The Western Snowpack is 137% of normal

Skiing on Southern California's Mt. Baldy, May 3rd 2010 - Image: The Ski Channel

From The Declining Spring Snowcover Department

Experts tell us that spring snowcover has seen rapid declines in the Northern Hemisphere over the last 20 years. As of today, western US snowpack averaged by state  is 137 percent of normal.

According to USDA Snotel measurements, Arizona is 446% of normal. California is 131% of normal. New Mexico is 184% of normal. Nevada is 126% of normal. Montana is 104% of normal.

Lake Powell water levels have risen four feet in the last month and are 56 feet higher than they were on this date in 2005.

http://lakepowell.water-data.com/graphingengine.php?graphing=1+back_days=150

Salt Lake City just had its latest spring snow on record. Mammoth is expecting a big Memorial Day snow storm.

The Obama administration (42% approval) forecasts heat and drought for the western US. Let’s see how they are doing!

http://www.hprcc.unl.edu/products/maps/acis/wrcc/WaterTDeptWRCC.png

http://www.hprcc.unl.edu/products/maps/acis/wrcc/WaterPNormWRCC.png

Apparently Arnie’s efforts to stop global warming have been successful.

Schwarzenegger has emerged as a national leader on global warming, the one whose name most frequently comes up in foreign capitals when international cooperation on reducing carbon emissions is discussed. Al Gore might have a Nobel Prize, but Schwarzenegger heads a state that, if it were a country, would rank among the 10 biggest economies in the world. Given the Bush administration’s unwillingness to seriously address the problem, Schwarzenegger’s initiatives to mandate hard emissions targets and set up carbon-trading schemes with other states and Canadian provinces make him this country’s most forward-thinking governor, and its greenest Republican.

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205 Responses to The Western Snowpack is 137% of normal

  1. Nik Marshall-Blank says:

    And in a a few years time after the climate has swung into its cold phase and temperatures decline the headlines will read.

    “All of our efforts to curb emissions and reduce the effects of Manmade Global Warming are now coming into fruition. You guys ought to deify us as we just saved your sorry ass.”

    Believe me, these people have no shame.

  2. Richard Henry Lee says:

    The polar bears are singing “California here I come!”.

  3. Dave N says:

    Nik:

    Curbing emissions would imply a reduction in the rate of increase of CO2. I’m willing to bet it will be hardly affected. Of course, alarmists will likely turn around and declare cooling to be bad, and somehow caused by CO2.

  4. Al Gored says:

    Yes. Fine. But how much of it is old snow?

    More seriously, this is great news. Looks like those above normal snowpacks are where the meltwaters will be needed.

  5. el gordo says:

    It’s the first time in more than 50 years that Sacramento has experienced such a cold spell this late in the season. As long as the AO index remains negative there will be no NH warming.

    http://www.cpc.noaa.gov/products/precip/CWlink/daily_ao_index/ao_index.html

  6. pat says:

    This surely accounts for The Warmest April in history.

  7. Ross M says:

    Averaging state percentages doesn’t seems like a good way to Western snow cover – they are all different sizes. The first link doesn’t do it this way, so the comparison is invalid.

  8. kwik says:

    I think I have understood why IPCC likes a global temperature.
    If you average NH and SH, you get rid of much of the cyclic pattern……and it becomes more difficult to see whats really going on.

  9. tonyb says:

    Still unusually good snow at Cairngorm mountain in Scotland after record winter snow fall
    http://www.cairngormmountain.co.uk/

    So obviously the warmest start to the year Globally has missed out Scotland. And the rest of the UK. And Western Europe. And the USA. And Much of China And….

    Wait a minute then, just where has it been so warm elsewhere that a record is being claimed? The Southern Hemisphere must surely have melted to compensate for the lack of warmth in much of the Northern Hemisphere.

    Couldn’t have anything to do with the tiny number of stations in Canada artificially skewing the temperature in the World’s second largest country could it?

    Tonyb

  10. Northern Exposure says:

    Welp…

    Sounds like everything is right on target as per AGW computer model predictions : More snowfall… lots and lots of snowfall… so much snowfall that it will have to be measured in feet, not inches… and it will be unprecidented.

    They sure showed us, didn’t they ?

    And when all that precipitation translates into unprecidented amounts of heavy rainfall in the summer months, they’ll tell us that the models predicted that too.

    And then when everyone drops dead from drought and lack of drinking water, they’ll tell us the models predicted that too…

    And if at anytime during these high precipitations, (side by side with droughts), should there arise a cooling period somewhere in mix for any period of time, the models will have seen that coming as well.

    But the cooling period will only be temporary because the models say so. And after 10, 20, 30 years of cooling and global temps dropping by how much they’ve increased thus far, we’ll suddenly jump right smack dab into catastrophic global warming and unprecidented snowfalls, rainfalls, droughts, etc.

    On the other hand…

    If we don’t see this predicted cooling period for whatever reason, the models were then also correct in their catastrophic runaway venus-like warming too.

    So you see, 30-year temporary cooling can run side by side with runaway heating… and heavy precipitation can run side by side with drought.

    Hope that clears up any confusion some of you may have !

  11. crosspatch says:

    And on the news tonight (I live in California) the story is that May precipitation is below normal so expect reduced water deliveries. Go figure. This has been one of the coldest months of May I can remember since moving here. Daytime highs have been some 20 degrees below average many days. Tomorrow’s high is currently forecast to be 58F and 63F the day after. It is nearly June and I live in San Jose. It should be in the 80’s by now.

    That increased snow pack in California might be more due to colder temperatures than increased precipitation. Tioga Pass through Yosemite is still closed. Highway 108 (Sonora Pass) is still closed a little South of Yosemite. Most years the pass opens in May but there is one opening recorded as late as July 1. That might have been due to road repairs, though, and not snowpack. 1998 was one heck of a winter, though. We got some 15 inches of rain in one series of storms around New Years Day that flooded parts of Cupertino and San Jose that winter.

    Reply: The closure till July 1st was due to snowpack. I drove through Tioga pass on that July 1st. It was a good thing to, otherwise I would have had to drive the long way through Reno instead to visit my family on vacation in the Eastern Sierra. The scenery as magnificent that day.~ ctm

  12. Bill Tuttle says:

    The Obama administration (42% approval) forecasts heat and drought for the western US.

    That pretty much guarantees more snow in the offing…

  13. Mike Fox says:

    Doesn’t matter. It’s all rotten snow!

    ;-)

  14. Larus says:

    Yep, and Actic sea ice is back to average, right? Honestly, how hard is it to grasp the concept of “trend”? How can you think an anomaly negates a twenty-year trend?

    Also, citing a study showing declining snow cover in the Northern hemisphere and disproving it by touting the western part of the United States is ludicrous. This is like saying, “Are you sure there’s only a one in six chance of rolling a six? Well, well, well, look at this – I’ve just rolled a die three times, and got two sixes. Now, I don’t know about all that fancypants statistics stuff, but I’m pretty confident that two in three is more like 67 per cent, not 17. Those statistician clowns really have no shame, shouldn’t they learn basic arithmetic first?”

  15. Big Al Bore And The Phoney Consensus says:

    But of course you all know now (because I’m telling you) that more snow means Global Warming (because the warming causes more evaporation, more precipitation and hence more snow). And if the ice caps grow any more this year then that’s ‘case closed’ as far as I’m concerned. Just what will it take to convince you Denialismists? Do we have to be buried under 20 feet of ice before you’ll believe in Global Warming?[/sarc]

  16. sandyinderby says:

    Ross M says:
    May 25, 2010 at 11:25 pm

    Averaging state percentages doesn’t seems like a good way to Western snow cover – they are all different sizes. The first link doesn’t do it this way, so the comparison is invalid.
    —–
    You’ve seen Anthony’s figures now let us see yours.

  17. James says:

    Thats odd

    Rutgers shows neither a positive or negative departure of snow cover in the continental US??!! Lots of negative departure everywhere else though…

    http://climate.rutgers.edu/snowcover/chart_daily.php?ui_year=2010&ui_day=144&ui_set=2

  18. Athelstan says:

    Don’t know why Cal’ doesn’t join the EU.
    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/environment/article7136639.ece
    Afterall Arnie is Austrian by birth.

  19. Rhys Jaggar says:

    That data looks like saying that there is a large anomaly in the SW (Arizona, NM and the gambling state), a reasonable one in California but slightly below elsewhere.

    As one assumes that the SW snowpack is the smallest at this time of year, I’d ask what the actual anomaly is in terms of cubic metres of snowpack across the Rockies?

    Suspect not a lot or, if anything, slightly down.

    Interested to hear answers to that one…..

  20. Darren Parker says:

    California Uber Alles!

  21. Ed Zuiderwijk says:

    They were still skiing in the Scottish Highlands last week, the latest in the year in recorded history.

    The rise in Lake Powel is good new for Vegas. Is there any info about the Utah salt planes, which periodically become lakes again? Time to prepare the sandbags in Salt lake City?

  22. kadaka (KD Knoebel) says:

    Al Gore might have a Nobel Prize, but Schwarzenegger heads a state that, if it were a country, would rank among the 10 biggest economies in the world.

    I must be getting old. I remember when California was sixth largest, hands down, no debate. Now Kalifornia is merely ‘among the top ten,’ and I strongly suspect that’s a slight fudging of the old info rather than a reporting based on the current figures.

    Wasn’t it nice of Kalifornia to show the rest of the United States what happens when you follow those European social and environmental policies, even take the lead sometimes?

  23. RR Kampen says:

    “Experts tell us that spring snowcover has seen rapid declines in the Northern Hemisphere over the last 20 years. As of today, western US snowpack averaged by state is 137 percent of normal.”

    How large a fraction of the Northern Hemisphere comprises the western US?
    Why suggest this fraction is 100%?

    May 2010 in Holland was very cool. What does it suggest about hemispheric or global temperature? Nothing at all, of course. This cool May is just weather. So is snowcover this spring in that part of the US. Northern hemisphere snowcover has dropped far below normal, no?

    Of course, everyone on this forum knows all this. So what is the motive for all this silliness? Could it be you are all trying to be first laughed at, then totally forgotten in order to give Al Gore en Kyoto uncriticisable freeway?

  24. JER0ME says:

    As for why the snow cover maps needed adjusting, it has to do with how they were made in the first place, Robinson said.

    The maps are based on satellite images that are divided into grids. Squares in the grids are either judged as snow-covered or not, depending on how much they are filled with white. Just how much they must be filled to qualify as snow-covered varies in different places. So to just take the resulting maps from all corners of the continent, as is, and use them to study climate can lead to problems.

    “If they are misused they can result in faulty research,” Robinson told Discovery News. “What we’ve done is not changed it but tightened it up a little to develop better confidence limits. This has hardly needed cleaning up in some areas.” But in others, like some mountainous places, the data needed to be looked at again, he said.

    Looks like we could be seeing ‘homogenised’ and ‘adjusted’ figures. For our own benefit, of course, to make sure there is no ‘faulty research’. I recomend the best way to avoid ‘faulty research’ is to never let anyone see the raw data, and only show the ‘adjusted’ data. In extreme circumstances, you can delete the original data and claim it has been lost.

  25. Jimbo says:

    Ross M says:
    May 25, 2010 at 11:25 pm

    “Averaging state percentages doesn’t seems like a good way to Western snow cover – they are all different sizes. The first link doesn’t do it this way, so the comparison is invalid.”

    Unless of course snow cover went the other way. ;o)

  26. Dave Springer says:

    According to data here: http://lakepowell.water-data.com/

    Lake Powell is still a long way from full. It’s 77 feet below conservation pool level, 58% full, and inflows so far this year are 25% below average. Snowpack above it is 23% below average. Storage has fallen by 1.4 million acre feet so far in 2010. Lake Powell is not in good shape and the outlook isn’t either. Of course that has nothing at all to do with climate change and everything to do with rising demand for the water due to population growth.

    I live on the shore of a large man-made reservoir that’s an important source of water and electricity for a million people, agriculture, industry, and health of the downstream ecosystem. If we’re only at 58% capacity near the end of May that’s a big problem. We just came out of the worst drought since the 1950’s. Reservoir is at 97% capacity now (thank you El Nino) versus 55% last year at this time. Upstream slightly smaller reservoir is still down at some 78% full. Combined is 89% so we’re okay for the coming year but with La Nina making an appearance we’ll probably need a hurricane in the late summer to blow some good rain bands inland 150 miles from the Gulf to set us up for next year.

  27. Staffan Lindström says:

    …What a coincidence that Storlien, Jämtland nowadays Sweden, 583 m ASL {above
    myself…LOL…} , snowcover was first measured this season Sept 29…and still counting,
    since rather low temperatures are expected the coming days, we may have a record of
    10 consecutive months…If not, it’s still a new longevity record, old record being 227
    days (CONSECUTIVE!…) SO today we have … 2+31+30+31+31+28+31+30+26=240
    DAYS…All of them due to…have’nt a clue…??

  28. Smokey says:

    From the article:

    Schwarzenegger has emerged as a national leader on global warming…

    Gov. Arnold explains global warming.

  29. Jantar says:

    I’ll have to wait till friday to get the eaxct numbers, but from memory on Monday when we ran our data the New Zealand South Island snow pack was also around 135% of average for this time of year, and its not even winter yet.

  30. Joe says:

    Pretty interesting that AGW is only tied to temperatures with little regard for precipitation anomalies.

  31. rbateman says:

    Arnold Governators’ hot seat in California has been Terminated.
    He should go back to making movies that need no explanation.

  32. Ralph says:

    >>Tonyb
    >>Wait a minute then, just where has it been so warm elsewhere
    >>that a record is being claimed?

    Have you not noticed? It is always warmest in the most inaccessible parts of the globe, where nobody can verify their data. Places like the Yamal peninsula, and those warm spots that plagued northern Siberia and northern Canada.

    .

  33. Rhys Jaggar

    Why would you assume that snowpack is smallest this time of year? My bike ride last Sunday along the Poudre River was diverted several times by floodwaters from melting snow covering the trail.

    Lots of snow at Taos
    http://skitaos.org/webcamimages/tsv7a.jpg

  34. R. de Haan says:

    Yesterday the Dutch Weather report showed a picture of a potato field today and last year at the same date.

    Last year the field was green with the potato plants 15 cm high.
    Yesterday “there was nothing to see”.

    The weatherman told his public this was due to a lack of rain.
    The truth is it was because of the cold.

    Now after a few warm days temperatures are dropping again.
    Eastern Europe, Poland and Germany and France are coping with floods, severe damaging thunderstorms with big hail, even tornado’s.

