Super Typhoon Haima – headed for the Philipines

From the NASA/GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT CENTER

NASA analyzes Typhoon Haima in visible and infrared light

This infrared image of Super Typhoon Haima was taken on Oct. 18 at 12:40 p.m. EDT (1640 UTC) and showed that the coldest temperature around the eyewall was around 220 Kelvin (-63F/-53C) indicating very powerful thunderstorms with the capability to generate very heavy rainfall. CREDIT Credits: UW-Madison/SSEC, William Straka III
This infrared image of Super Typhoon Haima was taken on Oct. 18 at 12:40 p.m. EDT (1640 UTC) and showed that the coldest temperature around the eyewall was around 220 Kelvin (-63F/-53C) indicating very powerful thunderstorms with the capability to generate very heavy rainfall.
CREDIT Credits: UW-Madison/SSEC, William Straka III

NASA satellite data provided a look at Super Typhoon Haima in visible and infrared light to show the extent and strength of the storm.

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite provided an infrared image of Haima on Oct. 18 and a visible image on Oct. 19.

An infrared image of Super Typhoon Haima was taken on Oct. 18 at 12:40 p.m. EDT (1640 UTC) and showed that the coldest temperature around the eyewall was around 220 Kelvin (minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit / minus 53 degrees Celsius) indicating very powerful thunderstorms with the capability to generate very heavy rainfall.

A visible image of Haima was taken on Oct. 19 at 1:35 a.m. EDT (05:35 UTC). The VIIRS image showed that the Super Typhoon’s cloud-filled eye was clearly visible. The eye was surrounded by thick bands of powerful thunderstorms.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted “Microwave imagery continues to show concentric eyewalls and an apparent eyewall replacement cycle. The eyewall replacement as well as interaction with land has contributed to the recent weakening trend.”

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) Haima had weakened to typhoon status as maximum sustained winds were near 138 mph (120 knots/222 kph) making it a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale. Typhoon-force winds extended 60 miles from the center, while tropical storm force winds extended out 205 miles from the eye.

It was located about 206 nautical miles northeast of Manila, Philippines near 17.3 degrees north latitude and 123.2 degrees east longitude. Haima was moving to the west-northwest at 18.4 mph (16 knots/29.6 kph).

This visible image of Haima was taken on Oct. 19 at 1:35 a.m. EDT (05:35 UTC) from the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite. The Super Typhoon's cloud-filled eye was clearly visible and surrounded by thick bands of powerful thunderstorms. Credits: NOAA/NASA's MODIS Rapid Response Team
This visible image of Haima was taken on Oct. 19 at 1:35 a.m. EDT (05:35 UTC) from the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite. The Super Typhoon’s cloud-filled eye was clearly visible and surrounded by thick bands of powerful thunderstorms. Credits: NOAA/NASA’s MODIS Rapid Response Team

On Oct. 19 there are many warnings in the Philippines. They include: Public storm warning signal #5 in the Luzon provinces of Cagayan, Isabela, Kalinga, Apayao, Northern Abra and Ilocos Norte; Public storm warning signal #4 in the Luzon provinces of Rest of Abra, Ilocos Sur, Mt. Province, Ifugao and Calayan Group of Islands; Public storm warning signal #3 in the Luzon provinces of La Union, Benguet, Nueva Vizcaya, Quirino and Northern Aurora; Public storm warning signal #2 in the Luzon provinces of Batanes group of islands, Pangasinan, rest of Aurora, Tarlac, Nueva Ecija, Northern Zambales, and Northern Quezon including Polillo Islands; and Public storm warning signal #1 in the Luzon provinces of rest of Zambales, Bulacan, Bataan, Pampanga, Rizal, rest of Quezon, Cavite, Laguna, Batangas, Camarines Norte, Camarines Sur, Catanduanes, Albay and Metro Manila.

Haima is weakening on approach to Luzon. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecast expects Haima to move across the northern part of Luzon and emerge into the South China Sea where it is expected to make a second landfall in mainland China, east of Hong Kong.

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RWturner
October 19, 2016 1:50 pm

The Navy and Red Cross aren’t going to be there to help afterwards, right? Afterall, it’s what the Filipinos want.

