Climate Change to Crush Ohio – film at 11

OSU_LogoFrom the Ohio State University: Climate Change Brings Mostly Bad News for Ohio

Early forecasts suggest big algae bloom in Lake Erie, a very dry 2015

By: Pam Frost Gorder COLUMBUS, Ohio— Scientists delivered a mostly negative forecast for how climate change will affect Ohioans during the next year or so, and well beyond.

Researchers report that the projected increase in precipitation and the associated runoff will likely lead to a larger-than-average bloom of harmful blue-green algae in Lake Erie this summer. In addition, the development of an El Niño over the Pacific later this year may result in a very dry 2015 in Ohio. But Ohio may fare better than its neighbors in one respect: While drought and high temperatures are expected to shrink crop yields in 2015, Ohio farmers will likely suffer less than those in the rest of the Corn Belt.

These were some of the findings delivered by scientists speaking at a conference at The Ohio State University on Thursday. On the heels of the recently released 3rd U.S. National Climate Assessment, nearly 200 researchers, educators, and policy makers gathered with the public to discuss how climate change is projected to affect Ohio.

The meeting was hosted by the university’s Byrd Polar Research Center and the Office of Energy and the Environment.

Among the gloomy outlooks for Lake Erie and the farm industry, researchers and other experts offered more encouraging news about the recovery of Ohio forests and improved energy efficiency in electricity distribution and the operation of hospital systems statewide.

The meeting was emblematic of a transformation in the way states are approaching climate change, said Ellen Mosley-Thompson, director of the BPRC and Distinguished University Professor of geography at Ohio State.

The conversation at the forefront of critical American infrastructure—including agriculture, energy, and public health—has shifted from whether climate change exists to how best to manage it and mitigate the likely impacts, Mosley-Thompson said.

“The climate is changing. The debate on that part is over,” she said. “The impacts of climate change are already evident, and will become more widespread and pervasive over the next half-century. The public and our policy makers need the best scientific information available to help them make important decisions, but communication is often challenging.”

Attendees got a preliminary look at the Lake Erie 2014 Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) forecast, which will be officially released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at Stone Laboratory on July 10. Jeffrey Reutter, director of Ohio Sea Grant, revealed that he expects a larger-than-average bloom of harmful blue-green algae this year. Longer storm seasons and more severe storms are contributing to an excessive amount of phosphorus in the lake—mostly from domestic and agricultural runoff—that feeds the HABs.

It is too soon to tell if the 2014 algae bloom could approach the size of the one in 2011—the largest in Erie’s history. As these blooms move into the Central Basin east of Sandusky, they tend to die and sink to the bottom where their decomposition sucks the oxygen out of the bottom portion of the lake and creates a dead zone covering thousands of square miles.

The dead zone will likely reappear this year, Reutter said.

“Eliminating the blue-green algae that cause the HABs would require a 40 percent reduction in phosphorus and other nutrients draining into the lake. Even with a 75 percent reduction, we could still experience a dead zone,” he added.

Lake Erie often produces more fish for human consumption than all the other Great Lakes combined, he explained. An algae bloom not only hinders swimming and boating—it also affects the fishery. So tourism and fisheries are both likely to be impacted. But the consequences will be strongest for Toledo and Maumee Bay, where the bloom is likely to be most severe.

Some other discouraging news came from Lonnie Thompson, Distinguished University Professor in the School of Earth Sciences and Senior Research Scientist at BPRC: there is a 60-70 percent chance that an El Niño will occur over the Pacific Ocean later in 2014. This climate phenomenon generates warm winds that drive weather in North and South America as well as Australia.

“If an El Niño develops, Ohio will likely be very dry and warm next winter,” he said.

From piecing together thousands of years of climate data preserved in ice cores around the world, Thompson has learned that periods of extended drought correspond with major world crises—famine, disease and war. Throughout history, such events have spread across travel and trade routes to affect entire countries and continents.

“It’s a bigger issue today than ever before, because now we are so connected,” he said. “A disruption in food supply in one place could affect people on the other side of the world.”

But some relatively good news for Ohio did emerge at the meeting.

