173 thoughts on “Open Thread Weekend

  1. Has there been any reliable proof of the existence of a link between the ozone hole/s and man-made ozone-depleting substances? Wasn’t there observation of the ozone hole dilating before the rise of anthropogenic ozone-depleting chemicals?

    I don’t trust any assertions coming from the human-bashing environmentalists. The ozone story smacks of global warming, DDT, biodiversity crisis, etc.

  2. As a UK citizen, it would be interesting to know if a US citizen could take Obama to court over the blatant lies he told in his recent climate speech, perhaps based on the charge of fraud or willful deception?

  3. All,

    Don’t know if you have seen this but it is something.

    The claims made here are mind numbing. Hard to watch.
    He starts by mentioning Gavin Schmidt and Michael Mann are there.

    Side note — The way the guy squirms, did the guy have to take a leak?

    AGU Chapman Conference — Climate Science: Richard Alley

    Published on Jun 28, 2013
    AGU Chapman Conference on Communicating Climate Science: A Historic Look to the Future
    08 June 2013 — 13 June 2013, Granby, CO, USA
    Presenter: Richard Alley
    Sunday, June 9, 2013, 1:00 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
    Session: New and Bleeding Edge Topics in Climate Science I
    Abstract Title: State of the Climate System

  4. This is one of the first excellent articles that I read on climate, after the publication of the hockey stick scare, and have recovered it from a pdf format so that others can read it in a much more readable format.

    Scientists Ask Why World Climate Is Changing; Major Cooling May Be Ahead
    By WALTER SULLIVAN
    New York Times

    The world’s climate is changing. Of that scientists are firmly convinced. But in what direction why are subjects of deepening debate.

    There are specialists who say that a new ice age is on the way-the inevitable consequence of a natural cyclic process, or as a result of man-made pollution of the atmosphere. And there are those who say that such pollution may actually head off an ice age.

    Sooner or later a major cooling of the climate is widely considered inevitable. Hints that it may already have begun are evident. The drop in mean temperatures since 1950 in the Northern Hemisphere has been sufficient, for example, to shorten Britain’s growing season for crops by two weeks.

    As noted in a recent report of the National Academy of Sciences, “The global patterns of food production and population that have evolved are implicitly dependent on the climate of the present century.”

    Vulnerability to climate change, it says, is “all the more serious when we recognize that our present climate is in fact highly abnormal, and that we may already be producing climatic changes as a result of our own activities.”

    The first half of this century has apparently been the warmest period since the “hot spell” between 5,000 and 7,000 years ago immediately following the last ice age. That the climate, at least in the Northern Hemisphere has been getting cooler since about 1950, is well established-if one ignores the last two winters.

    It had been forecast by some specialists that last winter would be exceptionally cold, but as all ice skaters know, it was unusually mild in the New York area. In Boston it was the warmest in 22 years and in Moscow it was the second warmest in 230 years.

    A major problem in seeking to assess the trend is to distinguish year-to-year fluctuations from those spread over decades, centuries and thousands of years.

    Lack of agreement as to the factors that control climate change make it particularly difficult to assess current trends. Of major importance, therefore, is the debate as to the cause of such changes and the role of human activity in bringing them about. Among the major hypotheses are the following:

    1. Solar Energy Variations
    The amount of solar energy reaching the earth’s surface at anyone place and time of year varies because of changes in the earth’s orbit and the tilt of its spin axis (The extent of that tilt determines the extent of seasonal changes).

    There are also slight variations in the amount of energy radiated by the sun. They
    follow the 11-year sunspot cycle and relate chiefly to solar ultraviolet radiation.

    Dr. Walter Orr Roberts, former head of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., believes he has found a correlation between this cycle and weather phenomena such as jetstream behavior and droughts in the high plains east of the Rocky Mountains.

    The droughts, he believes, tend to occur either in step with the l l-year cycle or with one of 20 to 22 years.

    Such links are doubted by Dr. J. Murray Mitchell Jr., climatologist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Environmental Data Service. He sees no plausible explanation of how such slight variations in solar energy could affect the massive weather phenomena responsible for droughts and floods.

    Tree-ring data from Nebraska and South Dakota, according to Dr. Mitchell, show that the pattern to which Dr. Roberts refers applies only to the last century. Whereas earlier-as far back as the 16th century – a major droughts occurred at irregular intervals generally longer than 20 years.

    Triggering of the ice ages by cyclic changes of the earth’s spin axis and orbit was proposed as early as the nineteen twenties by a Yugoslav, Milutin Milankovitch. Because of tugging by the gravity of other planets, the orbit of the earth changes shape. Sometimes it is virtually circular. At other periods the earth’s distance from the sun varies during each year by several million miles.

    At present, 6 per cent more solar radiation reaches the earth on Jan. 14 than it does six months earlier or later, tempering northern winters. This variation In the shape of the orbit occurs in a cycle of about 93,000 years.

    The tilt of the spin axis with respect to the earth’s orbit around the sun varies from 22.0 to 24.5o degrees over a period or some 41,000 years. The aim of the axis with respect to the stars also rotates once every 26,000 years, causing precession of the equinoxes.

    For many years the combined effects of these variations, seemed too subtle to account for the ice- ages, but recent discoveries have won converts for modernized versions of the Milankovitch thesis.

    From the chemical composition of Pacific sediments, from studies of soil types in Central Europe and from fossil plankton that lived in the Caribbean it has been shown that in the last million years there have been considerably more ice ages than previously supposed.

    According to the classic timetable, four great ice ages occurred. However, the new records of global climate show seven extraordinarily abrupt changes in the last million years. As noted in the academy report, they represent transition in a few centuries, “from full glacial to full interglacial conditions.”

    Many scientists now consider it established that expansions of glaciers in the Southern Hemisphere coincided with the northern ice ages. Land areas, however, are meager in southern latitudes comparable to those that were heavily glaciated in the north.

    Dr. George J. Kukla of Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory has proposed a way in which small variations in solar energy falling on the middle latitudes-as in the Milankovitch concept-could affect the climate.

    It is the extent to which northern seas and land areas become covered with snow and ice in the fall. When such cover is extensive, as in the fall of 1971, the white surface reflects sunlight back into space and there is a reduction in heating of the atmosphere.

    This prolongs the northern winter and cools the globe. In 1971, according to images from earth satellites, autumn snow and ice cover increased by 1.5 million square miles.

    The following year was one of freak weather throughout much of the world. The winter was exceptionally cold in North America, the Mediterranean and other areas. Severe drought struck many parts Asia and Europe.

    The implication was that a change in solar input that was slight, but sufficient to increase autumn snow and ice cover substantially, could eventually lead to a major climate change.

    From a reworking of the Milankovitch calculations Dr. Kukla has found that solar energy falling on the atmosphere in the autumn hit a minimum 17,000 years ago, at the height of the last ice age. It reached a maximum some 6,000 years ago, when the world became warmest since the last ice age.

    While the theory is, as yet, far from being a full explanation for climate changes it suggests, he said, that a trend toward cooling will continue for the next 4,000 years even though, since 1973, autumn snow cover has diminished somewhat.

    2. Pendulum Swings

    Some scientists believe that the ice ages are a product of cyclic phenomena affecting the flow of heat from the tropics to the polar region through the sea and air.

    Most of the solar energy that enters the oceans and drives the winds is received in the tropics and carried poleward. The polar regions radiate more energy into space than they receive from the sun, but ocean currents and winds bring in enough heat-or almost enough-to make up the deficit.

    Until a few years ago some persons suspected that the presence or absence of pack ice covering the Arctic Ocean might play a key role in this delicately balanced process. An absence of pack ice, when ocean currents were carrying considerable heat into that ocean, would allow evaporation and the resulting moist winds would shed the snows of an ice age. Periodic freezing of the ocean would end the glaciation.

    Recently, however, sediment samples extracted from the floor of the Arctic Ocean have shown that it was apparently never free of ice between the ice ages, even though before they began that ocean does appear to have been open.

    In fact, according to Dr. G. Kenneth Hare, professor of geography at the University of Toronto, fossils from the Arctic islands of Canada, the Soviet Union and from Greenland all indicate an ice-free ocean with “luxuriant” forests along its shores.

    Another proposal regarding built-in pendulum swings of climate is that of Dr. Reginald E. Newell, professor of meteorology at the Massachusetts Institute of technology. He believes ice ages are initiated when energy losses at high latitudes exceed energy gains in the tropics-a state that may exist at present.

    An ice age ends, in this concept, when enough of the ocean becomes ice covered to curtail the escape of heat being carried poleward by ocean currents. At the present stage of such a cycle, he said in a recent article, surface water in polar seas would be growing cooler, “in the slow process that will lead to the next ice age.”

    In a recent issue of the British journal Nature, Drs. Reid A. Bryson and E. W.
    Wahl of the Center for Climate Research at the University of Wisconsin cite records from nine North Atlantic weather ships indicating that from 1951 to the 1968-1972 period surface water temperatures dropped steadily.

    The fall was comparable, they reported, to a return to the “Little Ice Age” that existed from 1430 to 1850. It was early in this period that pack ice apparently isolated the Norse colony in Greenland and led to its extinction. The temperature drop in the North Atlantic carried it one sixth of the way to the level of a full-fledged ice age, according to Drs. Bryson and Wahl.

    Unfortunately, they said, several of these weather stations are being discontinued so that monitoring future trends will be difficult. Dr. Bryson attributes recent droughts in Africa and elsewhere to a southward displacement of the rain-bearing monsoons.

    A similar change occurred in about 1600 B.C , he believes. The monsoon rains no longer reached northwest India. Fresh water lakes that had been there for 7,000 years dried into salt beds and the Indus Empire that had spread over the region for 1,500 years was destroyed.

    3. Man-Made Influence

    There is general agreement that introducing large amounts of smoke particles or carbon dioxide into the atmosphere can alter climate. The same would be true of generating industrial heat comparable to a substantial fraction of solar energy falling on the earth. The debate centers on the precise roles of these effects and the levels of pollution that would cause serious changes.
    Carbon dioxide in the air acts like glass in a greenhouse. It permits solar energy to reach the earth as visible light, but it impedes the escape of that energy into space in the form of heat radiation (at infrared wave lengths).

    Dr. Mitchell has pointed out that a variety of factors determine the role of carbon dioxide on earth. For example, the extent to which that gas, introduced into the atmosphere by smokestacks and exhaust pipes is absorbed by the oceans depends on the temperature of surface waters.

    This, in turn, is affected by climate, leading to so called feedback effects. Plants consume carbon dioxide at rates that depend on temperature and the abundance of that gas in the air, complicating predictions of their role.

    The observatory atop Mauna Loa, the great Hawiian volcano, has recorded a steady rise in the annual mean level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, amounting to 4 per cent between 1958 and 1972. That, however was a period of global cooling- not the reverse, as one would expect from a greenhouse effect.

    The Mauna Loa observatory has also recorded a steady rise in atmospheric turbidity-the extent to which particles overhead dim the brightness of the sun. The academy study finds that human activity over the last 120 years has contributed more to this atmospheric dust than have volcanic eruptions.

    However, it says, the present atmospheric load of man-made dust is perhaps only one fifth what was thrown into the stratosphere by the volcanic explosion of Krakatoa in 1883. The role of atmospheric dust is complex, for it cuts off sunlight from the earth, but is itself heated by that light, warming levels of atmosphere in which it resides.

    Until recently the idea that ice ages are initiated by intense volcanic activity was unpopular for lack of evidence for such activity. The hypothesis has gained more credence from the analysis of sediment cores extracted from the ocean floors by the drill ship Glomar Challenger.

    According to University or Rhode Island scientists, ash was far more common in layers laid down in the last two million years than in the previous 18 million years.

    If worldwide energy consumption continues to increase at its present rates, catastrophic climate changes have been projected by M. I. Budyko, a leading Soviet specialist. He says that the critical level will probably be reached within a century.

    This, he has written, will lead to “a complete destruction of polar ice covers.” Not only would sea levels rise but, with the Arctic Ocean free of ice, the entire weather system of the Northern Hemisphere would be altered.

    However, Dr. Mitchell has suggested, warming of the climate due to pollution might be enough to head off an ice age “quite inadvertently.”

    CAN THE TRUTH BE
    LEARNED?

    More precise knowledge of the past is certain to aid in choosing between various explanations for tong-term climate changes. The Greenland Ice Sheet Program, with
    American, Danish and Swiss participants, is drilling a series of holes into the crest of the Greenland ice in the hope, ultimately, of reconstructing a year-by-year record of climate for the last 100,000 years.

    So far the ice has been penetrated 1,325 feet, extending the record back 1,420 years. The yearly layers can be counted, like tree rings, in terms of summer and winter variation in the relative abundance of two forms of oxygen (oxygen 16 and oxygen 18). Their ratio indicates temperature at the time when the snow fell to term that layer of’ the ice sheet.

    The isotopes also reflect the long-term climate changes. A remarkable finding, reported in May 1 issue of Nature, is that the trends in Greenland for the period
    850 to 1700 A.D ., closely match the British record for 1100 to 1950. California tree
    rings show a climate record similar 10 the one in Britain.

    The implication is a lag of 250 years between climate variations in Greenland and those in regions east and west of the Atlantic.

    If, in fact, the climatic cycles of Greenland precede those of Europe and North America by 250 years, a powerful means of prediction would be available. However, as noted in the Nature article, it is by no means certain that the effect is persistent.

    The Academy of Sciences report notes that any assessment of climate trends is crippled by a lack of knowledge: “Not only are the basic scientific questions largely unanswered, but in many cases we do not yet know enough to pose the key questions.”

    The oceans clearly play an important-and little understood-role. Not only are they the chief source of water in the atmosphere but they harbor a vast reservoir of thermal energy. “When the dynamics of the ocean-atmosphere interaction are better known, according to the report, “we may find that the ocean plays a more important role than the atmosphere in climate changes.”

