Guess the Weather Station City and Country

You may have noticed that I have been absent from WUWT for a few days. The stories have been on scheduled automated posting, and the WUWT team of moderators has held down the fort (thank you).

The reason is that I have been traveling on business. While I was traveling I was invited to photograph the weather station at what I think is probably the most visually stunning and technologically advanced meteorology center in the world today:

mystery_weather_station

Can you guess what city and country this is in?

Hints below.

The building in the background has a Doppler radar on top, and is the meteorology HQ for the city. The entire building is just for meteorology and they employ 150 people. The Stevenson Screen in the foreground is where the official temperature record for the city is measured.

Hint: The city is not in the USA, NOAA has nothing like this.

I’ll have a complete report in a few days.

WUWT contributions made this portion of my trip possible, so I owe all of you a big thank you. More to come. – Anthony

UPDATE: well, that was fast. I’ll have more on this in a few days.

WeatherMan

It’s the Shenzhen Meteorological Observatory in China.

REPLY: YES, WE HAVE A WINNER

Congrats to “weatherman”! If anyone wants to locate it on Google Earth, and post URL here or lat/lon, it would save me a lot of trouble. I couldn’t take my GPS with me due to concerns at being at a gov installation with one might get me in trouble. Gotta catch a plane, back online in a day or so. – Anthony

About these ads

90 thoughts on “Guess the Weather Station City and Country

  1. Could this be a city in Russia? The buildings in the background remind me of the vast concrete apartments built around industrial endeavors to house workers.

  2. Sorry to spoil the party but I think you only hold a fort. Holding one down might be a bit difficult: especially if it got a trifle uppity. And I don’t have a clue where it is. Interesting architecture though:sort of thing the French do rather well.

    Kindest Regards

  3. It’s the Shenzhen Meteorological Observatory in China.

    REPLY: YES, WE HAVE A WINNER

  4. I cheated.

    At my last job we had a supplier in Guangdong province in China. Saw plenty of photos from post-visit reports – for the city, try Shenzhen.

    REPLY: right, but too late, you came in second. OK gotta catch a plane, back online in a day or so – Anthony

  5. Just a wild guess, but I wonder if it’s in the Caribbean…perhaps the Cayman Islands empire in the background?????

  6. Looks like it might be on a roof; what might be a roof edge is visible and the surrounding structures have the utilitarian appearance which often exists on unoccupied rooftops. But the same utilitarian appearance is shared by industrial and scientific equipment, so it might simply be due being in a scientific facility. Is there a cooking grille nearby?

  7. Could it be Beijing?

    REPLY: could be, but not quite. getting warmer

    Is it getting warmer due to increased CO2, urban heat island, or smog?

  8. Anthony, how did you determine specifically it is a ‘Doppler’ (meteorological) RADAR?

    There is no indication from the exterior, and not all RADARs in service for meteorological purposes need be ‘doppler’ in nature (although it is a safe bet in this day and age.)

    The proper term, if I may, is “meteorological RADAR”, with the modifier ‘Doppler’ if so designed. Popular slang has shortened that to simply ‘Doppler RADAR’, but that doesn’t make it proper or necessarily correct in for cases.
    .
    .
    REPLY: Quite simple, I asked my host, who is a meteorologist there. She and her associate both said that the DOPPLER RADAR had been built in China, using a combination of licensed technology from the USA, and Chinese construction of the radome. I also saw the radar display on LCD screens in the lobby. – Anthony

  9. I hate to elaborate on this subject all this, but, suffer me this one last post and I’m done!

    I found the Rosetta stone here: www2.inmh.ro/uploads/wsr98d.pdf

    To wit:

    In 1996, Lockheed Martin, with the China Meteorological Administration, formed a joint venture to produce an affordable, state-of-the-art, full-coherence Doppler Weather radar. The radar would integrate the technology from Lockheed Martin’s [original] WSR-88D performance with advanced technology.

    The first NEXRAD WSR-98D radar will be installed in China in 1999. NEXRAD as an S-band radar, provides fully coherent data over its entire operational range. Its high resolution, accurate reflectivity, radial velocity and velocity spectrum width data, when processed by the advanced meteorological algorithms used in the [USA] WSR-88D enables generation of over 70 weather products, designed to meet the meteorologist’s operational and research requirements.

