Fixing the Firefox 7 and 8 missing http://

Earlier today I got zapped by what I considered a “bug” in Firefox 7 (and now today, 8) when I copy and pasted a URL to Bob Tisdale’s blog into a short post this morning. Thanks to a new “feature”, the http:// no longer displays in the address bar in Firefox7:

While the feature is supposed to add the http:// back when copy/paste work is done, it doesn’t always work, hence I made a link in a blog post today without the http:// which prompted a slew of “dead link” complaints.

This “feature” is annoying, and I set out to find a way to solve it. I found it, and thought I would report on it for the benefit of readers and whoever might happen upon this blog via search. Here’s the fix:

  1. Type about:config in Location (address) bar, press Enter
  2. Filter for browser.urlbar.trimURLs (or scroll until you find it)
  3. Right-click or double-left-click on that phrase and toggle it to false

The http:// should then show up again, as seen below:

Now maybe readers can help me with a vexing problem in Windows 7.

I use the new search feature a lot in Windows Explorer. Problem is the search engine takes off and starts a search often before I can complete a finished phrase or word set. This prevents any new input until the initial search completes. Or if I make a mistake in typing, same problem. Ditto when searching for emails in Windows Live Mail.

Does anyone know of a way to make the Windows 7 search feature only start after pressing Enter? Or maybe add a bit more delay before the search engine starts on is own?

I’ve searched for weeks for a fix, to no avail.

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74 thoughts on “Fixing the Firefox 7 and 8 missing http://

  1. Disable Search Suggestion Popups. As you type in the Search Box, Windows 7 makes suggestions based on past queries by pulling past queries from the Registry. You can disable this in the Local Group Policy by enabling User Configuration | Administrative Templates | Windows Components | Windows Explorer | Turn Off Display Of Recent Search Entries In the Windows Explorer.
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/2009.10.77windows.aspx?sid=5cbb6c33dee24e04beee633c420481a2

  2. Faster computer? Kiddding. I don’t know where to turn of the search-ahead feature, but as a workaround, you might try typing your search term in Notepad and then copying it into the search box. A bit of a hassle, but you shouldn’t have to wait as you describe.

  3. I usually type my search request in notepad first then copy/paste into windows explorer. A hassle but avoids the problem you mention.

  4. I’ll second the recommendation for voidtools – their program Everything Search is terrific. But, while it’s great at filename search, it’s slow at sorting on the other attributes for a long list so trim the list down by using partial names.
    You may want to try excluding certain directories or drives from the search ( and it won’t index a network drive or FAT32, only NTFS ). It’s not perfect but I don’t know how I got along without it as I have about 1.5 million files spread across 7 disks and a buttload of partitions.
    I’ve had to mount some of them as NTFS paths otherwise I would be out of drive letters.

  5. I think this behaviour might depend on the version of Internet Explorer. In IE9 I think the option you might be looking for is in “manage Add-ons”; Internet Options, Programs tab, Manage Add-ons, select Search Providers type… once you have selected a search provider (say Bing or Google or whatever is in the list) there is an option called search suggestions which you can enable or disable down near the bottom.
    Hope this helps.

    REPLY:
    No, this is HD search, not net search, but thanks – A

  6. Anthony and others on System 7,
    First, thanks for the Firefox info. I updated it and also experienced these problems. Fixed, thanks to yourself!
    On searching in System 7, which I have been on since late March, I was immediately struck by the apparent “dumbing down” of the search functionality available in Windows Explorer in the upper, right-hand corner. GONE was the power to search for just file names! Whatever you type in there is grist for the searching of the innards of every file in however many subfolders lie beneath the nexus of your search! It searches inside every file which lies below the folder you choose, 3 days ago taking 6 hours on an i7 quad-core 940XM extreme running on a 256GB SSD to search about 90GB of data, yielding over 300 files!!!!! And all I wanted were the files that had a 5 character string in their names!!!!
    Today I was rewarded by a contract IT employee with what appears to be a satisfactory solution so far.
    http://www.ultrafilesearch.com/
    I found the file I was looking for in 5.56 seconds. This may or may not be the answer to each user’s specific gripes with file management on System 7, but it does install in Windows Explorer at the folder right click level such that you can do some more sophisticated searching than with the native XP search function.
    Just sayin…..

