Early Snow in Russia

By Steven Goddard

Russia has seen it’s first snow accumulation of the season.

http://www.snow-forecast.com/maps/static/europe/last3days/snow

According to Rutgers Global Snow Lab, Russia doesn’t normally receive snow until the second week in September.

http://climate.rutgers.edu/snowcover/chart_dclim.php?ui_day=251

More is forecast for the next week, as well as in Norway and Sweden. Southeast Greenland is expecting heavy snow.

http://www.snow-forecast.com/maps/static/europe/next3to6days/snow

Much of The UK and Ireland are expecting cold weather during the next week, as is Moscow. Temperatures on the Greenland ice sheet will be dipping down to near -25C. Nice August weather!

http://www.snow-forecast.com/maps/static/europe/132/lapse

No doubt the news media will be talking about the Moscow heat wave for at least two more weeks. Absolute, undeniable proof of “global” warming.

———————————————————————————————————————

The Russian heat wave is estimated to have cost their economy $15 billion. Put in perspective, the US national debt increases by more than double that every week.


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John Marshall

These earlier snows might indicate some form of cooling. Oceans are cooling and despite a ‘record’ July in the UK we have had lower than the so called average in August.
Climate is a chaotic system and will vary within wide parameters-wider than alarmists are willing to accept and definitely not human driven.

GBees

As per usual nature shows us she knows better than we do.

Timdot

Getting chilly early up North I see. Down here in Tasmania it’s not too cold, but the temps are staying consistently low. Problem is, it’s felt a lot colder than the official record.
An amusing side point – Bishop Hill has a post on Connolley and his bad behaviour on Wikipedia.

KPO

Steve, I realize we can measure temperatures across the 510,065,600 km2 of the Earth’s surface to an accuracy of 1/100th of a degree Celsius over decades. (The absolute genius of man). But, if you settle before the due date we are prepared to write off the 52 cents. Signed – The Peoples Republic of China.

Paul Deacon, Christchurch, New Zealand

It seems a few private sector weather forecasters (who depend on the accuracy of their forecasts for revenue) are predicting a cold European winter. We shall see. Nailbiting times (again)…

Mike McMillan

The Russian heat wave is estimated to have cost their economy $15 billion. Put in perspective, the US national debt increases by more than double that every week.
$ 1 3 , 3 7 6 , 3 2 1 , 6 6 3 , 5 2 3 . 4 8 (updated)

Yeah, but we owe it to the Red Chinese, not the Ruskiis.

KPO

In the same vein as measuring ice loss/forest loss (or gain) etc in x number of Olympic sized swimming pools, or x number of football fields the debt calculates out to $1,361,250.13 per square kilometer of US soil, or $43,266.88 per soul. (Surely you all can just borrow that amount) – sarc! OK – enough of the useless information – back to the interesting stuff.

Patrick Davis

There’s cold everywhere, certainly feel it here in Sydney, Australia. Sydney is down a few deg C on the average for this time of year, and even more interesting, for me anyway, Alice Springs is 9c below the norm for this time of year too.
And yet, the BoM says it’s the warmest on record. Well I guess that is possible if you manipulate the record.

Joe Lalonde

Steve,
In the good old days….Bad news was death to the messenger.
🙂

Scott BL

LOL! You’re so predictable. I can’t believe I have to explain this to you WUWT guys again!
Seasonal cooling, like early snow in Russia, is weather, not climate!
Seasonal warming, however, like Russia just experienced this summer, is a strong climate signal, a clear indicator of global warming, and not weather at all. The burning in Russia is also a forcast of the doom that awaits us for our abuse of Gaia. And for our rampant consumerism, too. And air conditioners. And SUVs. Evil, evil SUVs.

Jarmo

In Finland we had little snow in Lapland on 23 July. Simultaneously temperatures in southern part of the country were 20 degrees C. Six days later we had highest temperature ever recorded, 37.2 degrees Celsius, in eastern part of the country.
http://yle.fi/alueet/lappi/2010/07/lumisade_yllatti_lapissa_1851310.html

Marcos

I’ve noticed that leaves have started to change colors in various parts of NYC. strange since its been very warm until this week…

Given the NOAA satellites’ track record for confusing albedo with temperature, I wonder if NOAA will report unusually warm temperatures over the fresh snow fields?

dorlomin

No doubt the news media will be talking about the Moscow heat wave for at least two more weeks. Absolute, undeniable proof of “global” warming.
= = = = = = = = = = = = =
UAH showed it warmest August day on the record a few days back. That Roy Spencer is in on the global warming cult as well 😉 worlds cooling, arctic ice is growing and only the religous say otherwise. Keep repeating it till it feels true Steve.