    NEXRAD WSR-98D will enable the meteorologist to select from either the manual mode of operation used by most current radars, or the Volume Coverage Pattern mode employed so successfully by the WSR-88D.

  10. Link to articles about Shenzen and you’ll note that they are seeding clouds there to induce rainfall….hmmmm

  11. @rickM (19:22:29) :
    It shouldn’t be necessary at the moment – it’s been raining since the weekend.

  12. Gotta catch a plane, back online in a day or so. –

    Anthony Watts in Around the World in Eighty Days

  13. That ‘weather radar’ seems to be an enormous technology transfer. Surely their military technicians will have taken a copy and been all over it?

  14. a jones (16:52:13) :
    Sorry to spoil the party but I think you only hold a fort. Holding one down might be a bit difficult: especially if it got a trifle uppity. And I don’t have a clue where it is. Interesting architecture though:sort of thing the French do rather well. Kindest Regards

    Hold down the fort is a common American English phrase – comes from Western movies, usually some poor soul is holding down the fort by themselves when the Indians attack.

    In everyday idiom it refers to taking care of a place or project while someone else is away – like the moderators taking care of our WUWT while Anthony was away.

  15. “The tower building, the new office of the Shenzhen Meteorological Observatory, is located on a small hill in the east of the Shenzhen International Garden and Flower Expo Park”

    http://english.sz.gov.cn/ln/200711/t20071106_279291.htm

    A solar power project was installed on rooftops in the Garden, and this two-page summary includes photos of two of the buildings.

    http://www.bpsunoasis.com/en/images/Aust_ps_solar_Shenzhen.pdf

    Looking for green areas in Shenzhen with those buildings, then on the east side the tower is visible.
    Coordinates are 22 32 30.25 N, 114 00 19.70 E

  16. I am with a jones, hold the fort (as in keep out attackers), not hold down (as in a job) bit more life and death than that.

    O/T (with apologies) but have you seen the Monibot article on the Carteret Islands? Might be worth a response (Carbon Cult in the Carterets?). Having lived in Bougainville with an active volcano nearby and regular earth tremors I feel there may be another explanation!

  17. Speaking of Doppler and radar:

    http://tinyurl.com/p9ryrb

    From The Times, May 25, 2009

    Action on wind farm radar threat to aircraft

    The body that monitors UK airspace is seeking a solution to the potentially disastrous problem of commercial and military aircraft disappearing in radar blackout zones caused by wind farms.

    National Air Traffic Services (Nats) has asked Raytheon, the American defence company, to design the world’s first system for allowing radar to see through wind farm interference.

    The cost of the £5 million project is expected to be picked up by the wind energy industry.

    Wind farm turbines create a Doppler effect as they turn, which shows up on radar screens. As the area and number of these wind farms has increased, the number of radar blackout zones has also risen. Aircraft passing through the area can disappear in the blackout and air traffic controllers can lose their exact position. …

  18. China then. I have to say, my initial guess was Dubai or Abu Dhabi. Etisalat, the Emirati telecoms company have several buildings with similar ‘golf balls’ on top. I believe they house microwave tansmitters / recievers.

  19. Slightly OT:

    That ball on top has become common across the world. What is inside? What is its purpose?
    How does it differ from more conventional appearing weather stations?

    Thanks!!

  20. Never heard of “Hold down the fort” in the UK.

    “Hold down a job” is a common phrase over here, as is “Hold the fort”, but we do not mix the two….

  21. Fantastic! A place that in twenty years has gone from a few villages to a vast industrial urbanisation.

  22. It’s definitely “Holding the fort”. Used for the situation when a superior officer or noble would mount some kind of expedition, and a junior officer would be required to take command at the outpost or castle. The instruction is meant to convey the sense that everything is to be kept running (but nothing changed and no expeditions mounted).

    “Holding down the fort” might perhaps occur with a wilful fort for whom time out in the naughty corner is not sufficient.