    The point is there is a lot of disinformation on any level.

  35. vigilantfish says:

    Heatwave in Toronto. It feels as if this part of the world is disconnected from larger global trends this year. Sigh… :-(

  36. Joe says:

    As an observation…does it not seem like mountainous areas have all been effected with increased precipitation and cooler than normal temperatures?
    With the oceans being cooler, these would be effected first.

  37. Joe says:

    R. de Haan says:
    May 26, 2010 at 4:16 am
    Food supply shortages and increased pricing will be what climate cooling will create. This in turn would lead to more starvation and death to a great many of the poorest.

  38. Stephen Skinner says:

    “Schwarzenegger has emerged as a national leader on global warming”
    He should be in line for an Oscar nomination then!

  39. brokenhockeystick says:

    Off topic but not sure where else to ask. Anthony, how do I find the articles I’ve missed in chronological order? There used to be a button to click at the bottom of the homepage that sent you to prvious articles. I’ve been away from the PC for a while and want to see what I’ve missed

  40. Tom in Florida says:

    In my area of Florida, we have no snow pack, no mountains, not even hills (the highest points are I-75 overpasses) so I cannot comment on these things.

    However, at the bottom of the reference material is this:

    ” Reference period for average conditions is 1971-2000.”

    I will protest the use of the word “average” when dealing with a short, arbitrary base period.

  41. California increased from 131% to 142% overnight, while Rasmussen lost their last ten days of polling data. I wonder if their web site was hacked?

  42. Pascvaks says:

    TODAY “The Western Snowpack is 137% of normal” — aka Weather (to some) aka Global Warming (to some).
    TOMORROW “The Western Snowpack is -137% of normal” — aka Weather (to some) aka Global Warming (to some).
    ___________________________

    We’re not on the same page. We’re not using the same definitions. One side is using the rules of reason. The other side is making their own rules as they go along for their own reason. This is not about science or truth. This is about science VS a political agenda with the aim of a new world order. This is about apples and oranges.

    This is Yankee VS Red Coat. This is Blue VS Grey. This is West VS East. This is A VS B.

  43. Paul Hildebrandt says:

    It was warm in Puerto Vallarta last week and there is no snow in the coastal ranges of Mexico. But then, that is to be expected.

  44. John Egan says:

    Anthony – As Ronald Reagan would say, “There you go again.”

    For someone who regularly uses numbers you sure do cherry pick when it comes to approval of the Obama administration. Everyone who uses political numbers – Dem and GOP alike – knows that Rasmussen is highly partisan and often an outlier.

    RealClearPolitics gives Obama an average approval of 47.0 to a disapproval of 46.6.
    Pollster.com gives Obama an average approval of 48.9 to a disapproval of 47.2.
    These are averages of multiple polls – some rather partisan like Rasmussen – others nonpartisan.

    Furthermore, I fail to see how the reference to the “Obama administration” is especially germane since the agency to which you link was established under the Bush Sr. administration. Was there any particular announcement on climate from the Obama administration lately about summer temperatures and drought?
    http://www.globalchange.gov/about/overview

    Undue politicization of the website will likely only make it an echo chamber. (I realize that it is YOUR website and you are free to do anything you choose.) If your goal is to present multiple views with an emphasis on those which seek to refute some of the research and policy assumptions of climate change advocates, then a less partisan approach would serve you more effectively.

  45. Arn Riewe says:

    Al Gored says:
    May 25, 2010 at 11:15 pm

    “Yes. Fine. But how much of it is old snow?”

    And more importantly, how much is “rotten” snow?

  46. Enneagram says:

    Instead of snow extent what counts now is global governance cover extent, you are now under a 90% cover; 100% planned to be reached next autumn, after Cancun.

  47. CO2Insanity says:

    Don’t forget our reservoirs are now 96.18% full and we haven’t had the snow melt yet. Not to mention it’s snowing in the Sierras. Lake Shasta is no 113% of normal and 99% full. Lake Oroville (the one they claim they use for water the most) is now 80% of normal and 69% full and no snow melt yet. But they keep telling us we have a drought in California. The greentards in Sacreamento just don’t want to give it up.

  48. RR Kampen says:

    R. de Haan, “The weatherman told his public this was due to a lack of rain.”

    That surprised me too. Correct, it was because of the cold. We did some analysis within the met community here and also ruled out the possibility they were different potatoes.
    It is the cold. May 2010 is in the 5-10 percentile coldest and after the fairly warm weekend today is very cold indeed again.

    http://www.knmi.nl/klimatologie/grafieken/maand/txgn/txgn260_201005.png

    Today’s max may hardly exceed 12° C.

  49. Frank K. says:

    RR Kampen says:
    May 26, 2010 at 2:40 am

    “This cool May is just weather.”

    Which is to say, any atmospheric event (whether hot or cold) is “just weather”…

    Please tell this to the our friends in the Global Warming Industry, Inc. (and their mainstream media comrades) when there is a heat wave somewhere this summer… Of course, heat waves are their equivalent to Public Television pledge drives – opportunities to distort science in order to collect their billions in climate ca$h…

  50. Pamela Gray says:

    Some twit will come out and say this: This is thin first year snow and will melt rapidly. Old snow has mostly disappeared from the mountains.

    However, I follow snow pack regularly, which is measured as water equivalent, the only way to measure snow that has meaningful information. Snow cover means nothing in terms of stream flow and water availability. This year Oregon’s water equivalent is adequate for the summer irrigation season and a bit better than last year (by basin, it ranges from 70’s to 130’s % of average water equivalent), so we’re good.

  51. The first two “Key message” points are not true. The average US temperature has not risen 2F in the last 50 years and precipitation has not increased 5%. The Reanalysis data shows a slight decline for both.http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/cgi-bin/data/timeseries/timeseries1.pl. The rest is biased conjecture.

  52. Hoppy says:

    Mr Watts,
    I thought cherry picking was a sport practiced by the other team?
    Your first graph appears to show that there has been more accumulated snow pack in the South West and less in the North West. There are a few too many averages of averages of a difficult to measure substance going on to believe any of the actual numbers. From the UHI guy (great work) – I expect better of you.

  53. Pamela Gray says:

    Oh my heavens. I just read the linked article at Discovery and they are doing exactly what I just said was stupid. Measuring snow cover by pixels. They, in essence, are following weather systems and saying it is climate change. What idiots. These people have never fought over irrigation water. Water equivalent is the only thing that matters. Ever plowed water snow versus sugar snow? I have. Water content is everything. Not depth, and not coverage. Anything else related to snow is just academic silliness.

  54. toby says:

    There cannot be that much snow in Arizona in May anyway!

    On these maps, there is only a tiny white speck, which was not there last year.
    Scroll down.

    http://www.climate4you.com/SnowCover.htm#Recent USA-Canada snow cover

  55. hotrod ( Larry L ) says:

    Keep in mind that the snow season has not ended yet in the Rockies. In the Denver Metro area, we are still about 2 weeks from our latest historical snow in the metro area, and snow will still be falling in the high country for another month.

    According to the Colorado Basin River Forecast center http://www.cbrfc.noaa.gov/ significant melt has not started yet in the Colorado Basin except for a small area in north central Colorado were there are areas reporting bank full flows, all others are reporting normal stream flows.

    It will be several weeks before we have a good idea what the actual snow melt run off conditions will be this year. In wet years peak flows frequently occur in the early part of June. Then we also have additional precipitation in early summer if we have good upflow from the gulf and heavy stationary thunderstorms develop as happened in the Big Thompson flood on July 31, 1976, when a stationary thunderstorm parked over the Big Thompson drainage and dropped up to 12 inches of rain in 4 hours.

    The June 1965 flood in Metro Denver occurred on June 16, 1965, when heavy spring rains fell on rain soaked ground saturated by days of continuous rain, and river drainages full of snow run off melt water.

    Our water year is just getting started. Actual peak reservoir levels will not be known for some time yet for this year.

    Larry

  56. Pamela Gray says:

    Just a note: Reservoirs should not be at capacity right now if snowpack water equivalent is taken into account in above average areas. That is so melt does not cause down stream flooding. Lowering levels now gives the reservoirs the capacity to do what they were often built to do, hold and manage snow melt.

  57. Steve Keohane says:

    The minimum snow pack occurs just prior to it increasing at the end of summer. Dave Springer says: May 26, 2010 at 2:55 am Storage has fallen by 1.4 million acre feet so far in 2010. Lake Powell has yet to see any major inflow this year as the run off from snow pack is just beginning, and will peak in 6 weeks or so.
    WRT April being the warmest ever, in Carbondale, Colorado, the nearest town to me, the highs for April never reached average, and in fact the average high for April 2010 was 7° below the historical average. We expect frost until June 1st-ish, but still have solid freezing, 25°F yesterday, every few days still. This is the second year of late warming. It can be labeled weather of course, but the anomalies for a warming climate tend to be above average not below.

  58. David Mayhew says:

    “RR Kampen says:
    May 26, 2010 at 2:40 am

    “Experts tell us that spring snowcover has seen rapid declines in the Northern Hemisphere over the last 20 years. As of today, western US snowpack averaged by state is 137 percent of normal.”

    How large a fraction of the Northern Hemisphere comprises the western US?
    Why suggest this fraction is 100%?

    May 2010 in Holland was very cool. What does it suggest about hemispheric or global temperature? Nothing at all, of course. This cool May is just weather. So is snowcover this spring in that part of the US. Northern hemisphere snowcover has dropped far below normal, no?

    Of course, everyone on this forum knows all this. So what is the motive for all this silliness? Could it be you are all trying to be first laughed at, then totally forgotten in order to give Al Gore en Kyoto uncriticisable freeway?”

    Dear Mr Kampen,
    Possibly also worth for you to mention that the current cold period started here, in the Netherlands, in November 2009 (coinciding with a certain climate conference) and has been caused by a persistent high pressure system over the North West Atlantic affecting the whole of North West Europe (UK, France, Germany, NL, Spain, Denmark, Norway, Iceland, Sweden) which is a little unusual, or different to “usual” (whatever that is, e.g. the last thirty years)??. To dismiss observations actually concerning 6 months and hundreds of thousands of sq km. as “weather and not climate” doesnt appear to make much sense because, as I am sure you will agree, climate is in any case ultimately just a derived function of weather measurements, at a different time scale.
    The problem with the “current situation” is always how to distinguish noise from long term signal. However, its doesnt seem to me in the current situation, seeing the limitations revealed with various “official” data sources, very wise to have a closed mind concerning new developments. Indeed it is very instructive to see how the (subjective) perception adds up to the “official” record (or not..)
    So, despite your comments concerning “silliness”, Mr Kampen, my thanks to this blog, where, laughed at or not by you, these developments are discussed, no doubt with a lot of hot air and mistakes, but ultimately with some increase of individual knowledge for those open to it….
    DM

  59. Hu McCulloch says:

    The reference period for the source data at http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/snotelanom/snotelbasin is 1971-2000.

  60. Craig Moore says:

    Here is the latest drought map: http://drought.unl.edu/dm/monitor.html

  61. MostlyHarmless says:

    That’s not snow – it’s the first fruits of the Stateswide Albedo Project (SAP) which is reflecting that nasty sunlight back into space where it belongs. Supporters of Ursus Bogus have dressed up in white polar-bear costumes and are lying down in protest at the failure of an otherwise caring and progressive government to tax fossil fuels to extinction and create millions of green jobs for illegal immigrants who really need them.

  62. PJB says:

    Anthony is undoubtedly pretty busy and can be excused for using a “reasonable” way of showing a variance in warming indicators…..much like our Pythonesque friends like to say:

    “Now we’ve taken this theory one stage further. If we increase the size of the penguin until it is the same height as the man and then compare the relative brain sizes, we now find that the penguin’s brain is still smaller. But, and this is the point, it is larger than it was.”

  63. Ric Werme says:

    Dave Springer says:
    May 26, 2010 at 2:55 am

    According to data here: http://lakepowell.water-data.com/
    Lake Powell is still a long way from full. It’s 77 feet below conservation pool level, 58% full, and inflows so far this year are 25% below average. Snowpack above it is 23% below average. Storage has fallen by 1.4 million acre feet so far in 2010. Lake Powell is not in good shape and the outlook isn’t either. Of course that has nothing at all to do with climate change and everything to do with rising demand for the water due to population growth.

    “Lake Powell” and “good shape” in the same sentence? There were people who never expected it to fill. Of course, several of them never wanted it created.

    Interesting site. In addition to pool level, inflow and outflow are important. At last report (May 24th) sees 23704 in, 9957 out. A week before saw 16067. Units cubic feet/sec instead of something scientific. The average inflow for today is 40024 cfs, and the temperature 16°F warmer.

    I suspect the data reflects slow melting more than poor snowpack, or at least I suspect inferring snowpack from temperature and inflow requires more than a single day’s data.

  64. Sonicfrog says:

    Here in Fresno, it is expected to reach a whopping 74 degrees today. Yesterday, it was 68. Tomorrow, again, 68. And it rained last night, which mean there was snow in the higher elevations of our neighboring Sierra Nevada mountains. For those who have never lived in this area, this is weather you would expect to see in early March. Normally at this time in late May, we will not have seen any rain for over a month, s cloud appearing in the sky is a rare event, and the temps are usually in the upper 80’s to mid 90’s. Having a 100 degree day in late May is not unheard of.

    If this is Global Warming, then… More Please!

  65. Doug in Seattle says:

    The SW is doing fine for snow as the article reports. In the WA however only the Olympics are well packed at over 200%, while Eastern WA is running a deficit with snow pack below 70% over most of the east side of the state (same with ID).

    ftp://ftp.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/data/water/wcs/gis/maps/wa_swepctnormal_update.pdf

    Most irrigated Ag is in Eastern WA, so there are still a few worries, but snow pack was down around 50% in the Cascades as late as March and has recovered quite a bit since then. A good deal of the irrigated Ag water comes from the Cascades, so all is not bad since they have snow pack of about 80-90% where the irrigation projects get their water.

  66. Amino Acids in Meteorites says:

    Schwarzenegger has emerged as a national leader on global warming

    Business continue to leave California because of California’s business unfriendly regulations. This is why many want Meg Witman to become Governor. She has run businesses successfully unlike Arnold Schwarzenegger. Californians can’t wait until he is out. I live in California so I know this firsthand. And unfortunately I voted for Arnold! :-(

  67. Amino Acids in Meteorites says:

    BTW, where did global warming go? Maybe it fell in Arnolds couch cushions. It’s been a cold Spring here.