There is a distinctly Autumnal feel in parts of the UK already. I’ve noted some leaves starting to turn and showing hints of red – at least 3 weeks early. Also in our garden our resident robin is proclaiming his territory – a sound I usually associate with early October.

dolormin,
Keep telling yourself what is being observed is anything other than natural variability. It’s always fun watching someone get all hyper over the black cat fallacy.

Another record highest snow extent for the winter of 2010-2011?

dorlomin
In a 30 year global temperature record with no temperature trend, we would expect to see 12 daily record highs set every year. 365 / 30 = 12
No point getting hysterical over a standard Gaussian distribution.

RockyRoad

Steve, I think there’s an upward shift in that Gaussian distribution due to the addition of asphalt, air conditioning units, more buildings, more concrete, reflective glass, larger airports, expanded highways, thermometer elimination, etc., etc. No wonder there just might be a slight “warming” of the earth.

Andy Mayhew

Not sure how reliable that chart is. According to weatheronline, temp at Nar’jan Mar (on the Pechora river just a few miles from where the snow is shown to be lying) is currently 8c and it hasn’t dropped below 2c yet this month.

Leon Brozyna

Snow?
Already?
That’s okay, my Al Gore is ready for it — that’s the name of my ergonomic snow shovel, not to be confused with the fat, crazed, sex-poodle of tabloid fame.

Jeff L

1st significant cold front of the season overnight in the Colorado front range. 52 deg & rain this morning at the house. Was talking to a friend from Montana last week who said there were winter storm warnings about 7000 ft last week.
…. winter is on the way

Tenuc

Interesting that the sun is still in the doldrums:-
“The geomagnetic field was quiet to active on August 23. Solar wind speed ranged between 272 and 408 km/s, slowly increasing after 13h UTC as a high speed stream from CH418 became the dominant solar wind factor. Solar wind density reached very high levels during the latter half of the day, typical of the leading part of a strong coronal hole disturbance.
Solar flux measured at 20h UTC on 2.8 GHz was 74.9 (down 7.7 over the last solar rotation). The planetary A index was 7 (STAR Ap – based on the mean of three hour interval ap indices: 6.6). Three hour interval K indices: 10001224 (planetary), 00012214 (Boulder).
At midnight UTC the visible solar disk was spotless.”
Issued on August 24, 2010 at 02:10 UTC
Thanks to Solen, who provided the summary.
http://www.solen.info/solar/

Matt

Steve,
Dont mind the fact that the Rutgers Global Snow Lab map is “an 89 x 89 cell Northern Hemisphere grid, with cell resolution ranging from 16,000 sq. km to 42,000 sq. km. If a cell is interpreted to be at least fifty percent snow covered it is considered to be completely covered, otherwise it is considered to be snowfree.”
I’m sure everytime there’s a < 10cm dusting of snow in Russia over three days, it completely fills one of these 16000 km2 cells and exceeds the 50% coverage threshold, especially when regional temperatures are above zero. Or maybe snows like this aren't uncommon this time of year, but aren't sufficiently large enough to show up on Rutgers climatology maps.

This is, as I’m sure the EAU/CRU and other Warmists will be quick to tell you, a mere anomaly, one they can ignore on their models because it doesn’t fit the ‘norm.’ Besides this is weather isn’t it? I’m sure Messers Mann et al will say it is to reassure their footsoldiers and the 97% of ‘scientists’ they claim agree the ‘science is settled.’
Here in the Taunus we have temperatures distinctly cooler than ‘normal’ for August and the trees are doing their autumn thing. Yes, I’m convinced its Anthropomorphic Global Warming… Now, where did I put my thermal underwear?

Ian L. McQueen

I read every post through with great interest. But I am bothered virtually every day by “it’s” used as the possessive of “it”. Anthony, “it’s” means “it is”. Always has. I hope always will! Puleeze…..write “its” as the possessive form!!!
Since this note is meant directly for Anthony I don’t mind if it gets removed by a moderator.
IanM

MattN

The sooner snow falls in Siberia, the colder the HN winter will be….