While drought and high temperatures are expected to shrink crop yields in 2015, Ohio farmers will likely suffer less than those in the rest of the Corn Belt. Similarly, Ohio’s forests—which are now recovering from heavy timber exploitation in the early 20th Century—are expected to fare better than those in the arid west or along the coasts.

That news came from Peter Curtis, a professor of evolution, ecology, and organismal biology who specializes in forest ecology; and Richard Moore, professor of environment and natural resources, who studies agricultural trends in the state.

Bruce Braine, Vice President for Strategic Policy Analysis at American Electric Power, said that Ohio utilities are preparing for more frequent severe storms, which were forecast by the recently released climate assessment.

“We’re in a world where over the last 30 years we’ve become much more efficient in our use of electricity than ever before, but we’ve developed more uses for electricity than ever before,” he said.

The company is using new technologies such as infrared detectors to monitor power lines for preventative maintenance. A pilot project to install “smart” power meters in homes has cut the average length of power outages by 30 percent, and reduced power consumption as much as 3 percent. Those strategies, coupled with increased tree trimming to reduce the chance of fallen lines, has led to some success: service disruptions in the company’s territory have fallen from around 4,000 in 2009 to only 1,000 in 2013.

Meanwhile, the Ohio Hospital Association (OHA) is leading an initiative that is unique in the nation: to reduce power consumption in healthcare through energy audits.

“I wanted to save hospitals money, and I saw an opportunity,” said Rick Sites, Regulatory Counsel for OHA. “Six of the 10 largest employers in Ohio are hospitals. There’s a chance to make a big impact.”

By enabling Ohio hospitals to obtain Energy Star ratings, OHA encourages hospitals to boost efficiency and resilience in the face of power outages. So far, the association’s energy audits have earned participating hospitals more than $6 million in government energy rebates and saved more than $7 million annually in energy use.

The result is not only money saved, but less pollution from fossil fuels, which aids public health—“a natural goal for hospitals to have,” Sites said.

Ironically, two of the event’s scheduled speakers—an officer from the Navy’s Task Force on Climate Change, and Franklin County Commissioner Paula Brooks—were unable to attend because severe spring storms had grounded their flights into Ohio.

Brooks was to talk about climate preparedness, especially regarding businesses and new buildings in Franklin County. The Naval officer was to discuss how climate change impacts national security. Both speakers may return; a similar event is in the planning stages at BPRC for the summer or fall.

===============================================================

Meanwhile, from 2011, NASA says the main cause of algal blooms in Lake Erie is a heavy rainy season and runoff containing phosphorus laden fertilizers.

“This is considered the worst bloom in decades, and may have been influenced by the wet spring,” says Stumpf. Heavy snow fell in the winter and spring, followed by record-setting rainfall in parts of the Lake Erie watershed in April. The rain and melting snow ran off fields, yards, and paved surfaces, carrying an array of pollutants into streams and rivers—including phosphorus from fertilizers. More rain and runoff resulted in more phosphorus, and as in earlier decades, that nutrient nourished the algae in the lake.

Source: http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=76127

I doubt that somehow the cause is any different today, but certainly the perceptions are.

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69 Responses to Climate Change to Crush Ohio – film at 11

  1. Since when was El Nino a sign of “climate change”?

  2. Ron says:

    Oh my God, the sky is falling! A little research geared to the ultimate goal of proving a point can be dangerous to us all.

  3. Jim Watson says:

    So they’re predicting that it’s either going to be wet next year or it’s going to be dry next year and that either one is going to be bad, bad, bad for Ohio.

  4. Col Mosby says:

    And these are university professors making these claims. Oh, that’s right, we’re talking Ohio State University. Never mind.

  5. If you can make lemonade out of lemons, why not fuel out of algae

  6. Gary says:

    So the CO2 produces phosphorous that makes the algae grow? No. Okay, so where does the phosphorous come from? From fertilizers. Okay, so the CO2 makes the fertilizer go into the lake? No. It’s the heavy rains and snow that causes runoff that cause the phosphorous to enter the lake? I see. So it’s not really the weather that’s making the algae grow, it’s the fertilizer. I see. It seems to me that THE FERTILIZER should be the focus of environmental groups, not the weather. See? There really are subjects of environmental concern besides CO2. No really, there really are.

  7. John says:

    I’d like a dryer Ohio. The humidity here in the summer is stiffling.

