Charlotte smashes 123 year record low temperature

Charlotte.com

GREG LACOUR, The Charolotte Observer

This morning was downright cool in the Charlotte region — cool enough to break a record that had stood for more than a century.The temperature at Charlotte/Douglas International Airport was 56 at about 5:30 a.m., breaking the July 2 record of 58, set in 1885. The normal low for this time of year is 70.

It’ll warm up quickly today, though. Temperatures today are expected to peak at 90 degrees, according to the National Weather Service. But it’ll still feel pleasant because of humidity levels between 20 and 25 percent, said NWS meteorologist Doug Outlaw.

Conditions will be cool again overnight, with the low descending to 59, one degree warmer than the record for July 3, set in 1932. And the Fourth of July is expected to be warm and dry, with a high of 92 and “a very, very minimal chance” of rain, Outlaw said.

Forecasters don’t expect any rain until Saturday afternoon, when they call for a 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms.

About these ads

63 thoughts on “Charlotte smashes 123 year record low temperature

  1. I live in the mountains of western North Carolina, and it has been downright chilly with temps overnighting in the 40′s for a week or so.

    The days have been pleasant as well.

  2. We are headed back to a 1977 type winter….I have been putting in new windows and insulation. Costs on NG heating I am hearing is going up 100% here in Ky. this winter season.

    Hansen and Gore will be on trial in 2009 for fraud.

  3. Anchorage, AK also set a record low on July 1 and tied a record low on July 2. 43 degrees and 46 degrees respectively.

  4. This is off-topic, but in reading the recent hysteria over the ice melting in the Arctic, a question occurred to me.

    If there’s been significant melting of the ice, why haven’t the ocean levels showed a corresponding rise in water levels? I thought that the consequence of such melting would be the inundation of coastal cities.

    I’m still relatively new at this climatological science game, so this is a real (not sarcastic) question.

    Thanks

    Reply: Sea Ice floats on top of the Ocean and is in hydrostatic equilibrium, neither changing nor lowering the total water content of the Ocean when melting or freezing and is unrelated to sea level rise or fall. You can do the elementary experiment with a water glass filled to the rim with ice protruding above and see if water spills over the rim of the glass when the ice melts…It doesn’t.~jeez

  5. We here in Alabama have been having the same type weather. July 1st low was 53.6, July 2nd was 55.9 and today was 59.9 all below normal temps our highs were also a little below normal 1st 82.6, 2nd 86.4 and today not there yet but current at 1:30pm 87.4

    looks like the SE might be cool for July also but getting dry.

    Bill Derryberry

  6. Reply: Sea Ice floats on top of the Ocean and is in hydrostatic equilibrium, neither changing nor lowering the total water content of the Ocean when melting or freezing and is unrelated to sea level rise or fall. You can do the elementary experiment with a water glass filled to the rim with ice protruding above and see if water spills over the rim of the glass when the ice melts…It doesn’t.~jeez

    I’m glad you spelled this out, but can you cut out the “jeez”?
    Some of us, while educated, are not scientists, and have heard for YEARS that AGW was going to inundate coastal areas. Please, the sarcasm doesn’t help.

    My follow-up question: so what does cause the ocean levels to rise and fall? is it solely the melting of Antarctica and Greenland? I think that ocean levels were much higher in prehistoric times – where I live in TX was obviously at the bottom of an ocean for quite a while. I’m just not certain whether the reason that it’s dry here now is from plate uplift, or ocean levels dropping.

    We also set records in June here in SA TX for heat – but last year we set June records for cold and wet (IIRC). Thank heavens that it’s finally raining here today!

    Reply: jeez is my username, with which I end most of my inline comments in order to distinguish myself from Anthony. I believe you have misinterpreted its use. Ocean levels can be influenced by the amount of water stored away in Glaciers on land. More water locked away in Glaciers, such as a large area of Greenland, the lower the sea level. Melt the Glaciers and they flow into the sea, raise the sea level. Sea level is also influenced by the Ocean temperature, with sea level rising as the water warms, if it warms, etc.~jeez

  7. sravana: Har! Har! He IS “jeez”. That’s his handle.