ShrNfr
Reply to  RWturner
October 19, 2016 2:27 pm

Can we send them Hillary if they promise to keep her??

MarkW
Reply to  ShrNfr
October 20, 2016 9:49 am

I’ll chip in for shipping. How much do you think UPS would charge?

Logos_wrench
October 19, 2016 1:51 pm

The fault of humans no doubt. I think I saw a label near the eye that said Made in USA.

October 19, 2016 1:59 pm

I wonder how the Chinese media is treating the possible threat.

Curious George
October 19, 2016 2:02 pm

Good luck to Philipines. Is this typhoon expected to hit Seattle later?

ToddF
Reply to  Curious George
October 19, 2016 6:24 pm

The models I’ve seen show it turning around and heading back that way. Don’t know if it’s enough to make a medium.com journalist wet his onsies or not, though.

rocketscientist
October 19, 2016 2:25 pm

With any luck it will inundate the newly made “islands” the Chinese have been constructing just west of the Philippines. And to get a extra media mileage out of this the islands’ demise will be attributed to sea level rise.

October 19, 2016 2:48 pm

indicating very powerful thunderstorms with the capability to generate very heavy rainfall.

The eye was surrounded by thick bands of powerful thunderstorms.

Not to split hairs, but tropical cyclone ‘thunderstorms’ are not really thunderstorms at all. It *is* deep, sustained convection, but since the whole atmosphere is being lifted (thus the low surface pressure), there are few updraft/downdraft couplets to create the shear to cause the turbulence to cause the ice crystal friction, to build up a static charge, to cause a lightning discharge…to cause thunder. There is very little lighting in the core of mature, steady-state or weakening tropical cyclones.
This was seen with Hurricane Matthew over the Caribbean Sea while at CAT 4. There was alot of lightning in the persistent convection to the east of the storm but little if any in/around the core of Matthew. Same can be seen w/ Typhoon Haima.
http://www.lightningmaps.org/?lang=en#m=sat;r=0;t=3;s=0;o=0;b=;n=0;y=4.8251;x=-229.457;z=4;d=9;dl=9;dc=1;
So, please don’t call deep convection thunderstorms unless there is actually thunder with the storms…ya’ know?

Greg
Reply to  JKrob
October 19, 2016 10:24 pm

Thanks. Very good point.
It seems that term thunderstorms is just being used for dramatic effect, in a totally inaccurate way.
Rather like NASA’s coverage of climate issues really.

October 19, 2016 2:53 pm

Glad to hear it is weakening…

brians356
October 19, 2016 3:30 pm

Wait, we had a “Super Typhoon” last year, didn’t we? Since this will undoubtedly be “historic” it must be a “Super Duper Typhoon”.

Gary Kerkin
October 19, 2016 3:33 pm

The language is getting tiresome, isn’t it? Now we have to label it “super”. What was the diameter of the eye? Were the wind speeds mentioned in the media (in New Zealand, at least) of around 300 km/h measured or estimated?
In my opinion the media reporting these events is always remiss because they never make the effort to go back in history and compare with storms of the past. Between December 1974 and February 1975 two cyclones hit northern Australia, one with severe consequences, the other of importance to me because it affected my family. The first was, of course, Cyclone Tracey which flattened Darwin on Christmas Eve. If you consult the BOM (Aus) records you will find Tracey was a category 2 storm when it hit Darwin. Cyclone Trixie passed over Dampier, where we were living temporarily, on 21 February 1975. From the same source, the centre was 35 km off Dampier, it was at Category 5 when it passed, it was traveling at about 15 km/h. The BOM records do not carry much in the way of wind speeds, because there was no “official” anemometers anywhere near, but Karratha airport reported a speed of 155mph and Trixie crossed the coast at Hamersley Station where an anemometer was broken at 165mph. Dampier was a in the eye of the storm for 40 minutes as it passed over. My calculations indicate that the eye was about 71km diameter. Karratha airport was outside the eye.
Because of this experience (which I have no desire to repeat!) I do not trust the hyperbolic language of the media when reporting such events, and I take a jaundiced view of “official” reports and descriptions.