    Seriously, haven’t they determined that larger-than-normal algea blooms are caused by fertilizer runoff? And Ohio residents have been beset by fertilizer ads on TV this year.

  8. Louis says:

    “The climate is changing. The debate on that part is over,” she said.

    That’s like saying, “the stock market is changing.” Of course it is! Anyone can predict that. But what’s it changing to? We need to know in what direction and how much before it does us any good. Likewise, if you can’t tell us how the climate is changing, or how much it will change, what good does it do us? Given that previous forecasts have been mostly wrong, why should we trust current forecasts? With so many unknowns, only a snake-oil salesman would claim “the debate is over.”

  9. Rick K says:

    I guess OS doesn’t mean Ohio State; it means Oh Sh…

  10. earwig42 says:

    So some gov’t agency took $7,000,000 from taxpayers and gave it to some hospitals (probably large corporations) in order to save $6,000,000. That seems like a net loss to the people.

    Meanwhile the gov’t distributors of that $7,000,000, get to make friendly connections with the environmental and efficiency lobbyists so that they can get great jobs when they are voted out of office. I’m sure the taxpayers of Ohio salute them. sarc off

  11. MikeinAppalachia says:

    I’ll ignore the implied insult toward tOSU given it’s from VaTech. Having the Thompsons tenured is just an annoyance. They are the source of significant funding so as long as that prevails, they will get their dog and pony shows covered.

  12. Gamecock says:

    “A disruption in food supply in one place could affect people on the other side of the world.”

    Bet no one can explain this, especially because “a disruption in food supply” has no meaning.

    “Let them eat word salad!” – GC

  13. ossqss says:

    The good news is that most of these claims are made from modeling. How is that working out so far? /sarc

  14. Chris4692 says:

    Col Mosby says:
    May 20, 2014 at 11:08 am

    And these are university professors making these claims. Oh, that’s right, we’re talking Ohio State University. Never mind.

    That’s THE Ohio State University, you cretin.

    /sarc

  15. Frank says:

    From the headline and the article, one would conclude that El Nino is now a part of “climate change.”

  16. Tom O says:

    “The climate is changing. The debate on that part is over,” she said.
    It is a breath of fresh air to hear one of these bozos actually state the truth. Of course, as is pointed out in other comments, how it is changing is far more important that realizing that it is changing. A warmer world generally does produce more food, a colder world generally produces more deaths by starvation and hypothermia. If you are poor, which way do you “hope” your government will work to “change” the future, to increase the likelihood of more deaths by starvation and hypothermia, or by preparing for the possibility of that change?

  17. JohnWho says:

    “The climate is changing. The debate on that part is over,” she said. “The impacts of climate change are already evident, and will become more widespread and pervasive over the next half-century. The public and our policy makers need the best scientific information available to help them make important decisions, but communication is often challenging.”

    Bleeping idiot! “The climate is changing. The debate on that part is over,…” !!!

    Was there ever a debate on whether the climate is changing? Who took the “climate is not changing” position?

    “The impacts of climate change are already evident, and will become more widespread and pervasive over the next half-century.”

    Has there ever been a time when a changing climate didn’t have some impact somewhere?

    “The public and our policy makers need the best scientific information available to help them make important decisions, but communication is often challenging.”.

    Uh, since both the public and our policy makers are ignoring the best scientific information, why even make such a statement?

    “If you like your climate, too bad, ’cause you can’t keep it.”

    Geez.

  18. Resourceguy says:

    The reason El Nino is now counted as climate change is that alarmist policy frauds have turned the corner to call each and every change part of the ill effects and damage of climate change. It got rolling with Sandy, then explaining away harsh winter, and moved on to California drought. Policy insanity does not get better on its own. It will continue to spin and flail until it is perceived as a cost in elections. This is a lot like an asset bubble with speculation that is difficult to time for the collapse.

  19. Ralph Kramden says:

    On the bright side, when have the alarmists ever been right?

  20. mikegeo says:

    Lonnie and Ellen – serial non-archivers of data derived from public funding, but relentless alarmists from their study conclusions, that no one can check the information on.
    http://climateaudit.org/2012/07/08/lonnie-thompsons-legacy/
    http://climateaudit.org/2012/07/01/lonnie-and-ellen-serial-non-archivers/

  21. Alan Robertson says:

    As long as Ohio State crushes Notre Dame, i don’t really care who crushes Ohio State.

