Jack Eddy – discoverer of the Maunder Minimum and LIA, 1931-2009

Jack_eddy_photo

Jack Eddy, undated photo, "He liked words"

…it is with great sadness that I report that Jack Eddy passed away yesterday.
– Dr. Leif Svalgaard in comments today

“My reasons for taking this less-traveled road were many. One is the inevitable thrill of discovery when you wander into new areas. More importantly, you also avoid the danger of being too comfortable in too narrow a niche. I truly believe the sayings that there is no hope for the satisfied man and that without fear there is no learning. Entering a new field with a degree in another is not unlike Lewis and Clark walking into the camp of the Mandans. You are not one of them. They distrust you. Your degree means nothing and your name is not recognized. You have to learn it all from scratch, earn their respect, and learn a lot on your own. But I also think that many of the most significant discmaunder_minimumoveries in science will be found not in but between the rigid boundaries of the disciplines: the terra incognita where much remains to be learned. It’s not a place that’s hidebound by practice and ritual. I have always tried to keep moving between fields of study.” — Jack Eddy, 1999. Click here to view full text of Eddy interview

I didn’t know Jack Eddy personally, I knew of his work (the Maunder Minimum ) in 1978 before I knew he was the man behind it.

I think I speak for the entire WUWT community when I say that we have lost a man whom was true to his craft,  careful in his outlook, and courageous in his challenge of the solar consensus of the 1970’s. The WUWT community, offers our sincerest condolences to the Eddy family and to his friend, Dr. Leif Svalgaard.  – Anthony

Tributes can be left in comments.

UPDATE:

An online petition has been started to name the next solar minimum per Leif’s suggestion in comments:

http://wattsupwiththat.com/2009/06/13/online-petition-the-next-solar-minimum-should-be-called-the-eddy-minimum/

Nearly 200 signatures so far.

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80 thoughts on “Jack Eddy – discoverer of the Maunder Minimum and LIA, 1931-2009

  1. We are indebted to Jack Eddy’s attitude. More power to people like him.

    Many of us had no chance to know you Jack, but from the few words shown here it must have been a privilege for those who did. The rest of us are just grateful that his work was so enlightening.

  2. Just exactly the reason that if this current min sun activity turns out to be a true minimum.. it should be the Eddy Minimum. Gore should be forgotten.

  3. In that interview, he seemed to be a man still humbled and in awe of the first step in the scientific process. Observation. It is a rare scientist, one with books and papers listed in a pages long bibliography, who still believes that there is more to discover. No wonder Leif liked him.

  4. A man who is willing and able to look beyond and above the herd mentality is indeed a gift to humanity. He will be greatly missed.

  5. Sad to hear of this loss. I wonder who will now be able to stop Al Gore and the IPCC from inconveniently erasing the Maunder Minimum and the LIA from the climate record (As one postie stated, Leif Svalgaard matybe, nothing much changes unless someone dies)?

  6. I repeat and endorse Ian Cooper’s words: Many of us had no chance to know you Jack, but from the few words shown here it must have been a privilege for those who did.
    Further… those few words Anthony quotes from Jack Eddy are both inspiring and humbling. May history make note of this man’s contribution to knowledge, and place on record his wisdom.

  7. That excerpt is spot on, in my opinion ! This man understood fundamentals that few too scientists ever stop to even ponder.

    Condolences to the Eddy family and his close associates !

  8. pkatt (21:11:22) :
    it should be the Eddy Minimum.
    At the Solar Physics Division [of the American Astronomical Society] next week in Boulder, CO, I’ll formally request that if a significant solar minimum materializes that it be called the ‘Eddy Minimum’.

  9. This humble man of science and astute observer of mankind will be missed. From the interview……..
    ” I still believe that to some extent, for there is a hypnotism about cycles that seems to attract people. It draws all kinds of creatures out of the woodwork. “

  10. I never got to meet Eddy, but I have met you, Leif, and an honor it was.
    Count me in for the “Eddy Minimum” too.
    It’s a great way to honor your good friend, Jack Eddy.