  23. I have a question:
    .
    Has anyone ever considered measuring the heat which is generated within a Stevenson Screen caused by impinging RF radiation of local radar transceivers?
    .
    In the consideration that most of the power in a radar signal impinging upon the screen is likely miniscule —in most cases— one is given to wonder otherwise at the locations of some screens such as to give rise to artificial readings when a local radar transceiver is in operation.
    .
    That includes radio transmitters of significant power as well.
    .

  24. Anthony, would you kindly look at the NSIDC arctic sea ice map…I have never seen it glitch so bad…I thought they said they fixed their satellites or whatever it is they use…

  25. abraxas (01:41:55) :

    Slightly OT:

    That ball on top has become common across the world. What is inside? What is its purpose?
    How does it differ from more conventional appearing weather stations?

    Thanks!!

    Various kinds of microwave (really, really high frequency, short wavelength radio) systems use parabolic reflectors with a small illuminating antenna in front. Some are fixed in direction, some are pointable in both elevation and azimuth. While these systems generally “see through” rain and other precipitation, accumulations of moisture, and especially ice, on the antenna itself tend to degrade the antenna characteristics. Thus, the radome (the ball on top) was developed, primarily to keep the weather away. Another purpose is to keep unwanted observers from easily seeing which way a particular system is pointed.

  26. Also OT: The dead pixel on SOHO is back at 4 o’clock. It’s been at 10 for a few days. Did the satellite do a flip?

    And what is under the Stevenson Screen in the photo? Looks like old stonework.

  27. Highlander…in regards to your question about RF radiation affecting Stevenson Screens, at least at the frequency of that radar (Sband – around 3 Ghz), the RF energy should just reflect off the object and scatter back towards the antenna. The only ‘heating’ would occur if the object was covered in water drops. Then the water would absorb some of the radiation and be heated slightly…like in a microwave oven. However, the effective power levels from the radar would be so small because:

    1 – it is not in the direct line of scanning (it is below 0 deg tilt)
    2 – the radar is only pointed in that specific direction a small portion of the time
    3 – the average power of a radar is much lower than the peak pulse power (there is alot of dead xmit time between pulses of RF going out)

    With these factors in mind, any heating would probably be overwhelmed by other factors & be a very, very small impact on the actual temperature reading…kinda like CO2 in the atmosphere…eh?

    Jeff

  28. I knew it was some workers’ paradise the instant I saw the people boxes in the background. It’s interesting that many, if not most, of the guesses included the name of a country with socialist leanings. Architecture speaks volumes.

  29. Well it ain’t in the UK, that’s for sure!

    A fair way OT & apologies for doing so, but interesting @ BBC, http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/8068049.stm all about a “carbon rich meteorite, followed by this

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/8061929.stm.

    Poor old Auntie Beeb! I wonder if they know the game is up, but just don’t know how to turn from arrogant rabid AGW propagandists into a sensible, accurate, well informed, serious & trustworthy, state funded news organisation!

  30. Those who guessed Singapore was not far wrong. Singapore invested heavily in Shenzhen and was consulted on its urban planning resulting in its blocky, Singaporesque skyline.

  31. And what is under the Stevenson Screen in the photo? Looks like old stonework.

    Because the tower seems to have only two of those curved wings in the Google Earth aerial photo, the Stevenson screen must be in what used to be part of the adjoining Garden. There are many decorative features in there, so what you’re seeing is indeed probably stonework (if it’s not old it may have been built to simulate stonework).

    This being a scenic attraction, there are some photos taken in the area in Panorimo. I haven’t spotted the Stevenson screen location in a photo, but I did find two of the radar/broadcasting tower (one from the hill to the west, the other further north in the garden).

  32. And do the records from the ‘most visually stunning and technologically advanced meteorology center in the world today” suggest that the globe is warming or cooling?

    !!!!!

  33. It does look like Singapore in that the sky is grey.

    Who said Dubai? There aren’t any trees in Dubai; there is no old stonework in Dubai; and there is no humidity in Dubai. The photograph is virtually dripping!

  34. Anthony,

    While you’re in China, it would help all who follow temperatures throughout the globe if you could get at least the yearly series of several well-situated rural stations updated from 1990 onward. That’s when GHCN decided to rely exclusively on urban records in that country. With China booming, all of the latter show strong UHI, biasing the results for the entire region.

  35. Sure does have that “just poured concrete” look so popular with government employed architects. Sort of like Boston City Hall.