  7. Not sure what is going on there. I just did another search, just for fun, and it took 1.2 seconds, methinks something is messing with your install.

  8. The only thing I have been able to find that might help is to disable ‘Find partial matches’, then use the * symbol as a wildcard if needed, like the good old DOS days.
    To disable ‘Find partial matches’, while in Explorer, press the alt key to show the menu, then select Tools | Folder options, then the Search tab, and in the How to search section, uncheck Find partial matches.

  9. I second the “Everything” search tool recommendation by 2kevin. This free program is MUCH faster and more flexible than your current choice.
    Make sure to disable the startup and systray options since they do not add any utility but do use a minor amount of system resources. A good pass thru the other “options” will help to get it working the way you would like as well.
    Here is a review of the program and some comparisons of alternatives in the comments:
    http://www.techsupportalert.com/free-fast-file-search.htm

    REPLY:
    Thanks but no, this doesn’t solve the problem in searching emails. – Anthony

  10. From what I Have learned, this may be the default for the Windows default search engine. I am not even sure if it is doing a multiple keyword search or a boolean string search. What I do know is that there is no way within System 7 utilities or settings to affect much of this. Unfortunately, from the research since March, the best things I have found to date, assuming searching emails is a top priority, is Google Desktop Extreme add-in, which might fit the bill. It is of the indexing, not file allocation table et al, paradigm, but you do have some control over what it indexes. And it is Google, after all. Just sayin.
    Grep32, of UNIX derivation, if I remember correctly, can also access certain email variants. But it is also an internal string search engine. Useless for strings in file names elsewhere on disks.

  11. William McClenney says:
    November 8, 2011 at 11:39 pm
    Hmm, McAfee certainly does not like that link William!
    “Whoa!
    Are you sure you want to go there?
    http://www.ultrafilesearch.com/ may be risky to visit.
    Why were you redirected to this page?
    When we visited this site, we found it exhibited one or more risky behaviors.”
    Not saying they are correct but ………

  12. Odd.
    I use the search al lot, mainly for file names (by adding the “file:” prefix). There are plenty of other filter types, but that is most useful. More importantly, even if the serach has started, it restarts if I add more letters.
    I do find that it sometimes just fails, especially for files in the same directory. I may be using it wrong, but if I have files with “CU’ in the name in a folder, and type in file:CU it should get them, but it fails.
    I have Windows 7 Pro 64 bit, and I rarely update (could be the reason). I have an i7 quad processor, that may help. I also do not index the files, but I have no idea if that makes any difference.

  13. I use the Powerdesk file manager, which comes with an excellent file finder (and is an excellent file manager). Don’t know whether there’s a Windows 7 version (due to my trusty old XP install still working), but it’s very likely.

  14. Anthony
    In my windows 7 version of explorer I have google ( I think it was the default) as an innocous one line bar just below the main dialog bar. On the left is the google button that will take you to the search page if you press it, and to its right is the ‘always on’ box where if you type anything in, it will immediately start to find the reference. If you carry on typing, the information in it will automatically change letting you finish the full reference. If you highlight a sentence it will also display in the ‘always on’ box which I also find useful.
    They are both useful features and I can’t say I use or was even aware of any special search feature in Windows 7 or Explorer itself.
    tonyb

  15. Registry accesses may give a hint where to modify parameters directly. RegMon helped me a lot to find keys where programs store internal parameters which were not directly accessable from the user interface. In W2000 (I know…) for example ‘HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Full-Text-System’ (don’t know what it means) has some search parameters where I would try to change the key ‘When to Search Delay’ to a very big number…

  16. 2kevin says:
    November 8, 2011 at 10:43 pm
    I gave up on any search function within a windows operating system long ago. My search of choice is to install this http://www.voidtools.com/
    Thanks 2kevin! “Everything” search is an amazing software! Could hardly believe the seach speed.