  68. Richard Sharpe says:

    Larus says on May 26, 2010 at 12:24 am said:

    Yep, and Actic sea ice is back to average, right? Honestly, how hard is it to grasp the concept of “trend”? How can you think an anomaly negates a twenty-year trend?

    Honestly, how hard is it to grasp the concept of cycles and that parts of a sine wave look like a downward or upward trend until you have enough data?

  69. Ed, from Portland,OR says:

    I have been watching Lake Shasta in Northern California data. To my surprise it has gained about 100 feet in elevation and is now only a foot and a half from full. This lake is enormous, 4.5 million acre feet. A good reason to celebrate, its not all gloom and doom out there.
    http://www.shastalake.com/shastalake/

  70. tonyb says:

    vigilantfish said

    “May 26, 2010 at 4:22 am
    Heatwave in Toronto. It feels as if this part of the world is disconnected from larger global trends this year. Sigh… :-(
    ——-

    It seems to me that some urgent research is needed into the climatic conditions of Toronto.

    Pleae arrange research funding, accommodation, vehicle and send air ticket soonest. I am also willing to carry out research into other congenial areas of the world. :)

    Tonyb

  71. Jeremy says:

    What’s interesting in California is that even though snowpack is 137% of normal, and much of the water for Southern California comes from the Sierra Nevada winter snowpack via the California Aqueduct system, the only thing you *ever* hear in the media lately in So.Cal is “We’re in a drought, please conserve water.” They’ve purchased billboards all over So.Cal, you see commercials, the local municipalities are even implementing new water restrictions. All this despite INCREASED precipitation statewide.

  72. Jeff Alberts says:

    Out in Western Washington there was much gnashing of teeth in Jan and Feb twenty ten when temps were about 10+ f above average (not “normal”, there is no “normal”). Many municipalities went into stage 1 water restrictions in anticipation of a catastrophe. Then in March, April and even into May, the mountain snow came a-fallin’. As far as I know they haven’t lifted those restrictions…

  73. Jeff Alberts says:

    Joe says:
    May 26, 2010 at 4:25 am

    As an observation…does it not seem like mountainous areas have all been effected with increased precipitation and cooler than normal temperatures?
    With the oceans being cooler, these would be effected first.

    Joe, of course you mean “affected”, not “effected”.

  74. nandheeswaran jothi says:

    Larus says:
    May 26, 2010 at 12:24 am

    do you actually believe “20 years trend” is longterm trend. the alarmists used to claim 30 years is what is needed ( actually that might not be enough either ). now 20 years is enough for a “trend”? so, if by 2018, the “hottest year” is still 1998, would you then be talking about “20 year trend” as well?

    and you are doing the same as what you are ridiculing…. 20 years make it a trend in a world as complex as this.

  75. Robert M says:

    Everyone and anyone who doubts AGW has to understand that the warming that started in 1850’s and continues to this day. Was in anticipation of increased output of C02 by mankind.

    If for some reason the cooling trend continues this would be great news. It means that temps are starting to fall in anticipation that mankind has stopped emitting C02. Now since we can’t have a universe ending time paradox, it is imperative that the governments of the world, especially the ones from the West be given the power to enforce C02 cuts. This means that they have to tax and tax again, and they will probably have to imprison anyone who questions their methods for treason and crimes against humanity. It is the only way, and anybody who says differently is evil.

    Furthermore the horrible personal attacks on our leaders need to stop, and the perpetrators punished for all time. Al Gore works hard, and he has worked on the side of good. What does it matter if he has a few perks at our expense. Yes Mann, and Jones and Briffa and Hansen lied to us, but it was all for a good cause, not like those meanyhead individuals that keep yammering for silly things like raw data, and the methods used to achieve uhhhh everything that they have achieved of course. They are great men, and like all great men they have thier failings. Pay no attention to our Great Leaders actions, they only have our best interests at heart. You know what they say, to make a hockey stick you have to break a few laws, both natural and Mannmade.

  76. RHS says:

    The water basins in Co may be below average but very few front range cities have mandatory watering restrictions. For current and historical levels, take a look at:
    http://www.co.nrcs.usda.gov/snow/snow/watershed/current/daily/maps_graphs/swe_hilo.html

  77. Ed Caryl says:

    Yes, the desert is blooming this spring. I can attest to that. There is still snow showing on the southern side of Sierra Blanca. (12,000 ft. Southern New Mexico) It’s usually bare by now. I note that the increased snowpack is predominantly in the SW. BC and Alberta, not so much. But one spring does not make a trend. Let’s wait at least a couple of years, if not ten.

  78. RR Kampen says:

    Richard Sharpe says:
    May 26, 2010 at 7:25 am

    Honestly, how hard is it to grasp the concept of cycles and that parts of a sine wave look like a downward or upward trend until you have enough data?

    And how hard is it to grasp the concept of forcing on any cycle? Like: sin[x] + exp[a x], a a small positive constant?

  79. Craig Moore says:

    USGS on streamflows: http://waterwatch.usgs.gov/

  80. Don B says:

    George Taylor, previously long-time Oregon State Climatologist, wrote an article in 2005 responding to those who started snowpack calculations in the 1950s, thus accentuating the trend compared to using a longer view.

    Regardless, he showed how snowpack is more dependant on precipitation than on temperature.

    http://www.tcsdaily.com/article.aspx?id=052605X

  81. Chuck says:

    From the “Weather isn’t climate” department…. There’s been a persistent trough in the eastern Pacific this spring which usually means ridging in the east so that part of the continent has been warmer than average.

    Still not a single 80 degree day at my location in the Sierra foothills of California. Last year we had 95 by this date. Rainfall is 120% of an average season at my house which ends June 30th.

    Just checked some of the high Sierra roads. Hwy 4 is still closed due to snow. Hwy 120 over Tioga Pass in Yosemite is still closed with 4-6 feet of snow and rock slides and downed trees. Glacier Point road in Yosemite is still closed with 4 feet of snow on it. The Sierra received more snow last night and probably more tomorrow. In an average year these roads are open by Memorial Day weekend. Maybe 4th of July this year?

    When it finally does stop raining and warms up the “Bad Fire Season Expected” headlines will start because the rain made the grass and brush grow like crazy.

  82. Robert M

    You said the warming started in 1850. That must be when the Hummer was introduced.

  83. crosspatch says:

    “How large a fraction of the Northern Hemisphere comprises the western US?
    Why suggest this fraction is 100%?”

    I believe this year’s satellite data (same data used to show Arctic ice) showed greatest Northern Hemisphere snow cover since they started recording data in 1979.

  84. Milwaukee Bob says:

    crosspatch says: at 12:14 am
    And on the news tonight (I live in California) the story is that May precipitation is below normal so expect reduced water deliveries. Go figure.
    Just as a reminder, because I know you know this – “precipitation” is from Mommy Nature, “water deliveries” are from Daddy Government. And Mommy and Daddy have never been married and do not talk to each other. The AWG crowd is as much (or more) about control of your life, and specifically therein – water, as they are about CO2 emissions.

    And you say Sonora Pass is still closed? Do you know which level? There are three. Just east of Strawberry (which I have to believe is open), almost at the top (Dardanelle, which would not be surprising that it’s still closed) and about have way between the two (Forest Rd 5N28). Yes, and there was a – “year of little trade” in Mi-Wuk Indian lore in which the snow was so deep through the summer that the Mountain Mi-Wuks on the western side of the Sierras could not trade with their Nevada brethren. Oh, and how I do miss Mi-Wuk Village and the Sierra Nevada Mts. and especially the Diamondback Grill in Sonora. Best dang hamburgers West of the Pecos!

  85. Layne Blanchard says:

    Ed Zuiderwijk says:
    May 26, 2010 at 2:25 am

    “The rise in Lake Powel is good new for Vegas. Is there any info about the Utah salt planes, which periodically become lakes again? Time to prepare the sandbags in Salt lake City?”

    This is a fascinating process: Each year, the salt flats become shimmering mirrors of 6 inch deep water. The water evaporates, leaving minerals behind, and late in the summer, they are the Bonneville Salt Flats, known for land speed records set there.

    Here is a photo during the wet period.

    http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/family-vacations-in-utah-5.jpg

    and then dry:

    http://www.westcountygazette.com/blog/uploaded_images/Salt-Flats-of-Utah-792990.jpg

    http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/salt-3.jpg

    The freeway is elevated thru this area.

    And speaking of Global Warming, have a look at the size of Lake Bonneville before it all evaporated, leaving behind The Great Salt Lake. Makes Lake Powell look like a puddle!

    http://www.bonnevilleshorelinetrail.org/geology/geologiclake.gif

    But this was not related to the flood of 1983, which was caused by “City Creek” overload. The overflow was diverted thru the city via sandbagged streets and they made little bridges for us to drive over it.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:SLCfloodphoto.jpg

    Salt Lake City

  86. Layne Blanchard says:

    I think my comment is in the spam filter…. :-)

    [Rescued & posted. ~dbs, mod.]

  87. melinspain says:

    Western parts of continents show similar weather patterns.
    In Spain reservoir capacity (quite large indeed) is nearly 85% ¡Fantastic!
    ¿See it in the news? Spain is officially supposed to get drier and drier, hotter and hotter…
    http://www.embalses.net/ – interesting web it shows all the reservoirs, trends, variations, inflows, outflows, etc.

  88. PeterB in Indianapolis says:

    Everyone should remember, NO ONE experiences “climate”. We all experience “weather”, and we adapt to it on a constant and rapid basis.

    As far as NH snowpack, WHERE IS MOST OF THE NH SNOWPACK IN MAY??? Oh yeah, up in the mountains… DUH. People claiming that an average of mountain state snowpack as faulty must not realize this. Now, the Canadian Rockies and Alaska should probably be thrown in as well, and the Alps, and the Urals, and any other NH mountains high enough to have snow-pack in May, that would indeed be a better NH snowpack average than just the Western US, yes, I would agree with that assertion.

  89. HaroldW says:

    Salt Lake City just had it’s latest spring snow on record.

    …and after all that discussion about “it’s” vs. “its” on the previous post… tsk tsk.

    [Thank's, fixed. ~dbs]

  90. Enneagram says:

    Pamela Gray says:
    May 26, 2010 at 6:24 am

    That is because they don’t see reality on the field, just sitting in front of their computers watching anything (hope not pornography)and the computer itself counting pixels in the background.
    That “stasis” for so many hours is bound to produce clots in their arteries and heart attacks for sure.

  91. rogerkni says:

    brokenhockeystick says:
    May 26, 2010 at 4:58 am

    Off topic but not sure where else to ask. Anthony, how do I find the articles I’ve missed in chronological order? There used to be a button to click at the bottom of the homepage that sent you to previous articles. I’ve been away from the PC for a while and want to see what I’ve missed

    Beneath the “Posts By Date” calendar for May there is a little link to “Apr.”, which in turn will no doubt lead further back. And there is the Categories click-line, which opens up to a set of article-topics that can be selected. I don’t know where the old Archives link has gone.

  92. All the leaves are brown (ish green)
    And the sky is grey(ish pink)
    ….
    California dreaming
    On such a winter’s day.

  93. R. de Haan says:

    #
    RR Kampen says:
    May 26, 2010 at 5:46 am

    R. de Haan, “The weatherman told his public this was due to a lack of rain.”

    “That surprised me too. Correct, it was because of the cold. We did some analysis within the met community here and also ruled out the possibility they were different potatoes.
    It is the cold. May 2010 is in the 5-10 percentile coldest and after the fairly warm weekend today is very cold indeed again.

    http://www.knmi.nl/klimatologie/grafieken/maand/txgn/txgn260_201005.png

    Today’s max may hardly exceed 12° C.”

    That’s why farmers, independent weathermen and skeptics don’t buy the the AGW crap. They know when someone lies.

  94. RR Kampen

    Normally the oceans don’t retain snow, so it might not make a lot of sense to figure them in to snowcover calculations.

  95. R. de Haan says:

    The small percentage of weatherman that tell us AGW is real do so because they fear losing their job if they say otherwise.
    Others are paid to say AGW is real but most of them don’t act like it.

    So what’s left is an absolute minority of people who do believe AGW is real but they are such a small crowd, too small to explain any “consensus” on the subject.

    Therefore the consensus on AGW is a lie too.

    Those who do or did believe AGW was real keep telling us that weather is not climate.
    But with this we agree. Because it’s true.

  96. Milwaukee Bob says:

    Layne Blanchard said at 8:56 am
    Makes Lake Powell look like a puddle!
    But this was not related to the flood of 1983, which was caused by “City Creek” overload. The overflow was diverted thru the city via sandbagged streets and they made little bridges for us to drive over it.

    I was there also! (Had lake front property :) in Sandy, 106S) I filled a lot of those sand bags. It still ranks (in my mind) as the most efficient and amazing successful volunteer task of all time! We literally rerouted a RIVER (or soon to be river because “Creek” it was not!) thru the heart of downtown SLC! Thousands of volunteers, magnificently coordinated, filled and placed sand bags along a very snake like route thru the city to guide the melt runoff that was about to come. That’s right! It was done well AHEAD of the flood that the planners knew was coming. Yes, we were in a hurry and there was water while we were still laying bags, but it work perfectly (as I recall) and was a stunning sight at the peak of runoff! Tens of thousands of cubic feet of water per minute rushing down its “commanded course” from mountain to The Great Salt Lake…. “Unbelievable planning and execution” I kept saying to myself as I watched it go by – – dead tired and with much increased respect for the leaders of the City as well as the Mormon Church. When “they” call for help – – – it happens! and no, I’m not Mormon.

  97. jorgekafkazar says:

    “…Schwarzenegger heads a state that, if it were a country, would rank among the 10 biggest economies in the world….”

    He’ll soon fix THAT! Back to Hollywood with him!

  98. jorgekafkazar says:

    RR Kampen says: “And how hard is it to grasp the concept of forcing on any cycle? Like: sin[x] + exp[a x], a a small positive constant?”

    The concept is easy. What’s hard is proving the forcing really exists when you have no data that shows causation.

  99. Richard Sharpe says:

    RR Kampen says on May 26, 2010 at 7:57 am said:

    Richard Sharpe on says May 26, 2010 at 7:25 am

    Honestly, how hard is it to grasp the concept of cycles and that parts of a sine wave look like a downward or upward trend until you have enough data?

    And how hard is it to grasp the concept of forcing on any cycle? Like: sin[x] + exp[a x], a a small positive constant?