    The report, including a wide range of proposals for national and international programs of research, was prepared by by the academy’s Committee for the Global Atmospheric Research Program, headed by Dr. Verner E. Suomi of the University
    of Wisconsin.

    In his preface Dr. Suomi notes that, by the end of this decade, space vehicles will be able, on a global scale to observe the sun’s output, energy reflected from the earth, distributions of clouds, snow and ice, as well as ocean temperatures. With these and other inputs a better understanding of how and why the climate is changing should become possible.

    Source: http://www.wmconnolley.org.uk/sci/iceage/ny-times-1975-05-21.pdf

    Walter Seager Sullivan, Jr (January 18, 1918 – March 19, 1996) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_S._Sullivan

    [Original article publishewd May 21,1975]

  5. vukcevic says:
    July 12, 2013 at 11:53 am

    In the UK we are having real great summer weather, it reminds me of the 1976’s summer,….

    Hold on just one damned second mister. The Met Office assured us a few weeks back that the UK should expect wetter, cooler summers as a result of global warming. Now they got a heatwave. Before that they predicted sizzlers which turned out wet.

    Oooops. My apologies Vuk. I forgot the rule about the Met Office. ;)

  6. @Steve Oregon –
    One really wonders what planet this coelenterate is on. This, in the face of all the data that proves the models are crap and it’s cooling, not warming? This guy has more balls and less brains than a sack of marbles.

  7. Thanks Vukcevic and Jimbo . . . .

    It’s a ‘balmy’ evening here in the UK. It’s just how it should be. All windows open, warm, no breeze, just wonderful. Eating dinner outside on the patio, glass of Sauvignon, glorious – up to the pub afterwards – just bring on the CO2!

    A complete contrast to the last 23 years of summers in the UK. 1990 was the last time I saw the lawn so parched.

  8. Ilma says:
    July 12, 2013 at 10:40 am

    As a UK citizen, it would be interesting to know if a US citizen could take Obama to court over the blatant lies…
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>.
    I think it has to be done by Congress not us.

    FWIW there is a petition with ~ a million signatures demanding Congress prosecute U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder over various messes.

    The problem with going after Obama is you are then stuck with Vice President Biden and that puts Biden in a great position to run for president for another 4 to 8 years.

    Outing all the dirty linen in Washington, all the back room deals (including that of republicans) is a much better idea. Then may be we will get a viable third party. SEE: America’s Ruling Class — And the Perils of Revolution for the best analysis I have seen of the US situation.

  9. Steve Oregon says:
    July 12, 2013 at 10:55 am

    Fifteen minutes or so of Richard Alley was quite enough–irritating voice, mocking manner. However, thanks for including two inks. It made it easy to run both and have Richard talking over Richard.

    Finding all that heat (at very tiny Delta T) in the ocean, even if significant, is the focus of his argument that the planet is still warming. That all those who say the warming has stopped are fools, in effect, including those on his side of this debate. I frankly find it hard to get excited over the sorts of Delta Ts in the 700-2000m depth range.

    The tactic is explained by analogy to the advice for trial lawyers with regard to facts vs. law: If you have temperatures rising, then talk about temperature; if the temperatures aren’t rising, then talk about energy.

  10. Yupp..Climategate 3 kinda vanished….no explanations…hope its zoombies up before the IPCC show.

  11. As some others have posted the UK is at the moment enjoying its best summer weather since 2006. Which looks like it could be with us right to the end of the month.
    The jet stream has become a little less waving during July, so it looks like this will end up been a warm month for the NH.

  12. Since it is open thread, I thought I’d submit something I wrote a while ago. Maybe it could help, maybe not.

    THE EYES HAVE IT

    All amateur golfers share one distinctive trait; finesse shots continually come up short. Chips don’t always get there, balls are constantly finding bunkers or water, putts fall short more often than not. “I didn’t hit it”, “I hit it fat”, “I decelerated my swing”, “The greens are slow”, “The rough caught my club”, etc, etc, etc. We have heard all the excuses, much too often. But why, if we know the reasons, do we continually commit the same errors over and over. Think about this: the excuses for a poorly executed shot are not the reason why we executed the shot poorly. The reason does not lie in the mechanics; dare to say the mechanics were probably executed about right! The problem is that your brain tells the muscles to execute a shot that makes the ball end up at the last place your eyes have focused on. Let me explain. Most golfers have decent hand eye coordination, probably better than many of us think it is. When you focus unconsciously on a spot, your brain thinks that’s where you want the ball to end up. It then instructs the muscles to hit a shot just hard enough to make the ball end up there. Remember the bunker between you and the green? You were looking at the top weren’t you! You were thinking “I just need to clear that lip” yet because your eyes focused on the top of the bunker, your brain only allowed your body to hit a shot hard enough to end up there! Leaving your putts short? I’ll bet it’s because you drag your eyes back away from the cup so that the last place your eyes focus on is right in front and that’s where the ball comes to rest! Did you want to chip just to the edge of the green and let the ball run to the cup but instead the ball ended up right where you wanted it to land on the fly? Same reason. You start your back swing with the proper speed for the shot you think you are going to hit, but the brain takes over and tells the body to slow it down because it only wants to hit the ball hard enough so it ends up where the eyes have last focused! To remedy the situation try this: the next time you must chip over a bunker do not look at the bunker at all, focus on the top of the flag stick. Take your eyes from the flag stick directly to the ball, do not let them drag back over the bunker. When putting, after getting the line, take your stance and the last thing is to focus on the back of the cup and bring your eyes directly back to the ball, do not drag them back along the line for a last look at the final break before the cup. Hitting over water? Do not look at the farthest bank and say “I just need to get it there”. Focus on the flag, take your stance, move your eyes from ball to flag to ball without looking at the water at all. NEVER look at a hazard and say “I don’t want to go there” because that’s exactly where your eyes make the brain think you do want the ball to go. It’s really a mental thing but it does take conscious effort and concentration to focus on the correct target and hold that focus until the ball is on its way.

  13. @ Girma: Best to post a short summary in your own words with a few pithy extracts, and a link to the article. Copying entire articles is generally frowned on by the mods; also by the feds.

    Theoretically what you just did is a criminal offense with a $150,000 statutory fine and possible prison sentence in the US. Hollywood paid good money for the law to be like that. You do respect the law right?

  14. The Colorado University Sea Level Research Group apparently uses 64 tide gauges to calibrate their satellite data. Does anyone know which 64 tide gauge stations these are?

  15. Even though the difference in temperature of the deep ocean warming is very low, the difference in energy gain is much greater due to the parameter of heat capacity. Basically meaning that the ability to absorb heat is much lower per degree temperature rise. The difference between water and air is that water is about 1000 times better at absorbing heat. That is why 90 percent of warming is going into the oceans.

    what is even more interesting is that if the surface temperature is lower than normal (a la nina) then, because energy transfer is based on the difference in temperature, MORE heat energy goes into the ocean if the surface of the ocean is cooler.

    And if the surface of the ocean stays cooler than normal? well that is because the deeper ocean is always just above freezing, even in the tropics. A small increase of surface mixing will always make the surface of the ocean cooler, and lead to greater heat energy flowing into the oceans.

    here is an informative video on the subject.

  16. Remember last January when Anthony said we shouldn’t worry about unusually warm temps in northern rural areas, then he had people guess why, and said one person got it right? What ever came of that?

  17. Kevin Kilty says:July 12, 2013 at 1:28 pm
    Fifteen minutes or so of Richard Alley was quite enough

    skunky says:July 12, 2013 at 1:44 pm
    Kevin Kilty, You are a better man than me, I managed 4 minutes.

    Ok but we WUWT regulars have presumably built up sufficient resistance to being impacted.

    I managed to bounce-scroll through most of it and catch quite a bit of ludicrous stuff.

    I’ll wait to see if we can collectively check it all out for the worst of the worst.

    Who knows someone may watch all of it? Maybe Willis? He’s very durable :)

  18. jmitchell;
    The difference between water and air is that water is about 1000 times better at absorbing heat.
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    Good to know. Now the mass of the oceans is about 1400 times that of the atmosphere, so accordingly, it will take 1,400,000 times as much energy to raise the temperature of the earth by one degree than previously thought. Good on ya for explaining the physics to us.

  19. Gail Combs says: July 12, 2013 at 1:10 pm “SEE: America’s Ruling Class — And the Perils of Revolution for the best analysis I have seen of the US situation.”

    Thanks! I’ve enjoyed your posts here before, but now I will search them out.

    http://spectator.org/archives/2010/07/16/americas-ruling-class-and-the

    Only The Constitution Party represents America’s conservative Country Class against the progressive Ruling Party of Demotic and Repugnant Liars.

  20. Mark and Two Cats:

    The “ozone hole” business has around for quite a while; I remember when I first heard about it, the hypothesis (presented in the MSM almost as a “fact”) was that the various chloro-fluoro-carbons (CFC’s) from the NORTHERN hemisphere (where most of the land mass/population/industrialization is), traveled all the way to the south polar region, and destroyed the ozone. The chemistry was more or less accurate, i.e., that chlorine (and other halogens) could interact with ozone, and cause the molecule to dissociate into elemental oxygen and a free oxygen atom (which then reacted with something).

    It always bothered me that the CFC’s did all of that traveling, without interacting with anything unless and until such time as their arrival at the South Pole. Seemed inconceivable.

    Then, a few years ago, it was found that the CFC’s were much less reactive with ozone than had been previously thought, so the ‘source’ of the ozone hole became even more problematic.

    On the basis of those two problems, I had a high degree of skepticism about the whole affair.

    As some on this website might know, I am a voracious reader, and have studied the CAGW-scam in great detail. One of the works I read in my never-ending study was written by Marcel Leroux, late head of the French meteorology office, and also an AGW skeptic. He did, however, have an interesting hypothesis about the Antarctic ozone hole.

    Leroux observed that Mt. Erebus has been in almost continuous eruption for about the last century, give or take. Now, one of the well-documented products of volcanic outgassing is chlorine radicals, of various flavors. Mt. Erebus puts a logical source mechanism DIRECTLY under the south polar ozone hole, I think this idea needs more substantiation, but is certainly a better explanation than Northern Hemisphere CFC’s, migrating most of the way around the globe, to selectively destroy Antarctic ozone molecules, and no one else’s.

    Hope that helps,

    Mark H.

  21. Most of you know of the ridiculous accusation that skeptic scientists are supposed to be paid shills of the fossil fuel industry. For those unaware of it, my new blog has been online since late May, an outgrowth of my 3 years of online pieces (including 3 guest posts here at WUWT) about how the accusation is baseless and essentially got its media traction in the hands of ex-Boston Globe reporter Ross Gelbspan:

    http://gelbspanfiles.com/

  22. “It’s fair to say that the real world warmed even less than our forecast suggested,” Smith says. “We don’t really understand at the moment why that is.”

    It’s fair to say that a good part of the reason why would be that your models suck, and that the assumptions going into them are inadequate or invalid.

  23. “assumptions going into them are inadequate or invalid.”

    second last word should be ‘and’.

  24. Ilma says:
    July 12, 2013 at 10:40 am

    As a UK citizen, it would be interesting to know if a US citizen could take Obama to court over the blatant lies he told in his recent climate speech, perhaps based on the charge of fraud or willful deception?

    He’s a politician for gosh sakes. Why would you expect to believe anything any politician says? There is no, and has been no effective difference for decades, between the dems and pubs.

  25. clark says:
    July 12, 2013 at 1:06 pm
    Here is a nice ALARMIST link from weather.com.

    I liked the new age music and all, but the artist simply took a sea level rise of 25 feet and drew the buildings submerged. When will this occur? Maybe 20 centuries in the future? So, those buildings will not be there at that time. The whole thing is a hoax. People will retreat from rising seas–always have.

    Oh, and thanks to mitchell for explaining heat capacity/specific heat to us all.

    It is finally raining this afternoon for the first time this summer in parched Cheyenne, and friends have planned a garden party. I’m taking a raincoat and umbrella–I figure it’ll be a lot like sea level rise maybe 6,000 centuries from now and I can report back ta’ ya’ all later.

  26. davidmhoffer

    actually the earth’s atmsphere is supposed to weigh 5.2 X 10^18 Kg and the earth’s oceans only weigh about 1.4 X 10^21 Kg which is only about 269 times heavier.

    but in reality, yes, in a perfectly mixed ocean where all warming happened everywhere at once the surface of the ocean would be closer to 39 degrees F everywhere on the globe and the earth’s temperature would be much cooler. Fortunately, the oceans have significantly reduced mixing. so we get to enjoy temperatures outdoors that are much warmer than we would have otherwise. This is why only a very small amount of extra mixing can influence global temperatures so much.

    Of course, on the flip side of that, in the presence of increased warming, the oceans take a much longer time to warm (generally considered to be one full cycle of the thermohaline current or about 500 years) to reach thermal equilibriuium. And the surface of the earth will continue to increase rapidly and then reach final equilibrium in several hundred years, according to the following graph.

  27. The UK is currently enjoying barbecue summer temperatures at last. It was correctly predicted by the useless Met Office recently who said that the UK should expect horrible summers. The Met Office are completely and utterly useless. Yet the British Government sees fit to spend tens of millions of Pounds on this crap outfit. What a joke.

    The Guardian – Wednesday 19 June 2013 – Leo Hickman

    Met Office meeting: UK’s spell of awful summers is set to continue

    Forecast that Britain could be in middle of 10-20 year ‘cycle’ of wet summers delivered following gathering at Met Office

    Don’t worry, summer is on its way – but you might have to wait until 2023.

    As the prospect of another gloomy Glastonbury and wet Wimbledon looms, leading climate scientists have warned that the UK could be set for a further five to 10 years of washout summers.

    Repeated at Huffington Post
    Haaaaaa, haaaaaa, haaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.