  22. Alan Robertson says:

    No wait…

  23. Greg says:

    “The climate is changing. The debate on that part is over,” she said.

    The climate has always been changing and always will. If you thought that was what the “debate” was about , I’m glad you think it’s over.

  24. Oldseadog says:

    So it is worse*/better* than we thought.
    ( * delete as you think fit.)

  25. tty says:

    “Lake Erie often produces more fish for human consumption than all the other Great Lakes combined, he explained. An algae bloom not only hinders swimming and boating—it also affects the fishery.”

    And why does Lake Erie have such a productive fishery? Because it is shallow, warms quickly and is rich in nutrients.

    And why does Lake Erie have algae blooms? Because it is shallow, warms quickly and is rich in nutrients.

  26. Rud Istvan says:

    The need to scare people on behalf of NCA/EPA/Obummer in an election year must have caused them to forget rule one being taught warmunists by the pause. That was to never make a near term falsifiable forecast. Here, the algae thing is baked in the cake because the rains already fell, Lake Erie already fertilized. But drought next year because of El Niño, now that is risky. First, it isn’t yet. Second, McCabe et al PNAS 101: 4136-4141 (2004) showed good regional correlations to PDO and AMO phases. We are currently beginning a negative negative. And that produces more rain in the Ohio river valley, not less. Like the past few months.

  27. vigilantfish says:

    “It’s a smaller issue today than ever before, because now we are so connected,” he said. “A disruption in food supply in one place can be mitigated by production on the other side of the world.”

    …. There, fixed it for him.

  28. Mike Maguire says:

    All bad weather is caused by climate change. This years heavy rains and this years El Nino……….climate change.
    Next year’s drought, on wild speculation………climate change. I have yet to see anybody forecast weather a year from now with any consistent accuracy(and weather forecasting is what I do for a living).

    Too much agricultural runoff in Lake Erie(from heavy rain/snow)……….climate change.

    Dang, maybe you could cut back on tens of millions of acres of corn in this nation, the most fertilizer intensive crop and stop one of the dumbest environmental moves ever………growing corn/food to make fuel.

    Since they conveniently forgot to mention it, corn ethanol, this supposedly cleaner renewable energy source, was supposed to make us more energy independent and result in less burning of those high polluting fossil fuels.
    Reality. It has greatly increased pollution and is responsible for larger dead zones in Lake Erie as well as the Gulf of Mexico and other places. It uses up much more natural resources and has numerous other negatives………but we’re just focusing on the “dead zones’ here.

    Another biased report that makes the objective crystal clear……..: look for creative ways to blame climate change for bad things.

    What’s insane is that this is getting ridiculously obvious to somebody with half a brain, that is halfway opened to realities and authentic science. These people get paid for it too!

    If I was part of an entity that produced this junk science, I would end up quitting or probably get fired for trying to show them the blatant flaws.

    The wasted time, money and research for these biased and misleading pieces of crappola must end!

  29. Bruce Cobb says:

    Remember when “the climate” produced just the right amount of rain and snow everywhere, with no flooding or droughts?
    Me neither.

  30. hunter says:

    The climate obsessed are fools in every sense of the word, except for their ability to grab money from tax payers.

  31. JP says:

    “Some other discouraging news came from Lonnie Thompson, Distinguished University Professor in the School of Earth Sciences and Senior Research Scientist at BPRC: there is a 60-70 percent chance that an El Niño will occur over the Pacific Ocean later in 2014. This climate phenomenon generates warm winds that drive weather in North and South America as well as Australia.

    “If an El Niño develops, Ohio will likely be very dry and warm next winter,” he said. ”

    Not every El Nino leads to a warm winter. Perhaps Lonnie Thompson should look at the winter of 1976-77 and 1977-78. If those turn out to be analog years for the US, then the winters will be anything but warm.

  32. M Simon says:

    By enabling Ohio hospitals to obtain Energy Star ratings,

    Patient comfort is a consideration of the past. The hospitals will be run by the numbers. Commissar.