  11. “Jack Eddy, unpresumptuous genius.” I completely agree, Nassif.

    Thank you for this recognition of Eddy, including the wonderful quote about moving between disciplines. I’ve never seen anything else about him, so Spencer Weart deserves our gratitude for a collegial insight into Eddy. He seems both warm and candid with his former student. That’s a trick in itself. I hope other aspects of his life, perhaps from readers here, become public in addition to this interview.

  12. < Just exactly the reason that if this current min sun
    < activity turns out to be a true minimum.. it should
    < be the Eddy Minimum. Gore should be forgotten.

    I completely agree.

  13. The greatest gift to science are those few extra ordinary people able to look beyond and challenge the comfort zone prejudices that all areas of endevour suffer from.
    The boundaries of science are in fact only really moved forward by rebels who rail against the prevailing logic, those few who can see past the widely accepted dogma and have the courage and self belief to explore beyond the confines of widely accepted beliefs.
    From plate tectonics to the age of the earth rebels have pushed aside the old theories by sheer determination and force of will, the old does not and never have and never will move willingly aside for the new, it must be bulldozed aside by sheer effort and endevour and that is how it should be, it should be welcomed and helped yet the new is always derided and scoffed at by the old established belief systems and the more powerful the consensus the harder it is to push the old aside yet it does happen often and the new becomes the accepted then turns into the old, its almost as if scientific theories have a human type life span.
    The old certainties are so sure they are right, so much time invested in them and the power of those who cling to them ensure that the new always has a difficult time in replacing them and yet pehaps that is how it should be,
    like a form of natural selection?

  14. Dr. Eddy will be honored with a toast and will always be remembered. My humble condolences to his family, friends and co-workers. I also am in favour of “The Eddy Minimum”.

  15. BTW, anywone visiting Boulder in June should definitely take raingear and explore one of the open – space trails above the Chatauqua Auditorium. Take an alpine flower book.

  16. As I read the rest of the interview I came to see in Eddy a very polite and humble man with a towering integrity. This type of integrity should absolutely be celebrated. Condolences to all who called this man a friend or a loved one. Your loss is also the world’s loss.
    The Eddy Minimum is an appropriate memorial to the man and his work.

  17. I heard about the Maunder Minimum long before I heard anything about AGW, so I have been a skeptic for quite some time. For this I owe thanks to Jack Eddy. It is sad he is not with us so see the full development of cycle 24 and it’s implications for solar science.

  18. In reading the transcript of Spencer Weart’s article with his old professor, I am rather struck that, though a “hard scientist”, Jack Eddy represented the essence of what we mean by “liberal arts”: a recognition that knowledge doesn’t end at the borders of our discipline. We are the richer for it.

    By all means, Leif, the Eddy Minimum.

  19. A very generous man, and loved by all. My heart goes out to his family and friends. Thank you Dr. Svalgaard for requesting to name this current minimum after Jack.

  20. At a time when I was encountering heavy administrative opposition, I was deeply inspired by the story told by Jack Eddy in the following interview:

    “Interview with Jack Eddy, April 21, 1999
    In Michigan by phone, conducted by Spencer Weart”

    http://www.aip.org/history/climate/eddy_int.htm


    This was a man who patiently endured that which opposed.

  21. I’m sure I speak for all of the Kiwis on this site, when I express our sorrow at hearing this news. I can only echo Mike Bryant’s words:

    As I read the rest of the interview I came to see in Eddy a very polite and humble man with a towering integrity. This type of integrity should absolutely be celebrated. Condolences to all who called this man a friend or a loved one. Your loss is also the world’s loss.
    The Eddy Minimum is an appropriate memorial to the man and his work.

    I support the Eddy Minimum; I never agreed with attaching Gore’s worthless name to it.