    Suspect it was inspired by the monster in the 1950s horror flick “Kronos”

  36. ARCTIC ICE GRAPHS
    The last week has been very strange with the graphs of arctic ice dropping like crazy. Finally NSIDC put a stop to it. Here is an update from them:

    From NSIDC.ORG

    Update: May 26 2009 The daily image update has been temporarily suspended because of large areas of missing data in the past week. NSIDC currently gets its data from the SSM/I sensor on the DMSP F13 satellite, which is nearing the end of its operational life and experiencing intermittent problems. NSIDC has been working on a transition to a newer sensor on the F17 satellite for several months. At this time, we have more than a year of data from F17, which we are using to intercalibrate with F13 data. The F17 data are not yet available for near-real-time updates. We will resume posting daily updates as soon as possible, either from F13, if the present problem is resolved, or from F17, when the transition is complete.

    So now you know! My next question is: how good is the F17 sensor?

  37. So now you know! My next question is: how good is the F17 sensor?

    At the rate the sensors are failing, I’m more concerned about when the F17+ sensor will be in orbit.

  38. Aw He…ck! Anthony Watts in China? Has anyone with a seismograph noted a tremor today centered on Albany?

  39. Sandy (21:59:41) :

    That ‘weather radar’ seems to be an enormous technology transfer. Surely their military technicians will have taken a copy and been all over
    it?

    You should see what we are preparing to ‘send them’ in the way of commercial product (auto-calibrating, adaptive beam-forming, phased-array RF-based gear) for manufacture (contract manufacturing in China) … this (the WSR-98D) looks tame by comparison …

  40. abraxas (01:41:55) :

    Slightly OT:

    That ball on top has become common across the world. What is inside? What is its purpose?
    How does it differ from more conventional appearing weather stations?

    Thanks!!

    The ‘ball’ on top houses a 28 foot diameter parabolic ‘dish’ that rotates at a maximum rate of approximately 5 RPM to generate 14 elevation scans* (from 0.5° to 19.5°) in about a 5 min time period; these are termed ‘volume scans’ and do a reasonable job of ascertaining precipitation (and other meteorologocal phenomonon) in 3-D about the area in view by the RADAR.

    The ball serves several purposes (touched by a couple of other posters) including but not limited to: reduces wear on gibmals and drive gearing, increases pointing accuracy by eliminating wind-flexure effects, reduces weathering effects (corrosion) in the mechanicals and the electricals, keeps questions (and ‘concerms’) by the public to a minimum (MANY fewer questions about a ‘passive white ball’ compared to an actively rotating 28 foot parabolic S-band antenna!)
    .
    .
    * for VCP-11. A number of other Volume (scanning) Control Programs (rates, elevation sample intervals, etc) are available depending on the current controlling weather service office mode selection and future software development.

  41. George M:

    Thank you, makes perfect sense, except the bit about “unwanted observers” ;-)

    peace

  42. ZCZC RDUCLMILM ALL
    TTAA00 KILM DDHHMM

    CLIMATOLOGICAL REPORT
    NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE WILMINGTON NC
    345 PM EST THU JAN 6 2000

    …THE 20TH CENTURY IN PORT CITY WEATHER…

    NOW THAT 1999 HAS COME TO A CLOSE AND THE YEAR 2000 HAS BEEN USHERED
    IN… IT IS TIME TO TAKE A LOOK BACK AT THE 20TH CENTURY FROM A
    CLIMATOLOGICAL STANDPOINT FOR WILMINGTON. INFORMATION WAS COMPILED
    ON A YEAR-BY-YEAR BASIS FOR EACH YEAR IN THE 1900S AND AVERAGES…
    MAXIMUMS AND MINIMUMS WERE TABULATED.