    It’s not, but you had better demonstrate that the exponential behavior is there, and the original poster was talking about a linear trend for a data set that looks to be shorter in (or close to) duration than one quarter of the period of the cycles involved.

    In addition, we know that CO2 levels were higher in the past. Indeed, quite a bit higher, and we did not see unlimited exponential behavior, so I think your exponential forcing term requires some change.

  100. Milwaukee Bob says:

    PeterB in Indianapolis said at 9:08 am
    Everyone should remember, NO ONE experiences “climate”.

    Well, actually we do. While technically “climate” is a made up condition found only in the mind of homo sapiens and their off-spring – computers, thereby making it impossible to “experience” as it doesn’t exist, it is by definition and in reality an average of weather. Therefore, when experiencing weather we ARE – experiencing climate.

  101. John F. Hultquist says:

    Ed, from Portland,OR says:
    May 26, 2010 at 7:25 am
    I have been watching Lake Shasta . . .

    Having not been in the Shasta area for about 30 years and seeking an update to my mental map of the region, I clicked on the link you provided, then the map links, but at a reasonable zoom to get the spatial context that Google link is useless. Try these coordinates in Google Earth (and turn of all the “stuff”):

    40.760335, -122.372561

    The mountain of like name is 45 miles (73 km) north and if you ask for Mount Shasta, CA via Google Earth you get the town 9 miles SW of the mountain.

  102. Enneagram says:

    R. de Haan says:
    May 26, 2010 at 9:52 am . This really made me laugh:
    So what’s left is an absolute minority of people who do believe AGW is real but they are such a small crowd, too small to explain any “consensus” on the subject
    because, that “minority” is those in power….so you are done!

  103. In the Cascade Mountains, the snowpack was less than normal this year – but it follows the pattern of strong correlation to El Nino. Cascades snowpack has been in a general upward trend since the mid-1970s See: http://www.appinsys.com/globalwarming/PNWSnow.htm

  104. jorgekafkazar says:

    Amino Acids in Meteorites says: “…unfortunately I voted for Arnold! :-(”

    Don’t feel bad. Lots of people, myself included, thought he was a Republican. He’s nothing but a Crypto-crat. And there are LOTS MORE of them out there. I could easily name several candidates who are running as Republicans but are actually left-left-wingers.

  105. Milwaukee Bob says:

    Opps, sorry. I should have said, “….by HUMAN definition it is an average of THE REALITY of weather. Therefore, when experiencing REAL weather we HUMANS ARE – experiencing the figment of our imaginations we call – climate.

  106. Roger Sowell says:

    California continues on a pace for below-“normal” temperatures for May, after having done the same for March and April. In Los Angeles, we are finally expected to have 75 degree (F) maximum daily temperatures for Memorial Day weekend (May 29, 30, and 31). http://www.calclim.dri.edu/

    Meanwhile we are throwing another log on the fire. (but only on those days that our Air Quality Management District allows such frivolous burning.)

    Looks like California is NOT contributing to 2010 being the “hottest year on record.” I suspect it has something to do with the California CO2 being a bit independent, anti-authoritarian, or just plain too drugged to care. Like, totally, dude!

  107. Enneagram says:

    Global Warming, Global Governance, Amazon forests for Carbon market…
    Internationalize the Amazonia?
    Below is an insightful response from the Brazilian Minister of Education, Chico
    Buarque,
    . better known as a poet, composer and musician, in a visit to an US
    university, Chico Buarque was asked about the possibility of ‘internationalise’
    the Amazonia. His response highlights the complexity of the issue, the powers in
    play, the threatened sovereignty of nations and the double standards applied
    when deciding on these issues. It also reveals a humanist approach, honesty and
    wisdom of a government minister such as Chico Buarque.

    Internationalize the Amazonia?

    Brazil’s Amazon basin, some 360 million hectares cleaved by the world’s largest
    river, the Amazon, whose 80,000 kilometers in length is equal to the distance
    between New York and Berlin, holds the planet’s greatest biodiversity reserve.
    This unique, complex, exceptional ecosystem is a colossal Patrimony of
    Humanity. Should it be internationalized?
    Cristováo Buarque

    During a debate in a US university over four years ago, a young US ecologist
    asked Cristóvão Buarque, then the Workers Party governor of the Federal
    District of Brasilia and currently Brazil’s minister of education, about his
    ideas on internationalizing the Amazonia, so often described as the “lung of
    humanity.”
    It was then and still is a theme strongly sustained in Washington’s
    power circles. The young man said he hoped Buarque would answer with the vision
    of a humanist rather than of a Brazilian. What he got was a response that was
    both Brazilian and humanist.

    “From a humanist perspective…”
    “As a Brazilian I would always argue against internationalizing the Amazon Rain
    Forest. Even though our government has not given this patrimony the care that
    it deserves, it is still ours. As a humanist who fears the risks posed by the
    environmental degradation the Amazon is suffering, I could imagine its
    internationalization, just as I could imagine the internationalization of
    everything else of importance to humanity.

    If, from a humanist perspective, the Amazon must be internationalized, we should
    also internationalize the world’s petroleum reserves. Oil is as important for
    the well being of humanity as the Amazon is for our future. The owners of the
    reserves, however, feel that they have the right to increase or decrease the
    amount of oil production, as well as increase or lower the price per barrel.
    The wealthy of the world feel they have the right to burn up this immense
    patrimony of humanity.

    In much the same way, the wealthy countries’ financial capital should be
    internationalized. Since the Amazon Rain Forest is a reserve for all human
    beings, no owner or country must be allowed to burn it up. The burning of the
    Amazon is as serious a problem as the unemployment caused by the arbitrary
    decisions made by global speculators. We cannot permit the use of financial
    reserves to burn entire countries in the frenzy of speculation.

    Before we internationalize the Amazon, I would like to see the
    internationalization of all the world’s great museums. The Louvre should not
    belong merely to France. The world’s museums are guardians of the most
    beautiful pieces of art produced by the human genius. We cannot let this
    cultural patrimony, like the natural patrimony of the Amazon, be manipulated
    and destroyed by the whims of an owner or a country. A short time ago, a
    Japanese millionaire decided to be buried with a painting by a great artist.
    That painting should have been internationalized before this could happen.

    The United Nations is holding the Millennium Summit parallel to this meeting,
    but some Presidents had difficulties attending due to U.S. border-crossing
    constraints. Because of this, I think that New York, as the headquarters of the
    United Nations, should be internationalized. At least Manhattan should belong to
    all humanity, as should Paris, Venice, Rome, London, Río de Janeiro, Brasilia,
    Recife… Each city, with its unique beauty and its history, should belong to
    the entire world, to all of humanity.
    If the United States wants to internationalize the Amazon Rain Forest to
    minimize the risk of leaving it in the hands of Brazilians, we should
    internationalize its nuclear arsenals, if only because the country has already
    demonstrated it is capable of using these arms, causing destruction thousands
    of times greater than the deplorable burnings done in the forests of Brazil.

    In their debates, the US presidential candidates have defended the idea of
    internationalizing the world’s forest reserves in exchange for debt relief. We
    should begin by using this debt to guarantee that each child in the world has
    the opportunity to go to school. We should internationalize the children,
    treating them, all of them, no matter their country of birth, as patrimony that
    deserves to be cared for by the entire world. Even more than the Amazon deserves
    to be cared for. When the world’s leaders begin to treat the poor children of
    the world as a patrimony of humanity, they will not let them work when they
    should be studying, die when they should be living.

    As a humanist, I agree to defend the internationalization of the world. But, as
    long as the world treats me as a Brazilian, I will fight for the Amazonia to
    remain ours. Ours alone.”
    http://naomicheckthisout.blogspot.com/

  108. Gary Hladik says:

    I don’t know about the California snowpack, but the annual weed & brush crop on my property is 151.327% of “normal” (average of years 1776-1492). That’s a wet winter in my book, whatever the “Duh-minator” says.

  109. Ulric Lyons says:

    The western USA has been stuck in a series of incursions of Arctic air. Study the N.H. animations on here: http://www.pa.op.dlr.de/arctic/index.html

  110. John Galt II, RA says:

    I am really concerned with the thaw and the floods.

    On the other hand, I guess the temps could continue to decrease.

    And we could all practice our Ice Climbing and Winter travel skills for the future north pole expeditions without wasting time, carbon or money on long distant travel.

    Also, Does anyone know how that program to create ‘diesel like molecules’ with algae is coming along – are these 4 day old molecules still called ‘fossil’? The last I heard, the goal was to speed up the process – this might be more controllable that drilling in 1 to 2 miles of sea water.

  111. Max Hugoson says:

    Just flew, PHX to MSP yesterday.

    Right over some of the prime “ski ranges” of the Rockies.

    Took photos if anyone is interested.

    OBVIOUS SNOW COVER OVER MANY MOUNTAINS!

    This is Near 1st of June.

    There are going to be some folks skiing into August…

    I live in MN. I hate to think what this means about Nov/Dec/Jan/Feb/March here…

    Max

  112. Innocentious says:

    Unfortunately it does not matter whether the weather becomes warmer or colder, wetter or drier, it is all caused by CO2 in the minds of climate scientists.

  113. nc says:

    High temperature records being broken in Ontario. Low snow packs over the most of British Columbia.

  114. Kenji says:

    CA state snowpack is currently 179% of ‘normal’
    Northern Sierra snowpack is 276% of ‘normal’ !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cdecapp/snowapp/sweq.action

    Yet the very same agency that publishes these statistics … also insists that CA is in the grips of the 4th year of a drought ‘crisis’ … and describes the state as “dry”

    http://www.water.ca.gov/drought/

    Why do we allow our state political-scientists to LIE to us ? Why don’t we call for the FIRING of these political apparatchcks ?

  115. Wayne Delbeke says:

    Toronto heat wave:

    I love watching the jet stream (and associated highs and lows) and how it wreaks havoc on the weather. The current snows in Alberta and Colorado and cool temperatures of the whole of the west of North America, and the hot weather on the east coast is simply a function of the position of the jet stream right now. It is flowing south in the west drawing cold air down along the west coast, then it turns north and is drawing warm Gulf and Mid-Atlantic air north along the east coast.

    I am sure the meteorologists among this group are well aware of this phenomenon.

    Also, rain and not snow pack determines most of the moisture input east of the Rockies. There were a number of “failed” hydro projects started on the prairies before it was realized that a good rainfall produced more run off than the spring melt. (Just look at the size of the culverts out in the Nevada and Arizona deserts sitting it dry washes.) For example, in one prairie study it was shown that one rainfall event contributed 85% of the total annual flow:

    Precipitation
    Precipitation differed by only 2% between the agricultural (1802 mm) and prairie (1767 mm) ecosystems for the 132-wk (924-d) period. In general, 1996 was wetter than 1997 at both study sites. A single intense rainfall during Week 2596 (subscript on week no. refers to appropriate year) delivered 103 mm to the prairie and 124 mm to the agricultural ecosystems. As a result, precipitation between May and June (335 mm) was more than twice the 30-yr average for precipitation during the 2 mo (163 mm) (Owenby and Ezell, 1992). The events of Weeks 396 and 2596 produced considerable runoff. For example, in the prairie, which was the only one of the three ecosystems to experience runoff during both Weeks 396 and 2596, the runoff during these 2 wk was estimated to be 85% of the annual total runoff.

    From http://soil.scijournals.org/cgi/content/full/64/2/715

    See also: http://www.ec.gc.ca/eau-water/default.asp?lang=En&n=E0399791-1

    It’s the rain.

    Snow pack is important, especially for the Pacific basin, but not always the driver.

    Most of us can’t figure out weather or water balances, no wonder “climate” is so confusing.

  116. Wayne Delbeke says:

    Oops – several sources say snowpack with rain on top causes many floods …

  117. Mariss says:

    I can see the south side of Mt. Baldy from Orange County where I live, a straight-line distance of 40 miles (64km). It’s unusual to see the top third of the mountain still snow covered in late May.

  118. Steven Hill says:

    The ocean is rising fast and could flood Gore’s new home at any point. That new snow was produced by water from melting ice at both poles. Also, the oil leak in the gulf was caused by rising sea levels and added depth pressures on the pipe.

  119. Bruce Cobb says:

    “After the fine tuning the maps, New Jersey State Climatologist and Rutgers University professor David Robinson found a 1990 decline in spring snow extent that we still see today.”
    Confirmation bias anyone?

  120. Purakanui says:

    This time last year, southern New Zealand had just experienced a very early snow storm and the coldest May on record. That was followed by a very cold winter.
    This year we have just had what is being described as a rainstorm on the once in a hundred years scale. Certainly, there has been extensive flooding, emergency spilling from hydro lakes and the cutting for several days of the main South Island highway, in several places.
    Snow has begun to fall to fairly low levels and more is expected. The ski fields could have opened early last year, except the access roads were blocked with snow. It’s shaping up the same way this year, as well. Winter officially starts on June 1.
    This weather is unusual to the extent that on the east coast, in many years, snow doesn’t appear until July – some years not at all or only as a dusting on the highest ground. It’s common to get to the shortest day, (June 21) with no really bad weather to speak of, but this year the first frosts came at the beginning of May.
    Just to help things along, our usually reasonable and conservative government, apparently alone in the world, is to introduce an ETS on July 1. The power companies are already signalling price increases…

  121. Curt says:

    @Kenji says:
    May 26, 2010 at 11:31 am …

    Kenji — You have to be very careful about using spring snowpack numbers as an indication of water supply potential. They usually have more to do with spring temperatures than the total seasonal precipitation (which is what is important).

    Last year Obama’s Energy Secretary Steven Chu kicked up a huge fuss talking about a modeled 90% reduction in the April 1 California snowpack if the maximum IPCC-estimated warming came about, implying that this meant a comparable reduction in the available water supply. However, none of the models he relied on forecast any reduction in precipitation for California under these conditions, and most forecast an increase. All that the April 1 reduction meant is that the runoff from the mountains into the reservoirs would happen earlier in the year.

    Several years ago, a UC Davis engineering study looked at the impact to the California water supply of several warming scenarios. Taking the extreme scenario used by Chu, and using the overly pessimistic (as they admit) assumption that no additional runoff before April 1 could be captured, they forecast a 15% decline in available water. Probably a more realistic value would be 10% (and this is in 100 years without any infrastructure improvements).

    But this works both ways. The very high snowpack values you see now mostly reflect late snowmelt.

  122. Enneagram says:

    Wayne Delbeke says:
    May 26, 2010 at 11:55 am
    …and which is the driver of the “jet stream”?