  33. Marcos says:

    someone needs to tell these state ‘climate scientists’ that temps in the Corn Belt have not risen…at all

    http://www.drroyspencer.com/wp-content/uploads/Corn-belt-CMIP5-models-vs-USHCN-temps.png

  34. M Simon says:

    A pilot project to install “smart” power meters in homes has cut the average length of power outages by 30 percent

    I’d like to know how meters can reduce the length of power outages. Of course if by “meters” he really means remote control of YOUR electrical power, he might have something.

  35. DrTorch says:

    It’s called Zero State for a reason

  36. george e. conant says:

    Lake Erie algae boom hybrid offspring from CO2 laden air projectile vomited by Super El Nino Godzilla set to eat the entire state of Ohio. Fish are very concerned.

  37. Michael Jankowski says:

    Cleveland has fallen from over 900,000 people in 1950 to below 400,000 today. Climate change refugees?

  38. RiHo08 says:

    When Lake Erie died a number of years ago, the phosphorous to fuel the algae bloom came from the Detroit River where the City of Detroit was dumping its phosphorous effluent into the Detroit River that flowed into Lake Erie which then fronted the algae bloom.

    Along came an invasive species, the Zebra Muscle which thrives on…algae. Lo and Behold, Zebra Muscles were all over the place. These invaders filtered the water of…algae. The EPA went to the mover’s and shaker’s of Detroit and asked kindly would they please quit dumping the phosphorous and clean up your waste effluent. Well, Detroit got some Federal money and Lo and Behold, a new system of effluent dumping was installed and , along with Procter and Gamble using a lot less phosphorous in their laundry soaps, the Zebra Muscles could keep up with the algae and the sunlight reached the Lake’s floor where all sorts of aquatic plants grew again and Lo and Behold, the fish came back. Whew.

    Now there is a new invasive species Quagga Muscle a fresh water bivalve immigrant from the Ukraine also filtering all sort of yuk from the water and leaving in their wake, well, not really that they motor along and leave a wake, but they leave behind, clear, sunlight penetrating water.

    Another algae bloom gone to an immigrant population which stores the pollutants in their shells which don’t decay for hundreds or even thousands of years. Hmmm. A really bad actor. Yes, but…

  39. Andy DC says:

    The so-called experts predicted a much above normal winter for the upper Midwest. Instead it turned out record cold. I would not put much stock in a weather forecast out more than 3 or 4 days, let alone a year ahead of time.

  40. jayhd says:

    The people of Ohio better pray the climate changes warmer, not colder.

  41. Gunga Din says:

    Climate Change to Crush Ohio – film at 11

    ====================================================================
    Well, at least Michigan should get it first……….

  42. Gunga Din says:

    (For you International readers, Ohio State and Michigan are considered to be the greatest rivalry in college football.)

  43. donaitkin says:

    Gunga Din, Ithought it was U of M versus Michigan State. It certainly was when I was in Ann Arbor.

  44. Steve from Rockwood says:

    Algae blooms are caused by fertilizer run-off. I think these climate scientists are actually making some real progress here. In 30-40 years they may start looking for the source of the fertilizer run-off and 30-40 years later may even recommend reducing fertilizer run-off into Lake Erie as a possible way to mitigate against increased algae bloom. I’m a patient person so I’ll wait…

    In the meantime … what’s high in the middle and round at both ends?

  45. Tom J says:

    I couldn’t help but notice that Lonnie Thompson, a ‘distinguished’ professor at Ohio State, popped in with a comment about El Niño in the lovely story above. Ah, I thought Mr. Thompson was the glacier man, not the ocean man. But, maybe this maverick, daredevil, explorer isn’t quite the glacier man after all. I don’t know much about high altitude mountain ascents (to study high altitude mountain glaciers) but I would think sane people usually bring two way radios, medical supplies, and oxygen along on these forays of research. Ah, but those trifles weight you down, don’t they?

    Research at What Cost?
    By JULIANNE BASINGER JULY 27, 2001 – See more at: http://m.chronicle.com/article/Research-at-What-Cost-/13035#sthash.stn5z5yl.dpuf

    Of course, Ohio State University doesn’t look too good in the above story either. Nice to know, after forming a committee including Lonnie (and, perhaps some high dollar lawyers), that the university’s committee decided to reimburse the student’s father for five figure travel (could I say evacuation?) expenses for he and his son. But, I wonder why it took a committee.

