This is why we don't leave black holes lying around

Just because it is Thursday, funny, and well done…

 

Note: This post originally had a foretitle of “hump day hilarity”, with a reference to Wednesday aka “hump day”. Somehow the post scheduler didn’t work (or I goofed which is more likely) and it published today instead of next Wednesday.

I was offline doing other real work and didn’t notice until later.  – Apologies, Anthony

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Pamela Gray

Would that post-normal science meet the same fate.

PaulH

I learned years ago that portable holes are useful, but must be used with care…

Ha ha! greed got the better of him.

Pamela Gray says on June 23, 2011 at 4:55 pm
Would that post-normal science meet the same fate.

They are half-way in the hole already … greed (position, power, grant-money) will see they make it all the way in (just like our ‘friend’ in the video!)
.

Menth

Uh….it’s Thursday.
Typical denialist misinformer error. JK!
[Already fixed, but thanx. ~dbs, mod.]
REPLY: I thought I had this setup to auto-publish next Wednesday, when I’ll be at the Heartland conference, but I somehow mangled the start time. Sorry – Anthony

Paul Deacon

It’s been Friday for over 12 hours here in NZ.
REPLY: Darn those post schedulers, – I must have mangled the publish time. – Sorry – Anthony

Gary Hladik

So that’s where the missing heat went!

DanDaly

The old legal maxim: “Pigs get fed; hogs get slaughtered.”

I think they did it with special effects.

Cathy

Hmmmm . . .
That was really creepily, cleverly funny. Watched it all the way through . .
Then saw the next video in the queue. “Too short.”
Tsk! Tsk! ;-D

Douglas Dc

Beep!Beep! Acme, a name you can trust…
Love it…

Psion

Hmmm … I rather enjoyed “Too Short”. Not on the same level as “Black Hole”, but it had it’s … advantages.

Ringo has a hole in his pocket.

Hm, didn’t mean to display the vid again, and the wrong url got entered.
Sorry!
Too Short has over 64 million views, and the Black Hole only 9 million. So Too Short is 7X better!
[Error fixed. ~dbs]

KR

Lmao!
Saw that when it came out, great video…

grayman

That was awsome! LMAO. Now to watch Too short.

It is remarkable how much time and energy it takes to move a hole which consists of … nothing. I once had to move a doorway one door width over.

NikFromNYC

ACME changed it’s name to McMaster-Carr:
http://www.mcmaster.com/#confined-space-rescue-equipment/=cvq7pn
Their smoke generators page won’t load on this iPhone, so search away. I’d make a quick shot with the camera of their print catalog but TinyPic.com also won’t cooperate with my mini operating system. My computer is currently entertaining boisterous folk.

Helpless with mirth! This is going viral!

Kelvin Vaughan

I invented a black hole fly trap. You hang it from the ceiling on a bit of string and when a fly goes near it’s sucked in and crushed. Trouble is I dont know what to do with it when it gets too big.

AdderW

shows that you cannot trust sticky tape

Bob in Castlemaine

Is this really the end?
Just be careful what you wish for!

Annei

Very funny!

Matthew W.

As a claustrophobic,
It scared the bejesus out of me !!!

Olen

I’m not sticking my hand in there. It has the power to amputate.

David L. Hagen

I think he forgot John’s vision and the consequences of actions:

Then I saw a great white throne and him who was seated on it. The earth and the heavens fled from his presence, and there was no place for them. And I saw the dead, great and small, standing before the throne, and books were opened. Another book was opened, which is the book of life. The dead were judged according to what they had done as recorded in the books.

mkelly

What is the surface temperature of a black hole?

D. J. Hawkins

Kelvin Vaughan says:
June 24, 2011 at 1:51 am
I invented a black hole fly trap. You hang it from the ceiling on a bit of string and when a fly goes near it’s sucked in and crushed. Trouble is I dont know what to do with it when it gets too big.

If it’s small enough to begin with, just stop feeding it and it will evaporate.