    THE AVERAGE TEMPERATURE IN WILMINGTON IN THE 20TH CENTURY WAS
    63.5 DEGREES… WITH THE AVERAGE HIGH BEING 73.0 DEGREES AND THE
    AVERAGE LOW BEING 54.1 DEGREES. THE WARMEST YEAR OF THE CENTURY WAS
    1990 WITH AN AVERAGE TEMP OF 66.5 DEGREES. THE COOLEST YEAR WAS 1981
    AT 60.9 DEGREES. 1990 ALSO HAD THE HIGHEST AVERAGE MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE
    (77.4 DEGREES) WHILE 1901 HAD THE LOWEST (70.0 DEGREES). LIKEWISE…
    1981 HAD THE LOWEST AVERAGE MINIMUM TEMP (50.1 DEGREES) WHILE 1949 SAW
    THE HIGHEST (57.3 DEGREES).

    THE AVERAGE ANNUAL HIGHEST EXTREME TEMPERATURE WAS 97.5 DEGREES.
    THE HOTTEST TEMP RECORDED DURING THE 1900S (AND EVER) WAS 104 DEGREES
    ON JUNE 27TH 1952. THE COOLEST READING FOR A YEARLY EXTREME HIGH WAS
    91 DEGREES ON A PAIR OF DAYS IN 1909. THE AVERAGE COOLEST HIGH FOR A
    YEAR WAS 32.6 DEGREES. THE EXTREMES FOR COOLEST HIGHS WERE 16 DEGREES
    ON DECEMBER 30TH 1917 AND 47 DEGREES ON 3 DAYS IN 1990.

    THE AVERAGE ANNUAL LOWEST EXTREME TEMPERATURE WAS 17.3 DEGREES.
    ON CHRISTMAS MORNING IN 1989 THE MERCURY DROPPED TO ZERO… WHICH
    WAS THE COLDEST TEMP EVER RECORDED IN THE PORT CITY. THE WARMEST
    READING FOR A YEARLY EXTREME LOW WAS 29 DEGREES ON 5 DAYS IN
    1949. IN CONTRAST… THE AVERAGE WARMEST LOW FOR A YEAR WAS
    78.2 DEGREES. THE WARMEST LOW TEMPERATURE RECORDED WAS THIS PAST YEAR
    ON AUGUST 1ST WHEN THE TEMP ONLY DROPPED TO 83 DEGREES. THE LOWEST
    WARM LOW WAS 74 DEGREES ON 7 DAYS IN 1944.

    DURING THE AVERAGE YEAR IN THE 1900S… THERE WERE 33.4 DAYS WHEN
    HIGH TEMPERATURES OF 90 DEGREES OR WARMER WERE RECORDED. THE MOST IN
    ONE YEAR WAS 71 IN 1980 WHILE THE LEAST WAS 5 IN 1938. THE LONGEST
    STREAK OF DAYS WITH SUCH HEAT WAS 23 DAYS BETWEEN JULY 7TH AND 29TH
    IN 1900. IN ADDITION… THERE WERE 16 DAYS DURING THE CENTURY WITH
    HEAT IN EXCESS OF 100 DEGREES.

    THE NUMBERS WERE FAIRLY SIMILAR FOR FREEZING DAYS. THE AVERAGE YEAR
    SAW 33.9 DAYS WITH LOW TEMPS OF 32 DEGREES OR COOLER. THE MOST IN ONE
    YEAR WAS 72 IN 1968 WHILE THE LEAST WAS 8 IN 1921. THE LONGEST STREAK
    FOR FREEZING TEMPS WAS 19 DAYS BETWEEN JANUARY 26TH AND FEBRUARY 13TH
    1978. THE PORT CITY SAW HIGH TEMPERATURES STAYING AT OR BELOW FREEZING
    ABOUT THREE TIMES EVERY FOUR YEARS (77 TIMES DURING THE CENTURY). 1917
    HAD THE MOST OF THESE DAYS WITH 5. THERE WERE 9 DAYS WHERE LOW TEMPS
    REMAINED IN SINGLE DIGITS.

    RELATED TO TEMPERATURES… THE AVERAGE GROWING SEASON WAS 246.8 DAYS
    LONG. THE LONGEST SUCH SEASON OCCURRED IN 1946 WHEN THERE WERE
    302 DAYS BETWEEN FREEZES. THE SHORTEST GROWING SEASON WAS 191 DAYS IN
    1926.