  17. You can type “filename:” (without the quotes) followed by your search term to search the names of files. Slowish, but it works. Is that useful?

  18. WExplorer search tool: Just ignore the search results you get while your are typing your keyword. When you add new characters, the search restarts. It isn’t a problem, just different. The advantage is you might find what you are looking for without having to type the whole keyword.

  19. @Anthony
    “I use the new search feature a lot in Windows Explorer. Problem is the search engine takes off and starts a search often before I can complete a finished phrase or word set. This prevents any new input until the initial search completes. Or if I make a mistake in typing, same problem. Ditto when searching for emails in Windows Live Mail.”
    Interesting. You’re not getting good advice probably because you have a problem that others can’t duplicate so they don’t understand what you want.
    I can continue modifying the search term after the search begins. The priority is low so it can get a bit slow in accepting new keystrokes if there are a lot of higher proirity tasks at that instant competing for and winning the bids for a CPU timeslice but it definitely does not wait for a search to complete before changing the contents of the search term window.
    I’d guess you’ve got something going on that is blocking normal preemption due to very high priority. Device drivers are the usual culprits and in this case I’d suspect the mass storage device driver. Do you have anything that is out of ordinary in way of the mass storage that is being searched? Perhaps something you added onto the system yourself?
    REPLY: The behavior is common to all Windows 7 machines I have, with differing hardware. I have thousands of files on my machines, so search takes a long time. On a virgin machine, it acts as you describe. – Anthony

  20. I thought this problem was down to an annoying glitch on my new desk top. Thanks for the heads up Anthony. I’ll get my other half onto the problem because when it comes to PCs I’m lost if it doesn’t switch on..

  21. Thanks for a very useful fix – I hated the truncated URL’s in Firefox – they don’t look like URL’s at a glance, never mind the problem pasting them.
    I reckon that there are layers of software such as operating systems and browsers (to name but two) that have matured as far as they usefully can – further change is pointless and often counter-productive.

  22. I am surprised nobody has suggested Google Desktop
    http://desktop.google.com/en/?ignua=1
    If you want to search, just hit ‘Control’ twice and then fill in the popup search box, then choose whether you want to search your machine or the web it does both and a lot faster than Windows. It takes a while to index your files but after that just keeps itself up-to-date in the background.

  23. I don’t use Windows explorer to search. Instead, I press the start button and start typing in the box that says “search programs and files”. Type in whatever you want to do or whatever you are looking for. Although there is no delay, I find this to be easier to use because it searches everything.

  24. Anthony,
    thanks for the firefox info — it’s been annoying me for a while but never enough to do anything.
    On an unrelated vein … if you do a lot of copy and paste via firefox, you may end up as I did having to use notepad to remove all the formatting before copying it again.
    I’ve just found that someone has finally updated the “Copy plain text – eve” addon which allows a “ctrl-shift-c” to copy text without any format.

  25. I use google as my primary search engine. Upon making it default search, the question was asked, “enable search suggestions?” Or somewhere along the way it was asked.
    Perhaps do a search on how to, “disable search suggestions in Windows 7.”