    Haere ra, Jack.

  22. I too learned about the Maunder Minimum( and other minimums) in the 70’s at school, a few years after we were all told (me 6 or 7 at the time) we were causing the NEW ICE AGE with our carbon monoxide and CFC/HFC emissions/aerosols that caused cooling and a ozone hole! OH DEAR!

    We tried fixing it through government banning and grants to believers. Nope, we didn’t do squat of a difference. They said in public forms, TV, Radio and print. We’ve got to SAVE THE WORLD from a depletion of ozone that can make the sun more intense, creating more cancers because harmful rays are coming in, OH DEAR! Beware the sun!
    But then things started getting warmer and we called our new war on CFC/HFC’s.. WON! Changed over our cheap easily made safe refrigerates out for expensive government mandated corporate makers. And made toxic emissions into life giving co2 for plant/ocean/human food.

    Skip forward 30 F-ing years in understanding and now “the sun has nothing to do with the heating in the last 30 yeas , it’s the CO2 in the atmosphere building up and the warming of the air for almost 200 years that is causing this!”

    Yep, and here we are today. Still no proof, going full circle and ended up at the next shift in climate like back to the 70’s.
    When I think about the minimums, I think back to the time that I read about the Dalton min/Maunder Min. and was exploring my love of earth sciences and palaeontology.
    I learned about tens of thousands, if not millions of climate variations from our sun. Extinctions and flourishing, depending the area and time you live in.

    The person Jack Eddy I never knew, but his science did reach/touch me and this is why I’m still fighting AGW/C 30 year old garbage. The old real sun science that makes up my thinking today, is still there!
    I’ve held the knowledge(his) of the suns minimums and then the understanding of solar variations in a cycle. The powers of the sun and our civilizations survival/adaption.

    I too think “The Eddy Minimum” is only logical and right.

    RIP

  23. For some reason I’m reminded of the Elton John song:

    “I would have liked to known you,
    but I was just a kid,
    your candle burned out long before,
    your legend ever did”…

  24. It would seem we have lost a great scientist. May the principles and integrity he stood for prevail.

    Condolences to his friends and family.

  25. I fully endorse much of what has been said. Condolences to his family & friends for their loss. I sincerely hope his passing was peaceful & with dignity.

    However, I believe that whilst his passing is a loss to all in the scientific community, we should celebrate his life & his achievements more than ever. That is the way to silence the LIA deniers, his work should be pushed to the fore as much as possible to bring him into the general public view.

    AtB

  26. Leif Svalgaard (21:56:56) :

    At the Solar Physics Division [of the American Astronomical Society] next week in Boulder, CO, I’ll formally request that if a significant solar minimum materializes that it be called the ‘Eddy Minimum’.

    Leif, I suggest you phrase the request as “the next solar minimum.” He deserves the honor, no matter when the event occurs.

  27. Leif, you have my sympathy as well.

    A suggestion of raingear for next week’s conference in Boulder was made already. You might consider warm clothes as well if you intend to visit Rocky Mountain National Park. Trail Ridge Road was closed again last night because of snow, the third or fourth closing since it opened for the season just before Memorial Day.

  28. John W. (05:23:48) :
    “At the Solar Physics Division [of the American Astronomical Society] next week in Boulder, CO, I’ll formally request that if a significant solar minimum materializes that it be called the ‘Eddy Minimum’.”

    Leif, I suggest you phrase the request as “the next solar minimum.” He deserves the honor, no matter when the event occurs.

    I’ll formally request that when a significant solar minimum materializes it be called the ‘Eddy Minimum’

  29. “Entering a new field with a degree in another is not unlike Lewis and Clark walking into the camp of the Mandans. You are not one of them. They distrust you. Your degree means nothing and your name is not recognized. You have to learn it all from scratch, earn their respect, and learn a lot on your own. But I also think that many of the most significant discoveries in science will be found not in, but between the rigid boundaries of the disciplines: the terra incognita where much remains to be learned. It’s not a place that’s hidebound by practice and ritual. I have always tried to keep moving between fields of study.” — Jack Eddy, 1999.