    DURING THE 20TH CENTURY… WILMINGTON RECEIVED 5137.58 INCHES OF RAIN
    (IN EXCESS OF 428 FEET) FOR AN AVERAGE OF 51.38 INCHES PER YEAR. THE
    MOST IN A SINGLE YEAR WAS 72.06 INCHES… THE TOTAL IN 1999. THE LEAST
    WAS 27.68 INCHES IN 1909. THE AVERAGE YEAR SAW A 24-HOUR MAXIMUM
    RAINFALL OF 4.43 INCHES. HURRICANE FLOYD BROUGHT A RECORD 24-HOUR MAX
    OF 14.84 INCHES ON SEPTEMBER 15-16 1999. THE SMALLEST 24-HOUR MAXIMUM
    IN ANY YEAR WAS 1.70 INCHES ON DECEMBER 4TH 1902.

    THE AVERAGE YEAR HAD 117.8 DAYS WITH MEASURABLE PRECIP. 1989 WAS THE
    YEAR WITH THE MOST (148) WHILE 1941 SAW THE FEWEST (92). ON AVERAGE
    THERE WERE 14.7 DAYS A YEAR WITH AT LEAST AN INCH OF RAIN. 1992 HAD
    THE MOST (25) WHILE 1931 WAS THE YEAR WITH THE LEAST (6). THUNDER
    WAS REPORTED ON AN AVERAGE OF 51.2 DAYS PER YEAR. 1947 HAD THE MOST
    THUNDER DAYS (81) WHILE 1968 HAD THE FEWEST (32).

    FROM THUNDERSTORMS… HAIL WAS OFFICIALLY REPORTED 71 TIMES DURING THE
    100 YEARS. THE YEARS OF 1925… 1949 AND 1998 EACH HAD 4 EVENTS – THE
    MOST FOR ANY YEAR.

    IN THE 100 YEARS THAT JUST PASSED… A TOTAL OF 177.2 INCHES (NEARLY
    15 FEET) OF SNOW FELL ON WILMINGTON (1.8 INCHES PER YEAR). THE
    GREATEST AMOUNT OF SNOW IN ONE YEAR WAS 19.4 INCHES IN 1912. THERE
    WERE 106 DAYS WITH AT LEAST ONE-TENTH OF AN INCH OF SNOW (1.1 DAYS
    PER YEAR) – 1912 AND 1973 TIED FOR MOST WITH 5 EACH. THE YEARLY
    AVERAGE FOR MOST SNOW IN A 24-HOUR PERIOD WAS 1.3 INCHES. 11.7 INCHES
    WAS THE MOST MEASURED IN A SINGLE 24-HOUR PERIOD DURING THE 20TH
    CENTURY (FEBRUARY 9TH-10TH 1973).

    THE PORT CITY AVERAGED 64.6 PERCENT OF POSSIBLE SUNSHINE DURING THE
    1900S. THE SUNNIEST YEAR WAS 1941 WHEN 74 PERCENT OF POSSIBLE SUN WAS
    RECORDED. THE LEAST SUNNY YEAR WAS 1951 WHEN ONLY 53 PERCENT WAS
    RECEIVED. THERE WAS AN AVERAGE OF 20.2 DAYS PER YEAR WHEN DENSE FOG
    /VISIBILITY OF ONE-QUARTER MILE OR LESS/ WAS REPORTED. 1998 HAD THE
    MOST DENSE FOG DAYS (42) WHILE 1902 HAD THE FEWEST (5).

    THE WIND SPEED WAS 8.4 MPH. 1958 WAS THE BREEZIEST YEAR WITH AN
    AVERAGE OF 12.1 MPH. 1981 WAS THE CALMEST YEAR WITH AN AVERAGE OF
    5.8 MPH. THE AVERAGE ANNUAL HIGHEST SUSTAINED WIND WAS 43.9 MPH.
    HURRICANE HELENE BROUGHT THE FASTEST SUSTAINED WIND… 88 MPH ON
    SEPTEMBER 27TH 1958. 1931 AND 1992 EACH THE SLOWEST WIND FOR A YEARLY
    MAXIMUM… 28 MPH.