  26. the_Butcher says:
    November 9, 2011 at 4:14 am
    > Why would you need the http:// ?
    To specify the protocol to use in to access the URL and to tell the browser that the next element of the path is the hostname where to access the ultimate target.
    Otherwise, there’s ambiguity in knowing if the target is HTML, FTP, or just a file, and ambiguity about whether the first element is a host name or file name.
    Firefox is trying to be “user friendly” while keeping up with the other browsers.
    One thing I don’t get is that on my laptop (at least the Windows 7 OS, I haven’t checked Ubuntu today), I’m running Firefox 7.01. It displays unadorned URLs, e.g. http://www.facebook.com/CoCoRaHS, but I tried various flavors of highlighting the whole URL. Whenever I copied (why does Windows need that ^C? Unix’s X11 doesn’t) and pasted the result, I’d get one with http:// prepended. Personally, I find that behavior rather annoying, if I scan something with the mouse what I see highlighted is what I expect to paste.
    Ah well, just more dumbing down for the masses. And confusion about why Anthony doesn’t get that prepending. I even tried restarting without plugins, same behavior. Ah well. Firefox started nagging me about 8.0. I suppose I’ll try it out.

  27. Thanks for the Firefox tip! Done!
    As for searching in Windows 7, I believe the behavior you describe is by design. Windows starts searching as quickly as it can to speed of the searches. HOWEVER, it should never stop you from continuing to type in the search box. There are three main reasons why that would happen: 1) Your disk is not indexed( or the index is corrupt), or 2) You’re searching in too big a space, or 3) Your computer is a “dog” :).
    Given an adequate computer, you can fine tune your searches rather easily and not have the problem that you are describing.
    Click on the “Start menu globe” and then type “index” in the search box – without the quotes. When the results come up, select “Indexing Options”. You can tailor where you are going to search by clicking on “Modify”. Make sure you select the “Users” folder. Once you have tuned the folders click on “Advanced” and select “Rebuild Index”. Then leave the machine on and walk away, it will take a while…. Don’t let the machine sleep until it’s done. Now even thought the searches still begin as you type, the computer should not show you the processing Icon and stop you from typing. This all assumes that while searching in Explorer you are looking in your whole disk or in your whole User folder. By design, Explorer only searches within the Folders or Libraries it is looking in at that moment.
    Also, when searching you can select “Type:” from the filters (in blue below the search box) and the select something like “email”. Then when you type your search text it will only show you emails, not other files. This will NOT speed up the search though, it just narrows the selection.
    Best,
    J.

  28. Anthony,
    Here’s another vote for Agent Ransack. When we “upgraded” to Windows 7 here at work, is was immediately obvious that the new search functionality was a retrograde step. Agent Ransack does the job extremely well – give it a try.

  29. My solution? Use Opera. I recommend it.
    Been using Opera since version 6 under Win 98 SE days and current version is 11 something.
    Just sayin …

  30. please don’t anyone recommend google chrome or google desktop or ANYTHING google because every single one of their “free” products is just spyware designed to track you all over the internet and build profiles on you. google is not your friend.
    (and facebook and twitter aren’t either)

  31. James Reid says:
    November 8, 2011 at 11:09 pm
    Your suggestion helped me, James. I recently “had to” install IE9 from IE7. (i.e. I didn’t want to, but from a hurried shut down the install got started from an errant mouse click.)
    With IE9, I started to get too many suggestions from queries that I would make and that contained the web site name when all I wanted was the web site that I had been going to for years.
    Thanks, Warren

  32. @Anthony
    As another poster did I was going to suggest checking into the indexing. I don’t think the pre-search happens if indexing isn’t enabled and if the index is incomplete or corrupt lord only knows what problems that might cause. Hit the start button and type ‘index’ into the search box to get the options for it.
    In any event something else is wrong as someone else mentioned as well what you are seeing is not the way it is supposed to work. The disk search is high priority task and the search term undating is a low priority task but the former should not be hogging up so many resources that the latter screeches to a halt.