    ” Har! Har!”? Dude you owe me five dollars~jeez

  8. It sounds like the cool weather (except for Texas) is pretty widespread. I live in Northeastern Indiana, and the early morning temps have been in the low to mid 50′s every day this week with daytime highs in the mid 70′s to low 80′s. Great sleeping weather and really easy on the AC bill.

  9. In a nutshell:

    Antarctica has c. 80% of the ice.

    Greenland has c. 20% of the ice.

    All the other glaciers in the world have c. 0% of the ice. (well, maybe 1%.)

    Monckton reports that the latest IPCC supplemental reduced the next 100 years’ SL rise from ice melt to a mere 6 or 7 cm. The majority of SL rise would be due to thermal expansion (assuming the oceans warm in the first place).

  10. Jeez is the moderator’s name.

    Last weekend we had dewpoints in the 50s in N TX.

    Something is taking the vater vapor out of the air!!!

  11. sravana (11:44:01) :

    “My follow-up question: so what does cause the ocean levels to rise and fall? is it solely the melting of Antarctica and Greenland? I think that ocean levels were much higher in prehistoric times – where I live in TX was obviously at the bottom of an ocean for quite a while. I’m just not certain whether the reason that it’s dry here now is from plate uplift, or ocean levels dropping.”

    In Ice Age timeframes (say 100,000 years) the major effect is ice, to the tune 300-500 feet IIRC.

    In geologic timeframes (say 1000X longer), much greater uplift occurs. In general land is built up by volcanism and sedimentation and worn down by erosion. Wherever you see sandstone and limestone, you’re looking at old sea floor that has been lifted up. The North Rim of the Grand Canyon is sedimentary rock at 8,000 feet above sea level, the South Rim is the same, but 1,000 feet lower. I’ll leave further details to the geologists here. There are many higher sea floors and even some coral beds in southwestern US mountains.

  12. This is more everyday proof that water vapor is the major greenhouse gas. Lower the water vapor and you get more radiational cooling. The CO2 mix is still the same so it has no real effect.

  13. Austin has cooled off nicely with some recent rain – we had a fairly hot and dry June. We just had a record low nightime temp at the airport. I think we also had 5 record lows in April.

    http://www.statesman.com/search/content/news/stories/local/07/03/0703roundup.html

    ***Wednesday’s low sets record***
    “Just two days after Austin left behind the hottest June on record, the city saw a summer rarity on Wednesday: a record low.
    The temperature dropped to 63 degrees just before 7 a.m. at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport, breaking the old record of 69 degrees set in 2002, Lower Colorado River Authority meteorologist Bob Rose said.
    The low was 69 degrees at Camp Mabry, which didn’t come close to the record low of 57 degrees, Rose said.
    The rest of the day saw highs in the lower 90s and nearly a half an inch of rain at the airport, he said. There was a trace of rain at Camp Mabry, Rose said.
    Austinites should expect a few isolated showers through the weekend with highs in the mid-90s, Rose said. “

  14. Sea level rise is primarily due to thermal expansion as the water warms.

    Rising sea levels are IMO opinion the most persuasive evidence of a warming climate, although with a substantial lag, perhaps 20 or 30 years.

    However, recent data shows the oceans aren’t warming and sea levels stopped rising about 2 years ago.

    BTW, measuring changes in millimeters over years when sea levels change by meters every day is a rather difficult problem and it may be that the measurements are wrong. And some locations like Singapore show no sea level rise at all.

    Finding ocean sediments on land has nothing to do with sea level rises, except when those sediments are recent and on or near the coast. In which case they indicate that current sea levels aren’t as high as they have been in recent geological times (say 1 million years), which is the case where I live.

    Why sea levels aren’t as high as they appear to have been in previous interglacials is an interesting question and could well indicate that the Antarctic and Greenland icesheets gain more ice than they lose over the glacial cycles.

  15. We tied a record low in Denver a few days ago at 47, also rebounded all the way up to 87 the same day. That dry air cools and warms quickly. Meanwhile, scary projections from some scary meteorologist, uncritically reported by the AP.

