A Queenslander’s Guide to Australian Universities

Guest essay by Eric Worrall

The university choices faced by my fellow Queenslanders leave much to be desired if you want to avoid being indoctrinated to global warming mantras. Here is a rundown of choices.

My native Australia prides itself on the quality of its educational offerings. We have a range of fascinating options for students seeking a higher education.

If you like living and studying in the sunshine, the premier University in Queensland is The University of Queensland, which supports scientists like John Cook, who produced the infamous 97% climate consensus survey, which you aren’t allowed to examine in detail.

http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/05/15/university-of-queensland-threatens-lawsuit-over-use-of-cooks-97-consensus-data-for-a-scientific-rebuttal/

If University of Queensland is not quite your thing, you could elect to attend James Cook University, which recently ejected Bob Carter, even taking away his library pass. http://joannenova.com.au/2013/06/jcu-caves-in-to-badgering-and-groupthink-blackballs-politically-incorrect-bob-carter/

If you want to be educated in Sydney, home of the year 2000 Summer Olympics, your choice might be Macquarie University, which recently terminated skeptic Murry Salby, under some in my opinion rather strange circumstances – stranding Salby in Paris, after holding a meeting in his abscence. http://joannenova.com.au/2013/08/murry-salby-responds-to-the-attacks-on-his-record/

If Macquarie is not quite to your taste, but you like New South Wales, you could try the University of New South Wales, home of the Ship of Fools. http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/01/22/spiritofmawson-ship-of-fools-apologize-for-mess-face-recovery-costs/

Of course, if you set your sights on the very pinnacle of Australian academia, you could try the Australian National University, whose director of the Australian National Centre for Public Awareness of Science recently demanded we should ignore the facts when it comes to climate science. http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/03/15/australian-national-university-forget-the-climate-facts-we-need-opinions/

If you fancy the cooler Mediterranean climate of Australia’s southern coast, Melbourne University might be your choice – the Melbourne University which hosted to the Gergis study, $300,000 worth of effort which lasted 3 weeks before it had to be pulled due to a major flaw. http://joannenova.com.au/2012/06/300000-dollars-and-three-years-to-produce-a-paper-that-lasted-three-weeks-gergis/

If none of these Universities meet your requirements, you could go West, and try the University of West Australia, former home of our old friend Lewandowsky. UWA’s vice chancellor recently refused to release data to McIntyre, because he didn’t like McIntyre or something. http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/04/03/a-stunning-revelation-from-a-uwa-vice-chancellor-paul-johnson-over-access-to-lewandowsky-poll-data/

So, which Australian university would you choose for your kids?

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72 thoughts on “A Queenslander’s Guide to Australian Universities

  1. I had this problem, or at least my son did (it really being his choice where he goes). He ended up with the Ship of Fools University, which is probably the least worst choice these days. I suggested the James Cook University in Cairns, based on the premise that the hotter it is, the less clothes the female students wear. Perhaps I was just harking back to my own main areas of interest at his age…

  2. Australia is an amazing and beautiful country but its population is very vulnerable to Global Warming propaganda for a number of fairly obvious reasons.
    Google ‘World’s top 20 deserts’ and you’ll find two of them in Australia; the Simpson and the Great Sandy deserts. Next time you hear of a ‘heatwave’ scare coming from Australia bear in mind that the ‘scientists’ here have taken to incorporating temperature data from the heart of these deserts into their overall climate picture. Given that there are two major cities on the fringes of semi arid zones; Perth and Adelaide it is not hard to scare people into believing that their situation is precarious…and to make matters worse these are coastal cities threatened by sea level rise on the one hand and desertification on the other.
    Now factor in that the vast majority of Australians live in cities and suburbs. Yes, in this vast continent 90 percent of the population spend their time in cars with the AC on crawling along urban and suburban highways between home and workplace. On a hot afternoon in a traffic jam on the edge of a baking city with the haze of a nearby bush-fire hanging in the air….anyone would be vulnerable to the message that the world is overheating.
    Finally the Australian media…wow…hard to know where to start.
    Let’s just say that the ABC which is the state broadcaster is openly, blatantly indeed brazenly Alarmist. This is bad news for anybody with a brain because the rest of the media is pretty moronic so if you want to watch or listen to anything remotely intelligent, that’s not littered with adverts you have to accept a great dollop of Global Warming Drivel along with it.
    The new government has taken certain steps to dismantle the Warmist nest that has grown here over the last ten years. Immediately on gaining power it abolished ‘The Climate Commission’ through which the likes of Tim Flannery was paid $100,000 a year to predict that Brisbane would run out of water in 2009! etc etc.
    The defunding has already begun and the ABC is already feeling the pain of its support for Green Labor and the entire Carbon Tax fiasco….but it will take a long time before any kind of balance is regained.