  33. beng says:
    November 9, 2011 at 5:19 am
    > HaHa! Get Firefox 2.0 & you won’t have the problem…
    Don’t laugh – my main system (I’m typing on it now) runs SUSE 10.1 and the update server evaporated years ago. Some of the stuff here is so old that a huge number of upgrades would have to occur before I could even think of upgrading from Firefox 2.0.0.5!
    I can’t shut this down – it updates various weather things, WUWT things (BTW, the ENSO meter data source didn’t upgrade this week, so it’s stuck at -1.1 until Monday or so), and various other things.
    I bought a cheap Lenovo laptop with Windows 7 and I co-installed Ubuntu Linux so I’d have something to run the various things that no longer run on this tired system.
    I might find time next year to replace this one. Hey – at least it has a RS232 port to talk to my Vantage Pro weather station every 20 minutes.

  34. I was very surprised to read this post. I have been using Firefox 7 on my Mac since it was released and the “http://” ALWAYS shows up.

  35. As far as Firefox goes, I have yet to have an issue with copying and pasting with the http:// hidden. It has worked as intended for me each and every single time so personally I won’t be changing the settings, but all the power to you for finding a fix.
    As for the windows search issue, I would suggest Linux 😉

  36. The Windows 7 interface annoyed me so much ( a plague on their Usability researchers … ) that I went looking for something better. I have been using XYPlorer ( http://www.xyplorer.com ) for a year now on all my machines and am very happy with it. Including the file search.

  37. Funny, Chrome wisely abandoned the silly http:// on the screen in version 2 or so about 2 or 3 years ago. People were annoyed that the http:// beginning also disappeared when the URL was copied and then pasted, but this was fixed – the http:// was returned when properly used via clipboard – in version 3 or so, also 2+ years ago.
    I am sure that the elimination of redundant and always the same http:// is the right direction and I guess that Firefox will ultimately fix the clipboard behavior if it hasn’t been fixed yet.

  38. Thanks for the Firefox tip.
    For whole system search I purchased X1, a few years ago. I have 25+ years of computer stuff, docs, files, source code and emails. I’ve changed my “filing” system too many times over the years to remember where things are. Once indexed it does a very good job. I seems to handle all of MY file types. The window layout isn’t the best, but I find things when I need them.
    It is one of my few exceptions to my no purchase for basic computer tools.
    Pete

  39. Like you, I’m sure, I find the Mac! PC!! Mac!!! idiots tiresome. I use both platforms daily. But sometimes I need to search the PC for something, and then I’m like MAC!!!!!!!!!

  40. ****
    Ric Werme says:
    November 9, 2011 at 7:06 am
    Don’t laugh – my main system (I’m typing on it now) runs SUSE 10.1 and the update server evaporated years ago. Some of the stuff here is so old that a huge number of upgrades would have to occur before I could even think of upgrading from Firefox 2.0.0.5!
    *****
    Ric, you’re a fellow old-schooler! This is composed on an NT4 OS, dual-booted to W95. I’d still use the W95 except Firefox 2.0 won’t run on it. I actually have Linux as a third boot, but can’t get the TCPIP protocol to work on the internet (it DID work w/my previous internet provider).
    So you guessed it, I’m cheap. BTW, I DO have a decent (free) antivirus, and I’ve never, ever had any virus.

  41. @Lubos Motl
    Even if all copy and paste bugs are fixed (and it is hard to catch all variations of url editing – you would not, after all, want http:// prepended to a urlbar that has something like w foo or g bar [I bind the w to wikipedia for quicksearch, or g to google]), and they have fixed a lot of them.
    I am still opposed to the idea of hiding protocol. It teaches people who aren’t copying, but just typing out a site, to skip http:// – this screws up a lot of autolinking in web forms out there.
    And protocol is still printed for ftp and https, so, why not include for http? Are those 7 characters really that much of a waste of space?

  42. I guess I don’t understand the problem, or I can’t repeat it. Running Windows 7, in both folder search or start menu search, you can keep typing even as the search is on going, and it will filter its results. For me, it behaves just like google live search. It doesn’t interrupt my typing.