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/25501251/

  16. Melting of floating ice can cause a slight change in SL depending on fresh/salt ratio of the water. If the ice is freshwater, it is slightly less dense than salt water. It displaces it’s weight which in a freshwater lake would be of equal volume. In salt water, slightly less volume. So the level could rise a bit.

    Living 2000 meters above sea level, that is rather low on my list of things to worry about.

  17. Just an FYI,

    “Jeez” has kindly offered to help me with the daunting and never ending task of moderation. There are so many comments that it has become almost impossible for a single person to keep up with it. I do late nights and mornings, he does late mornings to early evenings.

    He is known to me in person; he, Steve Mosher; Steve McIntyre, and myself have met last year in SFO.

    I thank “jeez” for his kind assistance in keeping this blog from turning into a wild west word war, which can happen without application of some level of decorum, and occasional snips, OT offing, or rant removal.

  18. Anybody else been watching ozone maps of the US over the past two months? I have. And we are losing ozone (remember, cosmic rays eat up ozone). I wonder if that means colder cold and hotter hot. Without our blanket in the sky, it stands to reason that while we are tipped away from the Sun, the cold is colder because we can’t keep the warm in. As we tip towards the Sun, hot will be hotter because we can’t keep the hot Sun out. Scenario: We will freeze our little private parts off at night and during the winter from September to June. But once thawed out, come July through August, our crops will burn in the hot Sun.

  19. Be Jeez! us, let it happen! Anthony has created a solid respectable place. Thanks, and Jeez welcome to a quality place on the internet.

    The same hysterical human dynamics such as global warming (in years past) allowed self proclaimed godz the power to sacrifice virgins on mountain tops…

    Bless our bloody little hearts its only a tax but offers roughly the same effect.

  20. According to the icepack’s overall size, the North Pole ice pack has not returned to record size. It did, however, recover from a very low minimum which when measured from minimum to maximum, was a 10% increase compared to other min to max years going back to 1978. It also stayed colder longer so the recovery continued going up. In years past, the minimums were not quite as low and it was not cold enough, long enough, to pack on new ice to any degree that looks like a trend. This past winter season clearly was a different show than previous years.

    The South Pole just keeps getting colder.

  21. Is that 56°F before HANSEN (BN) or after HANSEN (AN). If it’s BN, then Hansen hasn’t adjusted the old record low enough, negating the new record.

    REPLY: Hansen does not adjust the by date record high/low temps for individual station held by the National Weather Service and NCDC. He’s a trendy guy, sort of like “slope on a rope”.

  22. “Rising sea levels are IMO opinion the most persuasive evidence of a warming climate, although with a substantial lag, perhaps 20 or 30 years.”

    The trouble is, Phillip E, there is no documented increase in ocean temperatures and much of the “sea level rise” has been attributed to subsidence of the land, not rising of the sea. We now have some very accurate satellites in orbit that will give us a very good picture of sea level changes … provided those measurements aren’t “adjusted” by agenda driven “scientists”.

    Ocean temperatures have been slightly cooling over the past several years. Also, do not confuse temperature at the very surface with the temperature of the water a few feet down. A change of 5mph in the trade winds makes a big difference in the surface temperature while making no difference in the temperature below. So weather impacts the surface. Climate impacts the water below. There is no warming of the oceans and there has been no warming of the atmosphere over the past 10 or 11 years. Some land surface recording stations record higher temperatures but those are influenced more by local land use changes than by climate.

  23. jeeztheadmin (11:58:21) :

    See sravana? It’s my username.

    oops

    [sravana skulks away to hide in embarrassment]

    No problem. It was a logical error on your part since you were unaware of my existence~jeez

  24. Ric Werme,

    For an even more dramatic example of geologic uplift you can’t do better than this – THE SUMMIT OF MOUNT EVEREST IS MADE OF MARINE LIMESTONE!

  25. Ric Werme (12:38:22) :
    [snip my question]
    In Ice Age timeframes (say 100,000 years) the major effect is ice, to the tune 300-500 feet IIRC.