  28. jai mitchell says:

    “Even though the difference in temperature of the deep ocean warming is very low, the difference in energy gain is much greater…”

    ================================

    jai mitchell must have missed Kevin Kilty’s comment above:

    The tactic is explained by analogy to the advice for trial lawyers with regard to facts vs. law: If you have temperatures rising, then talk about temperature; if the temperatures aren’t rising, then talk about energy.

    Therefore, mitchell talks about energy…

    None of the arguments for warming of the oceans have adequately explained how the deep ocean is warming, without the thousands of ARGO buoys detecting any warming.

    May I point out the logical conclusion? Thank you:

    There is NO WARMING in the deep oceans. The planet has been cooling for at least sixteen years. “Deep ocean warming” is the last gasp of the climate alarmist crowd.

  29. Ilma @ July 12, 2013 at 10:40 am

    To convict any politician of fraud or willful deception you would have to provide evidence to the court of a politician not committing fraud or willful deception.

    That, I think, will be very difficult.

  30. The Met Office DENIES it made any forecast of something or other. So, everyone else is lying. Yeah right.

    REMINDER
    The Independent: Stand by for another decade of wet summers, say Met Office meteorologists
    The Guardian: Met Office meeting: UK’s spell of awful summers is set to continue
    Daily Telegraph: Run of wet summers could last another 10 years
    Huffington Post: Met Office Predict Wet Summers For The Next 10 Years
    Sky News: Wet Summers To Last 10 More Years’
    BBC News: Scientists say UK wet summers down to Atlantic warming

    http://www.thegwpf.org/met-office-denies-soggy-summer-forecast/

    If you read carefully – they predict everything. As is now their modus operandi. What a bunch of hucksters. Climate bandits, receiving lavish funding and producing utter crap. They are an utter laughing stock in the UK. The UK “We Meant Office” or smelly “Met Orifice”.

    http://metofficenews.wordpress.com/2013/06/18/meeting-on-uks-run-of-unusual-seasons/

  31. Today’s California Water News carries seven articles about geothermal well water injection causing small earthquakes:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/11/wastewater-injection-study-earthquakes_n_3581074.html?utm_hp_ref=green

    http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-geothermal-earthquakes-20130712,0,7936876.story?track=rss

    [...]
    Though not intentional, the seismic activity helps stimulate the flow of hot water by fracturing bedrock and creating pathways to the surface.

    “These very tiny earthquakes that are occurring are really important for the continued operation of the geothermal field,” Ellsworth said. “If we didn’t have the little earthquakes occurring, the field would probably close up.”
    [...]

    http://www.science20.com/news_articles/salton_sea_geothermal_power_facility_california_induces_earthquakes_study-116221

    http://www.mydesert.com/article/20130711/NEWS0701/307110046/Study-Geothermal-power-linked-quakes?nclick_check=1

    http://www.kcet.org/news/rewire/geothermal/imperial-county-geothermal-causing-quakes.html

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2013/jul/11/fracking-water-injection-major-earthquakes

    http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/localnews/ci_23642015/ucsc-study-energy-production-causing-quakes

  32. Is it just me or has the UK media generally remained silent on global warming and the UK’s current hot weather? If it carries on much longer they may get going though. If they do then just remind them that the best climate brains in the world assured us that summers would be wet and disappointing – as well as being of a barbecue nature. Is there anything that the trace rise of the trace gas (Co2) can’t do???

  33. Yupp..Climategate 3 kinda vanished….no explanations…hope its zoombies up before the IPCC show.

    I’m afraid there just wasn’t much red meat left after the first two.

    OTOH, v. 1 was quite enough to be going along with.

  34. jai mitchell July 12 2:30 pm

    Let me grant you your premises.

    1) The missing heat that the “climate models” predict, which should be raising the surface temperature of the earth, is actually being absorbed by the deep oceans (mechanism unstated but somehow it happens real real quick — which is an impossibility!).

    2)And the deep oceans have a huge huge huge capacity to absorb that heat. ( Point of fact — the missing heat that the climate models predict would be a totally trivial amount compared to the amount of heat needed to make any measurable change in deep ocean temperature. Even if the deep oceans are absorbing that heat — for all practical purposes nothing is changing down there.)

    From the above we can draw the obvious conclusion —

    A change that is no change = climate change

    So according to you climate change is actually no change at all. A feedback mechanism exists that keeps the surface temperature of the earth stable. So all the doom and gloom predictions of the last thirty years were nothing but so much “hot air” that your “oceans of wisdom” have absorbed and nullified.

    You do realize that is what you have just told us, right?

    This is all about Trenberth’s Kraken — the monster in the deep that eats all heat — and shits out — nothing.

    Try to think, man.

    Eugene WR Gallun

  35. jai mitchell says:

    “Of course, on the flip side of that, in the presence of increased warming, the oceans…”

    mitchell must be denser than the deep ocean itself. It was already explained to him that the ARGO buoys do not show ocean warming, therefore he is inventing ‘facts’ not in evidence.

  36. jai mitchell says:
    July 12, 2013 at 4:07 pm
    “http://thinkprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/FairPlanFig1c.gif”

    Do you also have that from an organisation that is not funded by George Soros?

  37. Office of the Inspector General semiannual report 2007

    http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2009/oig0902/oig0902_4.pdf

    An OIG investigation into an allegation that a former professor at a Colorado university submitted a proposal to NSF that overlapped with an undisclosed proposal from an external non-profit research company founded by the subject, resulted in a recommendation of debarment. The university and our office both conducted investigations into improper award management and conflicts of interests. NSF had concurrent awards to the subject at the university and the first company, but more recently only to the company.

    Our investigation revealed that the subject, consistently and over a period of many years, violated or disregarded various federal and NSF award administration requirements, violated university policies related to conflicts and outside compensation, and repeatedly misled both NSF and the university as to material facts about his outside companies and other matters relating to NSF awards.

    After many years of operation of the first company, the subject created a second, for-profit company that acted as a subcontractor to the first company. The subject was the sole owner and employee of the second company, which existed solely to receive grant funds from the first company and pay them to the subject as salary. The subject failed to notify NSF of the subcontracting relationship with the second company, and improperly failed to limit indirect charges for the subcontract costs to the first to $25,000 as required.

    The university repeatedly asked the subject to disclose all outside financial interests, and he repeatedly withheld information about the funds he received from his companies; when the university learned the truth, it severely restricted his access to its research facilities. The professor then resigned from his tenured faculty position.

    When we asked him to supply supporting documentation for the salary payments, the subject provided timesheets reflecting highly implausible work hours — for example, the subject claimed effort averaging nearly 14 hours a day for 98 continuous days between May and August 2002 (including weekends and holidays), and in other instances claimed to have devoted as much as 21 hours per day to the project. We recommended that NSF debar the subject for five years, and NSF’s decision is pending.

  38. elmer says (July 12, 2013 at 2:39 pm): “Remember last January when Anthony said we shouldn’t worry about unusually warm temps in northern rural areas, then he had people guess why, and said one person got it right? What ever came of that?”

    This article?

  39. jmitchell;
    actually the earth’s atmsphere is supposed to weigh 5.2 X 10^18 Kg and the earth’s oceans only weigh about 1.4 X 10^21 Kg which is only about 269 times heavier.
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>

    OK, so let’s use YOUR numbers. That leaves us at 269 x 1000 = 269,000 times as much mass. Then adjust for specific heat:

    http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/air-specific-heat-capacity-d_705.html

    http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/water-thermal-properties-d_162.html

    Call it roughly 4.2 x 269,000 = 1,130,000 times as much energy to raise the temperature by one degree.

  40. for anyone following this, my 1,130,000 times number is also wrong. The trick is to see if jm can figure out why.

  41. taxed says:
    July 12, 2013 at 1:53 pm

    As some others have posted the UK is at the moment enjoying its best summer weather since 2006….
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Yes, we got the rain instead in NC. (We have another flood watch tonight) We have had 12.4 inches of rain in the last month and a half with rain for over half the days. 9.68 inches for June with the normal 4.1 . I have never seen the ground so soggy in summer. Normally it is hard as a brick at this time of year but instead I got my truck stuck in the farmyard.

  42. davidmhoffer says:
    “for anyone following this, my 1,130,000 times number is also wrong. The trick is to see if jm can figure out why.”

    Don’t pressure the guy , David, he is rather dense and very wet behind the ears !

  43. jai mitchell says:
    July 12, 2013 at 5:37 pm
    david
    I said 296
    >>>>>>>>>>

    OK 296x1000x4.2=1,243,200

    Number is still wrong. Do you know why?

  44. AndyG55 says:
    July 12, 2013 at 6:09 pm
    davidmhoffer says:
    “for anyone following this, my 1,130,000 times number is also wrong. The trick is to see if jm can figure out why.”
    Don’t pressure the guy , David, he is rather dense and very wet behind the ears !
    >>>>>>>>>>>

    I’ve been watching him over a number of threads. He’s actually learning.

  45. Tom in Florida says:
    July 12, 2013 at 2:04 pm

    That’s good advice.

    Neil Jordan says:
    July 12, 2013 at 4:34 pm

    LOL. I’m sure it’s just coincidence they all appeared at the same time.

  46. Hey Jai, did you learn about the algebra Hoffer taught you? (Two divided by Two is the same as 4 divided by Four.)

    ‘fess up if you learned something, or provide your “spin”.

    Either way, we will enjoy….

  47. I’m not sure if this ruling will be significant, but it does show a court thinks the EPA isn’t doing enough to rid the world of demon CO2, even from green sources.

    http://www.eenews.net/stories/1059984329 says in part

    CLIMATE:
    Court rejects EPA rule that deferred carbon standards for biomass industry

    Jeremy P. Jacobs and Jean Chemnick, E&E reporters
    Greenwire: Friday, July 12, 2013

    A three-judge panel scrapped a U.S. EPA rule today that had given biomass-burning facilities a pass on compliance with federal greenhouse gas emission standards.

    The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit panel found EPA failed to justify its 2011 decision that provided a three-year exemption to its greenhouse gas rules for facilities that burn materials ranging from wood and algae to scrap tires.

    In exempting biomass, EPA said it needed more time to study the overall impact of the industry’s carbon dioxide emissions. Industry has contended that in some instances — wood burning, for example — biomass facilities have a net neutral CO2 impact because trees absorb the heat-trapping gas before they are cut down.

    Environmentalists didn’t buy EPA’s approach. The Center for Biological Diversity said the “blanket exemption” violated the agency’s greenhouse gas policies.

    The Center for Biological Diversity contends the biomass facilities’ inclusion was “triggered” by the Clean Air Act when EPA began regulating greenhouse gas emissions.

    At arguments in April, EPA tried to make the case that the science on biomass sources was unclear and the agency needed more time to study it.

    The arguments before the court panel centered on whether the Clean Air Act allowed EPA to consider “net” CO2 emissions over a fuel’s life cycle when setting emission limits (Greenwire, April 8).

    In the case of biomass, this could include the impact growing a fuel crop might have on carbon emissions due to land use change.

    Environmentalists hailed the decision. Frank O’Donnell, president of Clean Air Watch, said EPA’s move to “cut a special break for biomass pollution was quite obviously a political one — and today’s court decision rightly found that the administration broke the law.”

  48. From the “It’s Worse Than We Thought” file:
    Climate Change Has Resulted In More Predation On Mosquito-Eating Birds
    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 286 people were killed in the US in 2012 by West Nile virus, which is carried by mosquitoes. Many bird species eat these mosquitoes and other insects that can be agricultural pests. Rising temperatures are threatening these wild birds, including the Missouri-native Acadian flycatcher, by making snakes more active and hungrier.

    http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1112895990/snakes-are-devouring-more-mosquito-eating-birds-071213/

  49. And this:
    DOE Offers Dire Warnings Of Climate Change’s Impact On Energy Grid
    July 12, 2013
    A new US Department of Energy (DOE) report warns about the massive direct and indirect impacts climate change is expected to have on the United States’ energy grid in the coming years.
    Citing a shortage of cooling water for power plants, low water levels hampering coal barge and oil tanker traffic, and raging wildfires taking down transmission lines, the report asserts the effects of climate change are already being felt by the nation’s energy sector.

    http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1112896113/doe-offers-dire-warnings-of-climate-change%E2%80%99s-impact-on-energy-grid/

  50. jai mitchell says:
    July 12, 2013 at 10:41 am

    Just wondering, has anybody here seen this kind of massive cut off low that is forming in the atlantic seaboard today? It is projected to start spinning and moving east to west all the way into texas by tuesday.

    A meteorologist acquaintance of mine posted on FB:

    What an incredibly bizarre weather setup. Upper level low will retrograde from southwest PA right now to New Mexico by early next week, before dissipating. Weird.

    I’m tempted to make a crack about global weirding.

  51. This just in, “Why Land Air Temperature is Exactly Wrong” by EM Smith

    Discusses energies released in the atmosphere with phase changes.

    Excerpt from Why Land Air Temperature is Exactly Wrong, on water vapor:

    “Where it is dry, it can get very hot. Where it is wet, the water turns to steam, rises, falls as rain, and the land cools. Temperature over land tells you about the water nearby, or in the clouds and rain. Not about the radiative profile. Florida, far more south than California, has a daily summer tropical temperature profile that peaks in the low 90s F. (Sometimes less). Water all around, so lots of rain to cool peak temperatures. It’s about a 20 F to 30 F offset between the dry places (Arizona desert, Death Valley) and the wet places (Florida). Another 10F to 20F cooler along the coast of California near San Diego. It is all due to water, not due to radiative differences.

  52. jai mitchell says: @ July 12, 2013 at 4:07 pm
    …..Of course, on the flip side of that, in the presence of increased warming, the oceans take a much longer time to warm (generally considered to be one full cycle of the thermohaline current or about 500 years) to reach thermal equilibriuium. And the surface of the earth will continue to increase rapidly and then reach final equilibrium in several hundred years, according to the following graph.