Reply to  Gary Kerkin
October 19, 2016 3:40 pm

From the most recent reports, it is a Cat 4. Hardly merits ‘super’, let alone super duper. But then Matthew was supposedly a Cat 4 over the Bahamas wirh measured Cat 1 winds. Cyclone grade inflation.
Like Lake Woebegon, where all the children (and cyclones) are above average. H/t Gerrison Kyellor and The Praire Home Companion.

hunter
October 19, 2016 3:36 pm

Others have pointed out that this not “super”. It is a typical strong storm.
Drop the hype please.

October 19, 2016 4:10 pm

Aw, common guys – your smarter than this (one would hope). The term ‘Super Typhoon’ is an official designation for western pacific storms…

“Super-typhoon” is a term utilized by the U.S. Joint Typhoon Warning Center for typhoons that reach maximum sustained 1-minute surface winds of at least 65 m/s (130 kt, 150 mph). This is the equivalent of a strong Saffir-Simpson category 4 or category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic basin or a category 5 severe tropical cyclone in the Australian basin.

http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/tcfaq/A3.html
it’s not ‘hype’, it’s not ‘media’, it’s fact.
Google (or your favorite search engine) is your friend

Reply to  JKrob
October 19, 2016 4:21 pm

There are quite a few different scales for rating the strength of tropical cyclones around the world. This is the most comprehensive list I have seen:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tropical_cyclone_scales

TA
October 19, 2016 4:16 pm

“Super” is overblown hype. It’s no wonder some people are confused about climate issues.

clipe
October 19, 2016 4:30 pm

Am I the first to notice?
Philipines Philippines
Took me a while to remember it’s one L and three Ps even after visiting there. MNL/CEB.

MarkW
Reply to  clipe
October 20, 2016 9:52 am

I’m pretty sure that correcting spelling counts as a micro-aggression.

Ric Haldane
October 19, 2016 5:23 pm

There is a wind farm of the northwest most corner of Luzon. (Bangui, Llocos Norte). As I recall, most or all were made by Vestas (V82). There should be 15 to 20 or so. Any bets on how they hold up?

Carla
October 19, 2016 8:05 pm

Just checked out the typhoon Haima over on Earth Wind Map.
And I noticed the extent and size of the cold front over all of the eastern half of the Northern Hemisphere. From 70E to 132E along 43N wow
https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/surface/level/overlay=temp/orthographic=72.84,38.53,472/loc=98.990,29.619
Then compared it to the Western Hemisphere extent. Nothing compared the Eastern Hemisphere
https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/surface/level/overlay=temp/orthographic=-78.53,17.70,472/loc=-69.428,52.987

Reply to  Carla
October 20, 2016 4:47 pm

Last year right around this time, temps in eastern Siberia which had been experiencing above average temps took a sharp plunge that lasted for 3 to 4 months months with lows up to 30 degrees F lower than average. The cold then spread west across most of Russia and eastward into Alaska and Canada. I wonder if that is about to happen again? I made some comments about the change at the time as it was a large area of the upper NH impacted by the cold wave. I also wonder if the reason for the difference which you are pointing out between the west/warm and east/cold is that the El Nino has kept the west side from joining in with a similar October below average pattern. Will No America experience a similar cold outbreak when the effects from this last El Nino drain away, and the negative ENSO increases?

October 20, 2016 12:01 am

I very much hope it heads to Indonesia. They seem to deserve it thoroughly.
http://controversialtimes.com/law-enforcement/muslim-woman-caned-23-times-for-standing-too-close-to-her-boyfriend/
No storm would be enough.

WBrowning
October 20, 2016 2:21 am

What about the imbedded Sharknadoes?

Khwarizmi
October 20, 2016 5:20 am
Dan Hawkins
Reply to  Khwarizmi
October 20, 2016 7:50 am

Wow, what an image. Thank you for that link.

October 20, 2016 4:52 pm

The top wind is still at 110 mph. They are getting hit hard with this …https://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/isobaric/850hPa/orthographic=-238.53,20.62,819/loc=117.556,21.589

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