  123. Mari Warcwm says:

    The snow pack may be at record level, and you good honest intelligent people are wondering how to convince the world that global warming is not happening. In the meantime Tony Blair is making hay while the sun shines.

    The London Evening Standard today reports:

    ‘The former prime minister will be paid at least £700,000 a year to act as a “strategic adviser” to Khosla Ventures, a venture capitalist firm founded by Indian billionaire Vinod Khosla. The Californian company bankrolls businesses hoping to profit from technology that helps reduce global warming and carbon emissions’.

    Let’s hope that even as the snow refuses to melt, the global financial melt will change bankroll to bankrupt and end this scam.

  124. kadaka (KD Knoebel) says:

    nc said on May 26, 2010 at 11:31 am:

    High temperature records being broken in Ontario. Low snow packs over the most of British Columbia.

    So are you requesting that the Western US ships the snow mistakenly sent there up to British Columbia? ;-)

  125. Nuke says:

    Anybody know how Lake Mead is doing?

  126. harrywr2 says:

    Larus says:
    May 26, 2010 at 12:24 am

    “Yep, and Actic sea ice is back to average, right? Honestly, how hard is it to grasp the concept of “trend”? How can you think an anomaly negates a twenty-year trend?”

    Because there is something called the Pacific Decadel Oscillation that is a 30 year naturally occurring trend.

    To determine the ‘true trend’ one has to measure ‘peak to peak’ and ‘trough to trough’.
    That takes 60 years.

  127. Jeff Rankert says:

    Lake Powell is up 4 ft in the last month. If you look at data from other years, you will see that either the snowpack in the Rockies and Wind Rivers is low, or that the melt has not really started yet, which would make it late. Lake Powell will rise about a foot a day in peak snow melt. That is when they get 100,000+ CFS in Cataract Canyon, and wave train in the Big Drops is the stuff of legend.

    The Colorado is a puny little river, but in May-June it is the raging Colorado.

    http://graphs.water-data.com/lakepowell/

  128. Z says:

    Milwaukee Bob says:
    May 26, 2010 at 10:23 am

    PeterB in Indianapolis said at 9:08 am
    Everyone should remember, NO ONE experiences “climate”.

    Well, actually we do. While technically “climate” is a made up condition found only in the mind of homo sapiens and their off-spring – computers, thereby making it impossible to “experience” as it doesn’t exist, it is by definition and in reality an average of weather. Therefore, when experiencing weather we ARE – experiencing climate.

    Climate is what we expect. Weather is what we get.

    It’s almost impossible to change the weather, millions of tons of atmosphere and billions of joules of energy dancing together is very hard to stop.

    It’s easy to change the climate – just change your expectations.

  129. Schrodinger's Cat says:

    I groan when I read that scientists predict some catastrophe based on their modelling of whatever subject.

    As a scientist myself, I appreciate the power of modelling, yet there is a huge difference between a model based on known relationships and one which is based on assumptions or speculation.

    The former should predict reality, the latter could predict anything at all. Yet, modelling is not just a calculation, it is an attempt to simulate an interactive, complex system. It seeks to answer the question “what if” and it can provide the means to measure the degree of understanding being applied, provided the results can be confirmed in reality.

    Perhaps it is this last point that is important. A model is no good if it cannot predict reality. Some systems may be modelled and tested and this is the ideal. Others are deemed good if they can reproduce the outcome of past events. Alas, every financial modeller must realise that the past is not a good guide to the future. Climate scientists generally predict events that may lie beyond our lifetimes.

    So where does that leave the science of modelling? A starting point would be to establish the accepted relationships and those that are based on assumptions. The assumptions need to be justified, otherwise we get into a whole new ball game.

    Imagine you are creating the rules of a new computer game. Are you on the side of the bad guy or the good guy? If you are completely objective, the game will probably be boring. If you are creating a climate model, to what extent will your beliefs and prejudices influence the relationships that you assume? Will your model accurately mirror your prejudice? Of course it will. Is that objective science?

    Is it any sort of science?

    Perhaps modelling is valid when the scientist is scrupulously neutral. As soon as he or she becomes even subconsciously biased, then the objectivity is lost, the science is lost and the answer is the one that was wanted all along.

    We might as well decide to install windmills on the toss of a coin. If it is heads, the warmists can install windmills. If it tails, we do no such thing. You are a warmist. It comes up tails.

    “Best of three,” I hear you say.

    I would be interested to hear a debate on this subject, particularly if modellers could comment on their experience of how to deal with the expectation of the paymaster.

  130. GeoFlynx says:

    Anthony – This is the Snotel Data for Arizona that you referenced on your site. The only Arizona data is from San Francisco Peaks Basin. I can’t seem to find where you came up with the 446% of normal figure. The Arizona State Snotel Map for May 26, 2010 is at the link below and shows this area to have less than 50% SWE of the 1971-2000 Normal. I would like to be critical but right now I’m just plain confused!

    http://www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/ftpref/data/water/wcs/gis/maps/az_swepctnormal_update.pdf

    Your Referenced Data Set:

    ARIZONA
    VERDE RIVER BASIN …………………………………………………… 5 of 7 * 120
    SAN FRANCISCO PEAKS ………………………………………………. 1 of 1 25 71
    CENTRAL MOGOLLON RIM ………………………………………… 3 of 3 * 117
    LITTLE COLORADO – SOUTHERN HEADWATERS …….. 5 of 5 * 118
    UPPER SALT RIVER BASIN / WHITE MOUNTAINS …… 6 of 7 * 106
    SAN FRANCISCO RIVER BASIN …………………………………… 5 of 5 0* 103
    UPPER GILA RIVER BASIN ………………………………………….. 3 of 3 0* 115

    The Snow Water Equivalent Percent of Average represents the snow
    water equivalent found at selected SNOTEL sites in or near the
    basin compared to the average value for those sites on this day.

    The Accumulated Precipitation Percent of Average represents the
    total precipitation (beginning October 1st) found at selected
    SNOTEL sites in or near the basin compared to the average value
    for those sites on this day.

    * = Data are not available or data may not provide a valid measure
    of conditions for over half of the sites within the basin.
    Refer to the individual state reports for a complete data
    listing and basin analysis.

  131. Roger Sowell says:

    Mari Warcwm, at May 26, 2010 at 12:54 pm

    Global warming stocks are not faring so well these days. With oil prices low, they are likely to never compete without government mandates or massive subsidies.

    http://sowellslawblog.blogspot.com/2010/05/global-warming-funds-as-investments.html

  132. Yollo Yuba says:

    The data at this site (NRCS SNOTEL):
    http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/snotelanom/snotelbasin
    shows that Arizona snowpack is at 446% of normal?

  133. Kenji says:

    Curt says:
    May 26, 2010 at 12:45 pm

    Curt, I agree that looking at ANY statistical snapshot-in-time can be misleading. Especially regarding a water YEAR. No doubt that the Massive Spring snowpack levels are partially the result of extended cold weather patterns, that have delayed the snowmelt.

    However ! If you couple the massive snowpack numbers ALONG with the ABOVE-AVERAGE reservoir water levels …

    http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cdecapp/resapp/getResGraphsMain.action

    Then you cannot dismiss the EXTREMELY high snowpack numbers as a time-sensitive statistical oddity. Shasta is essentially FULL to the spillway … with 276% of normal snowpack/snowmelt … still coming. ANNNNND it is STILL RAINING and SNOWING in CA … into JUNE !!! This is also NOT NORMAL. This is NOT a DROUGHT … NOT even CLOSE

    Yet the overpaid government bureaucrats INSIST CA is gripped in a drought. This reeks of the same LIES (and statistical manipulation) told by global warmists. Time to FIRE the LIARS … free-up some tax dollars for REAL science that can help humanity.

  134. ked5 says:

    While Seattle did have a very mild winter (and the Howard Hanson Dam thanks mother nature), we’re more than making up for it now. We’re doing well to break 60, and Spokane set an all-time record low this week of 32.

  135. BillD says:

    The picture here has perhaps been going on for a couple months. Cool in the western US and skipping spring and going straight into summer in the midwestern US and, as noted above, Ontario.

    http://mapcenter.hamweather.com/records/3day/us.html?c=maxtemp,mintemp,lowmax,highmin

    I also read somewhere that the Jan through April global temps are the highest in the modern record.

  136. Kenji says:

    Curt says:
    May 26, 2010 at 12:45 pm

    And Curt … what would you say about the CRISIS-mongers at the state DWR who declared that CA was gripped in the “WORST DROUGHT IN THE HISTORY OF CA” ?

    The DWR made this statement in mid January 2009. Well-before the bulk of CA’s snowpack is typically recharged. As I recall, the Water year 2009 ended VERY close to NORMAL. This was massively irresponsible political-speak that passed for “science”. It is statistically irrelevant to make such a statement at such a snapshot-in-time. But our gullible public doesn’t stop to think about what they are being told … and sadly … our lapdog media laps it up without question.

    Lies … Damn Lies … and statistical manipulation by scienci-sounding bureaucrats.

    FIRE the LIARS !!!

    , I agree that looking at ANY statistical snapshot-in-time can be misleading. Especially regarding a water YEAR. No doubt that the Massive Spring snowpack levels are partially the result of extended cold weather patterns, that have delayed the snowmelt.

  137. Big Al says:

    They are trying to get the trail ridge road open in Colorado open for Memorial Day weekend

  138. Gail Combs says:

    Larus says:
    May 26, 2010 at 12:24 am

    “Yep, and Actic sea ice is back to average, right? Honestly, how hard is it to grasp the concept of “trend”? How can you think an anomaly negates a twenty-year trend? “
    ________________________________________________________________________
    Because the trend is part of a sine curve not a straight line headed always and for evermore up. The factors influencing that curve have changed from positive to negative for the most part. Six months of unusual weather in most of the northern hemisphere is the result and a pretty good indication that we are seeing a change in the “trend line” That is as long as no one “hides the decline” – that would be a travesty.

  139. MikeA says:

    You might want to check that Arizona figure back against the data

  140. Milwaukee Bob says:

    Z said at 1:38 pm
    Climate is what we expect. Weather is what we get.
    It’s easy to change the climate – just change your expectations.

    I like that and it’s true. We conceptualize (perceive?) everything and get reality. Climate is a concept, average weather during a specific period of time. Weather is real, what is or was happening at a specific location at a given moment of time.

    Ask me what the weather is like where I am and I’ll tell you it’s partly sunny, about 88F and 60% +/- humidity. Ask me what the climate is like where I am and I have to ask – when; spring, summer, Nov., etc. because I CAN NOT tell you the “climate” at a specific time on a specific day because that would be “weather” and “climate” is average weather over a period of time.

  141. Gail Combs says:

    jorgekafkazar says:
    May 26, 2010 at 10:04 am

    “…Schwarzenegger heads a state that, if it were a country, would rank among the 10 biggest economies in the world….”

    He’ll soon fix THAT! Back to Hollywood with him!
    _________________________________________________________________________
    Gee I thought Schwarzenegger already had with the California AB32 greenhouse gas law

    The results of California’s “green Policies”
    Collapse of Tax Revenue has left California near Bankruptcy

    Fiorina suggests California consider Bankruptcy

    Rasmussen: Only 27% of nationwide voters believe federal government should bailout California. 55% say let the state go bankrupt.

    Unemployment tops 20% in eight California counties

    EPA Regulations Cause Drought in California – some farming towns like Mendota seeing unemployment numbers near 40% The area affected is the size of more than half of Denmark.

    Flood Of California Businesses Abandon State

  142. LarryOldtimer says:

    Weather varies a bit, and the alarmists howl “climate change”. How foolish. No more foolish than looking at the temperatures over the past century or so and imagining some sort of “trend”, certainly. The margin of error in those measured temperatuires is huge compared to the differences in the averaged temperatures. And, of course, averaging data does not lower the margin of error. The concept that errors “average out” is pure bilge.

  143. Gail Combs says:

    Milwaukee Bob says:
    May 26, 2010 at 10:23 am

    PeterB in Indianapolis said at 9:08 am
    Everyone should remember, NO ONE experiences “climate”.

    Well, actually we do. While technically “climate” is a made up condition found only in the mind of homo sapiens and their off-spring – computers, thereby making it impossible to “experience” as it doesn’t exist, it is by definition and in reality an average of weather. Therefore, when experiencing weather we ARE – experiencing climate.
    __________________________________________________________________________
    As another commenter said. Weather is the derivative of climate. (mathmatically)

  144. Gail Combs says:

    Enneagram says:
    May 26, 2010 at 10:26 am

    R. de Haan says:
    May 26, 2010 at 9:52 am . This really made me laugh:
    So what’s left is an absolute minority of people who do believe AGW is real but they are such a small crowd, too small to explain any “consensus” on the subject
    because, that “minority” is those in power
    ….so you are done!
    ________________________________________________________________________
    AHHhhhh, but that is what the French Aristocracy thought before the eruption of the Laki volcano led to a dust cloud smothering much of Europe and caused such a drastic crop failure that it led to the French Revolution.

    In their greed the grain traders have set the modern world up for just such a disaster thanks to the WTO Agreement on Agriculture and the “Freedom to Farm” Act of 1996, both written by Dan Amstutz VP of Cargill the world’s largest grain trader.

    “Recently there have been increased calls for the development of a U.S. or international grain reserve to provide priority access to food supplies for Humanitarian needs. The National Grain and Feed Association (NGFA) and the North American Export Grain Association (NAEGA) strongly advise against this concept..Stock reserves have a documented depressing effect on prices… and resulted in less aggressive market bidding for the grains.” July 22, 2008 letter to President Bush http://www.naega.org/images/pdf/grain_reserves_for_food_aid.pdf

    “Quietly, the last of the U.S. government’s wheat reserves, held in the Bill Emerson Humanitarian Trust, were sold in late May onto the domestic market for cash. The cash was put in a trust for food aid. With no other government wheat holdings, U.S. government wheat stocks are now totally exhausted….