    In geologic timeframes (say 1000X longer), much greater uplift occurs. In general land is built up by volcanism and sedimentation and worn down by erosion. Wherever you see sandstone and limestone, you’re looking at old sea floor that has been lifted up. The North Rim of the Grand Canyon is sedimentary rock at 8,000 feet above sea level, the South Rim is the same, but 1,000 feet lower. I’ll leave further details to the geologists here. There are many higher sea floors and even some coral beds in southwestern US mountains.

    Okay, then what we have here in Central/South Texas is uplift, because the limestone is just below the topsoil (and full of sea-creature fossils). The geography of Texas is pretty interesting – and south of here the coastal plain just slowly subsides until suddenly you’re in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico.

    … and yes, to everyone, I do know that ‘skulking’ is not a word – but that’s as good a definition as any to my reaction to my recent jeez revelation.

    Speaking of jeez – I’m sorry for jumping all over you, thanks for taking it so well! I mean, Jeez! oops, or I don’t. ;) I love this place. I’ve learned so much, and to think, I used to believe AlGore. mercy.

  26. Pamela Gray:”Anybody else been watching ozone maps of the US over the past two months? I have. And we are losing ozone (remember, cosmic rays eat up ozone).”

    Ozone is unstable and is constantly being created and destroyed by solar radiation. It is NOT a finite blanket that can be eaten away to be forever lost.

    From: http://www.junkscience.com/Ozone/ozone_seasonal.html:
    “The conceptual “ozone layer” is not some delicate, static and fragile wrapping about the outer atmosphere but rather a dynamic and highly volatile component, both created and destroyed by solar radiation. Ozone creation is a continuous process, so we can not “run out” of stratospheric ozone. The more ozone (O3) is destroyed, the more free oxygen radicals (O1) are available to bind with free oxygen (O2) to create ozone (O3), the same applies with free oxygen (O2). “

  27. After looking at the article I’m glad I live in Portland Oregon. Normal lows this time of the year are 55F and when the daily highs climb into the 100′s the low in the morning STILL is no higher than the low sixties.

  28. Ozone can and does become depleted in a natural cycle. I know it is not fragile. Did I say that? Did I fricken say it would be forever lost? Gawd I hate it when people assume. Makes an ass outa me and you. Okay. Very tired. Very grumpy. I will shut up.

  29. crosspatch, I should have qualified that statement. How about,

    “Rising sea levels would be IMO the most persuasive evidence of a warming climate, although with a substantial lag of perhaps 20 or 30 years, if it were occuring.”

    Up until recently, I did think sea levels were rising (and hence oceans in their totality warming) although at a relatively constant rate, but as I said above, recent better sea level and ocean temperature data indicate that sea levels aren’t rising or rising much less and oceans aren’t warming.

    I am well aware that in many places the land is sinking. In fact I regularly email news outlets that come out with rising sea levels drown Bangladeshi village or Thai temple when these are places where the land is sinking. The BBC is one of the worst for these kinds of deceptive reports.

  30. What is this nonsense about melting sea ice not raising sea levels ?

    http://nsidc.org/news/press/20050801_floatingice.html

    The superficial “science” behind every tenet of Global Warmism is truly sad

    OF course sea levels will rise as floating ice melts !!

    Hmmm….I stand corrected, but hey according to this if all sea ice in the world melted it would raise the oceans 4 cm. This is not particularly significant in the overall pogies’ ammunition set, so for all practical purposes I would now modify my earlier statement to say that melting sea ice contributes an insignificant amount to sea level rise~jeez

    PS. Anthony, I also often do a late night sweep before heading to bed.

  31. Skippy,

    Interesting link, but he was referring to freshwater ice from glaciers and not sea ice in the Arctic which is presumably mostly frozen sea. Mind you there may be an element of freshwater ice on top of the frozen sea ice? I wonder if all these parameters are adequately acconted for in the models :-)

    When sea water freezes, the salt is left behind and you end up with “freshwater” ice. The link does indeed refer to sea ice, but the effect is not particularly significant.~jeez

  32. Huh. No post about the top-5 warmest Junes in several I-95 cities, but a post about a one-day record after Charlotte had just come off of a very warm June. Interesting.