  3. What ever happened to that Gergis paper? Last I heard it was put “on hold” while they sort out their problems. That was in June 2012.

  4. Charles Nelson says:
    “The new government has taken certain steps to dismantle the Warmist nest that has grown here over the last ten years.”

    And not without notice. I’m sure the rest of the world is closely watching the difference between Australia and Germany energy management. What started out as a political movement will soon be turned on by people when they realize the extent of the hoax.

  5. After reading this list, I think the best bet would be whichever Australian university is considered “party central”.
    /snark

  6. Charles Nelson says:
    May 18, 2014 at 4:07 pm
    Australia is an amazing and beautiful country but its population is very vulnerable to Global Warming propaganda for a number of fairly obvious reasons………………..etc etc etc as the Rodgers and Hammerstein’s King would say
    ————————————————————————————
    Well stated Charles- the whole article.

  7. Charles Nelson says:
    May 18, 2014 at 4:07 pm
    __________
    Pretty good summing there of Australia, Charles.

    My Country;

    The love of field and coppice,
    Of green and shaded lanes.
    Of ordered woods and gardens
    Is running in your veins,
    Strong love of grey-blue distance
    Brown streams and soft dim skies
    I know but cannot share it,
    My love is otherwise.

    I love a sunburnt country,
    A land of sweeping plains,
    Of ragged mountain ranges,
    Of droughts and flooding rains.
    I love her far horizons,
    I love her jewel-sea,
    Her beauty and her terror –
    The wide brown land for me!

    A stark white ring-barked forest
    All tragic to the moon,
    The sapphire-misted mountains,
    The hot gold hush of noon.
    Green tangle of the brushes,
    Where lithe lianas coil,
    And orchids deck the tree-tops
    And ferns the warm dark soil.

    Core of my heart, my country!
    Her pitiless blue sky,
    When sick at heart, around us,
    We see the cattle die –
    But then the grey clouds gather,
    And we can bless again
    The drumming of an army,
    The steady, soaking rain.

    Core of my heart, my country!
    Land of the Rainbow Gold,
    For flood and fire and famine,
    She pays us back threefold –
    Over the thirsty paddocks,
    Watch, after many days,
    The filmy veil of greenness
    That thickens as we gaze.

    An opal-hearted country,
    A wilful, lavish land –
    All you who have not loved her,
    You will not understand –
    Though earth holds many splendours,
    Wherever I may die,
    I know to what brown country
    My homing thoughts will fly.

    Dorothea Mackellar
    1885 – 1968

    http://www.poemhunter.com/dorothea-mackellar/

  8. Bond……started by a crook with a faulty memory but generally captured by those who actually agree that education for profit is not a sin.

    Also on the Gold Coast!

  9. “So, which Australian university would you choose for your kids?”

    None. Keep ‘em out. Keep ‘em honest. That’s what popped into my head on reading that question.

  10. Not exactly a complete list of Australian Universities. Also in my experience individual departments tend to have a fair degree of autonomy so, whilst the examples given are not good, it seems a little unfair to tar entire Universities with the same brush in this manner.
    That said, my experience with environmental graduates from a lot of Universities in Australia is that many of them graduate utterly convinced that Global Warming is the most imminent and highest priority threat that the World faces.
    Some actual quotes include;
    “I tend to accept what others tell me” and
    “I read this in the New Scientist and you can’t get more authoritative than that!”
    I suspect the underlying problem, which is a worldwide phenomenon is that Universities today seem to be obsessed with the mere learning of “facts” instead of trying to help their students to think critically about the things they are being taught.