  43. @ Anthony:
    Slight edit needed to your post.
    “…I found it, and though I would report on it for the benefit of readers…”
    Should be “thought”, not “though”. I had to re-read it 5 times to figure out what was meant to be said.

  44. I would have to echo what a few others have stated.
    I manage about 650 give or take, Windows 7 enterprise computers and none of them have the problem you describe. Typing should not be inhibited while searches are going on and adding more letters should cancel the current search and start a new one.
    Have you checked you event viewer for errors regarding the indexing service. Is your indexing service running automatically at start up and is it normally on?
    Also is your computer a dog :p JK

  45. If all that stuff checks out by the way, may i suggest executing the search at a folder level.
    For instance, if you are looking for a picture, you navigate to the folder where you have your pictures , or the root of your website, if you are searching that, and use the search there.
    ( You are organizing your files aren’t you? )

  46. In windows explorer pressing ESC usually works to stop a search in progress, though I have occasionally had to press it twice. Still looking for how to change the search pause time.

  47. Google Desktop is no more as they’ve already discontinued it http://googledesktop.blogspot.com/
    For Windows 7 searches also check out these tips http://windowssecrets.com/woodys-windows/getting-the-most-from-windows-search-part-1/ and http://windowssecrets.com/top-story/getting-the-most-from-windows-search-part-2/ in addition to the recommended fixes above.
    Dragging the link in Firefox to another program will probably lose the protocol but copy and paste should not. No issues with v7/8 on my XP.

  48. All I can say is I ran into this at work (still XP at home), and thought WTF? and then served up all my favorite four-letter words at the idiot project manager for Windows 7 at MS who directed the layout and features for Windows 7 and changed a perfectly (almost) intuitive and VERY user-friendly XP and came up with that abortion.
    For one thing, it took a LONG time to find the bloody thing.
    I LOVED the simple [Windows]>F hot key in XP. Still do!
    It seems every new director of such things has to stamp his imprimatur on the entire emterprise, not knowing when to leave well enough alone.
    If it ain’t broke…

  49. joe says:
    please don’t anyone recommend google chrome or google desktop or ANYTHING google because every single one of their “free” products is just spyware designed to track you all over the internet and build profiles on you. google is not your friend.

    This is total nonsense. If you are concerned about privacy using Google Chrome uncheck all the features in the Privacy section. Go to the Wrench icon – options – under the hood – privacy and uncheck them; https://www.google.com/support/chrome/bin/answer.py?answer=114836&hl=en-US
    Not to mention the source code of the browser is available online to put to rest any other conspiracy theories; http://src.chromium.org/viewvc/chrome/
    I don’t recommend using Google Desktop because it IMO is just a waste of time and resources. I don’t search for files on my HDs because I don’t have to, I have them properly organized in folders and know where they are. For this reason I intentionally disable the Windows Search service in Windows 7, this will also disable the instant searching in the start menu search box and in Windows explorer.

  50. beng says:
    Ric, you’re a fellow old-schooler! This is composed on an NT4 OS, dual-booted to W95. I’d still use the W95 except Firefox 2.0 won’t run on it. I actually have Linux as a third boot, but can’t get the TCPIP protocol to work on the internet (it DID work w/my previous internet provider).
    So you guessed it, I’m cheap. BTW, I DO have a decent (free) antivirus, and I’ve never, ever had any virus.

    Running an outdated OS that is not supported with security updates is a very bad idea. For Microsoft OSes no one who cares about security in the least should still be running Windows 95, 98, ME, NT or 2000 (and all variants there of) anymore as security updates have been discontinued from Microsoft. However, Windows XP is still supported by Microsoft until 2014. If you are running an end of life OS, I highly recommend upgrading your computer or getting a new one to run Windows 7 or Windows XP at the very least. Windows XP will run on very old hardware with minimum requirements being a 233 MHz CPU, 64 MB of RAM (128MB recommended) and 1.5 GB of available hard disk space. Otherwise if you must keep your older computer hardware use a current Linux Distro that will run on your hardware.
    I am cheap too and Microsoft Security Essentials is a free and very capable AV for Windows XP, Vista and 7.