    REPLY: I’m sorry, Fred, but I didn’t see that story, if you have a link, post it.

    Your complaint reminds me of the ones I used to get at the TV station such as “how come you didn’t report that it got up to/down to xx degrees in [small town] ? And I’d ask: “Where was the temperature measured at?” and often the reply would be something like “my house” to which I’d reply “There is no weather service reporting station in your town, so how would I know to report that unless someone called in to tell me?” “Congrats, you are the first”.

    Likewise this blog relies heavily on reader tips, plus my own research. So, if you are expecting an all seeing eye, I’m sorry to disappoint. – Anthony

  33. One thing about Charlotte, NC is that it’s near the center of a rather severe drought area. The low moisture levels there will encourage low nite-time temps, especially in relatively cool Canadian air after a cold-front passes.

    W. Virginia had record early frosts in August in the blistering hot & dry summer of 1936.

  34. Purely anecdotal (and thus unscientific) from the UK – ground frosts overnight in Scotland. Dewy cars every morning in the south-east where I live caused by overnight lows of 5C or so. Interestingly, daytime highs seem about normal for Britain i.e not very, prone to rain (it IS Wimbledon week).

    Not showing up much in the Hadley CET data though….

  35. OK, not as long a record as Charlotte, but Johnson City, TN also set a record low of 55 degrees, beating the 1990 previous low of 56. Talk about anecdotal- look at the hurricanes, forest fires, flooding, or diaper rashes being caused by AGW.

  36. Back to being 15 degrees cooler here than last year. By my records heat waves (hotter than last year) are transient but cool periods (cooler than last year) are longer according to the weather station data in Enterprise. So the trend continues. We have breezy, cloudy weather today with sprinkles and showers. Usually, July 4th has always been a scorcher, since the 80′s. Ozone map shows a relatively weak layer from the midwest/Rockies to the West Coast. It’s a bit thicker going East to the East Coast. I wonder if cosmic rays, which are up a bit, are seeding water vapor here.

  37. Just spent more time at the Enterprise weather station website and have this to report:

    Record Low Temperature: year set 2008
    Record Low Wind Chill Temp: year set 2008
    Coldest Night on Record: year set 2008
    Coldest Day on Record: year set 2004

  38. Pamela Gray: “Did I fricken say it would be forever lost? Gawd I hate it when people assume. Makes an ass outa me and you. ”

    You said “And we are losing ozone (remember, cosmic rays eat up ozone). ”

    Unless cosmic rays are going to crap ozone back out, it would be safe to assume that whatever ozone you say is “eaten up” will be lost forever. Perhaps you assumed everyone would know that ozone is also constantly being created. Gawd I hate it when people assume. :)

  39. Jeez,

    Thanks for your comment, which prompted me to delve into this a bit further.

    It seems that measurements of the salt content of sea ice vary widely, depending on ice age, thickness, the salinity of the underlying sea and other factors but that, as one might expect, first year sea ice retains most brine inclusions. So the sea ice may not be exactly “freshwater ice”.

    The above comes from a preprint of the paper by Noerdlinger and Brower which Skippy linked. Interestingly Skippy’s NSIDC link was dated 24 August 2005 whereas the N &B paper was published in June 2007 and their preprint references papers from 2006. Just a typo by NSIDC I guess!

    N&B also note that their argument has not been considered in the mainstream
    science before and that it has faced “some resistance”.

    As you say the effect of their argument is not particularly significant, especially as the the majority of the 4cm rise come from the melting of Antarctic ice shelfs. Indeed, a later Aug 2007 paper by Jenkins & Holland (GRL Vol 34), which references N&B ( N& B also acknowledge J & H in their paper) estimates that the effect of total Arctic sea ice melt on sea level rises would be 2.1 – 3.1 mm!

    So aren’t we back where we started? Arctic sea ice melt will not affect sea level in any meaningful way. (But, hey, scientists can join theologians on arguing how many…. can fit on the head of a …)

  40. And I will admit to a second (brine inclusions) error. Precision is important. How important the discrepancy is to the overall picture, as noted, is separate matter.