    Our universities are going to bury themselves. There’s a real accounting they have in store for them. And the public needs to see just how callous and unsavory they, and their professors, and their grotesquely overpaid presidents really are. Earth saviors? I think not.

  46. RACookPE1978 says:

    Gunga Din says:
    May 20, 2014 at 2:42 pm

    (For you International readers, Ohio State and Michigan are considered to be the greatest rivalry in college football.)

    donaitkin says:
    May 20, 2014 at 2:55 pm (Edit)

    Gunga Din, I thought it was U of M versus Michigan State. It certainly was when I was in Ann Arbor.

    (For you International readers, Ohio State and Michigan (State University) are considered by themselves (and nobody else) to be the greatest rivalry in college football. Nobody else who follows US football in the rest of the real world really cares about those two small inconsequential schools somewhere up in the far Arctic wastelands.)

  47. Jimmy Dell says:

    “The climate is changing. The debate on that part is over,” she said.

    If you went into a car dealership and the salesman told you , “This is the best deal that there is .The debate on that part is over.” You’d laugh at him and walk out. That’s what needs to be done here.

  48. Keith Willshaw says:

    Climate scientists predict warm dry winter in 2014 !

    Time to buy a new snow blower and upgrade the cold weather gear I think.

  49. Gunga Din says:

    May 20, 2014 at 3:05 pm

    Gunga Din says:
    May 20, 2014 at 2:42 pm

    (For you International readers, Ohio State and Michigan are considered to be the greatest rivalry in college football.)

    donaitkin says:
    May 20, 2014 at 2:55 pm (Edit)

    Gunga Din, I thought it was U of M versus Michigan State. It certainly was when I was in Ann Arbor.

    (For you International readers, Ohio State and Michigan (State University) are considered by themselves (and nobody else) to be the greatest rivalry in college football. Nobody else who follows US football in the rest of the real world really cares about those two small inconsequential schools somewhere up in the far Arctic wastelands.)

    ========================================================
    Well, if The Weather Channel is right it will still be a year or two before we come an Arctic wasteland, but in the meantime……8-)

  50. Gunga Din says:

    Well, if The Weather Channel is right it will still be a year or two before we come an Arctic wasteland, but in the meantime……8-)

    =================================================================
    That should be:
    “Well, if The Weather Channel is right it will still be a year or two before we become an Arctic wasteland, but in the meantime……8-)”
    (It’s so coooold here I can’t type straight!)

  51. Gunga Din says:

    I messed up the BOLD end block. What can I say? I was born and raised in Kentucky.

  52. Gamecock says:

    “Those strategies, coupled with increased tree trimming to reduce the chance of fallen lines, has led to some success”

    Surreal. It is the tree trimming. Bundle any strange behavior, and increased tree trimming, and you get reduced outages. It doesn’t validate the strategies. It makes them weird.

  53. Gunga Din says:

    John Denver wrote a song about West Virginia being “almost heaven”. Why was it almost heaven?
    It borders Kentucky.
    (Everybody happy now?)

  54. Alan Robertson says:

    Gunga Din says:
    May 20, 2014 at 2:42 pm

    (For you International readers, Ohio State and Michigan are considered to be the greatest rivalry in college football.)
    __________________________
    Are you typing in your sleep? Maybe if somebody lives in Ohio, or Michigan, but who else has barely even heard of those teams?
    _____________________________
    RACookPE1978 says:
    May 20, 2014 at 3:05 pm

    (For you International readers, Ohio State and Michigan (State University) are considered by themselves (and nobody else) to be the greatest rivalry in college football. Nobody else who follows US football in the rest of the real world really cares about those two small inconsequential schools somewhere up in the far Arctic wastelands.)
    _________________
    Attaboy.

  55. more soylent green! says:

    Gosh, if it keeps getting warmer Ohio might turn into Tennessee!

  56. Charles Nelson says:

    Well they were spot on a few years back when they predicted this year’s record ice cover and record low temperatures so I take what they have to say very seriously indeed.