  11. For undergraduate education, I’d opt for the University of Canberra. Concentrates on good teaching and good learning, and so far as I know, not too many of the orthodox with respect to AGW. Lovely ambience, too.

    Declaration of interest: I was there for twelve years as its vice-chancellor.

  12. UQ provided my son with an excellent engineering education, up to PhD level. He remains as sceptical of CAGW now as ever. I’m sure in his time there he was untouched by Professor Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, John Cook or the Global Change Institute, as are most students.

    My wife studied Social Work at JCU and had to do a module similar to the currently available Developmental Approaches to Eco-Social Justice. She hated it and made it very clear that she did not think environmental issues would impact her one to one relationship with clients and that she did not feel the need to incorporate “a consideration of the non-human world” in her practice. I’m pretty sure it hasn’t intruded into her practice so far, beyond being asked to “Please think about the environment before printing this email”.

    I think the problem with the arts and humanities courses is that faculty staff are not qualified to assess climate science for themselves so they accept without question what their politicised climate science colleagues tell them and then feel the need to incorporate this into the courses they offer.

    Steve B, the only way I like to see Rockie is in my rearview mirror, beautiful and Rockhampton do not belong in the same sentence, although I’ll concede that the botanic gardens are worth visiting when driving through. Yeppoon, Rosslyn and Emu Park are a different matter entirely.

  13. Goldie
    Not exactly a complete list of Australian Universities. Also in my experience individual departments tend to have a fair degree of autonomy so, whilst the examples given are not good, it seems a little unfair to tar entire Universities with the same brush in this manner. …

    The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men (and women) do nothing.

    I don’t exactly see other departments and other universities in Australia rushing to take their fellow academics to task, for the sort of abuses I’ve listed, with a few honourable exceptions, such as John Costella and Ian Plimer.

  14. I once had an interest in visiting Australia, developed after visiting their pavilion at Expo 86 in Vancouver. Australia hosted the next Expo in 1988. I have no interest now in visiting Australia, and it’s all because of intrinsic global warming hype.
    One of my sisters spent a year in Burnie, Tasmania with her husband and two daughters a couple of years ago. They were glad to get back home to British Columbia (a province in Canada).

  15. Allegedly illustrious Harvard University brought the execrable Naomi Oreskes onto their team, with an offer of a tenured senior position in the Department of History of Science. Not to mention that they had John Holdren there for many years…..

    ergo, one must expect that hardly any university anywhere will prove immune to the hysteria and distortions of the CAGW crowd.

  16. garymount
    I once had an interest in visiting Australia, developed after visiting their pavilion at Expo 86 in Vancouver. Australia hosted the next Expo in 1988. I have no interest now in visiting Australia, and it’s all because of intrinsic global warming hype. …

    I know what you mean – but I’m hoping Australia is turning a corner on this issue.

    While I’m a bit p*ssed that the Abbott government wants to put up taxes, on Global Warming at least they seem to be making a real effort to defund the alarmists.

    Lets not forget that Australians voted overwhelmingly for Prime Minister Tony Abbott, despite a very public campaign by his opponents to paint him as a “denier”.

  17. Tanya Aardman
    You fail to mention my Alumni, The University of Adelaide

    Fair point – as far as I know, nobody has tried to eject Ian Plimer from University of Adelaide. Perhaps no news is good news in this case.

  18. http://www.open.edu.au/courses/education/units-list-pgrd-eln?mkwid=swcGBIEdr|dc&pcrid=36440912873&kword=griffith%20university%20courses&match=e&plid=&sctp=ppc&scvn=google&scsrc=google_search&sckw=griffith%20university%20courses&sccm=Search&gclid=CPCCta7ctr4CFU0IvAod0ygACA

    One of my son’s completed a degree in eighteen months on line. He buried himself in study to do so.
    To do so he went to open university, where it is possible to pick congruent courses for your needs, rather than what a particular uni dishes up.
    A bit like downloading a tune rather than having to buy a whole compilation to get the tune.
    This is good for Australia in that locals and international students may study here in many of the ‘soft’ subjects.
    So you may avoid ‘catastrophic global warming’ narratives run by the self elect.

