California’s ‘permanent drought’ now officially over after 376 straight weeks

The wet winter has washed away dryness for the first time since December 2011

LOS ANGELES (AP) — California is free of drought for the first time in more than seven years and only a small amount of its territory remains abnormally dry as a very wet winter winds down, experts said Thursday.

California is drought-free for the first time since Dec. 20, 2011, said the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, which jointly produces the monitor with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

“The state had experienced some form of drought for 376 consecutive weeks,” the center tweeted.

The state came close to being drought-free in soggy 2017 when it was whittled down to less than 9 percent of the state and then-Gov. Jerry Brown lifted an emergency declaration intended to conserve water.

Full story here

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48 thoughts on “California’s ‘permanent drought’ now officially over after 376 straight weeks

    • I just spent a week in Death Valley riding dirt bikes. No fear of death from heat. We were heavy jackets all week.lots of pretty snow on all the SoCal mountains.

  1. What typically comes after a good rainy season in CA is a slew of mud slides. So prepare for videos of houses sliding down hills and roads covered in debris, along with “climate disaster” headlines.

    • And then will come the wildfires once the spurt of annual vegetation resulting from increased soil moisture dries out and dies and that too will be claimed to be due to human activity.

      • rah…at 8:21 am
        And then will come the wildfires once the spurt of annual vegetation resulting from increased soil moisture dries out and dies and that too will be claimed to be due to human activity.

        and they will be right, it’s called forest mismanagement.

    • Define “on record”. There are megadroughts in tree ring records, which are much more reliable for this than for temperature. Otherwise the human records in Kalifornia date back to about 1850.

    • Yep, they ended the drought by raising California taxes on gasoline, thereby reducing global atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. This fixed climate change in California. Remarkable stuff from our great leaders.

      What do you think Griff?

  2. So basically, whatever climate scientists predict is going to happen is the opposite of what actually happens.

    • No… Anything can happen, the climate scientists have predicted it. They just need to massage any new data to make it compatible with whatever the favored climate model(s) says will happen.

    • icisil, usually they wait for something to happen and then predict that’s the new normal. After a mild snow-free winter, “snow will be a thing of the past”. When a couple of heavy snows showed that to be nonsense every thinking person knew it to be, suddenly “global warming means more moisture so therefore more snow”. After a year of low sea ice in the arctic, “the artic will be ice free by as early as 2014”, etc. When you can make any claim without having to consider how it contradicts previous claims, you have modern climate science alarmism.

    • Unless it can be used to support the climate alarmist narrative, in which case any “extreme” weather event that comes along is “proof” of climate change.

  3. Save that water and do not waste it, grow all that food, and Victor Hanson’s almond orchard.

    • Half of California’s water is used to keep scenic rivers scenic and ensure the dozen or so Delta smelt continue to exist as an irrelevant run. The other half we get to use for growing food, drinking, bathing, etc.

  4. And of course the greens will emphasize conservation, and block any new dam construction, because that is just what they do.

    • Its ok, all the people going to see it will wipe out the super bloom, don’tchya know! Actually saw an LAT article crying about how people going out to see the flowers was destroying them. Just can’t make some people happy.

  5. When you live in a desert, drought is a feature, not a bug.
    How do you raise a public stupid enough to vote for politicians that tell you to not believe your lying eyes?

    • Never ceases to amaze me that people in Cali claim that yellow patch down in the southwest corner is in drought. The Spanish who settled there called everything a couple miles from the coast desert, the chaparral. Known for long, dry summers and short damp winters, having a long history of, wait for it, wait,,,,,,wildfires. Written history, apparently one other thing the enlightened do have a use for.

      • Yes, and we’ve just had an above-average winter rainfall in the OC – how can we still be “abnormally dry”? (And what is normal?)

    • Question from Russ R. above: “How do you raise a public stupid enough to …{insert unimaginable stupid action of choice here}?”

      Answer: By allowing the government to control primary, secondary and post-secondary education.

      The country is finished if this is allowed to continue, IMHO.

  6. Once the snow melt comes on in the lower lats the mudslides will commence and the greentards will screech&wail about humans destroying the environment. Oh, they never stopped spewing. Never mind.

  7. “And it never failed that during the dry years the people forgot about the rich years, and during the wet years they lost all memory of the dry years. It was always that way.”

    John Steinbeck, East of Eden

    • That is how humans are. Falls in with the “it could never happen here” mantra, and when you point out “it” has happened “here” you are derided as an evil doomsayer.

  8. From John Steinbeck in East of Eden

    “And it never failed that during the dry years the people forgot about the rich years, and during the wet years they lost all memory of the dry years. It was always that way.”

    • This one also applies here:

      SAID HANRAHAN by John O’Brien

      “We’ll all be rooned,” said Hanrahan,
      In accents most forlorn,
      Outside the church, ere Mass began,
      One frosty Sunday morn.

      The congregation stood about,
      Coat-collars to the ears,
      And talked of stock, and crops, and drought,
      As it had done for years.

      “It’s looking crook,” said Daniel Croke;
      “Bedad, it’s cruke, me lad,
      For never since the banks went broke
      Has seasons been so bad.”

      “It’s dry, all right,” said young O’Neil,
      With which astute remark
      He squatted down upon his heel
      And chewed a piece of bark.

      And so around the chorus ran
      “It’s keepin’ dry, no doubt.”
      “We’ll all be rooned,” said Hanrahan,
      “Before the year is out.”