    His life and achievements, eloquently stated, are the quintessential rebuttal to “doesn’t have a degree in climatology”.

    Eddy minimum indeed.

  30. Lief and others-Yes it should be the “Eddy Minimum” Algore has no right to be honored as such. RIP Mr.Eddy…

  31. Truly a sad day. I was taken with his early publications on the subject and tracked them down and sumamrized their main points in a couple blog posts:

    http://digitaldiatribes.wordpress.com/2008/06/11/landscheidt-part-4-eddy-summary/

    http://digitaldiatribes.wordpress.com/2008/06/13/landscheidt-5-review-of-eddys-the-case-of-the-missing-sunspots/

    (While under the Lnadscheidt category because of his references to Eddy, the two posts above are almost strictly summaries of the Eddy Papers).

    Included at the end of that second post is a quote that jumped out at me, which I will repeat here, from Eddy’s “Case of the Missing Sunspots.”

    “It would seem that Maunder and Spoerer were right and that most of the rest of us have been wrong. As is often the case in the onrush of modern science, we had too quickly forgotten the past, forgotten the less-than-perfect pedigree of the sunspot cycle and the fact that it too once came as a surprise. We had adopted a kind of solar uniformitarianism, contending that the modern behavior of the sun represented the normal behavior of the sun over a much longer span of time.”

    The “scientific consensus” on climate change jumped out at me when I read this. Keep questioning! The truth will eventually bare itself, whether or not in our lifetimes.

    RIP, Mr. Eddy.

  32. I can only second all the comments above. A person worthy of being associated with a major scientific event, I also strongly support a request that the next solar minimum be named for Jack Eddy.

    Likewise my thoughts are with his friends and family.

    Larry

  33. Bob Kutz (05:18:01) :
    If this link has been posted, my apologies, if you don’t know who Jack Eddy is or what he accomplished this is the quickest read that covers most of it that I found;

    http://www.aip.org/history/climate/eddy_int.htm

    My sincere condolences to everyone who knew him personally.

    It was fascinating to read, in the interview, of Jack Eddy’s navigation through the often wayward and uncertain currents of academic science, and especially about his confirmation of the historical evidence of the Maunder Minimum using contemporary tools—proof positive of the value of interdisciplinary research.

    It is a little puzzling to read, at the end of the interview, that he seemed to have espoused the anthropogenic hypothesis of recent global warming:

    EDDY: Probably all that fame of sorts and TV shows and stuff, the Today Show and all that kind of stuff, was probably not the best for me, because it made me even more dilettante. But along came Herb Friedman about that time, and asked me if I would want to take part in a thing they were thinking about, really reviving the International Geophysical Year and the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program. And so in the early ’80s, 1983 I think, I started sticking my toe in that one and became very fascinated by what you could learn about the Earth as a whole if you tied all the sciences together, and if you looked at the cracks between biology and atmospheric science, or between geology and oceanology and stuff, that there was an awful lot to be found there that might be secrets about how the world worked. And in the course of that I became more and more aware of and concerned about global Warming than I had been.

    WEART: This was not a concern of yours before that point?

    EDDY: It definitely was not, and I must say, the reason I got off on the interdisciplinarity of sciences at that time, in the early ’80s, was not that I was so fascinated by the possibility of greenhouse warming. As it was, I was fascinated by the notion of bringing people together from different disciplines and mixing the chemistry and see what happened. And so I was the first chairman on the Academy Committee on what later became the sort of Global Change Program. I did a lot of work there. I set up a new organization within NCAR, who had decided to hire me back.

    Not to introduce a negative note (from the standpoint of this blog). Did Dr. Eddy ever consider that the late 20th-century warming, such as it was, might have been caused by a solar maximum?