    “http://thinkprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/FairPlanFig1c.gif”
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    ERRRRrrrrr, do you not have that backwards? If the full cycle is ~500 years (I thought it was ~800 to 1000 years) then we should be looking at the ‘surface’ temperature from 800 to 1000 years ago expressing itself now.
    Looking at a Wiki Graph it means we should be sliding into a repeat of the Little Ice Age.

    From NOAA:

    …The conveyor belt moves at much slower speeds (a few centimeters per second) than wind-driven or tidal currents (tens to hundreds of centimeters per second). It is estimated that any given cubic meter of water takes about 1,000 years to complete the journey along the global conveyor belt….. http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/kits/currents/06conveyor2.html

    So yes, it is 1000 years therefore If the Wiki graph is correct the ocean temp is peaking from the temperatures during the Medieval Warm Period peaking and according to the SST graph from the EPA and the most recent graph from Bob Tisdale, you can see the SST start flat-lining around 1998.

  53. okay, the gremlins got me. It should be:

    “Two divided by Two is the same as divided by Four.”

    Omit the stupid “4” that cropped up.

  54. Jimbo says: @ July 12, 2013 at 4:38 pm
    ….. Is there anything that the trace rise of the trace gas (Co2) can’t do???
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Produce a robust economy???? – No strike that, I forgot it is providing a Windfall of unearned cash for the hucksters.

  55. Please give me some feedback of these ‘Green’ engine designs I have released.

    Natural energy power collectors & Distributed storage suggestions

    http://s1291.photobucket.com/user/RichardLH/story/77871

    Natural energy power collectors & Distributed storage suggestions

    Wave

    Wind/Tidal flow/River flow

    Water/Tide

    Solar

    Storage

    Wave (Mechanical rectifier and storage circuit)

    Flat, ‘sea level’, beach pointing at the waves with turbine throat entry side walls to direct the water towards the turbine(s) at rear.

    Flat disc water turbine(s) (or see below) to remove the energy, drop the water to the return outlet level.

    Return flow of water to the beach edge across the whole of the entry face.

    Fig 1.

    Wind/Tidal Flow/River flow

    Large flat cross-flow air/water turbine ‘ring’ floating in/on a water supported canal, pond, lake, sea, etc.

    Fixed and/or moveable vertical air/water foils on ‘bank’ and ‘ring’. Power takeoff between ‘bank’ and ‘ring’.

    Fig 2.

    Water/Tide

    Large hollow boxes float in the working liquid at atmospheric pressure in a ‘lock pond’. Water flows through ‘lock pond’ from above (or from tide).

    Boxes float in the ‘lock pond’ under constrained conditions vertically to provide power.

    Water is exhausted to the lower level and the boxes return to bottom/start position(s).

    Double acting version (ballasted pistons) with rocking power connection to the engine house

    Fig 3.

    Fig 4.

    Solar

    Create ‘thermal diode’ by stacking ‘low – medium – hot’ hollow tubes of constant cross section, constructed with solar absorbing tops.

    Insulate non-collecting surfaces and separate tube into heat input areas in increasing thermal order.

    Take fast hot air provided at exit and deliver to turbine/fan throat in classical manner.

    Expand and slow the air in turbine/fan to exhaust velocities and extract power.

    Exhaust rises slowly up low chimney to outside.

    Fig 5.

    Personal/Leisure Power

    Use strap and ratchet system to build rotational speed in a water filled flywheel.

    Use energy collected for light power uses.

    Fig 6.

    Portable Solar

    Concentrate sun on ceramic air/heat exchanger

    Air is drawn in though base and passes the pre-heat tube (heated from ceramic air/heat exchanger)

    Air is then heated by the ceramic air/heat exchanger to working temperature

    Cold air is added as required

    Resultant mixture is passed to turbine throat

    Turbine/Fan slows the air and extracts energy

    Cool air rises from chimney

    Fig 7.

    Air Car/Toy

    Use compressed air (from free municipal supply?)

    Store in two (or more) lightweight cylinders running length of vehicle

    Working low pressure cylinders run the length also, alongside the storage

    Pistons (two or more) run in each cylinder

    Entry and exit valves are situated at both ends as normal

    Wire rope passes through seals in cylinder ends

    Rope passes out and over power takeoff wheel

    Pistons move back and forth in the normal way, full travel

    Low speed of air expansion and use means lower temperature and other expansion problems

    The back and forth motion is transferred by the takeoff wheel to drive wires

    The drive wires are connected to gearboxes/motors which converts this to rotary motion for motive power

    Fig 8.

    Distributed Inertial Mass Power Storage and Local AC supply/feed.

    Create large ring of heavy material floating, hydro-statically balanced, in a housing with lubricating fluids to be used in ‘sub’ or ‘surface level’, cellars/pits.

    One ‘local power pod’ contains AC/DC generator(s) to supply ‘house’/’factory’.

    One ‘local hook-up pod’ allows any locally collected energy to be input (solar, wind, water, etc.), if available.

    One ‘Good Neighbour pod’ contains hook-up through to municipal base load generators/supply.

    Mechanical/Magnetic connections between pods and ring for power transfer.

    Spin up through GNP and/or local supply to working speed.

    Connect ‘house’ when up to working speed.

    (‘house’ has no direct connection to the municipal base load generators/supply.)

    No picture

    RLH July 2013

    Wave

    Wind/Tidal flow/River flow

    Water/Tide

    Solar

    Storage

    Wave (Mechanical rectifier and storage circuit)

    Flat, ‘sea level’, beach pointing at the waves with turbine throat entry side walls to direct the water towards the turbine(s) at rear.

    Flat disc water turbine(s) (or see below) to remove the energy, drop the water to the return outlet level.

    Return flow of water to the beach edge across the whole of the entry face.

    Fig 1.

    Wind/Tidal Flow/River flow

    Large flat cross-flow air/water turbine ‘ring’ floating in/on a water supported canal, pond, lake, sea, etc.

    Fixed and/or moveable vertical air/water foils on ‘bank’ and ‘ring’. Power takeoff between ‘bank’ and ‘ring’.

    Fig 2.

    Water/Tide

    Large hollow boxes float in the working liquid at atmospheric pressure in a ‘lock pond’. Water flows through ‘lock pond’ from above (or from tide).

    Boxes float in the ‘lock pond’ under constrained conditions vertically to provide power.

    Water is exhausted to the lower level and the boxes return to bottom/start position(s).

    Double acting version (ballasted pistons) with rocking power connection to the engine house

    Fig 3.

    Fig 4.

    Solar

    Create ‘thermal diode’ by stacking ‘low – medium – hot’ hollow tubes of constant cross section, constructed with solar absorbing tops.

    Insulate non-collecting surfaces and separate tube into heat input areas in increasing thermal order.

    Take fast hot air provided at exit and deliver to turbine/fan throat in classical manner.

    Expand and slow the air in turbine/fan to exhaust velocities and extract power.

    Exhaust rises slowly up low chimney to outside.

    Fig 5.

    Personal/Leisure Power

    Use strap and ratchet system to build rotational speed in a water filled flywheel.

    Use energy collected for light power uses.

    Fig 6.

    Portable Solar

    Concentrate sun on ceramic air/heat exchanger

    Air is drawn in though base and passes the pre-heat tube (heated from ceramic air/heat exchanger)

    Air is then heated by the ceramic air/heat exchanger to working temperature

    Cold air is added as required

    Resultant mixture is passed to turbine throat

    Turbine/Fan slows the air and extracts energy

    Cool air rises from chimney

    Fig 7.

    Air Car/Toy

    Use compressed air (from free municipal supply?)

    Store in two (or more) lightweight cylinders running length of vehicle

    Working low pressure cylinders run the length also, alongside the storage

    Pistons (two or more) run in each cylinder

    Entry and exit valves are situated at both ends as normal

    Wire rope passes through seals in cylinder ends

    Rope passes out and over power takeoff wheel

    Pistons move back and forth in the normal way, full travel

    Low speed of air expansion and use means lower temperature and other expansion problems

    The back and forth motion is transferred by the takeoff wheel to drive wires

    The drive wires are connected to gearboxes/motors which converts this to rotary motion for motive power

    Fig 8.

    Distributed Inertial Mass Power Storage and Local AC supply/feed.

    Create large ring of heavy material floating, hydro-statically balanced, in a housing with lubricating fluids to be used in ‘sub’ or ‘surface level’, cellars/pits.

    One ‘local power pod’ contains AC/DC generator(s) to supply ‘house’/’factory’.

    One ‘local hook-up pod’ allows any locally collected energy to be input (solar, wind, water, etc.), if available.

    One ‘Good Neighbour pod’ contains hook-up through to municipal base load generators/supply.

    Mechanical/Magnetic connections between pods and ring for power transfer.

    Spin up through GNP and/or local supply to working speed.

    Connect ‘house’ when up to working speed.

    (‘house’ has no direct connection to the municipal base load generators/supply.)

    No picture

    RLH July 2013

  56. Nick Stokes says:
    July 12, 2013 at 6:35 pm
    New statement from Macquarie Uni on Salby’s dismissal.
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    Well at least this time they addressed some of the issues directly instead of hand waving. I suspect this story has plenty of twists and turns left in it,

  57. cynical_scientist says:
    July 12, 2013 at 4:58 pm

    Office of the Inspector General semiannual report 2007

    http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2009/oig0902/oig0902_4.pdf

    An OIG investigation into an allegation that a former professor at a Colorado university submitted a proposal to NSF that overlapped with an undisclosed proposal from an external non-profit research company founded by the subject….
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Desmog blog is accusing Murry Salby of being that professor.

    Unfortunately this ‘Confidential Memo’ posted by NSF to the internet seems to state it is true link

    What the heck is a United States Government connected organization doing posting on the internet memos stamped confidential?!? This is not a copy slipped to Greenpeace but from a http://www.nsf.gov/ site. Someone needs their rump kicked but good.

    Carlin Economics blog has a good write-up of Salby’s presentation in Germany: http://www.carlineconomics.com/archives/1569

  58. Mac the Knife says:
    July 12, 2013 at 6:25 pm

    From the “It’s Worse Than We Thought” file:
    Climate Change Has Resulted In More Predation On Mosquito-Eating Birds

    =============================================================================
    So is it time to bring back DDT? The wind turbines are taking out the bald eagles so what’s the harm?

  59. Richard LH says:
    July 12, 2013 at 6:54 pm

    Frankly i can make neither head nor tail of your post.

    As far as I can see the ideas your promote are very old some of which were at one time or another subject to patent but have long since been forgotten for the very good reasons that they did not work.

    May I suggest if you think these concepts might be commercially viable you consult a reputable patent attorney who will advise you.

    Kindest Regards

  60. Thanks Nick. Confirms some of the conclusions I had drawn. I assume you are aware also of the reasons why he left his tenured position at Colorado.

    When debate gets highly polarised there is a tendency to think in terms of us and them. The sad truth is there are saints and sinners on both sides. In my opinion some skeptics have been far too quick to close ranks behind this man who, while he may be one of us, a sceptic, is most definitely not a saint. They foolishly took him at his word not knowing that his history of dishonesty would indicate that his word should not be trusted. Oops!

    I’d like to draw a comparison between Salby and Gleick. Indeed the two of them should be put in the same box in my opinion (and then buried?). Science requires ethics. Neither seems well equipped. Gleick still has wide support among warmists. Is Salby going to retain his support among skeptics in the face of these revelations? It will be fascinating to watch.

  61. Mac the Knife says:
    July 12, 2013 at 6:25 pm

    From the “It’s Worse Than We Thought” file:

    Climate Change Has Resulted In More Predation On Mosquito-Eating Birds
    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 286 people were killed in the US in 2012 by West Nile virus, which is carried by mosquitoes. Many bird species eat these mosquitoes and other insects that can be agricultural pests. Rising temperatures are threatening these wild birds, including the Missouri-native Acadian flycatcher, by making snakes more active and hungrier.

    http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1112895990/snakes-are-devouring-more-mosquito-eating-birds-071213/

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    ERRRrrrr, Don’t they have that wrong? Isn’t it the bat-chomping, bird-slicing eco crucifixes that are reducing Mosquito-Eating Predators?

  62. cynical_scientist says:
    July 12, 2013 at 7:31 pm

    Thanks Nick. Confirms some of the conclusions I had drawn….
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    It certainly puts a question mark up there. I would certainly like to hear what Salby has to say about the whole mess before we hang him.

    I have lost any faith I had in the Rule of Law in the USA. There are just too many instances I know of where WHO you are or rather WHO you know has a heck of a lot more to do with ‘Justice’ than the facts do.

  63. cynical_scientist says:

    “Is Salby going to retain his support among skeptics in the face of these revelations?”

    If what is being alleged about Salby is true, then he is toast.

    But Macquarie has already admitted mis-handling the issue of the plane ticket. Let’s see how they explain the other accusations first. The truth will come out. On both sides.

    What I would really like is for Dr. Salby to be given the opportunity to cross-examine his accusers.

    Wouldn’t it have been nice if Mann and Jones’ accusers had been given the same opportunity? Instead, Mann and Jones were whitewashed. That is the difference that irks me: if you drink the Kool Aid, you are given a free pass no matter what.

  64. Gail Combs,

    Did you get your pick-up unstuck? Pull it out with horse power? (smile) Hope all ended happily.

    Thanks for all the great, as usual, research above.

    Janice

  65. “cynical_scientist says (at 7:31PM today): ‘Is Salby going to retain his support among skeptics in the face of these revelations assertions ?'”

    My response to your corrected question is: Yes!

    You reveal your bias by calling them “revelations,” implying that Mockery U.’s statements reveal truth. In your apparent eagerness to discredit Dr. Salby, perhaps you misspoke.

