Follow up: Meteorite from September 25 hits SUV, warmists thrilled

WUWT readers may recall the story I did last week:

Live in Ontario Canada? – help find this meteorite

Warmists thrilled about the SUV impact? Well I can only imagine but the meteorite did hit an SUV, according to CBC.  No major damage though.

From a University of Western Ontario Press release.

By Communications Staff

Friday, October 16, 2009

GRIMSBY, ONT. – When Tony Garchinski heard a loud crash just after 9 p.m. on Friday, September 25 he didn’t think much of it. That is, until he awoke the next morning to find the windshield of his mom’s Nissan Pathfinder with a huge crack in it. Making note of the ‘unusual’ rocks he later found on the car’s hood, Garchinski chalked the incident up to vandalism and filed a police report.

It wasn’t until two weeks later that his mother, Yvonne Garchinski, heard media reports that researchers from The University of Western Ontario were searching West Grimsby, Ont. for possible fragments of a freshly fallen meteorite. The Garchinskis realized who the real culprit was in the case of the broken windshield — or more specifically, what.

The ‘what’ was a 46-gram (approx. the size of a golf ball) completely fusion-crusted (melted exterior) fragment of an ‘ordinary chondrite’ meteorite. Chondrites are arguably the most important type of meteorite because they are the least processed of meteorites and provide a window into the material which formed the early solar system.

The meteorite is estimated to be 4.6 billion years old.

Western Associate Professor Peter Brown, an expert in the study of meteors and meteorite falls, and Phil McCausland, a postdoctoral fellow at Western’s Centre for Planetary Science & Exploration, presented the found meteorite to the media today at the Garchinski home in Grimsby, with the family on hand to tell their remarkable story.

McCausland has been leading the university’s ground search since seven ‘all-sky’ cameras of Western’s Southern Ontario Meteor Network (SOMN) captured rare video footage of the meteor event on September 25.

http://aquarid.physics.uwo.ca/research/fireball/events/25sept2009/

“Having both the video and the sample is golden because we get the dynamic information and the orbital direction from the video, and by having recovered material on the ground, we can complete the picture. We can take a rock that we now have in hand and we can study it in the best laboratories in the world and we can put it back into its solar system context. We can put it back into where it came from,” explains McCausland. “In all of history, only about a dozen meteorite falls have that kind of record.”

Brown says, “Scientifically, it’s equivalent to a sample return mission, which is sending a spacecraft out to a known location in the solar system and bringing back a sample. In this case though, the sample comes to us. We don’t have to spend huge sums of money to send a spacecraft to get the sample.

“We’ve worked out the orbit, where it came from, so it becomes a material within context. It’s like a geologist who can pick up a rock which may be interesting, but if you know where it came from, that context, it means so much more. Most meteorites – we don’t have the context. This one we do.”

Yvonne Garchinski has loaned the ‘pristine’ meteorite sample to Western but it remains her property as meteorites found in Canada belong to the owner of the land upon which they are discovered.

The Western-led search continues in West Grimsby and both Brown and McCausland believe more meteorite fragments will be found. In fact, the Garchinski property is a mere 200 meters off the fall line of the meteorite the Western Meteor Physics Group calculated using data from its video, radar and sound detection systems.

Meteorites may best be recognized by their dark and scalloped exterior, and are usually denser than normal rock and will often attract a fridge magnet due to their metal content. Meteorites may be found in a small hole produced by their fall into soil.

Meteorites are not dangerous, but any recovered meteorites should be placed in a clean plastic bag or container and be handled as little as possible to preserve their scientific information.

If you believe you have recovered a possible meteorite from the Sept. 25th fireball, the researchers ask that you please contact Phil McCausland at 519-661-2111, ext. 87985 or on his cell at 519-694-3323.

For interviews with the scientists and the Garchinski family, images of the recovered meteorite or images from today’s media conference, please contact Jeff Renaud, Senior Media Relations Officer on his cell at 519-520-7281.

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20 thoughts on “Follow up: Meteorite from September 25 hits SUV, warmists thrilled

  1. Yes, obviously GAIA is MAD at the SUV’s.
    Lucky the guy wasn’t in it, it might have knocked him out.
    Or is the Goracle calling down lightning and vengence from the skies these days?
    OY VEY!
    (Tongue firmly in cheek here.)

