on the crops we grown in Western Canada. (Whereas we do irrigate, the water HAS to be applied to the entire crop during the duration of the freeze..something that can’t be done on a large scale and with our irrigation systems. And most of our crops are not irrigated anyway.)

    I am NOT current in frost protection technology.

    But frost resistance is only one aspect of crop production where climate is compromised. Crops still require certain levels of “heat units” to produce their wares and they require time. Peas and beans are short-season crops, but unlike peas, beans must have relatively high minimum temperatures in order to “set fruit.” So we have frost free-period, heat units AND certain threshold minimums–well above frost.

    Without major breakthroughs in genetics, in Western Canada we would see a shift in types of crops if we lost (say) five or ten days in the growing season. Barley would replace wheat in many areas and pastures would replace barley land. Canola regions would be reduced (along with wheat). Ironically, agriculture could be forced more and more on cattle production which naturally are despised by extreme weenies…and is is VERY easy to overproduce cattle compared to demand. (But then again the cow farts would help warm us all.) Here in southern Alberta we could lose our dried-bean production and production of processing potatoes would be compromised. Overall output of “food stuffs” would be reduced. The “breadbaskets” of the world (Western Europe, North America and Russia), would be severely affected with a cooler climate. A one or two degree difference in annual temp can reduce actual production season significantly.

    BTW … forty years ago this week (June 11, 12 and 13) it lightly froze at various sites across southern Alberta. It caused a lot of crop loss. But that was back when we were being warned of a new ice age. Do you think? ☺

    Cheers!

    Clive

  146. “spring has been so cold in this area that most phenological events are running about 2-3 weeks behind schedule.”

    My own observation from Southern NJ. In 2007 the kids were in the pool by the middle of May. In 2008 it was Memorial Day (and that took some coaxing). This year they finally jumped in yesterday, June 7th and promptly jumped out complaining it was too cold.

    We’ve been having baseball playoff games this past week (when it hasn’t been raining) and the parents are bundled up in jackets and blankets begging for global warming.

  147. I like the idea of multi-storey greenhouses,I don’t know how practical they are,but it is an idea worth funneling some money into.Imagine a skyscraper filled with crops,it may happen one day.Sadly,it may be the future of some animals.

  148. I know Ethanol is not the answer alone however these points are often overlooked.

    1. It is a domestic renewable resource.
    2. It’s efficiency is dependant on the grain yield/acre and yields are climbing.
    3. Grain is both food and fuel which can be efficiently stored.

  149. “or crystal vapor for short.”

    The more technical name: “Crystalline greenhouse-gas precipitate”. Don’t get any of it on you!

  150. Noelene “I like the idea of multi-storey greenhouses,I don’t know how practical they are,but it is an idea worth funneling some money into.Imagine a skyscraper filled with crops,it may happen one day.”

    Not new concepts and researched back 30 years ago–and perhaps before.

    There are major issues with engineering (weight) and light transmission. This is mainly a light-transmission and accessibility to light issue. Once you go up, you create shade and shade will not produce crops at an economic level. And in any case, greenhouses are restricted to economic production of only a handful of food crops..most of them high-valued “luxury” crops that we could all live without … GH peppers and tomatoes an expensive way to get Vitamin C. Crops like carrots and broccoli simply are uneconomical in GHs. Trucking from “down south” is less expensive.

    GHs are indeed a great way to produce crops and offer fresh food in winter. But alas, greenhouses are not the answer to “feeding the masses” .. and besides they are terribly expensive to heat in winter…no matter whether the go up or out. Here in western Canada (and most places in the Northern Hemisphere) a GH uses as much energy from Nov thru Feb (4 months) as it does the other 8 months and yet productivity is relatively low.
    http://www.actahort.org/members/showpdf?booknrarnr=148_14

    Compared to GHs, it would be more economical to grow (say) crops like carrots and cabbage in summer and store them…we can do that for up to ten months. Yet storages are expensive and anyway who wants to eat cabbage all winter? Not I. So we build greenhouses for some crops and and import fruits and veggies much of the year.