    The assertions come from: 1) a hostile witness; and 2) a potential defendant in a civil, if not a criminal, action in which Dr. Salby would be the plaintiff. They have as little probative value as the effect of human CO2 on Earth’s climate.

  66. Crackpot ideas on arctic ice
    At another site* in a galaxy far,far away there was a flurry of comments about the ice cracking up at the start of the summer melting season. The cracks had never been seen before and were getting bigger and more extensive every day as the much anticipated catastrophic ice melt [ice free arctic] was due to happen this year. Arctic cyclones were breaking up the cracked ice and leading to melt ponds everywhere, even at the pole itself.
    A survey on the minimum ice extent had the usual couple of no ice ratbags but even so the average prediction was similar to last year or lower.
    Then a funny thing happened on the way to the forum
    The ice season had a “slow start” to the ice season. The ice kept cracking for 4 weeks but the ice refused to melt.
    [ What the heck does a slow start mean?]
    All the conditions had been perfect for this record melt year.
    Slowly cracks began to develop in the cracked ice theory. Instead of leading to more ice melt the cracks were allowing cold water through [fancy that] to cause more ice to develop and making the ice stronger and thicker.
    I would have thought, simplistically, that if there was more ice forming then there must be more cold about ie colder water underneath. Were has it come from ?
    The heat has gone down into the deep sea meaning the cold has come to the surface and is causing more ice.
    Global warming is therefore indisputably occurring and is going to lead to the world freezing over as the heat disappears into the depths. [Sarc]

  67. “Professor Salby’s employment was not terminated in any way related to his views on climate science, but rather due to misconduct in two areas. The first was his repeated refusal to teach, over a sustained period of time, in contravention of his contract of employment.”

    This is not news. Macquarie needs to provide a fuller explanation of what Salby was assigned to do.

    Salby said that they reduced him to a teaching assistant. A teaching assistant does not occupy a teaching position, does not teach, and cannot be confused with a teacher. Why will they not address Salby’s claim? If they gave him the duties of a teaching assistant then they have done irreparable damage to the department’s reputation. In such a case, the department would need to be placed in receivership.

    I have no conclusion about this affair. But Macquarie’s press releases on the matter have done them no good at all. Very unprofessional. Seasoned professionals would have grabbed the bull by the horns long ago and given the world some small, crystal clear bit of information about Salby’s misbehavior that is independently verifiable and verified. With such information, none of us would be looking forward to Salby’s next post.

  68. davidmhoffer says: July 12, 2013 at 7:04 pm
    ” I suspect this story has plenty of twists and turns left in it,”

    Sure does. John Mashey has an tangled story, including some unexpected characters. Lots of docs linked.

  69. jai mitchell says:July 12, 2013 at 2:30 pm
    Even though the difference in temperature of the deep ocean warming is very low, the difference in energy gain is much greater due to the parameter of heat capacity. Basically meaning that the ability to absorb heat is much lower per degree temperature rise. The difference between water and air is that water is about 1000 times better at absorbing heat. That is why 90 percent of warming is going into the oceans.
    Um, Water is 1000 times better at absorbing heat than air ? shouldn’t you mean that 99.9% of the warming should be going into the oceans as opposed to the air?
    [caveat you have not made any comment re land,water and air this applies purely to your air/water comparisons and assumes the energy actually reaches the water] as stated The fact that there is a lot more water mass than air mass in the world means the water should accept even more than 99.9% of any developing heat on your comments
    eg
    David M Hoffer 1400 times more mass 99.9994%
    JaI 269 times more mass 99.94$

  70. Janice Moore:
    You reveal your bias by calling them “revelations,” implying that Mockery U.’s statements reveal truth. In your apparent eagerness to discredit Dr. Salby, perhaps you misspoke.

    Everything factual in that statement is true. Vice Chancellors of large Universities don’t lie in written public statements. I don’t know what planet you are living on where you would believe otherwise. His statement might not tell us everything and indeed it almost certainly does not. But it contains no falsehoods. I trust it a lot more than I trust what Salby, a man who has a dishonest history, says in an email to sceptical blogs. Do you know the circumstances surrounding Salby’s resignation from his tenured position in Colorado? If you don’t know I suggest you find out as it has implications for his credibility.

    It was a revelation to me that he had bought the plane ticket from an unapproved agency using his credit card. I had suspected as much because Salby’s story didn’t make sense otherwise. But that was conjecture. Now I know.

    It was a revelation to me that his employment agreement explictly mentioned a duty to teach. Salby claimed that it did not. That is a direct contradiction. So who do we believe on this matter? Has the Vice Chancellor lied in written public statement right in front of the world and all? You would rather trust what Salby said on an email to some blogs?

    Believe what you want. I at least am not prepared to fight for Salby.

  71. Nick Stokes says:
    July 12, 2013 at 8:35 pm
    davidmhoffer says: July 12, 2013 at 7:04 pm
    ” I suspect this story has plenty of twists and turns left in it,”
    Sure does. John Mashey has an tangled story, including some unexpected characters. Lots of docs linked.
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    Well if those accusations hold up to scrutiny, then they will hurt Salby. However, the author is clearly biased against the skeptic position, and loses credibility nearly instantly by quoting Skeptical Science early in the article in a clear attempt to discredit Salby. Not to mention that the article appears on a blatantly warmist site. Interesting that his conflict at Colorado-Boulder seemed to center around Peter Webster, not exactly an even handed scientist on AGW.

    If the accusations are true that he was double dipping on grant money, then he should be held accountable. The IRS and NSF should obviously get right on that as soon as they are done with running down the billions that have disappeared with the likes of Solyndra.

  72. davidmhoffer says: July 12, 2013 at 9:00 pm
    “The IRS and NSF should obviously get right on that… “

    Well, the NSF has; in fact, they say “the case is closed.”. Part of their report, which follows an O-i-G investigation:
    “We conclude that the Subject’s deception was part of a long-standing pattern. We conclude that the Subject intentionally provided deceptive information to the NSF program officer about his affiliations with Company 1, and false and deceptive information to NSF OIG about Company 1 and Company

    Finding 5. The Subject provided deceptive or misleading statements to the University on his conflicts of interest forms and financial disclosure forms, and provided false and deceptive information to the University during the investigation about his additional external remuneration and potential conflicts of interests.”

  73. @Gail Combs –
    What irony – that the FEAR of climate change, not the fact, should be what’s killing all those mosquito-eating birds (by those landscape-despoiling, habitat-destroying, visually and chemically polluting monstrosities called “wind turbines”).
    Can we as members of the public sue the EPA for killing endangered species? Oh, but to wish it were so.
    @Janice Moore – I agree, cynical_scientist is an obvious warmist taking ad hominem cheap shots at Murry Salby, as per standard warmist concepts of “discourse.”. Let’s hope Dr Salby can give his tormentors some swift kicks to their pancreases, thymus glands and pineal bodies.

  74. @Gail Combs –
    Where can I sign the petition to bring Himmler – uh, Holder – to justice?

  75. Gail Combs says:
    July 12, 2013 at 7:36 pm

    Mac the Knife says:
    July 12, 2013 at 6:25 pm

    From the “It’s Worse Than We Thought” file:

    Climate Change Has Resulted In More Predation On Mosquito-Eating Birds
    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 286 people were killed in the US in 2012 by West Nile virus, which is carried by mosquitoes. Many bird species eat these mosquitoes and other insects that can be agricultural pests. Rising temperatures are threatening these wild birds, including the Missouri-native Acadian flycatcher, by making snakes more active and hungrier.

    http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1112895990/snakes-are-devouring-more-mosquito-eating-birds-071213/

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    ERRRrrrr, Don’t they have that wrong? Isn’t it the bat-chomping, bird-slicing eco crucifixes that are reducing Mosquito-Eating Preda
    Another more proximate cause for the death of insectivorous birds could be the catching and eating of insects full of long acting insecticides.
    Many of these insecticides are fat soluble and are stored in the bird’s fat mass to be used when food is less available or when the bird is stressed.
    Consequently the bird gets a dose of insecticide when it goes into a negative energy state and metabolizes the stored fat with the insecticide dissolved.
    In Australia the Tawny Frogmouth is highly subject to paralysis of the wings and musculature in winter when the insects dry up, and is subject to predation.
    BTW,newer generations of insecticides, such as imidacloprid have been hypothesized to be part of the cause of ‘colony collapse’ in the European honey bee.

  76. An Open Thread. Must be time for an E-Cat update. There’s good stuff going on on. All this comes from E-Cat World, which seems to be the best aggregator.

    One reminder about something I think I posted in the last round, but is worth a repost:

    The long awaited third party report on the E-Cat is out and is at http://arxiv.org/abs/1305.3913 Anthony is concerned that some of the reviewers were too close to previous activities, so the ban on E-Cat posts is still on.

    Rossi has a partner who can handle the roll out of lots and lots of the reactor cores or boilers or something. It’s big enough that Rossi has lost his controlling interest in the E-Cat. I consider this a Good Thing, it takes a GE or Siemens to get this up to speed if that’s who the partner is. Someone suggested Dean Kamen, the inventor of the home kidney dialysis machine, Segway, and a lot of other stuff. That’s a very interesting possibility and is a good fit in many ways. It’s also pure speculation and probably wrong. Another suggestion is that it’s Elon Musk’s Tesla Corp and SpaceX. I think he’s too busy.

    On July 8th the partner company made an E-Cat module and their CEO made the “charge” (nickel powder, catalyst, hydrogen) from Rossi’s directions, and the resulting device worked like Rossi’s. That the CEO was involved suggests the partner company is smaller than GE or Siemens.

    A non-Rossi event of note is an international patent application from Finland that was published on May 30 at http://worldwide.espacenet.com/publicationDetails/originalDocument?CC=WO&NR=2013076378A2&KC=A2&FT=D&ND=3&date=20130530&DB=EPODOC&locale=en_EP . It seems to describe a system similar to Rossi’s and has details about the catalyst and other components. The inventor, Pekka Soininen, may not have a working device, but the patent is interesting.

    All in all, things are moving along. It looks like it will be a while before production begins.

  77. Chad Wozniak says:
    @Janice Moore – I agree, cynical_scientist is an obvious warmist taking ad hominem cheap shots at Murry Salby, as per standard warmist concepts of “discourse.”. Let’s hope Dr Salby can give his tormentors some swift kicks to their pancreases, thymus glands and pineal bodies.

    Actually I’m a climate sceptic. I also tend to be quite sceptical about other things. Occupational hazard. Salby’s story never sounded right to me from the start. I know how universities work. I know how people get sacked at one and the process which has to be gone through. There seemed to be a lot missing from his story and bits of it just didn’t hang together.

    Salby appealed for our support as skeptics concerning the circumstances of his dismissal. By doing so he invites us to judge those circumstances and find him worthy of support. There is still much we don’t know, but it now seems clear to me that there is another side to this story. This isn’t a simple case of “sceptic gets sacked”. Hence Salby doesn’t get my support.

    By the way, I do appreciate the joke of accusing me of indulging in ad hominems right in the middle of your ad hominem. You did mean for that to be a joke – right?

  78. Nick Stokes says:
    July 12, 2013 at 9:20 pm
    davidmhoffer says: July 12, 2013 at 9:00 pm
    “The IRS and NSF should obviously get right on that… “
    Well, the NSF has; in fact, they say “the case is closed.”.
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    C’mon Nick. You’re either quoting me out of context deliberately or you simply missed my point.

    They should get right on that…. after they finish investigating the billions that Solyndra and others burned through in a matter of months and where all that money went. What? They’re not investigating that? Or the wrong doing in the climategate emails? Shall I go on?

  79. burgess says:
    July 12, 2013 at 4:39 pm
    More ocean heat = more sharknados.

    It’s worse than we thought.
    ===============================

    You forgot ……….. Oh Noes!!!!!!!

    Amateur. Up your game.

  80. Cynical Scientists says…
    “Actually I’m a climate sceptic. I also tend to be quite sceptical about other things. Occupational hazard. Salby’s story never sounded right to me from the start. I know how universities work.”
    Dear C.S.
    You know how universities work right?
    In this case it would appear that MU in Australia employed and, according to their own Vice Chancellor, supported Murray Salby to the tune of several hundred thousand dollars and were prepared to match project funding to the tune of a million or more dollars?
    OK, so what you’re saying…because you know how universities work, is that MU took Salby on without references (which would have declared that he was under investigation) or even an informal phone call to Boulder Colorado where word of Salby’s travails would have been common knowledge?
    You see maybe I don’t know as much about how universities work as you do but I can tell you this for certain sure…if you poke deep enough into anyone’s business you will eventually find something to discredit them.
    I also recognise the kind of comprehensive, officially resourced and well co-ordinated program of character assassination desmog blog is now engaging in, is only reserved for those who prove to be a major threat to the establishment.
    “Mike’s Nature trick”, Phil Jones’ and Kevin Trenberth’s “lack of warming” and a whole confectioners shop worth of ‘climate fudge’ isn’t enough to get anyone a smack on the wrist these days…Academic fraud and deception on a grand scale is acceptable but deception over ‘expenses’ well wow!
    Murray Salby must be hung drawn and quartered.

  81. philincalifornia says:
    July 12, 2013 at 10:41 pm
    A piece of quality unstoppabull.
    Note the journalist put a hereford on the picture post, which is a beef not a dairy cow,but then why let the facts get in the way of a good story.

  82. @Ric Werme: Thanks for the update on Rossi’s E Cat gadget. That his partner was able to manufacture one from his directions (and it works!) is a major step towards validation. That a Finnish inventor has come up with something similar (or identical) also looks good. What a laugh it would be if his gizmo makes the whole global warming debate moot! And, on top of that, if its underlying physics remains mysterious even after a billion of them have been installed worldwide!

    A honking black swan. (Completely off the radar of, and/or denied by, the mainstream.) I like it!

    Re Salby: Well, he’s written a top textbook, at least. And maybe those four blockbuster papers in preparation will amount to something.