  19. Hop across the ditch and attend university in New Zealand. Aussies in NZ pay the same fees as residents (unlike kiwis in Australia).

  20. Skiphil says:
    May 18, 2014 at 5:10 pm

    Allegedly illustrious Harvard University brought the execrable Naomi Oreskes onto their team, with an offer of a tenured senior position in the Department of History of Science. Not to mention that they had John Holdren there for many years…..

    ergo, one must expect that hardly any university anywhere will prove immune to the hysteria and distortions of the CAGW crowd.
    ________________________
    Harvard is one of the most likely schools to be infested with climate hysteria. It has been said that their primary mission is to provide statist underpinnings to the children of elites, preparing many for a lifetime of service in the bureaucracy.

  21. Skiphil says:
    May 18, 2014 at 5:10 pm
    “Allegedly illustrious Harvard University brought the execrable Naomi Oreskes onto their team, with an offer of a tenured senior position in the Department of History of Science. Not to mention that they had John Holdren there for many years…..”

    What a disaster. For Oreskes, the history of science begins with Marx’s juvenalia. After all, Marx explained that science is a social construct and that the truth is the last ideology standing. Harvard has no shame.

  22. donaitkin says:
    May 18, 2014 at 4:59 pm

    For undergraduate education, I’d opt for the University of Canberra. Concentrates on good teaching and good learning, and so far as I know, not too many of the orthodox with respect to AGW. Lovely ambience, too.

    Declaration of interest: I was there for twelve years as its vice-chancellor.

    I agree Don, my son graduated from there in Environmental Science, enjoyed the coursework and is successfully employed.

  23. Don’t forget the University of New England, Armidale NSW. They got a grant to aid removing nitrous oxide from soils? If they had asked my agricultural lecturer, he could have told them.
    Gypsum. Breaks up soils, so nitrous oxide can’t form. I went to UNE, it was great in the 80s but politics was rampant in the early 2000s. Having a post grad paper marked by a MA student, who didn’t know as much as I did, tends to put one off. Especially as I had a row with a senior lecturer Dr David Roberts over a bush ranger history, and was labelled a holocaust denier at the Sydney Institute. I was on the outer from then on, challenging a senior lecturer. I passed though. But I will not be completing my MA.

  24. “If you like living and studying in the sunshine”

    … yet lacking the Lux et Veritas

  25. Many years ago I studied for a bachelor of arts at University of QLD. Although most of my values and views were already shaped by my life experiences ( I was an older student at 28) I came to the experience with a receptive mind and high hopes. Three years later I left without completing my degree, fed up with the pervasive cultural Marxism and relativism and closed-mindedness of the teachers. Only 10% of the lecturers were truly independent thinkers – the rest were tenured radicals, and a surprising number were anti-intellectual mediocrities (surprising to me at the time, that is). This was before GAGW had really taken root. I can only imagine things have gone from bad to worse. It was for me an expensive mistake but at the same time a real eye-opener.

  26. Just not here!

    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/02/20/climate-craziness-of-the-week-climate-scientist-presented-as-a-god-like-mao-and-kim-il-sung/

    Jo Nova writes: “A friend at Curtin University, Western Australia reports that a new mysterious and imposing mural appeared on the facade. It is as if passers-by can look through the bricks and see a Saint-of-Science himself working.”

    He is working “to develop improved adaptation options for sustainable agri-food production systems.” By the way, Mao, Stalin, and the rest of that infernal crew from the 40’s and 50’s were agricultural reformers. It is an effective means of mass murder. I don’t think any Universities are telling anyone that anymore.

  27. Have Aussie Unis signed up to the UN sustainability agenda like many US Unis have? These are good places not to send your kids/grandkids.