      “The crops are done; ye’ll have your work
      To save one bag of grain;
      From here way out to Back-o’-Bourke
      They’re singin’ out for rain.

      “They’re singin’ out for rain,” he said,
      “And all the tanks are dry.”
      The congregation scratched its head,
      And gazed around the sky.

      “There won’t be grass, in any case,
      Enough to feed an ass;
      There’s not a blade on Casey’s place
      As I came down to Mass.”

      “If rain don’t come this month,” said Dan,
      And cleared his throat to speak –
      “We’ll all be rooned,” said Hanrahan,
      “If rain don’t come this week.”

      A heavy silence seemed to steal
      On all at this remark;
      And each man squatted on his heel,
      And chewed a piece of bark.

      “We want an inch of rain, we do,”
      O’Neil observed at last;
      But Croke “maintained” we wanted two
      To put the danger past.

      “If we don’t get three inches, man,
      Or four to break this drought,
      We’ll all be rooned,” said Hanrahan,
      “Before the year is out.”

      In God’s good time down came the rain;
      And all the afternoon
      On iron roof and window-pane
      It drummed a homely tune.

      And through the night it pattered still,
      And lightsome, gladsome elves
      On dripping spout and window-sill
      Kept talking to themselves.

      It pelted, pelted all day long,
      A-singing at its work,
      Till every heart took up the song
      Way out to Back-o’-Bourke.

      And every creek a banker ran,
      And dams filled overtop;
      “We’ll all be rooned,” said Hanrahan,
      “If this rain doesn’t stop.”

      And stop it did, in God’s good time;
      And spring came in to fold
      A mantle o’er the hills sublime
      Of green and pink and gold.

      And days went by on dancing feet,
      With harvest-hopes immense,
      And laughing eyes beheld the wheat
      Nid-nodding o’er the fence.

      And, oh, the smiles on every face,
      As happy lad and lass
      Through grass knee-deep on Casey’s place
      Went riding down to Mass.

      While round the church in clothes genteel
      Discoursed the men of mark,
      And each man squatted on his heel,
      And chewed his piece of bark.

      “There’ll be bush-fires for sure, me man,
      There will, without a doubt;
      We’ll all be rooned,” said Hanrahan,
      “Before the year is out.”

      Around the Boree Log and Other Verses, 1921

      • Once when I was in high school in North Dakota, back in the 60’s, we were in about the 3rd year of a drought. I remarked to a farmer that it, “must be kinda tough being a farmer these days”. He replied, “it’s not too bad once you get seven years of crops in the bin.” His remark sent me on a quest to get seven years of income earnings in the bank/market. Things weren’t too bad after that.

  9. It was essentially all but one over in 2017.
    The state was saturated and auqifirs fully recharged.
    Officials clinged to the drought narrative in hopes of it all reversing back to the drama they like to pump.
    But now we have another whopper year of wet and it washed away their tall tale.
    Santa Barbara county is one of the more impressive recoveries.

    https://www.countyofsb.org/pwd/cachumacamera.sbc

  10. Waiting for griff to appear to claim “there’s an ongoing drought,” “California’s climate IS now one of drought,” and that 3×7=20.

    • And he’ll tell you that an experimental hydrogen gas plant that hasn’t even finished being built let alone turned on is somehow operational and part of the grid.

  11. Please note that, now, if any small part of CA is ‘in drought,’ then the entire state is ‘in drought.’ That cannot be conflated with the state having a period of sustained, serious drought.

  12. This morning on NPR, they were waxing idiotic about how climate change being responsible for the terrible forest fires was also responsible for (get this) the slow re-growth of trees after said fires. I, being a glutton for punishment listened for more idiocies, but I then noticed a distinct burning sensation, and soon realized it was The Stupid, so had to shut it off. Yikes.

  13. The drought measures are based on percentiles. “Exceptional Drought” is the driest 2 percentiles. In other words, any place should be in Exceptional Drought about 1 week per year on average, or 10 weeks per decade. Or, you can think of it as 2% of the map should be colored dark brown on a typical week. (Note: that’s 2% for short term and another 2% for long term.) That seems like a rather loose definition of “exceptional” to me, but it gets worse.

    “Extreme Drought” is the next 3%. Severe Drought is the next 5%. Moderate Drought is the next 10%. Abnormally dry is the next 10%.

    Thus 30% of the map should be colored for short term drought and 30% should be colored for long term drought. If you double count the places labeled as both short and long term (“SL”), the total colored area will, on average, be 60% of the entire map.

    On average!

  14. So how do they figure drought free? We have had more rain than I can remember in San Diego this year. Try to hike trails and you sink in the mud. Why would we still be considered dry down here? Are we making you for every shortfall in the last 30 years or something?

    • I agree. I also live in San Diego and we are not “abnormally dry”. I have no idea how this measurement is made.

    • margue2: Why would we still be considered dry down here? Are we making you for every shortfall in the last 30 years or something?

      Basically, yes.

      From the linked full article:

      The conditions in the far south are because of very dry prior years, the monitor said, noting reservoirs in San Diego County are at only 65 percent of capacity. Abnormal dryness describes an area either entering drought or emerging from it, but below the four tiers of drought.

      Jim Whelan: I agree. I also live in San Diego and we are not “abnormally dry”. I have no idea how this measurement is made

      see above quote. Essentially it’s the result of years of drought leaving the reservoirs low.

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