    /Mr Lynn

  34. The Eddy Minimum, in honor of a truly great scientist, dedicated to discovery, definitely.

  35. My heartfelt condolences to the Eddy family and to you Dr. Svalgaard. The Eddy Minimum has a ring to it. To sleep, perchance to dream, …..

  36. “I truly believe the sayings that there is no hope for the satisfied man and that without fear there is no learning.”

    Wise words indeed, words to live by.

    Here is a poem I often turn to on such occasions.

    “I think continually of those who were truly great.
    Who, from the womb, remembered the soul’s history
    Through corridors of light where the hours are suns,
    Endless and singing. Whose lovely ambition
    Was that their lips, still touched with fire,
    Should tell of the spirit clothed from head to foot in song.
    And who hoarded from the spring branches
    The desires falling across their bodies like blossoms.

    What is precious is never to forget
    The delight of the blood drawn from ancient springs
    Breaking through rocks in worlds before our earth;
    Never to deny its pleasure in the simple morning light,
    Nor its grave evening demand for love;
    Never to allow gradually the traffic to smother
    With noise and fog the flowering of the spirit.

    Near the snow, near the sun, in the highest fields
    See how these names are fêted by the waving grass,
    And by the streamers of white cloud,
    And whispers of wind in the listening sky;
    The names of those who in their lives fought for life,
    Who wore at their hearts the fire’s center.
    Born of the sun, they traveled a short while towards the sun,
    And left the vivid air signed with their honor.”

    ~ Stephen Spender ~

  37. The Maunder Minimum.
    Lest we forget.

    To Jack Eddy, cheers mate.

    May this minimum be a maximum worthy of your name.

    RIP.

  38. Eddy, J.A., “The Maunder Minimum” Science, Vol 192 1976

    Eddy, J.A., “Historical and Arboreal Evidence for a Changing sun” AAAS Selected Symposia 17; The New Solar Physics, 1978 pp 10-33

    Eddy, J.A., Climate and the Role of the Sun” Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol X, No 4, spring 1980

    Just a few Jack Eddy Reference works from “The Maunder Minimum and the Variable Sun-Earth Connection” By Willie Wei-Hock Soon and Steven H. Yaskell.

    So another name sails off into the sunset. We all stand on the shoulders of such men and women who have gone before.

    RIP Jack A. Eddy.

    George

  39. Dr. Svalgaard,

    I read the interview of Jack Eddy that Anthony linked to.

    He was so richly human. The best that our species can reach for. He was quoted as saying:

    “When I die, I’ll think that’s one thing that I did that I’ll feel absolutely certain about. That the Sun really does go through prolonged period of anomalous behavior, and will again some day.”

    Yes, when that period arrives, it would very appropriately be named The Eddy Minimum.

    My sympathy at the loss of your friend.

  40. My condolences to the Eddy family and to Leif.
    I quite agree that the minimum needs to be historically significant to deserve his name being attached to it. Let us hope that this requirement is not met for a long time yet…

  41. Eddy Minimum, I agree would be a good way to remember Jack. Another is to cite him in publications, which I did years ago (1977). I always enjoyed his manner where he appeared in science programs, very easy going. I’ll miss him.

  42. I had the pleasure of having had associations with Jack during his graduate studies and during the time afterward during which he was looking at medicine wheels and had just completed his work on the Maunder Minimum. During a visit with him he patiently explained to me what he had done regarding the Maunder Minimum, which at the time I little appreciated, not understanding the significance of the changes of wine crops, etc., that he used to verify the temperature variation. When the AGW hypothesis reached its peak, I was surprised to read in Weart’s interview that he did not regard his work on the Maunder Minimum as potential evidence against it. In retrospect, I think that it was perhaps a manifestation of a humble attitude, a feeling that he should not regard his personal special achievement to be a “hammer” that can be used to solve all problems.
    It was unlikely that I would ever have had an opportunity to visit with him again, but his passing leaves me with a feeling of personal loss.