London247

mkelly
That is a fascinating question

mkelly:
The Black Hole No Hair Theorem tells us it does not have a ‘temperature’ – only mass, charge, and angular momentum:
scienceworld.wolfram.com/physics/BlackHoleNoHairTheorem.html
Temperature is a statistical quantity anyway, and is therefore irrelevant to a single particle such as a black hole.

D. J. Hawkins

mkelly says:
June 24, 2011 at 6:16 am
What is the surface temperature of a black hole?

See http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/ask_astro/answers/971111e.html
The answer is: really cold! Why? Because it depends on the object’s black body equivalency. Since black holes do not radiate (hardly any) energy, they’re about as close to absolute zero you can get. Close to the event horizon where things get, as my 5-year old says, “smushtipated,” there’s lots of energy being released.

Kelvin Vaughan

:
mkelly says
June 24, 2011 at 6:16 am
What is the surface temperature of a black hole?
I tried to measure its temperature but the thermometer got sucked in.

mkelly

D. J. Hawkins says:
June 24, 2011 at 11:52 am
Really cold is what I have always thought as they do not radiate. Given heat transfer theory, if the event horizon has lots of energy and some/all is thermal then heat should be being transferred to the black hole. if it “never” heats up is it then a perfect heat sink?

D. J. Hawkins

mkelly says:
June 24, 2011 at 1:22 pm
D. J. Hawkins says:
June 24, 2011 at 11:52 am
Really cold is what I have always thought as they do not radiate. Given heat transfer theory, if the event horizon has lots of energy and some/all is thermal then heat should be being transferred to the black hole. if it “never” heats up is it then a perfect heat sink?

Interesting question.
Disclaimer: I am not an astrophysicist, nor do I play one on TV.
Some radiation escapes as matter falls past the event horizon, as gravitational forces rips things apart at the atomic level. If you had a black hole in a relatively “empty” part of the universe and little or nothing was falling into it, I suppose it would act a near-perfect heat sink. However, it wouldn’t be very different than the space around it, since radiative transfer is proportional to T^4 and we’re only talking about the difference of about 3K (cosmic background). Maybe someone a little better versed in the theory of singularities could chime in?

DJH;
not a physicist either, but I’m pretty sure the entire black hole is not a singularity; that’s its infinitesimal center point. The black surface is the dividing line where gravity is sufficient to pull back all photons emitted deeper down. Right near that edge there is some Hawking radiation that does get away, as quantum frothing emits paired particles, and one falls in and the other escapes, resulting in net loss of mass. Or SLT.
Black holes can be very large and diffuse; we might be inside one, from the PoV of the wider universe.

OzWizard

Black Holes; Hockey Sticks; The tricks you can do with mathematics are quite amazing but I prefer to rely on reality as a guide to what is actually happening.

London 247

Re MKellys question and after a bit of reflection
If mass and energy are sucked into a black hole, and mass and energy being interconvertible, and energy cannot be destroyed then it must accumulate. That would suggest that at some point the thermal energy would overcome the gravitational energy of the accumulated matter to cause the thermal dislocation ( explosion, ) of the black hole. A sink hole analogy cannot be correct as the matter and energy do not just disappear. This may be the cause of quasars. As for the temperarure of black holes, the classical methods of convecton, conduction and readiation cannot be assessed from beyond the event horizon. Thus , IMHO, the temperature of a black hole below the event horizon would vary from just above absoloute zero to several miilions of degrees Farenheit depending on the age and size of the black hole.

Kelvin Vaughan

VAUGHANS THEORY OF THE UNIVERSE
A black hole forms in the space time field when matter is produced. The matter was formed from space time and left a black hole, an absence of field. Thats why there is a black hole at the centre of every galaxy. There never was a big bang. Red shift is light loosing its energy as it travels through the space time field which exerts an extremely small resistance. The background noise is the remnants of light that has red shifted far enough to become that noise. The universe is infinite and time is infinite.
Sorry I haven’t worked out yet why matter formed leaving a black hole but it probably has something to do with AGW.