    FINALLY… THE AVERAGE HIGH SEA-LEVEL PRESSURE FOR ANY SINGLE YEAR WAS
    30.66 INCHES WHILE THE AVERAGE LOW PRESSURE WAS 29.27 INCHES. THE
    HIGHEST SEA-LEVEL PRESSURE OF THE CENTURY WAS 30.85 INCHES IN 1934 AND
    1991. THE LOWEST PRESSURE WHICH QUALIFIED AS THE HIGHEST OF ITS YEAR
    WAS 30.46 INCHES IN 1985. WHEN HURRICANE FLOYD STRUCK IN SEPTEMBER
    1999… THE PRESSURE PLUMMETED TO 28.33 INCHES TO SET A NEW RECORD
    LOW. THE HIGHEST YEARLY LOWEST PRESSURE WAS 29.53 INCHES IN 1939.

  43. Ahhh i was gonna say Malaysia or Singapore
    But the foliage, building density, pollution residue and hazy sky are typical of China…

  44. OT: Obama plan: Paint roofs white to save world
    Suggests light colors would reduce global warming

    WorldNetDaily

    http://www.wnd.com/index.php?pageId=99290

    Steven Chu, who directed the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and was professor of physics and molecular and cell biology at the University of California before being appointed by President Obama to be the U.S. Energy Secretary, says white paint is what’s needed to fix global warming.

    Chu, who according to the federal agency’s website, successfully applied the techniques he developed in atomic physics to molecular biology and recently led the lab in pursuit of new alternative and renewable energies, has told the London Times that by making paved surfaces and roofs lighter in color, the world would reduce carbon emissions by as much as parking all the cars in the world for 11 years.

    The DOE says Chu’s areas of expertise are in atomic physics, quantum electronics, polymer and biophysics. According to the Times, he was speaking at the St. James’ Palace Nobel Laureate Symposium, in which the Times partners for media events, when he described his simple and “completely benign” … “geo-engineering” plan.

    He said building codes should require that flat roofed-buildings have their tops painted white. Visible sloped roofs could be painted “cool” colors. And roads could be made a lighter color.

    Chu, a co-winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1997, was sworn in as energy secretary Jan. 21.

    Obama said when he appointed Chu, “The future of our economy and national security is inextricably linked to one challenge: energy… Steven has blazed new trails as a scientist, teacher, and administrator.”

    “I think with flat-type roofs you can’t even see, yes, I think you should regulate quite frankly,” Chu said in the Times report.

    And asked if governments should promote white paint as the global warming “solution,” he said, “Yes, absolutely … White roofs everywhere, yes.”

    Light surfaces reflect more of the sunlight that falls on them, hardly a surprise in warmer parts of the world where walls and roofs have been whitewashed for generations.

    Chu told the Times his dogma on the issue was prompted by Art Rosenfeld of the California Energy Commission, who prompted a change in that state that now requires all flat roofs on commercial buildings to be painted white.

    The Times report said a year ago, Rosenfeld and several colleagues estimated changing the color of roofs in 100 of the largest cities around the world would save 44 billion tons of carbon dioxide emissions.

    “Now, you smile, but [Rosenfeld has] done a calculation, made a paper on this, and if you take all the buildings and make their roofs white and if you make the pavement more of a concrete type of color rather than a black type of color, and you do this uniformly… it’s the equivalent of reducing the carbon emissions due to all the cars on the road for 11 years, you just take them off the road for 11 years,” Chu told the Times.

    “Get a bucket of paint and a brush and save the planet!” wrote a participant in the news page’s forums page.

    —————-
    How will this stop the greenhouse effect? Isn’t the UHI effect minimal? Is white paint a carbon sink?

  45. Mike D. (00:17:37) :

    Speaking of Doppler and radar: http://tinyurl.com/p9ryrb

    From The Times, May 25, 2009

    Action on wind farm radar threat to aircraft

    The body that monitors UK airspace is seeking a solution to the potentially disastrous problem of commercial and military aircraft disappearing in radar blackout zones caused by wind farms. …

    Mike D., I can believe this becomes a problem if only Primary RADAR is in use (useful for non-coopertive targets e.g. as those with their transponders turned off) –

    – but not in this day and age (again for for cooperative ‘targets’) given Secondary RADAR (aircraft equipped with transponders and the ground-based component here in the US known once upon a time as “ATCRBS” – AIr Traffic Control Radar Beason System).
    .
    .
    .

Comments are closed.