    The “100-mile-diet” is a wonderful “green” concept … it just cannot not provide food for the masses in winter in the Northern Hemisphere.

    Cheers!

    Clive

  151. One of the new bio-fuel propositions is vertical algae farms. Not all that different than multiple story greenhouses.

    BTW, the last two days here in Southern MN have had highs 20F below normal. Looks like today will be the same. It’s not unusual to have cool, rainy weather like this in April/May but we didn’t get much this year. We have had some very low humidities this spring which also seems unusual. Most of the rain has stayed in the mid part of the country. It does seem like an unusual pattern overall in the US. Where is the Bermuda high?

  152. Clive (06:58:39) One of the key factors is the prevention of ice crystal formation in individual cells
    Glycerol prevents icy crystal formation, it’s a simple secret but how to put it within the cells? I don’t know that.
    In any case, you know potato and tomato, both, along with thousands of other crops were developed by the Inca culture, here in Peru, where you could get the original wild varieties. We currently eat a variety unknown for you: The yellow potato, which is delicious to taste. You can also get here a PURPLE CORN, which we use it for drink and porridges.
    Check:
    http://www.cipotato.org/

  153. From the Office of the New Jersey State Climatologist.

    “Near average temperatures and precipitation in May made for rapidly growing lawns and blossoming plants. Statewide, the preliminary monthly temperature was 61.3°. This was the 42nd warmest May of the past 115 years (tied with 1969), coming in 0.8° above average. Monthly precipitation across the state averaged 4.38″. This was 0.08″ above average, but due to the skewness of monthly rainfall to the low side it was the 36th wettest, not as close to the center point (57th or 58th place) as one might expect”

    I’ll vouch for that ‘rapidly growing lawn’ statement, since I’ve had to mow ~500 square feet six times so far.

    But May 2008 was significantly cooler.

    The English teacher in me wonders if the noun ‘skewness’ has ever been used before; indeed that entire sentence is not at all clear to me.

  154. Guys, guys (and a few gals)…you are responding to only one aspect of the impact of carbon. It’s not just global warming, but climate change. Carbon’s impact is two sides of the same coin. all this unpredictability is only manifested by the massive increase in man made Carbon. Weather events like this do not indicate that carbon is not effecting, massively, our climate.

    blink blink blink..uh…Where am I? I think I was reviewing “An Inconvenient Truth” before my son is compelled to watch it as part of a section on Science Ethics…apparently I had a psychotic break.

  155. ‘ “All wealth comes from the earth”
    Thomas Jefferson.’

    Somebody tell George Soros.

  156. Richard M (08:13:33) : “One of the new bio-fuel propositions is vertical algae farms. Not all that different than multiple story greenhouses.”

    I don’t know from algae farms and don’t know the light requirements of algae farms and the economics. But I know you can’t shade light intensive crops and expect economical production. (It can be done with lights…it can’t be done economically.) Artificial lighting is counter intuitive and has never been shown to be economically feasible for large-scale food production … just too expensive and CA growth chambers (that’s what you’d end up with) are rife with production problems … always will be.

    The simple answer is greenhouse crops can’t be grown economically in multi-storied structures unless you want to pay $30 a pound for tomatoes … obviously just a guess. We are talking about feeding the world, not a few wealthy people. Even if we could do it, the other question is why would you want to? What benefit? Certainly not in structural costs or energy savings. (Sort of boils down to heating vs. lighting.)

    GHs are for producing luxury foods, not feeding the masses in an economical manner. They are big business in the Western World because we like our tomatoes and peppers for more than 2 or 4 months each year.

    The exposed surface area of a multi-story GH is indeed < than that of a single-story structure, but given the lighting costs and structural issues this won't ever fly economically compared to other methods including transporting food long distances (in winter) and storage of more mundane crops like cabbage and carrots (say).

    Energy conservation in single-story GHs is well in hand and they are somewhat energy efficient given the limitations on structure re: light penetration. Cost/sq. m. of single-layer GHs are quite low and land is inexpensive.