  83. @Gail Combs.
    Yes it looks like the eastern side of the USA is getting the sort of summer the UK had last year. What seems to have happened is the fuel for this wet weather has been coming up from the warm waters around Cuba.This helps in part to explain the quiet start to the hurricane season. While the warm waters around Cuba have been feeding the eastern side of USA with a wet summer. They have not been able to feed the hurricanes that can form off the SE coast of the USA. .

  84. With regard to Murry Salby, you have to ask yourself why McQ U would employ him without considering why he left his post in the US. One must assume that the claims made against him leading to his dismissal were public knowledge. If this is the case I am surprised that McQ U would be so keen to offer him substantial funds unless he had convinced them that the charges against him were unfounded.

    Does it really come down to how fastidious Salby was in filling in his time sheets? I suspect that many people in similar circumstances fill in time sheets sometime later than when they did the work (having worked in a time sheet environment in the defence industry I know mine only approximated to the facts as there was always management pressure to book time to clients rather than some internal cost centre).

    We all got by because everyone knew how to play the game and nobody wanted to question it.

    But imagine if you wanted to blacken someone’s name – investigate their time sheets. It doesn’t matter if everyone else is also “playing the game” since they are not the subject of the investigation

    I apologise to all those people who are scrupulously accurate in recording their times, but my experience showed that nearly everybody was more interested in doing the actual work rather than accounting for their time down to the nearest 15 mins. Who enjoys form filling? And from what I read on this blog I suspect that academe is no more altruistic than the commercial world.

  85. Here’s a comment posted by the administrator on the E-Cat World site on July 10. (Note the off-grid implications.):

    Andrea Rossi is reporting that the first E-Cat that the USA Partner has produced is going to be employed in providing heat to the partner’s factory — and when they have perfected electricity production, they will do the same for electrical power. I find this to be an entirely logical approach.

  86. Seems the Boston Globe is for sale and no one is really interested in buying.

    With bids reportedly at a disappointing $65 million to $80 million, The Boston Globe’s impending sale is shaping up as more of a real estate deal than a newspaper buy…. even as one of the four purported finalists told the Herald they’ve lost interest in the broadsheet.

    “The implication is kind of obvious that the Globe as a straight business venture is not very highly valued …. — at least the majority of it, maybe more — is valued land and the building,”

    …. the Globe’s Morrissey Boulevard land could fetch at least $75 million on the commercial property market…..

    http://bostonherald.com/business/media_marketing/2013/07/bids_in_for_globe_and_they_re_low

    So it looks like the bidding just for the building and land and not the business itself…. the New York Times Co. is the current owner.

  87. Chad Wozniak says:
    July 12, 2013 at 9:32 pm

    @Gail Combs –
    Where can I sign the petition to bring Himmler – uh, Holder – to justice?
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Search engines are your friend.

  88. http://www.azcentral.com/business/consumer/free/20130712aps-seeks-higher-bills-new-solar-customers.html

    Arizona Power Supply to charge solar panel users extra $100 per month

    “Customers get credit for each kilowatt-hour of electricity they send to the power grid. Those credits are subtracted from the energy they use during the month at night, on cloudy days or when the panels were not making enough electricity. Customers with a large enough solar array can offset all of their electricity use and see bills as low as $22 a month, reflecting just a few basic fees.

    But APS officials said the 18,000 solar customers are getting too much credit for the power they send to the grid. Such power helps APS avoid the expense of power-plant fuel, but the utility still must cover the cost of new transmission lines, grid repairs and other expenses that solar customers don’t contribute to because they pay reduced bills.

    The company, which gets about 200 applications for solar a week, wants to address the issue before there are 50,000 or more solar customers on its system in 2016, the next time the utility is allowed to raise rates, officials said.

    APS has proposed two alternatives for charging solar customers more to cover expenses. The impact on customers would vary depending on how much electricity they use, the season and how much power their solar panels generate, but generally, the monthly bills most new solar customers pay would climb anywhere from $50 to more than $100.

  89. Cynical Scientists says…
    “Actually I’m a climate sceptic. I also tend to be quite sceptical about other things. Occupational hazard. Salby’s story never sounded right to me from the start. I know how universities work.”
    Dear C.S.
    You know how universities work right?
    In this case it would appear that MU in Australia employed and, according to their own Vice Chancellor, supported Murray Salby to the tune of several hundred thousand dollars and were prepared to match project funding to the tune of a million or more dollars?
    OK, so what you’re saying…because you know how universities work, is that MU took Salby on without references (which would have declared that he was under investigation) or even an informal phone call to Boulder Colorado where word of Salby’s travails would have been common knowledge?
    You see maybe I don’t know as much about how universities work as you do but I can tell you this for certain sure…if you poke deep enough into anyone’s business you will eventually find something to discredit them.
    I also recognise the kind of comprehensive, officially resourced and well co-ordinated program of character assassination desmog blog is now engaging in, is only reserved for those who prove to be a major threat to the establishment.
    “Mike’s Nature trick”, Phil Jones’ and Kevin Trenberth’s “lack of warming” and a whole confectioners shop worth of ‘climate fudge’ isn’t enough to get anyone a smack on the wrist these days…Academic dodgyness and deception on a grand scale is acceptable but deception over ‘expenses’ well wow!
    Murray Salby must be hung drawn and quartered.

  90. Looks like Aljazerra will be showing Lindzen Head to Head 12 GMT saturaday. Quite a change!

  91. philincalifornia says:
    July 12, 2013 at 10:41 pm

    Cow’s milk …. they almost made it to the end, but then just couldn’t stop themselves …..

    http://www.dailyfinance.com/2013/07/12/hot-cows-higher-milk-prices-global-warming/

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    ….With temperatures in the Midwest expected to remain in the 80s and 90s through the next couple of weeks, we could be looking at a lot of cows who are too hot to produce as much milk as usual.

    Oh for pity’s sake, they are really stretch on this one.

    North Carolina had a lot of dairy operations (until the USDA shut them down) and our summer temperatures are in the 80’s to over 100F. For example:
    May 2004 (17 days >90F)
    6 days – 91F
    6 days – 93F
    2 days – 95F
    1 days – 96F
    2 days – 98F

    So far this year we have had 2 days at 90F and one at 95F (compared to 36>90f for May, June, & July 2004)

    My Northern bred horses don’t break a sweat until the temperature is ~100F and that is only the heavily muscled drafts. Compared to beef cattle, dairy cows are lightly muscled and Texas is famous for its beef cattle herds that are often Cow/Calf operations. You don’t here of the calves starving because of Mama’s milk drying up now do you?

    However we now have the Food Safety Modernization Act reams of red tape and Animal ID hitting farmers so those WILL cause prices to go up. Sure sounds like a cover-up for government costs. It reminds me of the Groniad claiming it was ‘Global Warming’ causing India’s farmer suicide when it was the WTO and GMO seed (cost of seed + herbicide + fertilizer and not getting promised harvest)

    India Revokes Monsanto’s GMO Cotton Seed License
    “We welcome the decision,” said Kishore Tiwari, who heads the farmers’ advocacy group Vidarbha Jan Andolan Samiti.

    “We demand all other 28 companies sub-licensed by MMB should be banned and replaced by traditional Indian cotton seed, as the cost of seeds of straight varieties is much lower than Bt varieties”, Tiwari said.

    “Bt cotton seed has played a key role in the Vidarbha farm suicide saga since June 2005,” he said.

    The drought-prone Vidarbha region of Maharashtra state has recorded more than 8,200 farmers’ suicides in the past decade, 209 in 2001 alone.

    Trapped in a spiral of rising costs and in debt for costly genetically modified seeds that are supposed to repel cotton pests, as well as the pesticides they must buy when pests take over anyway, many farmers kill themselves by drinking pesticide or hanging themselves from trees….

  92. charles nelson says:…..
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Yes you are so correct. There is not an adult in the USA who has not broken some law and therefore is vulnerable if the government decides to go after them. (Think IRS targeting)

    The prosecuting attorney holds the power of who gets let off the hook (Peter Gleick) or who gets nailed (Murry Salby) I found that out the hard way when I tried to get the local DA to prosecute three thefts (three different thieves) where the thief was caught red handed with the goods. It never went anywhere because the thieves were ‘Well Connected’ to the local political party and I was a newcomer.

    Angelo M. Codevilla nailed it.

    ….if you are not among the favored guests at the table where officials make detailed lists of who is to receive what at whose expense, you are on the menu. Eventually, pretending forcibly that valueless things have value dilutes the currency’s value for all.

    Laws and regulations nowadays are longer than ever because length is needed to specify how people will be treated unequally…..

    By making economic rules dependent on discretion, our bipartisan ruling class teaches that prosperity is to be bought with the coin of political support….

    The prospect of legislation that would put a price on carbon emissions and allot certain amounts to certain companies set off a feeding frenzy among large companies to show support for a “green agenda,” because such allotments would be worth tens of billions of dollars. That is why companies hired some 2,500 lobbyists in 2009 to deepen their involvement in “climate change.” At the very least, such involvement profits them by making them into privileged collectors of carbon taxes. Any “green jobs” thus created are by definition creatures of subsidies — that is, of privilege. What effect creating such privileges may have on “global warming” is debatable. But it surely increases the number of people dependent on the ruling class, and teaches Americans that satisfying that class is a surer way of making a living than producing goods and services that people want to buy…..

  93. Gail Combs says:
    July 13, 2013 at 2:38 am

    Seems the Boston Globe is for sale and no one is really interested in buying.

    With bids reportedly at a disappointing $65 million to $80 million, The Boston Globe’s impending sale is shaping up as more of a real estate deal than a newspaper buy….

    IIRC, the Times paid $1 billion for the Globe. The changes since then have been pretty amazing. It used to be everyone in the tech fields would look to see bought the front page of the employment ads section. Bubbles, recessions, and the internet have squashed that. I assume Craigslist has wiped out the want ads.

    I’m glad I don’t work in journalism.

  94. rogerknights says:
    July 13, 2013 at 1:45 am

    Here’s a comment posted by the administrator on the E-Cat World site on July 10. (Note the off-grid implications.):

    Andrea Rossi is reporting that the first E-Cat that the USA Partner has produced is going to be employed in providing heat to the partner’s factory — and when they have perfected electricity production, they will do the same for electrical power. I find this to be an entirely logical approach.

    First, I forgot to include the URL, http://www.e-catworld.com/ there’s a lot more there than fits here.

    The “when they have perfected electricity production” phrase struck me as a bit odd. I figured all they need to do is make a boiler with a lot of the modules like the last one tested. Power just for the factory? Kinda small scale. Someone suggested running a Stirling Engine. Needs a lot of development. Dean Kamen involved? He got on a Stirling Engine kick for a while, possibly to power his Segway, and while not much seems to have come from it except a number of patents….

    Too much speculation, but it’s more fun than Salby v. Macquarie.

  95. Russell Cook (@questionAGW) says:
    July 12, 2013 at 3:14 pm

    Most of you know of the ridiculous accusation that skeptic scientists are supposed to be paid shills of the fossil fuel industry. For those unaware of it, my new blog has been online since late May, an outgrowth of my 3 years of online pieces (including 3 guest posts here at WUWT) about how the accusation is baseless and essentially got its media traction in the hands of ex-Boston Globe reporter Ross Gelbspan:

    http://gelbspanfiles.com/

    Thanks Russell for the link to your interesting blog. It’s an impressive body of work.

    If I might make a suggestion, to orient the new reader (me!) it would be helpful if you could link to a couple of key background articles in the Welcome post – the reader has to look through all the posts and (especially) your archive of links to other sites to try to piece the story of your research together.

    Also, I think you should put the key articles as pdfs on your own blog so that you aren’t depending on the stability of other sites (some of the links in the archive don’t work, especially to ClimateGateCountryClub).

  96. DR says:
    July 12, 2013 at 8:57 pm

    September or October for the U.S. stock market crash to begin?

    Maybe Monday, if the 2nd quarter Chinese GDP growth rate (released Sunday night) is below 7%–or above it, but not believable.

  97. Ric Werme says:

    Too much speculation, but it’s more fun than Salby v. Macquarie.

    Here’s a speculation I just had: Wouldn’t it be wild if the E Cat made steam-driven cars practical?! They have great acceleration, FWIW. Take that, Tesla!

  98. Gail Combs says:
    July 13, 2013 at 2:38 am
    Seems the Boston Globe is for sale and no one is really interested in buying.
    ========================
    As they are all “Bowtied” bumkissers and throne sniffers, it will be no great loss. I just wonder when those arrogant A-holes over on Morrissey Blvd lose their jobs, do they become part of the great unwashed masses that they have been telling how to live and what to think for the last 40 yrs?

    Can’t happen soon enough in my mind.

    Lifelong Massachusetts resident.

  99. Mac the Knife says:
    July 12, 2013 at 6:25 pm

    “Climate Change Has Resulted In More Predation On Mosquito-Eating Birds”

    Solution: let’s build windmills to chop up the birds and explode the bats’ lungs.

    Nick Stokes says:
    July 12, 2013 at 6:35 pm

    Nothing new here.

    cynical_scientist says:
    July 12, 2013 at 7:31 pm

    “Is Salby going to retain his support among skeptics in the face of these revelations?”

    By all means, let’s judge the science by what we think of the personalities.

    “I at least am not prepared to fight for Salby.”

    How about you fight for science? Salby’s is right. That’s all I care about.

  100. cynical_scientist says:
    July 12, 2013 at 8:52 pm
    “Everything factual in that statement is true. Vice Chancellors of large Universities don’t lie in written public statements.”

    And presidents of the US are natural born citizens.

    It’s interesting. When you get a lot of Flak you’re over the target. Salby has found something that really REALLY irks them.

  101. rogerknights says:
    July 13, 2013 at 8:46 am

    Ric Werme says:

    >>Too much speculation, but it’s more fun than Salby v. Macquarie.