MattN

NH (northern hemisphere), not HN.
need more koffee…..

Ken Hall

There is a distinctly Autumnal feel in parts of the UK already. I’ve noted some leaves starting to turn and showing hints of red – at least 3 weeks early. Also in our garden our resident robin is proclaiming his territory – a sound I usually associate with early October.

Too true Verity, Spring arrived very late this year, (even as the media was reporting that the spring is arriving two weeks early due to human induced climate change) After they reported this, the UK had a total whiteout national snow coverage. Now we have Autumn arrive a few weeks early.
I think it could be natural climate change. Y’know, the type that the alarmists are all “denialist” about.
It has been several years since we had a day in the 30’s Celsius up here in Northern UK.

Larus

In other words, an unprecedented and catastrophic heatwave followed by snowfall in August means that the climate is perfectly fine, nothing to worry about.
I for one can’t see anything alarming about it. I mean, it’s not like we’ve also had catastrophic flooding, mudslides, extensive coral bleaching, and new temperature records being set right left and centre all at the same time, right?

Casper

Meanwhile the temperature in Arctic has reached the melting point. Interesting…

Ern Matthews

Scott BL says:
August 24, 2010 at 4:46 am
LOL! You’re so predictable. I can’t believe I have to explain this to you WUWT guys again!
Seasonal cooling, like early snow in Russia, is weather, not climate!
Seasonal warming, however, like Russia just experienced this summer, is a strong climate signal, a clear indicator of global warming, and not weather at all. The burning in Russia is also a forcast of the doom that awaits us for our abuse of Gaia. And for our rampant consumerism, too. And air conditioners. And SUVs. Evil, evil SUVs.
========================================================
Lol rotflmao funny, you’re being sarcastic, Right?

monroe

2 degrees c. last night in southeat B.C. I know, I know “weather not climate”…… just darn cold weather instead of that wonderful global warming I was promised.

Al Gore was in Russia?

Someone on WUWT noted a month or so ago that swallows were leaving for points south over the English Channel, around two months earlier than usual. The old guy in the boat noted it was the earliest he’d seen them leave since 1947. Another old guy I met last year told me his family was snowed in at a farm outside Howarth, West Yorkshire during that year, in June.
Brace for another cold NH winter.

Larus says:
August 24, 2010 at 6:42 am (Edit)
In other words, an unprecedented and catastrophic heatwave followed by snowfall in August means that the climate is perfectly fine, nothing to worry about.

Correct. Except the heat waves and floods are not unprecedented. They’ve happened every decade somewhere in the world since Noah unexpectedly found himself in the ark building trade.

Rossa

The BBC’s weather presenter on Breakfast News this morning stated that there was a risk of frost in the rural South West of England tonight. I was so shocked I had to rewind the PVR to hear it again. WTF. It’s August for heavens sake (stonger words used at the time). Maybe in the northern reaches of Scotland but never heard of it in the S.West at this time of year (though no doubt someone on here from the UK may say otherwise).
Overnight temps were supposed to be around 10C according to her weather map. I shall be contacting my friend in Somerset (S.W.) tomorrow to see if there is any local reports about it.
We’ve already noticed that our lime and sycamore trees are dropping their leaves as we have a continual battle to get rid of them in Autumn. Looks like it’s here already in Yorkshire.

Pascvaks

Ref – Ian L. McQueen says:
August 24, 2010 at 6:22 am
“I read every post through with great interest. But I am bothered virtually every day by “it’s” used as the possessive of “it”. Anthony, “it’s” means “it is”…”
____________________________
Huuuuuum….. Ahhhhhhhh….. I think your spot on!

Henry chance

Cost 15 billion dollars? I can’t find business journals from Russland. From what i gathered, that was 15 billion calculated by lost of wheat exports and some fire fighting expenses?
The wheat is still there. It now has a higher price. Just less of it.
Do russians purchase fire insurance?