  28. Didn’t the ANU have one senior lecturer who complained about death threats etc., a few years back? But my old lecturer, Mike Morwood, who led the team who uncovered The Hobbit, left UNE and joined ANU. The politics in the Archaeology department was a bit of a problem at that time, The Chair was a strange man, after Professor Graham Connor who really liked students, he really was only interested in the students that could advance to Ph.D., the rest of us were fodder for his sarcastic put downs. AnD HE was a chauvenist

  29. Eric, they hired Gillard and made her a professor of law or something.
    After she paid a substantial “grant” (bribe?) to them just before she was unceremoniously dumped by the labor party.
    You know, Gillard’s the one that gave us the CO/2 tax who now “works” for want of a better word out of tbe Adelaide University.
    Please tell me you didn’t forget.

  30. Since we are trashing universities:
    In the 1970’s I was working on my PhD in Chemistry at a prestigious school in upper New York state.
    For months I labored to reproduce the results in a “significant” paper authored by a “big name” in science at Purdue. No matter what I did, or how many times I re-did the experiment, I got consistent results that were markedly different from those in the published paper.
    I finally gave up and went, in despair, to my adviser.
    He looked at my results, looked at the published paper, and said: “they faked their results; ignore this paper and move on”.
    What struck me were two things: that a “big name” had faked the results in a published paper; and that my adviser considered this to be totally unremarkable.
    It was my awakening to the realities of life in the world of big science.
    Clearly, “The Australian Disease” has been a long time coming; small wonder that science is in a state of crisis.

  31. Leigh
    Eric, they [Adelaide University] hired Gillard and made her a professor of law or something. … Please tell me you didn’t forget.

    Ouch, I didn’t know that one :-).

    Still, as long as Adelaide University treat skeptics like Plimer decently, we haven’t really got a case to complain, if they also allow other views on campus.

  32. “The University of Queensland, which supports scientists like John Cook …”

    This is the 2nd time in two days I’ve heard him described as a ‘scientist.’ When did he attain that status?

    Cartoonist, creator of the SkS propaganda website, then ‘Climate Communications Fellow’ at Queensland. I know he has been furthering his education, but was unaware that he had actually progressed beyond that and become a full-fledged scientist.

    Am I mistaken?

  33. At Sydney University we studied crystallography for a large part of 2nd and 3rd year geology, a ‘hobby’ field has nothing to do with anything, which was run by a lowly ranked and lowly paid tutor, and who conducted and taught most of the 2nd and 3rd year course materials himself.

    Somebody pointed out, in a review, that this wasn’t the best way to train people for various careers, (actually it was a joke) and the mining and petroleum industries didn’t sponsor much, if any, research, and the government doesn’t either, so there was little to no funding for research into something like mining or petroleum careers. This is true in many western contexts. Fundamentally, mineral and petroleum industries do not employ many people directly.

    Many older oil and mining geologists saw the writing on the wall similar to Sydney University, so went over into environmental research, which became a major new source of funding around the early 1990s. Environmental research then largely filled a void that was not being met by traditional mining and petroleum industries, for a variety of complex reasons (including lack of employment requirements in mining and petroleum, lack of new discoveries etc etc).

    Mining and petroleum may have flow on effects on employment generally, but they have never been large employers, moreover, they are both subject to vagaries and cycles of funding from financial institutions, the fundamental non-sustainability of mines and oil fields, as well as geographical and geopolitical issues such as the uneven distribution of resources between states and countries. (Patency, or ownership of discoveries are also a problem, unlike say in biotech or software applications-the field are immovable in the ground, and so are contestable and political). In other words, major western educational institutions cannot guarantee any employment or stability of careers within the mining and oil industries for a variety of complex reasons, including the simple fact that mines and oil fields for example are often located far removed from where such centres of education occur. There is both a fundamental ‘stability of career/social sustainability’ factor, as well as a ‘fundamental uneven social distribution’ component. This sort of thing does not occur with most other industries.