    > Here’s a speculation I just had: Wouldn’t it be wild if the E Cat made steam-driven cars practical?! They have great acceleration, FWIW. Take that, Tesla!

    I’m not sure about cars, but certainly long haul trucking would be completely changed. Put in a Google auto pilot and they could drive themselves across the country non-stop! Steam trains could make a comeback: all the romance, none of the cinders. The Cog Railway on Mount Washington replaced some of their coal burning locomotives with diesels. Just not the same, though everyone is glad the plume of smoke is gone.

    The facilities folks in Antarctica would be ecstatic with just the “domestic” hot water E-cats, hot cats for power generation would leave their fuel oil requirements a small fraction of what they have to plan for now.

  102. TomR,Worc,MA,USA says:
    July 13, 2013 at 9:27 am

    Tom, I enjoyed your term “throne sniffers” immensely.

    That was a new one on me. Hopefully, you will not sue me if I use it from now on….

  103. DirkH says:
    July 13, 2013 at 10:18 am

    “Salby has found something that really REALLY irks them.”

    He’s destroyed their entire raison d’etre. If humans have little to no influence over atmospheric CO2 levels (and we don’t), the entire brouhaha is moot.

    It was a stupid assumption from the get-go. The idea that such a system, so loosely regulated that we could have a significant impact on it, would nevertheless display such remarkable stability over millennia was absurd on its very face, and indicative of a mindset which has very little familiarity with real-world dynamics of systems.

  104. vukcevic says:

    July 12, 2013 at 11:53 am

    In the UK we are having real great summer weather, it reminds me of the 1976’s summer, but note of caution, those temperatures were not seen since

    http://www.vukcevic.talktalk.net/CET-D.htm

    Two hot days and a thunderstorm. I can hear rumblings in the distance and it’s turning black!

  105. Andres Valencia:

    Sorry if I typed that wrong; it is NOT my hypothesis. Marcel Leroux is (as far as I know) the first to propose this possibility. I simply saw that Occam’s Razor applied to it, and think that this is a better hypothesis that the current ‘Northern Hemisphere CFC’s travel to the South Pole, to assassinate ozone molecules’ (and don’t do any damage enroute).

    I would take credit for what I come up with, but Dr. Leroux proposed it first.

    Regards,

    Mark H.

  106. Girma says:
    July 12, 2013 at 11:11 am
    This is one of the first excellent articles that I read on climate, after the publication of the hockey stick scare, and have recovered it from a pdf format so that others can read it in a much more readable format.
    Scientists Ask Why World Climate Is Changing; Major Cooling May Be Ahead

    Chiefio has an interesting post explaining another mechanism how the sun may be influencing the warming of the oceans.
    Even if sun’s output as a whole might not change so much, variations in the bandwidth of the solar output may influence the energy different depth levels may receive:

    Here his post:

    http://chiefio.wordpress.com/2013/07/10/why-land-air-temperature-is-exactly-wrong/

  107. Jimbo says:
    July 12, 2013 at 12:21 pm
    If you live in the EU then you may soon find your food habits being regulated in the name of carbon dioxide. Extra carbon taxes on beef? Don’t say you haven’t been warned.

    Well, the romanian dictator at the time was treating the people as being too fat and needing a diet.
    Not a good precedent for the case, but as Europe is becoming more and more the opposite of a tax heaven… btw, how does one name it, the opposite of tax heaven? Tax hell?

    Ok keeping this in mind I would not wonder the europeans get tax on healthy, good food like meat, just based on the imaginary numbers of some dubious study. financed by WWF.

    I also remember having read on a blog somebody questioning what the influence of vegan food may have to human’s mind and behaviour.
    He was stating that from his own experience the vegans that he knew were not happy persons and he was explaining this as they may not feel happy or satisfied after eating, as it is not easy to eat balanced with only vegan food and this may have influence on their psyche.
    Considering many environmentalists are vegans there may be a connection here, I wonder, but the number of vegans I know is 1 and he seems to be ok.

  108. Steve Case says:
    July 12, 2013 at 2:29 pm

    The Colorado University Sea Level Research Group apparently uses 64 tide gauges to calibrate their satellite data. Does anyone know which 64 tide gauge stations these are?
    ========================
    Steve, My understanding is that the CU Topex/Poseidon derived sea level data are not calibrated against tidal gauges. Instead the satellite position is computed using the DORIS (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DORIS_(geodesy)) network of (50 or 60) fixed transmitters which is sort of, for lack of a better description, a “backwards GPS” with the reference transmitters at fixed locations and the receivers — whose position is to be determined — in orbit. IIRC, An precision of a few cm is claimed with the critical “altitude” component known to about a cm. None of that is prima facia impossible, but personally, I don’t find myself entirely convinced that the folks at CU are making realistic assessments of their error bounds.

    I’m going from memory here. I could be wrong.

  109. David Ball says:
    July 13, 2013 at 11:48 am

    http://drtimball.com/2013/what-happened-to-the-220000-leaked-climatic-research-unit-cru-emails/

    The cover-ups are effective because President Obama and other leaders continue to believe humans are causing warming/climate change and push for draconian, but completely unnecessary, policies. – See more at: http://drtimball.com/2013/what-happened-to-the-220000-leaked-climatic-research-unit-cru-emails/#sthash.pP6tt97g.dpuf

    ==========================================================================
    Thank you for that.
    But I’m not sure Obama and others really believe. I think they are just using it to implement their personal vision of Utopia … whether the rest of us want to be a part of it or not.
    “The end justifies the means” indeed.
    PS Thanks again, Mr. FOIA.

  110. jai mitchell says:
    July 13, 2013 at 10:14 am

    The problem with E-cat is that the copper produced in the nickel-hydrogen reaction happens to have the same isotopic abundance as naturally occurring copper. This would be impossible to reproduce using some kind of fusion reaction with naturally ocurring nickel.

    here is what a guy from brookhaven had to say about that:

    http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2011/12/05/the-nuclear-physics-of-why-we/

    Thanks. I read the article and the thread halfway through the comments, which were unusually civilized for exchanges on this topic. I agree the copper byproduct looks suspicious. And so do some other things. But what Rossi’s got going can’t be knocked down that easily yet. I keep hoping that we’ll have closure within a year. The latest developments look promising. But he’s managed to string this drama out long beyond the point where I thought the matter would be settled. So I just repeat, “Wait till next year!”

    One way to reduce the opportunities for trickery would be to use a large battery or battery pack as the source of input power, because its charge could be measured at the start and end of the process.

  111. cynical_scientist says:
    July 12, 2013 at 9:59 pm
    Actually I’m a climate sceptic.

    My bs meter beeped.
    I don’t know, it seems to me that this sentence is usually the introduction of a warmista rant who wants to pass as skeptic.
    Btw, what does it mean “climate skeptic”? I personally am not a “climate skeptic”. I know there is a climate and it changes, actually relative often…

  112. Lars P. says:
    July 13, 2013 at 12:06 pm
    “Jimbo says:
    July 12, 2013 at 12:21 pm
    If you live in the EU then you may soon find your food habits being regulated in the name of carbon dioxide. Extra carbon taxes on beef? Don’t say you haven’t been warned.

    Well, the romanian dictator at the time was treating the people as being too fat and needing a diet.
    Not a good precedent for the case, but as Europe is becoming more and more the opposite of a tax heaven… btw, how does one name it, the opposite of tax heaven? Tax hell?”

    Actually Ceaucescu is the perfect precedent. His wife was a chemist and had the state operate a chain of shops where people could get free cookies made from interesting stuff that one doesn’t find normally in food; I think algae amongst it; it was called “Program for the scientific nourishment of the population”.

    Similarly, the EU plan will probably serve to have giant food corporations create cheap faux food from industrial waste and get a sustainability subsidy for it or something. Notice that they explicitly mention collaboration with Barilla who seems to be all gung ho about the idea.

  113. jai mitchell says:
    July 12, 2013 at 4:07 pm
    Of course, on the flip side of that, in the presence of increased warming, the oceans take a much longer time to warm (generally considered to be one full cycle of the thermohaline current or about 500 years) to reach thermal equilibriuium.

    Before you start accepting so readily the idea of warming the oceans through CO2 you need to think a little at the mechanism how this can work.

    Here some facts known about the oceans and heat/energy transfer:
    The sun is warming the oceans directly in the levels from the surface down to 100 m (this is how deep solar radiation penetrates the oceans)

    The DLR – including all CO2 radiation does not penetrate the oceans more then several microns. If I correctly remember 80% stops at the first 6-7 microns.
    The oceans have a cool skin – several tens of centimetres – which has an inverse temperature gradient – cooler above and warmer below.

    This means that with all the mixing net heat transfer does not happen from the surface layer to the below layer.
    Net heat transfer happens only from warm to cold.

    So how could DLR warm the ocean? It could do this only through warming the surface and thus lowering the gradient which would let less heat escape from the oceans.
    Got that? It needs to warm the surface.
    The energy cycle is always sun -> ocean ->atmosphere -> space.

    However there is no observed surface warming – which agrees also with ARGO data.

    So how should heat from DLR bypass the surface, bypass the ARGO measured area to hide in the depth to come out later and haunt our grandchildren?

  114. DirkH says: July 13, 2013 at 2:08 pm “Actually Ceaucescu is the perfect precedent. His wife was a chemist and had the state operate a chain of shops where people could get free cookies made from interesting stuff that one doesn’t find normally in food; I think algae amongst it; it was called “Program for the scientific nourishment of the population”.

    Hmmpf, “Soylent Green is people!” I wonder, are they GMO’ed? As for not normally found in food, the Chinese are following the technology closely. The solution to pollution is dilution – in people.

  115. jai mitchell says at July 12, 2013 at 2:30 pm

    Even though the difference in temperature of the deep ocean warming is very low, the difference in energy gain is much greater due to the parameter of heat capacity. Basically meaning that the ability to absorb heat is much lower per degree temperature rise. The difference between water and air is that water is about 1000 times better at absorbing heat. That is why 90 percent of warming is going into the oceans.

    OK. For the sake of argument, you are 100% right. Now, why didn’t that apply in the 1990s?

    And, if the deep ocean can hold such energy, how much did it release in the 1990s? In other words, how uncatastrophic is Global Warming?

    Emphasising uncertainty does not increase fear and so does not justify the precautionary principle.
    Therefore it does not justify making policies on the assumption that cAGW is a fact.

  116. Doug Huffman says:
    July 13, 2013 at 2:38 pm
    “Hmmpf, “Soylent Green is people!” I wonder, are they GMO’ed? As for not normally found in food, the Chinese are following the technology closely. The solution to pollution is dilution – in people.”

    GM food is taboo in the EU. But maybe they’ll try to sneak it in via their sustainable eating program. I don’t have objections about GM food – American obesity is caused by simple old carbohydrates, not GM food (IMHO) – but of course unelected communitarian Eurocrats are the last persons I would trust with my interests of any kind.

  117. DirkH says:
    July 13, 2013 at 2:08 pm
    Similarly, the EU plan will probably serve to have giant food corporations create cheap faux food from industrial waste and get a sustainability subsidy for it or something. Notice that they explicitly mention collaboration with Barilla who seems to be all gung ho about the idea.

    Dirk, this gives me a goose skin already.
    “Our aim was to put the sustainable diets debate on the EU’s policy agenda”
    One should get now politicians to tell one what to eat? This does not look sustainable to me.

    “show what healthy low -carbon diets could look like in the project’s pilot countries: Spain, France and Sweden. ”
    low carbon diets rofl the nonsense gets denser, as Jo said, carbon demonized by climate propaganda:

    http://joannenova.com.au/2011/04/carbon-demonized-by-climate-propaganda/

    “Worse, 37% of people are so convinced carbon is pollution that they think it would be a worthwhile aim to reduce the carbon content of their body. (The ultimate diet, you might say).”!
    Well I need to better take care and avoid like hell buying any food with the bear on it.

    “they’ll have to take responsibility for their choices too– something that may come as a shock to the average post -modern consumer.”
    Interesting reading.

  118. Lars P. says:
    July 13, 2013 at 3:08 pm
    “Dirk, this gives me a goose skin already.”

    It’s funny isn’t it? Imagine – it’s useless, it will be a liitle bit complicated to propagandize their goals, and if there’s one thing that Europeans have in common is it’s they love their traditional food and quite often the traditional food of neighbouring countries. How will the stupid, stupid PolSci’s of the Eurocracy pull that one off? Especially as there are absolutely no other problems ATM (/sarc).

    “Worse, 37% of people are so convinced carbon is pollution that they think it would be a worthwhile aim to reduce the carbon content of their body. (The ultimate diet, you might say).”!

    That’s a great start! Maybe start a website and sell useless tasteless carbon-free gunk to the gullible. I’m Darwinist enough to think that natural selection will weed out the less adaptable – meaning, in the case of humans, the stupid ones. I hear the Vegans are already working on this problem.

  119. Lars P. says:
    July 13, 2013 at 3:08 pm
    “Well I need to better take care and avoid like hell buying any food with the bear on it.”

    I had some mackerel cans with the Panda on them, they were fine; it just means the company shoved some money over to the WWF. Normal Greenmail operation. I would have preferred not to finance these people but at that time that was the only Mackerel in my supermarket.

  120. rogerknights says:
    July 13, 2013 at 3:25 pm
    “Here’s a thread that says the house of cards is wobbling right now:”

    From 2010 on the Black Swans, corrections and crashes all happened between start of FEB and start of OCT. Has a lot to do with the protest and strike season in the Northern Hemisphere IMHO. Or maybe the central bankers meeting at the BIS in Basel every month or so make sure to crash the markets in Summer, when disruptions of food or energy supply don’t lead immediately to frozen dead people.