  51. Firefox is not so dumb about protocols as a previous poster mentioned, https and ftp, for example, are displayed as fully qualified in the address bar, Chrome has the same behaviour. And a clarification to my earlier post, for me the drag and drop of the address does work with the fully qualified address including the http but it may not work for all.

  52. I agree with BioBob and Elftone – Agent Ransack is the best
    http://mythicsoft.com/agentransack/
    I am not sure about Windows 7, but in Windows XP and Vista, the built in search only searches those files and directories that Microsoft thinks you should be allowed to search. One reason I like Agent Ransack is because it allows you to search almost the entire drive. (It still won’t search certain “active” files .. like the registry.) For example, in Windows XP, when searching for files named desktop.ini
    Explorer Search – 131 files
    Agent Ransack – 215 files
    Same search in Vista (after first moving a recursive directory to a temporary location to break the recursion)
    Explorer Search – 7 files
    Agent Ransack – 460 files
    Agent Ransack – 1,444 files if recursion is allowed
    Unfortunately, Vista 64 was designed to break many pre-Vista programs, such as Agent Ransack. Providing directories with infinite recursion is only one of the problems. (BTW, I had to use system restore to fix the temporary move because “Edit/Undo Move” failed. After that, the recursion was limited and no longer infinite.)
    In addition, Agent Ransack allows me to search the browser cache.

  53. I’ve tried to find a solution to the search-as-you-type feature, but can’t.
    The only suggestion I can make is that you switch off the indexing option, that way the search-as-you-type will be slower. Of course the trouble with that is the search itself when you hit enter will be slower.

  54. I don’t get Windows Vista search either, just gimmie the classic stuff I say. Using FileSearchEX and loving the clean feel..

  55. One other thing – the ‘new” windows search can also hog the process – resulting in a pc that runs like a dog.
    Open Task Manager (right clikc on the task bar and select Task Manager)
    Select the PROCESS tab
    look down in the bottom left corner – check the box
    click once on the title Bar to ensure that it is sorted alphabetically (or reverse alphabetically)
    Trigger a RE-INDEX of the search tool
    Locate the Processes for :
    searchfilterhost.exe
    searchindexer.exe
    searchprotocolhost.exe
    NOTE this will disappear and reappear as the search engine does its thing – patience; as long as the re-index is running they will appear !
    Select each on – right click select
    DOUBLE CHECK YOU HAVE THE CORRECT Process selected
    Set the priority to BelowNormal or even Low
    Close task manager
    This WILL SLOW DOWN INDEXING – BUT will stop the indexer from hogging all the processor power to the detriment of what you want to do – it has been known for the Index to steal ALL AVAILABLE PROCESSOR TIME
    If you get ACCESS DENIED messages – log in as ADMINISTRATOR or find your local friendly nerd !

  56. well – I wonder where the text went [Reply: have a little patience. There was only a 4 minute delay between your last post and this one. ~dbs, mod.]
    Select the PROCESS tab
    look down in the bottom left corner – check the box
    click once on the title Bar to ensure that it is sorted alphabetically (or reverse alphabetically)
    should read
    Select the PROCESS tab
    look down in the bottom left corner – check the box
    –> Show Processes from All Users
    click once on the title Bar to ensure that it is sorted alphabetically (or reverse alphabetically)
    AND
    NOTE this will disappear and reappear as the search engine does its thing – patience; as long as the re-index is running they will appear !
    Select each on – right click select
    DOUBLE CHECK YOU HAVE THE CORRECT Process selected
    NOTE this will disappear and reappear as the search engine does its thing – patience; as long as the re-index is running they will appear !
    Select each on – right click select
    –> Set Priority
    DOUBLE CHECK YOU HAVE THE CORRECT Process selected

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