    “This lack of emergency preparedness is the fault of the 1996 farm bill [written by a VP of Cargill, the grain traders]which eliminated the government’s grain reserves as well as the Farmer Owned Reserve (FOR),” explained Matlack….” http://www.marketskeptics.com/2009/07/us-govt-completely-out-of-wheat.html

    For those who think I have been blowing smoke the last few years because of my concern about the food supply…

    U.S. Food Inflation Spiraling Out of Control
    FORT LEE, N.J., April 22 /PRNewswire/ — The National Inflation Association today issued the following food inflation alert to its http://inflation.us members:

    “The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) today released their Producer Price Index (PPI) report for March 2010 and the latest numbers are shocking. Food prices for the month rose by 2.4%, its sixth consecutive monthly increase and the largest jump in over 26 years. NIA believes that a major breakout in food inflation could be imminent, similar to what is currently being experienced in India…..” http://www.marketskeptics.com/2010/04/us-food-inflation-spiraling-out-of.html

    Catastrophic Fall in 2009 Global Food Production
    by Eric deCarbonnel

    “After reading about the droughts in two major agricultural countries, China and Argentina, I decided to research the extent other food producing nations were also experiencing droughts. This project ended up taking a lot longer than I thought. 2009 looks to be a humanitarian disaster around much of the world….” http://www.marketskeptics.com/2009/02/2009-global-food-catastrophe.html

    Plant your gardens now folks and brush up on your canning skills….

    By the way how do you build a guillotine????/sarc

  145. Frank Perdicaro says:

    I can attest to Mt. Baldy here in SoCal being still snowed in. It is not visible
    from this seat, but if I go to the garage I can see it.

    There is some disconnect with the water agencies here in California.
    A few years back here in SoCal we created a new reservoir Diamond Valley Lake,
    which gets its water from Shasta at the other end of the state. Although Shasta
    is 15 inches from cresting the dam, Diamond Valley reports 100 feet below full.

    It will be interesting to learn the the combined Powell/Mead fullness on July 1,
    2010.

  146. Gail Combs says:

    Wayne Delbeke says:
    May 26, 2010 at 11:55 am

    Toronto heat wave:

    I love watching the jet stream (and associated highs and lows) and how it wreaks havoc on the weather. The current snows in Alberta and Colorado and cool temperatures of the whole of the west of North America, and the hot weather on the east coast is simply a function of the position of the jet stream right now…..
    _______________________________________________________________________
    Hot weather on the east coast ????? It was 35F in my area of North Carolina on the 10th and normally we have temps into the nineties, often as hot as 98F. This year we have had only a couple of days reach 91F. My grass is FINALLY starting to grow this week.

  147. It's always Marcia, Marcia says:

    Ross M says:
    May 25, 2010 at 11:25 pm

    Averaging state percentages doesn’t seems like a good way to Western snow cover – they are all different sizes. The first link doesn’t do it this way, so the comparison is invalid.

    Sure Ross, there isn’t anything that means anything in this global warming world…… except co2 is going to bring disasters to the world. We know the drill.

  148. BS Footprint says:

    @ Dave Springer says:
    May 26, 2010 at 2:55 am

    “Lake Powell is still a long way from full. It’s 77 feet below conservation pool level, 58% full, and inflows so far this year are 25% below average. Snowpack above it is 23% below average. Storage has fallen by 1.4 million acre feet so far in 2010. Lake Powell is not in good shape and the outlook isn’t either. Of course that has nothing at all to do with climate change and everything to do with rising demand for the water due to population growth.”

    Good point. Just because a reservoir is under capacity, doesn’t mean it’s caused by lack of snowfall. We just keep on building new homes in the semi-desert of California, fed by reservoirs built decades ago…

  149. It's always Marcia, Marcia says:

    tonyb says:
    May 26, 2010 at 12:07 am

    Still unusually good snow at Cairngorm mountain in Scotland after record winter snow fall

    Wow, I didn’t know this was true in Scotland too. Maybe we really are heading into a time of cooling. with warming having ended in 2001.

  150. Phil M. says:

    Steven,

    I’ll start by reiterating what others have already pointed out. Your calculations are in need of some serious TLC. If Arizona is 446% of normal than Nevada must be 1 million gabillion percent of normal.

    Inches of snow is a near-meaningless number. As someone else mentioned, snow water equivalent is the only number water managers really need. Reporting a number like inches of snow is about as useful as reporting rainfall in minutes.

    I have also pointed out to you (and most everyone else on this blog) your propensity for confounding weather and climate. Far more robust analyses of snowpack (i.e. SWE) have been done using data covering a much longer time period.

    http://tenaya.ucsd.edu/~dettinge/barnett08.pdf

    I could go on and on about the importance of not only SWE, but the timing of snowfall and precipitation in the Western U.S. (one of the numerous factors not captured by your May 26th, 2010 snapshot and incompetent calculations), but I’ve found that a fundamental understanding of the principles of ecology and water resource management pretty much absent on this blog. At any rate, here’s what the NWCC thought about the amount and timing of snow and precip a few weeks ago:

    ftp://ftp.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/support/water/westwide/streamflow/wy2010/strm1005.gif

    It will be interesting to see what the monthly outlook reports have to say for April. At any rate, there are much more interesting and informative maps and data out there. Maybe don’t be in such a rush to slap the first thing you see on a web page.

  151. Wayne Delbeke says:

    Gail Coombs 4:41

    Temperature map for the US yesterday below, heat warnings in Toronto today. Snow forecast for areas of Alberta tomorrow.

    http://www.wunderground.com/US/Region/US/MaxTempp1Day.html

  152. It's always Marcia, Marcia says:

    Hoppy says:
    May 26, 2010 at 6:15 am

    If you’re such a stickler for correct handling of data then how can you trust the Michael Mann Hockey Stick Graph, GISTemp methods, or any of the other “trick” global warming stats??

  153. Ross M says:

    It’s always Marcia, Marcia says:

    Sure Ross, there isn’t anything that means anything in this global warming world…… except co2 is going to bring disasters to the world. We know the drill.

    sandyinderby says:

    You’ve seen Anthony’s figures now let us see yours.


    No need for figures, IMO the maths is wrong. I’m skeptical of the method.

    e.g say we have n states, where the snow cover percentage for each state is s(n) and the area of each state is a(n).

    Total snow cover is therefore sum{ s(n) * a(n) } / sum { a(n) }

    Averaging by state is sum{ s(n) } / n which will give a different result.

    Or have I made a mistake?

  154. It's always Marcia, Marcia says:

    Please continue to show the failed predictions of global warming. It tastes sweet.

    The truth shall set you free.

  155. Smokey says:

    Phil M. says
    May 26, 2010 at 5:40 pm,

    Smart guy that you fancy yourself to be, why don’t you write an article for WUWT? I don’t think you will, because your alarmist globaloney would be debunked faster than you can say “robust.”

    Steve Goddard writes interesting and informative articles. If you think you can do better, give it a try. I think the result would end up looking like Monckton’s debate opponents. But maybe that’s just me. Show us you can do better than Steve. I double dog dare ya.

  156. It's always Marcia, Marcia says:

    Milwaukee Bob says:
    May 26, 2010 at 10:23 am

    PeterB in Indianapolis said at 9:08 am
    Everyone should remember, NO ONE experiences “climate”.

    Well, actually we do. While technically “climate” is a made up condition found only in the mind of homo sapiens and their off-spring – computers, thereby making it impossible to “experience” as it doesn’t exist, it is by definition and in reality an average of weather. Therefore, when experiencing weather we ARE – experiencing climate.

    That’s an interesting way to put it Milwaukee.

    p.s., I typed Milwaukee with the correct pronunciation in mind, Ma-wau-kee. :-)

  157. It's always Marcia, Marcia says:

    BillD says:
    May 26, 2010 at 2:32 pm

    I also read somewhere that the Jan through April global temps are the highest in the modern record.

    Should have provided a reference, don’t you think? Would help people believe you.

  158. It's always Marcia, Marcia says:

    Ross M says:
    May 26, 2010 at 5:54 pm

    You’ve missed the point of the post, and you’ve missed the “maths” too. You’re reading something into the “maths” that doesn’t even have to be there. But that’s ok. After reading through the comments I see others have missed the point too.

  159. Gail Combs says:

    It’s always Marcia, Marcia says:
    May 26, 2010 at 5:34 pm

    tonyb says:
    May 26, 2010 at 12:07 am

    Still unusually good snow at Cairngorm mountain in Scotland after record winter snow fall

    Wow, I didn’t know this was true in Scotland too. Maybe we really are heading into a time of cooling. with warming having ended in 2001.
    __________________________________________________________________________
    It is not just the USA, Scotland, New Zealand, Spain, Russia but also China and the worse hit was Mongolia where six million head of livestock died this winter.

    But do not worry, The Klimate Psychientists are telling us this year will be the “warmest ever”

  160. Jack Simmons says:

    Al Gored says:
    May 25, 2010 at 11:15 pm

    Yes. Fine. But how much of it is old snow?

    How much is rotten snow?

    This calls for a first hand look at the status of the trout stream in Western Colorado.

    Without even being asked, I will venture forth this weekend to see what is happening over on the western slope.

  161. Smokey says:

    Jack Simmons,

    Report back. And remember:

    Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will sit in a boat all day, drinking beer.

  162. Jack Simmons says:

    How to build a guillotine:

    http://www.madehow.com/Volume-7/Guillotine.html

    Don’t forget the all important quality control step.

  163. Gail Combs says:

    Wayne Delbeke says:
    May 26, 2010 at 5:51 pm

    Gail Combs 4:41

    Temperature map for the US yesterday below, heat warnings in Toronto today. Snow forecast for areas of Alberta tomorrow.

    http://www.wunderground.com/US/Region/US/MaxTempp1Day.html
    __________________________________________________________________________

    Wunderground temperatures for my city were “adjusted up” the next day from 1F to 5F last year. I got suspicious so I checked. Also all the old records got purged and are no longer available on line. The oldest year I can get now is 2004.

    Normally I see snow once every four or five years. This year we had FIVE snowstorms and Washington DC got plastered when Obama tried to come home from Copenhagen.

    I ran through all the available data for May for my city on another post. In May, 20 days were 90F or above in 2004 – three or four were 98F and I think another seven were above 95F. So far this is the coolest May for my area in the records available to me with three days at 91F and all the rest below 90F. Also the corn is only six inches high instead of the usual waist high at this time of year. (part of that was lack of rain in April)

    That is the data I am basing my statement on for MY city (actually county since I live in the boonies) I think it is the midwest that may have been warmer this spring but I am not sure. It certainly is not my area. Heck it is almost June and I still haven’t bothered to use the A/C.

  164. BillD

    Satellite temperatures at 14,000 feet have been the highest on record. Roy Spencer explained this as being due to El Nino. Had Crut has surface temperatures at #5, and GISS data is corrupted by unsupportable data handling techniques.

  165. jeff brown says:

    Why wouldn’t you bother to mention what an El Nino tends to do for snowfall in the America Southwest? Late spring snowfall is common even for places like Colorado during El Nino phases. This post is very misleading, and employs the same tactics as seen in alarmist reportings.
    Too bad the snowfall didn’t happen when the ski resorts were still open though…

  166. E.M.Smith says:

    tonyb says: Couldn’t have anything to do with the tiny number of stations in Canada artificially skewing the temperature in the World’s second largest country could it?

    Well, yes. But I have a solution:

    http://chiefio.wordpress.com/2010/05/19/cure-for-global-warming-invade-canada/

  167. Phil9860 says:

    The maths used in this post make no sense whatsoever. Example: state a) has 100% coverage at 100 sq.m, state b) at 10 sq. m.
    If on a given year, state a has 50% that’s 50 sq. m. If that same year state b has 200%, that’s 20 sq.m. The total coverage would be 70sq. m, which is about 64% for both states combined. However, using Goddard’s method, one would find 125%. Percentages can not be averaged by themselves.

  168. E.M.Smith says:

    RR Kampen says: “Experts tell us that spring snowcover has seen rapid declines in the Northern Hemisphere over the last 20 years. As of today, western US snowpack averaged by state is 137 percent of normal.”

    How large a fraction of the Northern Hemisphere comprises the western US?
    Why suggest this fraction is 100%?

    Perhaps because the western US is where the mountains are and this time of year the surviving snow is in the mountains?

    Is it really that hard a concept? Maybe you wanted to go looking for snow in Florida or Texas? Sheesh…

    Also, as someone who lives in the west, like Anthony, I can add that we tend to be Very Aware of the western snow as it tends to determine how much food we can grow and how much water we have to drink. It is a very important local and regional issue. ( Oh, and our Federales have managed to kill off a lot of farming by cutting off the water to “save” a smelt that most likely would do just fine anyway; so there is a major economic impact in California, where Euro-style Eco policies have driven us to bankruptcy and a 12%+ “official” unemployment rate with the odds of 25% real rate approaching certainty. (Yes, I’m an economist and we know the difference… in several counties, such as those farm counties, the rate is over 25% and among young males and especially minorities hits 50%+)

    So yeah, we care a great deal about how much snow is in the mountains of the west.

    Not so much about the lack of snow in Alabama or South Carolina… or Florida (though they did have a problem with “raining iguanas” this last frozen winter…
    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2010/01/06/cold-killing-iguanas/ )

  169. Roger Sowell says:

    Phil M, there are plenty of people (commenters and posters) on WUWT who are quite competent at water resource issues. You won’t make any friends with that tone you adopted.

    As just one (of many) resources, California’s lakes are already brimming this year, and the snow has not melted. Water managers are running water through the dams and into the oceans at prodigious rates. see

    http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cgi-progs/current/RES

  170. jeff brown

    It seems to me that excess spring snowpack is not the same as a spring snowpack deficit. But apparently I am not trained properly in AGW illogic.

  171. Pat Crowley says:

    I got .62inches this week in a part of Montana, Helena Valley, that averages about 7 inches/year. .32 inches were today in two thunderstorms that swept the area. Snow line is at about 5,500 feet in the mountains according to my eyeball estimate. I hope it dries out and warms up enough to plant the tomatoes and peppers this weekend. And then also dries out enough so that I can get the job in Malta, MT done, but they got 1.5 inches of rain this past week. This should be a good year if your wheat is in the ground.

  172. E.M.Smith says:

    John Galt II, RA says: Also, Does anyone know how that program to create ‘diesel like molecules’ with algae is coming along – are these 4 day old molecules still called ‘fossil’?

    The fuel is called bioDiesel, not fossil. It’s very easy to make Diesel from algae, the only question is “What will prevent OPEC from putting you out of business by opening the taps?”. There are at least 4 companies I know of doing it ( I own stock in one of them) but none are making much profit at it. Yet.

    There are two major processes (and several minor ones). Most take the oil (that can be up to 50% wt of the algae) and is a vegetable oil (tri-glyceride) and does a transesterfication on it to make a methyl-ester or ethyl-ester. This is easy and I’ve done it in my kitchen. ( Oil – 80%, lye – 1%, methanol 19%, mix at about 80 F or more, wait, phases form, decant.) Greens and home brewers like this one.