  57. Mac the Knife says:

    It won’t be Anthropogenic Global Warming that crushes the Ohio State Buckeyes.
    It will be The Wisconsin Badgers!
    On Wisconsin!

  58. RoHa says:

    Climate change to crush Ohio?

    Well, something has to, doesn’t it?

  59. PeterK says:

    When you think of all the hot air spewed about this Global Warming / Climate Change crap, and then you look at all the money wasted and how that money could have been used to better everyones lives, not to mention the thousands and perhaps millions of deaths directly or indirectly relate to this nonsense, then I think that we should really say:

    Global Warming / Climate Change = The New Modern Day Bubonic Plague

  60. SIGINT EX says:

    Just Bullshit.

    The “Thompson Twins” seem a case of, nudge nudge wink wink, “Nepotism” at the University Level.

    Ha ha

  61. Justthinkin says:

    Mike Maguire says:

    May 20, 2014 at 12:46 pm

    All bad weather is caused by climate change. This years heavy rains and this years El Nino……….climate change.
    Next year’s drought, on wild speculation………climate change. I have yet to see anybody forecast weather a year from now with any consistent accuracy(and weather forecasting is what I do for a living).
    Hummmmm. Tried the Farmer’s Almanac. That and any old guy with a scruffy beard who lives in a log cabin in the hinterland.

  62. lee says:

    Gamecock says:
    May 20, 2014 at 3:39 pm

    “Those strategies, coupled with increased tree trimming to reduce the chance of fallen lines, has led to some success”

    Surreal. It is the tree trimming. Bundle any strange behavior, and increased tree trimming, and you get reduced outages. It doesn’t validate the strategies. It makes them weird.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Increased CO2, Increased Tree Growth, Increased lopping, reduced outages. All because of Climate Change.:)

  63. john says:

    ” an excessive amount of phosphorus in the lake—mostly from domestic and agricultural runoff”

    So it’s not caused by CO2; it’s caused by…Procter and Gamble et al, who make vast profits by getting people to dump excessive amounts of phosphorus in the lake.

  64. Mike Bromley the Kurd says:

    I suppose these hacks are blind to the history of Lake Erie. The lake was a sludgebucket in the Sixties. Dead. Toxic. Is it now? Not by a long shot.

  65. Oatley says:

    The Columbus Dispatch is proud of their university and their ice core professor. At least once a week they run the latest global warming catastrophe story to fan the flames of belief. Pathetic.

  66. Frodo says:

    ** “MikeinAppalachia says:
    I’ll ignore the implied insult toward tOSU given it’s from VaTech.” **

    You know that I am just DYING to let loose here. Oh, I just can’t help myself…

    ** “Climate Change to Crush Ohio” **

    Yes please.

    ** “Col Mosby says:
    And these are university professors making these claims. Oh, that’s right, we’re talking Ohio State University. Never mind.” **

    Brilliantly stated, Colonel. I hereby promote you to General. Speaking as a Michigan Wolverine, I can state with 95% certainty – up from the previous 90% – that Ohio State $*ck$, and also point out the latest poll that shows that 97% of all rational creatures on this planet agree with that indisputable, scientific FACT. All citizens of that reprobate, toxic waste receptacle should be consumed by the wrath of God – all those except the few wise ones who decided to actually get a higher education and head up north to Ann Arbor to get it. Finally, something on this site that everyone can agree on. And yes, these are all completely unbiased scientific observations, based solely on validly collected, verified, and analyzed DATA, and only published here after extensive peer review by fellow UM alums. I plan on applying to the IPCC for a position any day now.

  67. beng says:

    Just one more in a current surge of meaningless, grant-seeking “studies” as acadopics jockey for handouts. It’s been forever known that phosphorus causes damaging algae growth, as in the Chesapeake Bay (runoff from all the McMansion lawns in a 50-mile radius around DC).

    Which of course has nothing to do w/climate change.

  68. Gunga Din says:

    Oatley says:
    May 21, 2014 at 3:09 am

    The Columbus Dispatch is proud of their university and their ice core professor. At least once a week they run the latest global warming catastrophe story to fan the flames of belief. Pathetic.

    ===========================================================
    Very true. Makes me glad my roots are in Kentucky.
    (Dig a bit deeper and Ireland pops up.)

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