    (Before 2010 I have no data. My model has been trained with the data since 2010 and came up with an extension of the Sell-In-May rule)

  121. Help, advice needed.
    It’s been pretty hot (by local standards) in Scotland for the last week and the office at work has been uncomfortably warm.
    The office doesn’t have air-con and being enclosed within a high-roofed space has no direct access to the outside.
    Typically the office is 2 or 3 degrees C warmer than the surrounding area which is 4/5 degrees warmer than outside.
    The RH in the office is generally higher than the rest of the building (more bodies). It’s sitting about 45-55% at the moment which is not too bad but it can sometimes hit the 90’s!
    The office has one door that exits to the enclosing structure.
    We have a 70 watt ‘swamp cooler’ and a largish 170W fan.
    What is the best way to rduce the office temperature.
    For example, using the 170W fan, how should we use it, so as, to more rapidly cool the office at the expense of the enclosing area?
    Is it better to position it at the office door blowing outwards or putting it in the enclosing area blowing inward?
    Would blowing it parallel to the door be more efficient?
    Should it be positioned on the floor or higher up?
    Is it better to angle it so that the blast hits the warmer air near the ceiling?
    Again, using the 170W, air-flow fan, to remove heat from the building at an outside door how should we proceed? Pump in the cool or pump out the hot – parallel to the floor or up to the roof?
    As for the ‘swamp-cooler’ under what conditions should we use it? Is it RH limited?
    So many questions – loads of practical physics, I’m guessing.
    Any tips folks?

  122. RoyFOMR says:
    July 13, 2013 at 3:54 pm
    “Any tips folks?”

    Hold your wrists under running tap water for a minute.

  123. Roy: Hard to say without a drawing, but usually two fans, one blowing in, with one at the other end of the office blowing out, can create a nice wind-tunnel effect. Adding a drop ceiling with insulation will isolate you better from the hot (cold in winter) roof, above. (Old Spanish farmhouses used burlap tarps between beams to do that.)

    You should consider (if practical) punching a hole and running a duct from the outside outside, instead of sucking hot inlet air from the inside outside. Hot outlet air should go to the outside outside, too, ideally.

    Yes, swamp coolers are RH limited. They do work well under low RH, very poorly at high RH. Check mfr’s info and/or a hygrometric chart for effective range, and other data.

  124. Having the fan rotate horizontally might help. Think ceiling fans. Leads to a rotation of the entire air volume in the room.

  125. RoyFOMR July 13, 2013 at 3:54 pm

    Turn on the AC!
    Oh, you don’t have any?
    Open the windows!

    DirkH, if everyone in the world turned on their ceiling fans, would it change the day length?

  126. Roy, FOMR, me lad, ask a friendly chap at the MET to forecast super-high temperatures for the rest of the summer in Scotland. #[:)]

    *****************
    FYI for Robert of Ottawa, if Dirk H. is where he usually is, you asked him that question at about 2:18AM local time. Hopefully, his response for at least the next couple of hours or so will be zzzzzzzz. :)
    *********************************
    Gail Combs, DID YOU GET YOUR PICK-UP UNSTUCK? Use horse power to get it out? #[:)]

  127. The sad truism about Salby v. Macquarie is that if Salby had been a Warmista then he would never had been fired. Period.

  128. Lubos Motl,

    Thank you for sharing that ANNOYING video. {|0] I watched all 48 minutes of it. I skimmed your detailed summary and it appears that you and I agree on most of what you wrote, but one MAJOR exception is that I do not find “plausible” at all the conjecture and speculation that human CO2 causes global climate change. CAGW assertions are backed up by NO evidence (model projections are not evidence, as I’m sure you agree). NONE.

    Thoughts elicited by the video:

    — Replace Richard Lindzen with someone adept at debating. He is personable and obviously bright, but was far too wishy-washy. His views may or may not actually be wishy-washy, but the person sitting in his place needs to have his or her arguments and facts ready to quickly and POWERFULLY communicate clearly the SCIENCE of natural drivers of global climate (and the lack of scientific evidence for human CO2 as a driver).

    — Replace the format where an obviously biased interviewer acts as the prosecuting attorney-judge with a genuine debate with equal time for argument and rebuttal between the two sides (pro-CAGW and anti-CAGW) and with ample time over all (not a 22 minute TV show).

    Well, I just realized I could go on and on about the problems with that wretched interviewer, the format, etc… . I’ll wrap this up by just saying, the video was a circus and all the usual clowns were present:
    Hysterical Hank: B-b-b-b, whaaat if we don’t act noooowwwww — millions will die!!!!!

    Pious Petunia: [sternly nodding at all the CAGW P.R. guy said, grimly frowning at Lindzen]

    Mr. Half-n-half: Windmills are stupid, but….. OF COURSE I believe humans cause global warming.

    IPCC Man: 97% of all scientists agree, but, that’s not the main point, the main point is that the IPCC’s models and [mumble, mumble, mumble] are right, and 97%, do you hear me? 97 percent! of REAL scientists agree.

    Maldives Mike: [talking as fast as the slickest used car salesman I've ever said, "Yeah, right," to] Thesealevelisrisingdoyouwantpeopletodrown? I’m not a scientist, but…… [blah, blah, blah] the fact that I can speak quickly means that what I am saying is very important and mostofallthat it is TRUE!

    That interviewer was a joke — the WHOLE THING was a joke — the poor defense expert witness sat there on the stand being grilled by the JUDGE, the prosecutor, the court reporter, and the prosecutor’s expert witness ALL joining in to oppose him. There was no defense attorney. Looked like what a “trial” looks like in the U.S.S.R. where the communist party member prosecutor and judge run the show.
    ************************************************

    Re: The woman in the photo — I’m praying for her safety.

    THANK YOU FOR SHARING (LOL, next time, how about an old episode of “I Love Lucy” or something? This comedy made me frown more than smile.)

    Take care, over there, Mr. Motl.

    Janice

  129. Don K says:
    July 13, 2013 at 12:37 pm

    My understanding is that the CU Topex/Poseidon derived sea level data are not calibrated against tidal gauges. Instead …

    Thanks for the response. There is evidence that they do use a set of 64 gauges, since they say here:

    We have restricted the ~100 available [tide] gauges to a set of 64 near real-time stations that span the majority of both the T/P and Jason missions, and will therefore provide a relatively consistent calibration for both.

    http://sealevel.colorado.edu/content/calibration

    I would like to know what stations those are so I can go to the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) and see what the record for those stations looks like compared to the other 1200 PSMSL stations.

  130. Lewis P Buckingham July 12, 2013 at 9:42 pm says:

    “BTW,newer generations of insecticides, such as imidacloprid have been hypothesized to be part of the cause of ‘colony collapse’ in the European honey bee.”
    *****
    Imidacloprid and other similar neonicotinoid insecticides were banned in France as a result of a study that showed a link to imidacloprid and bee death.

    However, a report put out by the federal EPA, “Pesticide issues in the works: Honeybee colony collapse disorder,” names many different potential causes and even goes as far to state that imidacloprid is not likely the cause of this bee colony collapse disorder.

    Despite Imidacloprid and other neonicotinoids being banned in France for more than 10 years, bee colony collapse disorder has not decreased.

    In Australia, where imidacloprid is widely used, there are no reports of bee colony collapse disorder.

    http://www.imidaclopridandtrees.com/beeimpact.html

  131. Just been watching BBC Sunday Politics Show

    Andrew Neill has given Ed Davey (Energy & Climate Change Minister) a complete battering..

  132. After several years of wet summers the UK is finally enjoying a hot summer which i have been expecting.I consider it a reversion to the mean. A climate is an aveage of weather records. There is a variance from the average. A best option to assess whther a new trend is developing is to assess the variance. But an average is a composite of extremes.
    The climate does change, has done since the Earth has had an atmosphere. AMG advocates seem to want to re-instiute pre-Copenican thinking putting makind at the centre of creation and the Universe.

    If the scientists can expalin wht the jsetstream was low for the past few years but now seems to have risne to higher latitudes then i am open to theeir theories.

    Any way back to the G&T’s. Must keep up the quinine intake to fend off those perky mosquitoes :-)

  133. Mark and two Cats says:
    July 12, 2013 at 10:19 am

    “Has there been any reliable proof of the existence of a link between the ozone hole/s and man-made ozone-depleting substances?”

    Some months ago I argued on line with a commenter on some topic and he identified himself as being a published expert on the ozone hole, chlorofluorocarbons the main culprit, etc. I asked him if he was aware that oxygen (O2) was relatively magnetic (paramagnetic), attracted to a magnet and Ozone (O3) was diamagnetic (repelled by a magnet) a condition that naturally pushed ozone away from the poles and attracted O2 in its place. The stronger the magnetic field, the more pronounced the effect. Thinking on his feet, he replied yeah but the field is not strong enough (translation was: I didn’t know that).

    I checked Nasa imagery and much to my delight noted that there was an Ozone-enriched “collar” of thickened Ozone around the “hole”. This suggests that ozone is not depleted but was rather pushed back away from the poles by magnetic repulsion like rolling the neck on a turtleneck sweater. To my knowledge, no one in the field has noted this.

    http://ozonewatch.gsfc.nasa.gov/

  134. DirkH says:
    July 13, 2013 at 3:25 pm

    That’s a great start! Maybe start a website and sell useless tasteless carbon-free gunk to the gullible. I’m Darwinist enough to think that natural selection will weed out the less adaptable – meaning, in the case of humans, the stupid ones. I hear the Vegans are already working on this problem.

    Dirk you are a genius. I need to hurry up to get a patent on carbon-free food. This might be the product of the century.

  135. Gary Pearse says:
    July 14, 2013 at 1:06 pm
    I checked Nasa imagery and much to my delight noted that there was an Ozone-enriched “collar” of thickened Ozone around the “hole”. This suggests that ozone is not depleted but was rather pushed back away from the poles by magnetic repulsion like rolling the neck on a turtleneck sweater. To my knowledge, no one in the field has noted this.

    Very interesting Gary, thanks for posting it!

  136. Sceptical Sam says:
    July 14, 2013 at 1:47 am

    Lewis P Buckingham July 12, 2013 at 9:42 pm says:

    “BTW,newer generations of insecticides, such as imidacloprid have been hypothesized to be part of the cause of ‘colony collapse’ in the European honey bee.”

    Foulbrood ( Paenibacillus larvae ssp. larvae) is the cause of honey bee deaths. It has been known since the early 20thC and has been so rife over the last 30-40 years that N. American beekeepers, at least, kill off their bees each summer’s end and order new bees in the spring (by mail, BTW). It was similarly identified in Europe around the same time but European beekeepers may be slow on the uptake. Wild bees seem to carry it but are resistant and probably infect domesticated bees each year. Possibly some cross-breeding is feasible to bring it to more manageable dimensions. The springtime ordering of new bees, although standard in the industry, is not mentioned in the Wiki article below:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_foulbrood

  137. Another week, another ENSO meter update. A sizable drop, but still well within La Nada conditions, nothing to get excited about.

    From my script:

    Opening http://nomad3.ncep.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/pdisp_sst.sh?ctlfile=oiv2.ctl&ptype=ts&var=ssta&level=1&op1=none&op2=none&day=15&month=jun&year=2013&fday=15&fmonth=jul&fyear=2013&lat0=-5&lat1=5&lon0=-170&lon1=-120&plotsize=800×600&title=&dir=
    Found target /png/tmp/CTEST137388600118563.txt
    Opening http://nomad3.ncep.noaa.gov//png/tmp/CTEST137388600118563.txt
    Data file
    data from 00Z15JUN2013 to 00Z15JUL2013
    “———-”
    -0.0404033
    -0.119467
    0.0517259
    -0.0648869
    -0.252974
    Length of data file 104, most recent value: -0.252974
    file_last -0.0648869
    anomaly -03

  138. Wow..after wading through the thicket of this.. Newsbytes: Sun’s Bizarre Activity May Trigger Another Little Ice Age (Or Not) I had to come over here and vent..cause all I hear is doom and gloom.

    Doom and Gloom, Rolling Stones.

    We would expect the boys to have a say in the current events. Wow..oh yes buried neatly. This song pumps, like the sounds of the day. Sr. Mick even has a rapper voice on.
    Happy 50th boys..

    The Rolling Stones – The Rolling Stones round off 50th anniversary celebration
    by Bang Showbiz | 14 July 2013

    The Rolling Stones have rounded off their 50th anniversary celebration with an energetic headline performance as part of the Barclaycard presents British Summertime Festival.
    The Rolling Stones rounded off their 50th anniversary celebrations by headlining the Barclaycard presents British Summertime Festival.

    The legendary band were performing at London’s Hyde Park last night (13.07.13) for the second time in two weeks in front of 65,000 fans as the heat soared.

    Sir Mick Jagger wasn’t put off by the warm weather, as energetic as ever wearing the same white jacket he wore for the group’s iconic performance at the same venue in 1969.

    !!Addressing the crowd – and the heat – he said: ”It’s fantastic to see you all here on the hottest day of the year so far. Are you surviving? Good.”!!..

    http://www.contactmusic.com/story/the-rolling-stones-round-off-50th-anniversary-celebration_3761767

    Did Mick turn 70?

  139. RoyFOMR says:
    July 13, 2013 at 3:54 pm
    Help, advice needed.

    Roy,
    I highly recommend gin and tonics, served in a chilled collins glass with lots of ice! A wee splash of Amaretto over the top, with a fat slice of lime, adds a bit of panache!

    If management is unwilling to support that most excellent recommendation, I urge you to route 2 sizable air ducts into your interior office space, that extend from the outside of the building. The intake air duct should be located low on the north facing exterior building wall (You are in the northern hemisphere, yes?), at a location that will pick up only cool fresh outside air. The exhaust duct should be routed from the ceiling of your work space to penetrate up through the roof of the building. Both should be equipped with in-duct fans, to forcibly draw in fresh cool air and exhaust hot, humid air.

    If management won’t support that, I urge an office revolt.
    MtK

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