    Another process just feeds it to the ‘hydrotreater’ at a regular oil refinery. Oil companies like this one.

    The process you are talking about is making a new algae that directly emits a hydrocarbon ( i.e. not an alcohol and not a tri-glyceride or fat). It is beloved of biological researchers and genetic engineers. It’s still lab scale, but has promise for ‘someday’…

    Oh, I ought to add: Origin Oil ticker OOIL is trading at 22 cents and Petrosun PSUD is at 3 cents, so $300 will get you 10,000 shares and you can sound important by saying you own “5 figures of stock” in an oil company… ;-) Not exactly a thriving business yet…

  173. And, as several common taters have observed, you’ll get a good quick read of real (i.e. able to be made $ from) snow conditions from skifields. The ski reports and webcams aren’t subject to the biasses of Gubmint drones, and are generally not UHI, either, for some reason.

    Here in the SH, our southern NZ fields are <a href="http://www.nzski.com/newsletter.jsp?id=71246543-0DA7-4D32-9023-192F50695A09&quot; title = "preparing for a good season", and currently on the east coast of the South Island, literally at the beach, there are freezing showers, hailstones and slushy raindrops, coming out of clouds propelled by a southerly straight out of Antarctica.

    So one can just imagine what the mountain basins are like, and in a few short weeks, there’ll be the click of boots on bindings, and we can report back for real….

    Just like plants, crops and animals, skifield webcams don’t lie.

  174. Pamela Gray says:

    Okay, I’ll bite. I’ll go check on the Wallowa River. Just to see if the flow is good of course.

    By the way, wheat needs an end of the growing season dry period to reduce its moisture and not sprout on the stalk. So I will wait to declare whether or not this will be a good year for wheat.

    I am already thinking that we will have snow every month somewhere on the valley floor this summer. It’s happened before.

    Alfalfa is another concern as well. Too much rain and you get moldy hay. However, you can put it up wet and let it “mash”. Cows love it. Kinda difficult to bail up and ship though.

  175. Pamela Gray says:

    Here is what the trails will look like for Memorial Day Weekend in the mountains of Wallowa County. Wonder if morel mushrooms thrive in this.

    http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?lat=45.17041997262667&lon=-117.2735595703125&site=pdt&smap=1&unit=0&lg=en&FcstType=text

  176. E.M.Smith says:

    Gail Combs says:
    “This lack of emergency preparedness is the fault of the 1996 farm bill [written by a VP of Cargill, the grain traders]which eliminated the government’s grain reserves as well as the Farmer Owned Reserve (FOR),” explained Matlack….” http://www.marketskeptics.com/2009/07/us-govt-completely-out-of-wheat.html

    For those who think I have been blowing smoke the last few years because of my concern about the food supply…

    Well, that’s not good…

    FWIW, I share your concern. With the “just in time” global food system we have about 1 month of food in ‘storage’ and that’s it. One crop failure in any one hemisphere (and there are only about 6 significant food exporting countries) and the world is in a ‘world of hurt’. My “nightmare” scenario is a large rock fall from space into the Pacific that swamps and sinks most of the shipping. We would still have the food, just no transport between continents… and it would take a few years to rebuild it. This WILL happen. “When” is the only question. Ought to be once every couple of thousand years.

    IIRC, the exporters are: Canada, USA, Australia, Argentina, Ukraine, Brazil

    (But that’s from memory of something about 20 years ago, so YMMV…)

    In case of cold induced food shortages, the main losers are likely to be the highly populated and poor nations. Most of Africa, Asia south and east of Russia including India. The folks with buckets of money can probably still buy food (i.e. Oil Exporting Countries – otherwise the Middle Eastern muslims who are vastly overpopulating the carrying capacity of their lands would be ‘toast’, but instead will give “oil for food” a whole new meaning… ) while the biggest question marks will hang over Europe.

    In a cold excursion, Europe tends to have a very large failure of agriculture. Given the high population density, there ought to be extreme famine and death. However, they have relatively high levels of money… So ought to be able to ‘out bid’ Africa and most Latin American countries for food. Then again, I could easily see Brazil and Argentina choosing to ship food to Columbia, Venezuela, Bolivia, Paraguay, etc. rather than have border wars. But I could also see Australia shipping grains to Europe in exchange for ‘protection’ via a European fleet from various hungry “neighbors” a bit more north of them…

    The “good news” is that we can make our grain go about 5 times further than at present by eating it, instead of feeding it to animals and eating them. So I’m not so worried about a global inability to find enough food. I’m much more worried about the ability to convince a Frenchman to skip his prime rib and instead ship corn to Somalia…

    Have I mentioned lately that Economics is named “The Dismal Science”? It’s because this is the kind of thing we study a lot… Malthus was an economist…

    Plant your gardens now folks and brush up on your canning skills….

    Well, I already have a garden… but for most folks the simplest and fastest bit of ‘preparedness’ they can do is to go buy several packages of seeds. Choose non-hybrid “heirloom” types that will open pollinate. Put them in an old glass jar, close the lid, and put it in your freezer. Seeds stored this way will keep for many many years. ( I’ve planted some that were 16 years old. That’s the longest I’ve stored…) You can store a dozen years worth of seeds in one jar pretty easily (for a small garden) and since these are open pollinated types, you can collect and replant your own seeds. ( I now make more seeds net each year than I plant. Basically, my ‘seed archive’ is now only for restarting a purebred line if I get genetic contamination.) A quart jar is big enough for most folks.

    Best for beginners are things with large seeds. Corn, beans, peas. (though finding non-hybrid corn can take some looking). It also takes a couple of years to get good at any one kind of plant and learn how to save seeds well. So after you have some seeds, do start a small practice garden, even if it’s only a 4 x 4 foot square or a couple of small tubs. Also note that for cold climates, root crops are better (turnips, radishes, potatoes, parsnips, carrots) and can take a while to get good at growing and producing seeds. For places with lots of snow, Kale is your friend. It will grow under light snow… Pumpkin and squash are prolific and the seeds are good in storage; but they take a lot of dirt area. You need a legume or a nut for a decent protein and oil (fatty acid) supply and it can be valuable to have a nut tree already growing (orchards trees take a decade or so to make significant yield…) so don’t decide to wait on them… (but pumpkin seeds can substitute for nuts often) Also, for what it’s worth, lentils are a pain to harvest, but grown darned quick and easy and the seeds keep a long time. Beets are fairly hardy and easy to grow (and both root and tops are edible). Finally, buckwheat is a traditional ‘catch crop’ for something quick when the regular crop fails. Lentils, buckwheat, and radishes may not be your idea of a normal diet, but they are very fast to yield… with some spinach and squash added, you have a decent diet, too.

    If that doesn’t appeal to you, at the grocers just buy a bag each of lentils, beans, popcorn, barley (not pearled, go to Whole Foods or equivalent and get whole grains), and brown rice (if you live in a warm wet place) whole oats or wheat berries and put them in jars in your kitchen shelf. Learn to cook with them. As long as you have 1/2 a jar left, you can plant a large area “if it comes to that”… It’s not ideal, but it’s better than nothing.)

    Yeah, I’m “into this stuff”. What can I say. Raised by two survivors of The Great Depression (who instilled in me their hunger experiences, while stuffing me to the gills on great food ;-) and in a Mormon Town to boot (and while not a Mormon, I appreciate what they taught about preparation for bad times…)

    For folks wanting to know more, including how to make a “do it yourself” food storage system for darned near no money (buy in bulk, store dry goods in jars) see:

    http://chiefio.wordpress.com/2009/04/06/food-storage-systems/

    BTW, canning is surprisingly easy. Most country hardware stores have the Ball Blue Book of Canning as do most Wal-Mart stores. That’s a good place to start. And even if you just buy fresh bulk in season and can your own, it tastes better and you can keep costs down. FWIW, the major cost item is the lids at way too much each ( $.25 or so) and they harp that you can not re-use them or you will die immediately. The reality is that they can be reused within reason, and in an emergency I’d be willing to do so. Just make sure the ‘paint’ on the inside of the lid is not scratched. I typically use ‘re-used’ lids for experimental batches of things (where it won’t sit on the shelf for a year, more like a day or a week) and for dry goods storage. Been doing it for about 2 decades now and I’m still breathing ;-) Wal-mart looks to have the best prices. Also, fwiw, Classico brand sauces come in real Atlas-Mason jars (as does a house brand jam at Whole Foods) and these are real canning jars. They work great. So while I own several dozen “Ball” and “Kerr” jars, you don’t need to ever buy a single jar if you are patient… and like spaghetti and jam… In an emergency you can use other thiner jars too. There is a slight increase in risk of breakage, but as long as you don’t tighten the lids too much you will not have breakage problems anyway.

    Oh, and for most folks, learning to dry food would be as valuable as learning to can.

    Well, enough on that. If you care, the information is available. It’s not hard and it doesn’t cost anything (increased buying efficiency pays the freight). If you don’t care, well, that’s your choice.

    Just realize that at least 2 Ph.D.s have made predictions that we start a new little ice age about 2014 and it reaches it’s deepest point about 2040. FWIW, I think they are right. Their science looked pretty solid to me. One based on solar theoretical work, the other based on Wavelet analysis of the historical solar and temperature data. When theoretical and direct historical data analysis lead to the same point, I tend to think that someone has something right.

    By the way how do you build a guillotine????/sarc

    No need. Just store some food, and when they come to the door, say “Sorry, we’re starving too” ;-)

    BTW: For those who would like to paint this as some kind of strange paranoid behaviour, please note: I very much HOPE that we have continued warm weather as at present. I don’t EXPECT a grand catastrophe and I’m CONFIDENT that the world can find a way to share the resources so that no one need suffer unduly if a major cold event happens. But I’m still going to be prepared… It’s the prudent thing to do. If it makes you feel better, think of it as applying the “precautionary principle”… just in case hope, expectations, and confidence are not enough…

    At worst, I’ve cut my food bill due to higher efficiencies and I’ve kept alive skills my ancestors cherished while entertaining myself with some pleasant hobbies. If you still want to think I must be crazy, then realize that I’ve been certified sane and remarkably well balanced. (It’s a long story involving being a test subject in a medical study with a battery of psych profiles and such). I am, literally, a model of sanity and the profile developed is used to select folks for high stress challenging work environments. It’s only prudent to prepared for events of reasonable probability where the result of not preparing is catastrophic and the cost is nil.

  177. Larus says:

    @Richard Sharpe (May 26, 2010 at 7:25 am)
    “Honestly, how hard is it to grasp the concept of cycles and that parts of a sine wave look like a downward or upward trend until you have enough data?”

    Not hard at all. The only problem is that a sine wave of the kind you seem to be postulating doesn’t seem to be in existence unless you mean the grand cycle of glacials and interglacials on the scale of millenia.

    For the time being, this site seems to be promoting an oscillation of a different kind where Phase A is “It’s not warming at all, it’s cooling” (for every time there’s a downward blip), followed by Phase B, “Oh, this bit of warming is all part of a sine wave, nothing to worry about” (for every time there’s a substantial incline in global temperatures or a decline in Arctic sea ice cover).

  178. E.M.Smith says:

    Phil M. says: I have also pointed out to you (and most everyone else on this blog) your propensity for confounding weather and climate.

    Unfortunately, the confounding of weather and climate was set forth by the “climate scientists” of the AGW movement when they decided to call the 30 year average of weather ‘climate’. Real climate is dependent on your latitude, altitude, distance to water, and topography and darned near nothing else. It is certainly NOT a 30 year average of weather (especially when we have known 60 year PDO cycles and 200 year solar cycles and 1500 year Bond Events and…) Things like “Mediterranean” and “Desert” and “Alpine” and “Tropical” and… are NOT based on 30 years averages of weather and ARE the correct definition of climate.

    So, in truth, a “Mediterranean Climate” existed in Rome during the Roman Optimum and during the Little Ice Age and during the MWP and the Iron Age Cold Period and even now, during the Modern Optimum. And it will continue to be there during the coming cold period too.

    But the AGW folks want to call short duration averages of weather ‘climate’, so that opens the door for haggling over the number of years that qualify. To me, if you want to hold up 20 out of the last 30 years as a “Warming Climate” (the last 10 have been cooling) then it is perfectly reasonable to say that excess cold and snow now is evidence of a cooling ‘climate’.

    But if you want to admit that California is now, has been for the last several thousand years, and will be in the next couple of thousand years, the same climate that it always has been during the holocene, hey, I’m ready to agree. (Mediterranean with Alpine mountains and desert out back). We can call “Climate Change” a bunch of bunk based on the broken definition from the get-go and all go home.

    But if you want to base “Climate Change” on a 30 year average of weather, then I’m happy to base it on “137% of Snowfall”. Since in both cases were just using a different averaging period and both of them are equally broken. And since your guys have already set that “rule”, guess you’re gonna have to live with the consequences…

    jeff brown says: This post is very misleading, and employs the same tactics as seen in alarmist reportings. Too bad the snowfall didn’t happen when the ski resorts were still open though…

    Speaking of misleading… Are you saying that the ski resorts all closed before the snow season or what? Can’t be that the snow came too late, as some places are STILL open:

    http://www.mammothmountain.com/ResortActivities/SpecialEvents/MemorialDay/

    We’re bringing the beach party to the snow May 29 and 30!

    Celebrate Memorial Day weekend with live music by Almost Famous and DJ Slipmatt, snow-beach volleyball, beer pong, an ice drinking luge, mechanical bull rides, drinks specials and an après party at Hyde!

    Saturday, May 29
    8am Lifts Open – get some turns in to start the day!

    11am Party begins:

    3:00pm Lifts Close- everybody head to The Mill Café, The Yodler or the sundeck at Tusks Bar

    Sunday, May 30
    8am Lifts Open – Recovery day!

    11am Party begins:

    3:00pm Lifts Close- everybody head to The Mill Café, The Yodler or the sundeck at Tusks Bar

    Third Night Free!
    Stay two nights at any Mammoth slope-side property and the third is on us!

    I’m hoping they stay open in June, just for the heck of it…

  179. Jack Simmons says:

    For those who like to track such things, here is my favorite for tracking snow levels, expressed in water equivalents, in Colorado.

    http://www.co.nrcs.usda.gov/snow/snow/watershed/current/daily/maps_graphs/swe_time.html

  180. E.M.Smith says:

    Pamela Gray says: Alfalfa is another concern as well. Too much rain and you get moldy hay. However, you can put it up wet and let it “mash”. Cows love it. Kinda difficult to bail up and ship though.