It’s all anecdotal. Here in eastern Massachusetts the leaves on the locust trees have been turning and falling for a couple of weeks, but maybe that’s because of the month-long drought we’ve been suffering from, until this weekend; got a lot of rain Sunday and Monday, but the grass had all turned brown, and even with the dam below us, the Sudbury River was too low for us to get the canoe out past the lillies and muck.
My 96-year-old mother in Maryland says that when you get a very hot summer, you’re sure to get a very cold winter. She thinks ‘global warming’ is ‘a crock’.
Re Ian L. McQueen’s complaint (August 24, 2010 at 6:22 am): That’s Steve, not Anthony, misusing it’s (the contraction of ‘it is’) for the possessive of it. I have raised the issue before, but got yelled at for picking nits.
/Mr Lynn

Neil Jones

In Switzerland we have trees turning and a bumper crop of autumn mushrooms, about three weeks early.
The Swiss tell me this is the type of weather (repeat WEATHER) they used to get in the 1960s.

Tommy

In Soviet Russia, snow shovels you!

rbateman

Folks are already talking of the “Feel of Fall” in the air. Birds flock 1 month ahead of normal.
The Sun is still doing it’s Rip Van Spotless act. I suppose that if NASA sent another 3 probes up, it would find the upper atmosphere still 1/3 shrunken from normal, as the last time they tried this (2008?).
The Moscow Neutron Monitor ( http://cr0.izmiran.rssi.ru/mosc/main.htm ) has halted it’s slide downwards. This particular station leads all the others, and all other follow suit eventually in pattern.
So, the question of continued Hemispheric Winter Hopscotch appears answered… rather early.

savethesharks

Smokey says:
August 24, 2010 at 5:28 am
@ dolormin,
Keep telling yourself what is being observed is anything other than natural variability. It’s always fun watching someone get all hyper over the black cat fallacy.
===============================
Right on, Smokey.
Chris
Norfolk, VA, USA

rbateman

2010 08 19 78 11 0 0 -999 A6.9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2010 08 20 77 11 0 0 -999 A6.2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2010 08 21 76 0 0 0 -999 A5.6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2010 08 22 75 0 0 0 -999 A4.9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2010 08 23 75 0 0 0 -999 A4.9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Spotless streak over. the 19th and 20th rather strangely having zero area. I’ll take it as 5 days spotless. Cute.

Olen

If Napoleon were alive this is when he would be invading Russia.

Layne Blanchard

An observation:
When Dr. Richard Keen presented temp records several months back, I noted that the 1930s were not only the period with the greatest number of highs, but also had a great number of lows.
Similar to stock market chart behavior? Where volatility precedes a change of direction? Fascinating thought, but what would be the mechanism?
http://icecap.us/images/uploads/TempExtremeDecadesm.jpg

Gary Pearse

Alert, Nunavut day highs 32F, night lows 26, snow (google Alert Nunavut Weather -weather underground) – not much but I guess it got missed by the snow mappers – or Environment Canada, whose lousy weather records of late may have missed it.

savethesharks

rbateman says:
August 24, 2010 at 7:45 am
=========================
Even on the east coast of the USA that has baked for the summer, a very unusual [for this time of the year] and vigorous upper level low has taken the place of the ridge and is bringing a taste of it.
Also eyeballing Danielle lose the convection in her sails right now….that definitely was not predicted.
F 10.7 down at 75. This ain’t no 1954, for sure.
http://www.leif.org/research/F107%20at%20Minima%201954%20and%202008.png
Maybe ya’ll are on to something!
And maybe its time for Svensmark to write a sequel.
Chris
Norfolk, VA, USA

Mr Lynn says:
August 24, 2010 at 7:31 am
> It’s all anecdotal. Here in eastern Massachusetts the leaves on the locust trees have been turning and falling for a couple of weeks, but maybe that’s because of the month-long drought we’ve been suffering from, ….
Locust trees are about the first to give up when late summer is dry. I noticed some color in other trees yesterday in New Hampshire, a bit surprising, and makes me wonder if the trees have accumulated enough sugar already to keep them happy over the winter. That or if the heat and dry weather is stressing more than just locusts.
The blackberries on my Mt Cardigan property are just incredible. Last summer was cool and cloudy, berries didn’t ripen until September. I made three batches of jam a couple weeks ago and picked and made another batch Sunday, all from a much smaller area than I gathered from last year. While it’s been fairly dry up there, it hasn’t been dry enough to slow down the plants. Ferns are also happy, whereas around home near Concord the grass is brown, some ferns around the house started out really well but the fronds withered a month or so ago.
It’ll be interesting to see how the different conditions affect the foliage this year.