  41. If ozone were a constant and therefor could be disregarded as an influential factor, there would be no ozonewatch web sites. It varies. Lots. Did you see 2007′s ozone hole over the Antarctic? My that was a big one. Not a record, but big anyway. Nature appears to have replaced what was lost though. It is my understanding that the old ozone didn’t come back to life, it was destroyed. New ozone was created.

    I like studying things that change. It makes me curious as to why they change. Check the ozone over the western US. Getting thin. Earlier this year, it was mostly green colored (meaning there was more ozone). Now its yellow (meaning there is less ozone). Does that not make your curious side itch to find out why? It does mine.

    Final discussion point: UV B light from the Sun creates this ozone. What if a significant decrease in UV B light from the Sun occurs? Might that change the amount of ozone being created? What if at the same time, cosmic rays hit the thinner ozone layer? It seems these two things might be a factor based on ozone measurements at the poles as well as globally. I am not saying this to prove a point. I am discussing this to open up a conversation about ozone and whether or not it is a factor in global climate.

    Lets not split the dog hair over “lost” versus “forever lost”. That detracts from the discussion. Tell me what you know about ozone and how it varies. Tell me what you think the climate influences are related to thicker or thinner ozone. Stuff like that.

    Finally, I think most people who post on this blog are aware of the basics of ozone. I like to assume that people are pretty darn smart. Otherwise we end up talking down to each other.

  42. Jeez,
    Thank you for you kind and patient reply. I have, since discovering WUWT, come to rely on this blog for straight talk on climate. I may not understand everything written here (my field is Political Science) but I am learning.

    The impetus for my query began as an innocent conversation with someone who was…shall we say…enthusiastic about anthropogenically-caused climate change. He spoke at length about the melting sea ice and the implications for coastal cities throughout the world. I posed that same question to him, essentially, if the sea ice had suffered extensive melting already, then why wasn’t NYC underwater?

    In response, he changed the subject with a rapidity that, if it had been a tennis match, I certainly would have dislocated my entire cervical vertibrae.

    Thank you again, and to Mr. Watts as well, for this wonderfully informative…and fair and balanced…resource.

    Sincerely,
    Ralph Couey

  43. It is easy to get confused as so many people who know nothing of what they speak spout so many opinions and conflate unrelated issues.

    Whatever side you are on here is the perspective on ice.

    Sea ice is argued as an indicator of climate change, not sea level issues.

    Glacial ice, either in Antarctica or Greenland can have a large affect on sea levels.

    Ocean temperatures can have a smaller, but measureable affect on sea levels.

  44. well it all true , but how can we teach people so that they understand and be aware of their own actions toward terrable climate changes ,so they collectively consciousely and actively do something about keeping our eco system clean and safe for our own sake.

  45. Gotta chime in and concur. It is abnormally cool here in Arkansas. It has been in the lower 60′s at night (with a few exceptions of nights leading up to rain storms). I agree about the low humidity, too. It’s been very pleasant 90′s during the day, due to low humidity. You can stand in the shade and get instant relief; the air feels cool when it blows against your sweat. Trust me, folks, this is absolutely abnormal for this time of year.

    Here’s a telltale sign: I’ve been turning off my AC at night and opening the windows. It’s cooler outside than inside, even if I run the AC nonstop. Standing in front of a window, it feels as cool (or cooler) as the air coming from the AC vent. (Very scientific of me, isn’t it? 62 degree air is quite cool. I be smart. I orta git me one of them there college educations like folks are always talking about.) I got chilly several times last night (July 15) with only two windows open in the entire house! Both windows in my bedroom were closed! This is Summer in the South? I’d best cut a little more wood to lay up for the coming winter…

  46. GREG,
    FYI – This month, July 2008 had the coolest average low temperature for Corpus Christi, Texas. One morning it was 71 degrees, unheard of for July. The Gulf has been relatively cool as well…Milankovitch cycle?

Comments are closed.