    I think you will find, that these sort of weaknesses and voids within the earth sciences are a part of the reason they have been largely filled by the socialist left under ‘environmentalism’, with all the attendant problems. As with communism, it was countries with fundamental weaknesses in government and in their economies who were most susceptible to falling to various centralised forms of socialism, with all the attendant problems, so too has this occurred within the earth sciences. Britain, for example, largely abandoned the teaching of geology in the early 19th century, because there are not many jobs in fossils or in maps which have already been compiled. (This is fundamentally true, and so there has always been problems with traditionally getting research funding into the earth sciences, something which has only changed in recent times with the environmental movement. Yet, paradoxically, earth science IS important to economies, its just that this is not always apparent to research councils and governments deciding between say, sponsoring medical research into autism, or sponsoring an understanding of the distribution of tantalum. Guess which one gets the funding?, yet both are required for societies to function).

  34. “I once had an interest in visiting Australia, developed after visiting their pavilion at Expo 86 in Vancouver. Australia hosted the next Expo in 1988. I have no interest now in visiting Australia, and it’s all because of intrinsic global warming hype.
    One of my sisters spent a year in Burnie, Tasmania with her husband and two daughters a couple of years ago. They were glad to get back home to British Columbia (a province in Canada).”
    Easily put off then, it’s not as if there are CAGW posters on very street corner. The natural beauty is unaffected (generally) by hordes of Greenie CAGW enthusiasts. As for Burnie, I wouldn’t base the Tasmanian experience on that one town. I visited Tasmania for the first time in the 70s and Burnie was easily my least-favourite place in the (then) Apple Isle.

  35. Well Tasmania has been very green, and has suffered from it financially. Now I have forgotten what I was about to write. Ah. Do you honestly think UQ would sue an American? They would have to hire an American solicitor or lawyer I would think. Not cheap.

  36. Well it is quite terrible that corrupting the data is considered science. William McBride got the Nobel Prize for discovering that thomilamide caused infant dreadful deformations. But he put in some research paper again and his assistant noticed the data did not coincide with the experiments, he mentioned this and McBride more or less told him to forget it, so he dobbed him in, and he was struck off the medical register. He admitted it though, but ruined his practice.

  37. “Charles Nelson says:

    May 18, 2014 at 4:07 pm

    Immediately on gaining power it abolished ‘The Climate Commission’ through which the likes of Tim Flannery was paid $100,000 a year to predict that Brisbane would run out of water in 2009!”

    Well said that man. However, just to be accurate, Flannery, his first degree was English Lit, was paid AU$180,000 for a 3 days per-week part time job at the commission. He was also on the board of directors of a geothermal energy company, and like Gore, has purchaced a very posh sea/river side property that, according to him, will be under a couple of meters of water in a few years. And some people think that was value for our tax money.

  38. “teapartygeezer says:

    May 18, 2014 at 9:04 pm

    This is the 2nd time in two days I’ve heard him described as a ‘scientist.’ When did he attain that status?”

    If memory serves, he did study physics at Ph D. level but did not complete the course in favour wanting to be a cartoonist (A poor one at that) and to work on the SkS blog.

  39. Charles Nelson says:

    May 18, 2014 at 4:07 pm
    Australia is an amazing and beautiful country but its population is very vulnerable to Global Warming propaganda for a number of fairly obvious reasons.

    Charles, don’t run down your fellow aussies like that. I have worked with and socialised with many antipodeans and find them the most educated, erudite and competent managers of all.

    The peoples of aus are no less educated than those of europe. Just watch some of the TV interviews with the unwashed masses of the UK & europe and you will note a much more gullible people than in Auz.

  40. It’s not Australia that is the problem… it’s Universities. Many all over the world are just shady gravy-train fishing expeditions disguised as research institutions. I graduated from Brunel University in London and can honestly say that is a fine University… However not all have the same integrity and standards and some simply can not resist easy money… Human by nature are greedy , some more than others.

  41. Bottom line , theiris shed load of cash to be had in researching AGW , if the research produces the ‘correct results’
    So of course universities are going to chase it even if it mean holding their noses while they do so.
    A good day will be when the climate ‘science’ departments start lying people off , for that will tell us the cash has gone has the political will slipped away , and it will mean many worthless ‘scientists’ will find themselves unwanted and unloved , can you image anyone outside of this area giving Mann a job?
    The bad news is the ‘leaders’ of this little happy gang have made cash and got their tenor so their safe. It’s the ‘minor players’ that will take the fall and all those poor souls that rushed into studying this area expected an easy life and good careers.

