Climate change was bad for Neanderthal children in the Pleistocene! And so was the lead-poisoning!

Guest commentary by David Middleton   In addition to an email from Rush Holt encouraging me to vote in the midterm elections (I already voted against every Democrat on the ballot), The American Association for the Advancement of Science in America clued me into this fascinating article: Neanderthal children shivered and suffered in ancient Europe By…

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Paper: 'Summer temperatures were about 10°C warmer than today, even though the concentration of atmospheric CO2 was similar'

From AAAS: From Russia with Lovely Data Climate and the atmospheric concentration of CO2 are closely linked. Brigham-Grette et al. (p. 1421, published online 9 May) present data from Lake El’gygytgyn, in northeast Arctic Russia, that shows how climate varied between 3.6 and 2.2 million years ago, an important interval in the global cooling trend…

Multiple, Intense, Abrupt Late Pleistocene Warming And Cooling: Implications For Understanding The Cause Of Global Climate Change

Guest essay by Dr. Don J. Easterbrook Dept. of Geology, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA The results of oxygen isotope measurements from ice cores in the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets several decades ago stunned the scientific world. Among the surprises from the cores was the recognition of multiple, late Pleistocene, extraordinarily abrupt, intense periods…

On certainty: Truth is the Daughter of Time

This comment from Dr. Robert Brown at Duke University is elevated from a comment to a full post for further discussion. Since we have a new paper (Shepherd et al) that is being touted in the media as “certain” using noisy data with no stable baseline, this discussion seems relevant. rgbatduke says: December 2, 2012…

Onset of the Next Glaciation

Guest post by David Archibald Baby boomers like me have enjoyed the most benign period in human history. The superpower nuclear standoff gave us fifty years of relative peace, we had cheap energy from inherent over-supply of oil, grain supply increased faster than population growth and the climate warmed due to the highest solar activity…