  2. Actually this just proves my theory of EIW – Extraterrestrial Intergalactic Warming caused by CO2 that has leaked from Worm Holes.
    That poor meteorite was just trying to escape the cauldron that the vacuum of space has become.

  3. I once saw a meteorite streak through low clouds on a foggy, rainy night. It looked like somebody had thrown a lit streetlight. There was a newspaper story a couple days later about it hitting a house.

  4. The meteors were controlled by Billy Cottrell,
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Cottrell
    using new light degrees of freedom that arise near the conifold point in string theory: the trajectory of the meteors is effectively controlled by mesoscopic warm holes arising from double D-brane condensates.
    He used to burn them but more recently, he used his expertise in string theory – and some special knowledge he learned from Hirosi Ooguri at Caltech – to liquidate SUVs mechanically.

  5. “Yvonne Garchinski has loaned the ‘pristine’ meteorite sample to Western but it remains her property as meteorites found in Canada belong to the owner of the land upon which they are discovered.”
    Good for her! She should keep it.

  6. “Yvonne Garchinski has loaned the ‘pristine’ meteorite sample to Western but it remains her property as meteorites found in Canada belong to the owner of the land upon which they are discovered.”
    How lucky is that! She should make a small fortune when she comes to sell this meteorite – with that provenance the collectors will be queuing up to buy.

  7. Global Warming caused the Earth’s gravitational field to fluctuate, disrupting the meteor’s orbit and causing it to nearly destroy Humanity. Anybody who disagrees is a filthy Denialist who hates children and a racist.

  8. Lucky for the average person the chances of getting hit by a meteorite is very low, you’re much more likely to die in a car crash.
    As for the warmists being thrilled here’s the latest TAO data
    http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/jsdisplay/
    They may be thrilled at El Nino intensifying just a little for now, but it actually is screaming ‘modoki’ instead of ‘classic’ the way it seems to be going which some here have predicted this because they expected an oceanic heat release as the Sun’s output stays at lower levels.

  9. He’s pretty lucky I’d say. I guess a metorite is more valuable than a windshield and a hood, so to speak. So you could say SUV driver is rewared with a meteorite…

  10. Meteorites are not dangerous, but any recovered meteorites should be placed in a clean plastic bag or container and be handled as little as possible to preserve their scientific information.
    A likely story: http://tinyurl.com/lpkqb2

  11. Adam from Kansas (11:56:27) :
    They may be thrilled at El Nino intensifying just a little for now, but it actually is screaming ‘modoki’ instead of ‘classic’ the way it seems to be going which some here have predicted this because they expected an oceanic heat release as the Sun’s output stays at lower levels.

    Yep, that was me. If you look at the current ocean temp anomaly map (top of enso connects with PDO thread), you can see the ocean surface temp is fairly uniformly elevated worldwide, rather than higher temps spreading out from a hot-spot in the Pacific. This is exactly what I predicted months ago on this site.
    The sun is quiet, the oceans have gone into heat release mode everywhere because solar energy isn’t being pumped down into the ocean at above the equilibrium rate.
    Anyway, back to meteors.
    Help I’m a rock, help I’m a rock, help I’m a rock!
    Somebody, please, please!
    Help I’m a rock, help I’m a rock…
    Wow man, it’s a drag being a rock
    Help I’m a rock…
    Who could imagine that they would freak out somewhere in kansas…
    Kansas kansas tototototodo
    Kansas kansas tototototodo
    Kansas kansas
    -Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention- Help I’m a rock!-
    -Freak Out! 1966-

  12. Adam and Tallbloke,hereis the UNSIS SST’s for today.
    Yep ,looking awfully Midokiish out there.
    Pay no attention to that cold pool in the N.Pacific and the really cold pool off the Peruvian coast….

  13. Douglas DC (11:18:21) :
    Tell you what, we’ll do a deal … you take the odd meteorites, and I’ll take the even ones.

  14. I beg to differ.
    This is clearly God’s way of telling us to drive North American SUV’s.
    Save your neighbour’s job – drive GM, Ford or Chrysler.
    :^)

  15. The meteorite is not really pristine. It’s impacted with an SUV and that would give it physical changes plus an inferiority complex.

  16. I would like to share that the term meteorite is also used for a meteoroid that has landed on the surface of a celestial body other than earth.
    There are three main types of meteorites.
    1.stone meteorites
    2.iron meteorites
    3.stony-iron meteorites

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