    Maybe I’m missing something… My Dad always said wet hay fermented and caused barn fires. I know, alfalfa ain’t hay, and you did say hard to bail… So what keeps it from heating up in the barn? Or do you just make small piles and feed it up quick?

    (And yes, I’ve played on ‘very warm bails’ in the barn… that’s where I asked the question… which lead to a lesson in unstacking bails in said barn, and despite the thanks for noticing, a personal resolution to never mention warm bails of hay again ;-)

    FWIW, it snowed on me near L.A. this last weekend:

    http://chiefio.wordpress.com/2010/05/23/freaky-snow-in-california-in-may/

  181. Tenuc says:

    Snow cover area, thickness and durability is very important regarding rapid climate change. Snow is highly reflective and bounces much of the energy from the sun back into space, so cooling our planet. It also has a high enthalpy and it takes much solar / atmospheric energy to melt it.

    Because of this we have seen a much later NH Spring, and here in the UK the ‘Spring bloom’ was around a month late compared to recent years. There is a real risk to food production if we get an early winter, as the growing season will be too short to get a good harvest.

  182. Hoppy says:

    “It’s always Marcia, Marcia says:
    May 26, 2010 at 5:51 pm
    Hoppy says:
    May 26, 2010 at 6:15 am

    If you’re such a stickler for co… blah, blah, blah”

    What makes you such an expert in the views of Homo-Hoppy? You don’t know me, you know nothing about me. Well, a bit like the worst blind date ever, lets start to get to know one another. I cannot stand hypocrisy. You must favour it I presume, no matter how much it further dirties the issues involved?

    My point was valid. Cherry picking is cherry picking. It is an alarmist headline with no real substance.

    p.s. Marcia – are you free next Wednesday for a drink, maybe food, back to my place to compare hockeysticks?

  183. Tim Clark says:

    Pamela Gray says: Alfalfa is another concern as well. Too much rain and you get moldy hay. However, you can put it up wet and let it “mash”. Cows love it. Kinda difficult to bail up and ship though.
    E.M.Smith says:
    Maybe I’m missing something… My Dad always said wet hay fermented and caused barn fires. I know, alfalfa ain’t hay, and you did say hard to bail… So what keeps it from heating up in the barn? Or do you just make small piles and feed it up quick?

    Probably ensiling it outside in the open. Around here farmers dig pits and shred corn/whatever. Pile it in the pit and let it ferment. Sunflower silage is a favorite for many because of the oil.

  184. Tim Clark says:

    Jack Simmons says:May 27, 2010 at 12:18 am
    For those who like to track such things, here is my favorite for tracking snow levels, expressed in water equivalents, in Colorado.
    http://www.co.nrcs.usda.gov/snow/snow/watershed/current/daily/maps_graphs/swe_time.html

    U cun trus that cit becuz it s govment sorce i wuk fr.

  185. Tim Clark says:

    E.M.Smith says:May 26, 2010 at 11:19 pm
    IIRC, the exporters are: Canada, USA, Australia, Argentina, Ukraine, Brazil
    (But that’s from memory of something about 20 years ago, so YMMV…)

    Your memory encompasses about 95% of world agricultural exports. Well done. If you want to know the precise numbers (or trade commodities), this is a gud govmint website:

    http://commodities.about.com/gi/o.htm?zi=1/XJ&zTi=1&sdn=commodities&cdn=money&tm=18&gps=206_598_1259_825&f=00&su=p649.3.336.ip_&tt=2&bt=0&bts=0&zu=http%3A//usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/MannUsda/viewDocumentInfo.do%3FdocumentID%3D1079

  186. Tim Clark says:

    I give up.

    [Fixed. ~dbs]

  187. Tim Clark says:

    E.M.
    The reality is that they can be reused within reason, and in an emergency I’d be willing to do so. Just make sure the ‘paint’ on the inside of the lid is not scratched. I typically use ‘re-used’ lids for experimental batches of things (where it won’t sit on the shelf for a year, more like a day or a week) and for dry goods storage. Been doing it for about 2 decades now and I’m still breathing ;-)

    A good trick I learned from ma was to set the jars in warm 120 F water for 30 minutes or so before use. It reduces the vacuum and effort needed to remove the lids and as you know, bending the seal casting can be an issue. For pickles and such you may need to cool back down. I wonder if any of the youngsters on this site know how to use or even have a church key? ;~P

  188. Tim Clark says:

    Smokey says:
    May 26, 2010 at 7:10 pm
    Jack Simmons,
    Report back. And remember:
    Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will sit in a boat all day, drinking beer.

    ROFLOL

  189. Mike says:

    Did you folks read the initial article A linked to?

    http://news.discovery.com/earth/snow-cover-shrinking-maps.html

    “It may not seem so in many places today, but North America and Eurasia’s snow cover has shrunk, according to study of more than 40 years of weather satellite-based snow cover maps.”

    “… the snow cover is leaving earlier but is just as extensive in winter and fall. This, said Robinson, is just how models have suggested climate should be changing snow cover and matches other research that has found earlier warming and greening up of the land in spring.”

    At any given time you can point to one area where regional climate is cooler than normal. The point of AGW is that it is global. Global and data over longer time lines back up the theory. That so many of you would regard Anthony’s comments as evidence against AGW, shows that you are not open to evidence that is consistent with AGW. No one event or season or study can prove AGW is a fact, but most of the evidence points that way.

  190. Tim Clark says:

    Mike says:May 27, 2010 at 9:10 am
    Did you folks read the initial article A linked to?
    http://news.discovery.com/earth/snow-cover-shrinking-maps.html

    Did you understand what you read, or are you just cherry picking phrases? Here’s the rest.

    The discovery of a sharp decline in late winter and early spring snow
    cover starting in the 1980s until 1990 was revealed after researchers
    made overdue adjustments to decades of daily snow cover maps.

    After the fine tuning the maps, New Jersey State Climatologist and
    Rutgers University professor David Robinson found a 1990 decline in spring
    snow extent that we still see today.
    “It has remained lower over the past 20 years compared to the previous 20 years in
    North America and Eurasia,” he said.

    No decline since 1990.
    http://climate.rutgers.edu/snowcover/chart_anom.php
    ?ui_set=0&ui_region=nhland&ui_month=4

    And CO2 has done what since 1990? No correlation here, move along.

  191. Kenji says:

    Northern Sierra SNOWPACK is currently 318% of ‘normal’ THREE HUNDRED EIGHTEEN percent !!
    Statewide CA SNOWPACK is 194% of ‘normal’ ONE HUNDRED NINETYFOUR percent !! … nearly TWICE the ‘normal’ SNOWPACK

    http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cdecapp/snowapp/sweq.action

    annnnnnnnnd Reservoir storage is wayyyyyyyy above-normal for MOST of the states reservoirs

    http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cdecapp/resapp/getResGraphsMain.action

    annnnnnnnnd EVEN MORE rain and snow is coming to CA …

    http://www.intellicast.com/National/Radar/Current.aspx?location=USNV0076&animate=true

    http://video.dot.ca.gov/asx/d3-Soda-Springs-EB-80.asx

    http://www.intelliweather.net/imagery/intelliweather/sat_goes10fd_580x580_img.htm

    Yet … useless bureaucrats in the state dept. of drought mongering and global warmist shilling … INSIST that CA is in the grips of “year 4″ of a “drought” and that the state is “dry”. These LIARS should all be FIRED for politicizing their “science”. drought ? … reallllllllly ? dry ? … reallllllly ?

    http://www.water.ca.gov/drought/

    STOP LYING to the public !!

  192. DeNihilist says:

    EM said – {The reality is that they can be reused within reason,}

    Have put down quarts of blackberry jam using plastic wrap and rubber bands for the lid. Apply while jam is still warm, ans as long as the lid is concave, good to go!

    Enjoy

  193. peterhodges says:

    How about the nearest station to us,341% of normal.

    notice the peak, one month past normal. and it hasn’t been going anywhere, and we still have at least a few days of winter left, apparently.

    last weekend, we got 8″ of global warming.

  194. peterhodges says:

    Phil M. says: May 26, 2010 at 5:40 pm ….blah blah blah ackphhht blah…

    sorry to pick on phil, but this post exemplifies quite a few posts i noticed in the thread.

    this is the opinion of someone who just doesn’t know what they are talking about. phil may be smart as hell and well educated, or even an h2o expert. but in this specific case all of this is refuted by FACTS. this is the problem and bias within much of science today, a severe disconnect separating esoteric theory from actual observation.

    as someone who lives, works, and travels in the southwest, i assure you from actual observations and experience, recent and current, that the mountains of the desert southwest, south of most of those in nevada, are still covered in unusually, surprisingly large quantities of snow. San Francisco peaks of northern arizona are especially and astonishingly vivid. you can see them from virtually everywhere north of the mogollan rim.

    and as i write this, it is 25F below normal and snowing.

  195. E.M.Smith says:

    Tim Clark says: Your memory encompasses about 95% of world agricultural exports. Well done. If you want to know the precise numbers (or trade commodities), this is a gud govmint website:

    Golly! Noggin still works… and thanks for the link, I do trade commodities sometimes.

    Link without “About.com” wrapper:

    http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/MannUsda/viewDocumentInfo.do?documentID=1079

    Top level:

    http://usda.mannlib.cornell.edu/MannUsda/homepage.do

    Per “church key”, remember to ‘lift’ straight up, not ‘lever’ in rotation as that bends the lid… OH,and if you make a stack of them and roll it on edge on a counter, the little ‘flange’ that forms on opening gets rolled back into shape. Also, warmed in a boiling water bath, the ‘rubber’ will soften and flow back to the normal position.

    So far the only limit I’ve found on re-use is rusting in any place where the enamel has been scratched. On my ‘todo’ list is to find a food grade enamel formula… Oh, and hand wash with a sponge and soap only, no dishwasher. The dishwasher soap does a number on enamel lifetime…

    @DeNihilist: Thanks! Nice to know for ‘that day’. Good alternative to expensive wax for things like jams. (not so useful for green beans ;-)

    FWIW, I’ve canned meat, fish, and stew all with a 1:20 minute canning time for pints and 1 hour for cup size jars. Somewhere I’ve got a write-up on canning meats and stews at home… You can cut the time down if you add some acid, but really need a pH meter to be exact. Maybe I’ll put up a page…. Also found an article about canning for a ‘Victory Garden’ published by the USA during other ‘hard times’. Formulas for canning in a wash tub(!) with times for boiling water bath canning of things like green beans that ran out to a couple of hours. Don’t intend to ever use it (as there is some risk) but again a nice-to-know if your pressure cooker is gone and you have food to store and no alternative.

    Ah, there it is:

    http://www.earthlypursuits.com/WarGarV/HomeCan1919/HomeCanDryVE32.htm

    The whole manual is a quite good introduction to a Victory Garden:

    http://www.earthlypursuits.com/WarGarV/WarGardTitle.htm

    Ah, the good old days ;-)

  196. GeoFlynx says:

    I can’t imagine what you found offensive in my May 26th post – certainly nothing was intended! My point was simple, snotel shows the May 26th snowpack in Arizona to be at <25% of normal for the three basins that have snowpack this time of year. Maybe I am reading the data wrong since this does not agree with your 446% figure. I only sought clarification. The error could have been mine.

  197. GeoFlynx says:

    My May 26th post:

    Anthony – This is the Snotel Data for Arizona that you referenced on your site. The only Arizona data is from San Francisco Peaks Basin and I can’t seem to find where you came up with the 446% of normal figure. The Arizona State Snotel Map for May 26, 2010 at the link below shows this area to have less than 50% SWE of the 1971-2000 Normal. I would like to be critical but right now I’m just plain confused!

    http://www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/ftpref/data/water/wcs/gis/maps/az_swepctnormal_update.pdf

    Your Referenced Data Set:

    ARIZONA
    VERDE RIVER BASIN ………………………. 5 of 7 * 120
    SAN FRANCISCO PEAKS …………………….. 1 of 1 25 71
    CENTRAL MOGOLLON RIM ……………………. 3 of 3 * 117
    LITTLE COLORADO – SOUTHERN HEADWATERS …….. 5 of 5 * 118
    UPPER SALT RIVER BASIN / WHITE MOUNTAINS ….. 6 of 7 * 106
    SAN FRANCISCO RIVER BASIN ……………….. 5 of 5 0* 103
    UPPER GILA RIVER BASIN ………………….. 3 of 3 0* 115

    The Snow Water Equivalent Percent of Average represents the snow
    water equivalent found at selected SNOTEL sites in or near the
    basin compared to the average value for those sites on this day.

    The Accumulated Precipitation Percent of Average represents the
    total precipitation (beginning October 1st) found at selected
    SNOTEL sites in or near the basin compared to the average value
    for those sites on this day.

    * = Data are not available or data may not provide a valid measure
    of conditions for over half of the sites within the basin.
    Refer to the individual state reports for a complete data
    listing and basin analysis.

  198. RC Vickerman says:

    The only thing that Arnold is famous for in any and all Disabled Kalifornia State Residents Homes is the fact that; “We all have had $100.00 and more ripped from our Disability Awards, which money actually came off of all of OUR Dinner Tables!” Thanks Arnold, you are really a stand-up guy! Taking money away from a Disabled Persons measly Award must make you very proud! I will Boycott any and all Arnold Movies from this date on!

  199. GeoFlynx says:

    Huh?

    http://www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/ftpref/data/water/wcs/gis/maps/az_swepctnormal_update.pdf

    REPLY: SNOTEL reports have an unfortunate side effect of being incomplete if they aren’t called in. This looks incomplete. -A

  200. peterhodges says:

    GeoFlynx says: May 28, 2010 at 9:20 am
    * = Data are not available or data may not provide a valid measure
    of conditions

    and therein lies the rub

    i saw these same graphs, which after having just been in Flag, i knew to be inaccurate. i searched and searched and could not find any data points for where the actual snow is. you would think NAU would at least have something up there.

    i also have it on authority from the dirtbag climber network that at least as of a few weeks ago, the high ranges of southeast AZ and south NM also still have snow on them. it was what we call a split flow year, most of the storms came in from socal/n baja (where several new highway bridges washed out), hence the large snowpacks. the persistently snowy desert ranges really stand out this year. at one point ski apache had more snow than mammoth.

    don’t know where anthony got his numbers

  201. Brian blagden says:

    4″ of snow fell at the weekend here in Scotland. Ski season extended into June – fantastic.

    http://uk.news.yahoo.com/5/20100601/tod-scottish-skiers-enjoy-the-snow-in-ju-870a197.html

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