  42. My daughter is looking at Newcastle Uni for her Post Grad. Any thoughts? I have discouraged all my kids from UQ, this is not the first major ethics fail in the last few years.

  43. There is at least a diversity of views here at UTAS – which is as it should be! Stuart Franks, Garth Paltridge and others of varying persuasions.

    Burnie is a bit of a struggle town: an industrial city in decline. Try Hobart, especially with MONA (Museum of Old and New Art – Google it!) or Launceston.

    • Good points, Aynsley. UTAS is present in both Hobart and Launceston (as well as the Cradle Coast). AS for MONA… a bit highbrow for me, but stunning nevertheless.

  44. I musta dodged a bullet when I went to Queensland University of Technology, instead of UQ, mind you that was 30 years ago. Even then I remember being urged to work “key words” into grant applications, so nothings changed on the grant chasing front, just the key words change – the trendy key words of the day “Climate Change”.

    Ahh, the more things change, the more they stay the same.

  45. I can remember Griffith University in Brisbane a looong time ago, studying science to fill in the time between drinks. I recall being under the tutelage of one Dr Ian Lowe. The last time I said that out loud, the support group applauded …

  46. Ian Lowe.. he was the strange fellow we met at a party who berated us about the ecological threats imposed by citizens driving cars in Brisbane, and then called a cab to take him home. These proponents of CAGW at least have the smarts to see a money grabbing opportunity. I wish I knew what the NEXT BIG THING will be to inhibit economic growth and scare the pants off the populace, if I did I’d be planning how to make a financial killing from it and the hell with ethics.
    BTW Univ of New England and Sydney were my alma maters and each at the time was fantastic, because of the people within the departments where I studied. Which Uni depends on what subject, and if the subject is to be soft (eg history, anthropology, social sciences, journalism, environment, the arts etc) it is naive to expect that the departments teaching these will be free of bias. There is less room for belief systems to be promulgated in science, engineering, accounting and medicine and hopefully these faculties are set up in most universities to train people how to think and reason.

  47. rockdoctor04
    … These proponents of CAGW at least have the smarts to see a money grabbing opportunity. I wish I knew what the NEXT BIG THING will be to inhibit economic growth and scare the pants off the populace, if I did I’d be planning how to make a financial killing from it and the hell with ethics. …

    You wouldn’t be able to do it – if you were capable of doing it, you would already be doing it.

    To obtain money through a mechanism you knew was a lie, or at least a mechanism you didn’t want to question too closely, you would first need to develop an overwhelming sense of personal entitlement – you would have to be comfortable with continuously helping yourself to the fruits of other’s labour, through coercion and fiat rather than through trade, and you would have to believe that it was right and proper for you to do so.

  48. Bush Bunny:
    ‘Well it is quite terrible that corrupting the data is considered science. William McBride got the Nobel Prize for discovering that thomilamide caused infant dreadful deformations.’

    McBride won several awards, but never a Nobel.

  49. Yes Eric, you are right. I’ll stick with being able to sleep straight in bed at night.

    Cheers

  50. Yes Aynsley you are correct, he was struck off and found guilty of medical fraud, but reinstated in 1998.

  51. Most uni’s today are little more than post-adolescant daycare combined with Barrista career training.

    What do you do with that degree in Feminist Studies? You keep those Latte’s comin, baybee!

  52. Feminist studies would be a unit included in a BA. It could part of a social science major. That would be for budding psychologists. I think it would be a worthwhile unit. Actually BA also include archaeology and palaeoanthropology, and some units are in the science degree. Useful if you get a grant to dig somewhere or work for the National Parks and Wildlife department. They wouldn’t take me on digs, because of my age and fitness. Some of the regions they go too are isolated, and as the late Prof Mike Morwood told me once, yes they do hear crocodiles splashing not far from the camp site, then a walk was 5 kilometers away from the rock art they were studying, up hill etc. No thanks the crocs would frighten me as they can come on land.

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  54. Moderator – I don’t get it?

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