    As I said multi-story GHs will indeed work. They were not economically feasible 30 years ago when I was involved … and won't fly today.

    Cheers!

    Clive

  157. Freddie Stoller (11:12:22) :..And last weekend it was snowing again and the pass had to be closed
    In Svensmark’s “The chilling stars” you’ll find several references to Swiss Alp passes and solar minimums. That is a clear indication now that global warming has changed to “climate change”. HE is always right.

  158. Two years ago we moved south to Kentucky to get warmer, but last week it got down to 55. I don’t know where else to go. The cold is bad for my health, but I can’t keep uprooting my family.

  159. Arthur Glass (09:20:26) :

    “The timing of the seasons are not changing astronomically – believe me: astrophysicists understand these things.”

    What about the precession of the equinoxes?

    The seasons aren’t changing much beyond the nearly 6 hour shift each year, the Gregorian calendar makes the year be 365.2425 days long, pretty close to the 365.2422 length it should be. (I think Russia has a calendar where they get closer, but the first deviation from the Gregorian calendar is a few centuries away.)

    Precession is a 26,000 year cycle and affects the timing of Earth’s apohelion and perihelion. Those shift one day every 71 years, so it shouldn’t have much impact. over a few lifetimes.

    We can actually see the change in that, though official dates are affected significantly by the position of the moon.

  160. Chris Schoneveld (05:45:35) :

    Despite the general global warming fear, everybody I know (even those who believe in AGW) is hoping for a nice warm summer.

    I’m 3/4 Swedish and have a lot of outdoors work to do this summer. I’d be happy if it stayed below 80F in central New Hampshire, though I do like tomatoes and corn. How about hot weeks and cool weekends?

    Allan M R MacRae (19:43:02) :

    Here is the quote:
    “According to Long Range Expert Joe Bastardi, areas from the northern Plains into the Northeast will have a “year without a summer.”

    Dang, is my critique of the silly “The Day after Tomorrow,” 2016: The [Next] Year without a Summer, a blown forecast?

  161. Clive (04:55:15) :

    Allan M R MacRae wrote, “”Should we also be doing more work on frost-resistent crops? Not a subject I know much about – would appreciate comments from knowledgeable people.”

    Clive wrote:
    “BTW … forty years ago this week (June 11, 12 and 13) it lightly froze at various sites across southern Alberta. It caused a lot of crop loss. But that was back when we were being warned of a new ice age. Do you think? ☺”

    ________________

    Thank you Clive, a most helpful and informative post.

    2009 minus 40 = 1969, towards the end of the cooling period from ~1945-1975, ~six years before the famous ~1975 cover articles on global cooling in Time and Newsweek.

    This was the last major negative PDO cycle and it lasted ~30 years. The recent positive PDO cycle lasted ~27 years until ~2002.

    Will we now get a 30-year negative PDO? Hard to tell for certain. My guess, for what it is worth, is we will, but the most serious cooling will happen later, by 2020-2030. Today’s chill is just a little taste of the future.

  162. Well, it hasn’t been snowing down here in southern New Mexico, but it hasn’t been all that hot either, and around here that is something to write home about. Our local newspaper was proclaiming “Early Summer” back near the beginning of May when they cherry picked some downtown temperatures of 100 degrees taken next to a blacktop road. That day the temperature was only 93 F at the airport on the edge of town.

    Since that single day the temperature has never returned to near 100. In fact, this is the coolest June I can remember since perhaps 1986-7. That year we got nearly 16 inches of rainfall, double our normal 8 inches. This year has been more unusual since it hasn’t featured that much precipitation, just cooler than normal temperatures.

  163. Well well well. For the FOURTH night in a row we are covering the tomatoes here in southern Alberta. Froze the past three nights and warnings again for tonight! Absolutely crazy weather!!

    We are ~ 25 days past the mean day for last frost…probably (just a guess) we are ten days past one standard deviation from the mean date.

    Talked to a farmer today. Some of their canola has been frozen..not sure how widespread the damage has been. It ain’t good.

    Al Gore can kiss my frozen ______. ☺ (snip?? ☺)

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