  43. I didn’t know him that well but I did get the opportunity to talk to Jack on a couple of occasions many years back when I first started researching both the weather – climate and the solar cycle. And he respectfully gave me some of his time when I had contacted him in regards to the possible planetary influence upon the solar cycle. So I’ll always remember this as well as the other things previously mentioned.

  44. Thanks for the WUWT obituary post, and the link to the exceptionally good interview transcript. It is for individuals such as he that research funding should concentrate, instead of the ‘overwhelming consensus’ departments concerned only with political paradigms. One good brain eclipses them. His name should certainly be immortalised somehow.

  45. I really like the proposal to name this minimum the “Eddy Minimum.” If that doesn’t fly, then it should be “the Gore Debacle.”

  46. I must confess that I’m not a scientist, that I view these climatology blogs from the view point of an historian and journalist and that I never heard of Jack Eddy until today. That said, after reading the links provided above, I can say that with his passing that the world is greatly diminished and that I’ve found a kindred spirit whose work I can now study and appreciate for a long time to come.

  47. Dear Friends,

    I thank you from the bottom of my heart for your beautiful thoughts and words about my precious, beloved husband of 17 years, Jack. I wish he were here to read them, for he was so humble and sweet, and did not know how truly loved and respected he was in your community. He was and is my whole life, and I miss him more than anyone could ever imagine.
    With love,
    Barbara (Mrs. John A. Eddy)

    REPLY: Dear Barbara, thank you so much for your visit here during this difficult time. Know this, Jack is held in high esteem and will be rewarded for his contributions to science. My sincerest condolences. If Jack had a cause or affiliation that he would have liked to see tributes sent to, don’t hesitate to mention it and I’ll make sure it is prominently posted here. Kindest regards, Anthony Watts

  48. Dear Friends,

    Could you kindly correct the birth date for this sight? Jack was born on March 25, 1931 (not 1932).

    With kind regards,
    Barbara (Mrs. John A. Eddy)

    REPLY: Done, and thank you. – Anthony

  49. Thank you very much for your kind words.

    Yes, he was and is loved and respected by our community; he will be missed.

  50. My first reading of Jack Eddy’s work in Science in 1976 has always remained vivid, just like other dramatic events, eg the assassination of President Kennedy, the first Moon walk and the first Challenger explosion. By way of background, I live in Canberra, Australia.

    At the time in 1976 I had since 1974 been a member of the Priorities Review Staff, a small group of analysts set up to advise the newly elected Prime Minister Whitlam about the goals and strategies of his Government. By 1976 the Whitlam Government was no longer in power, the PRS had been abolished and I was advising Prime Minister Fraser about foreign policy and intelligence and security matters. But those of us that had worked for Gough Whitlam kept in touch.

    Eddy’s paper ran counter to our entire outlook. We were of the view that governments could and should change anything for the better (or worse). My focus had been social and education policy. The idea that agricultural productivity and therefore the supply of essential foods might be largly regulated by the Sun and beyond government’s capacity to influence seemed absurd from within this outlook. Our general view was that Eddy’s idea was just another crazy idea. And yet the thought hit me vividly that just as the tides are outside our control so might ultimately agricultural productivty. I didn’t think much beyond that – I had no understanding of the Sun or the climate. The thing that struck me, and perhaps why my memory is so vivid, was the idea that forces external to the planet might have such power and governments might be so puny. But I was still in the camp of government can – and should – do anything. Improvements to agricultural productivity was one. Over the next decades I thought no more about the Sun and Jack Eddy and all of that until I stumbled upon the work of Rhodes Fairbridge about six years ago. By that time I had a better sense of the limits of government and about the proper role of government. Broadly speaking, I find myself in broad agreement with Douglass North and the institutional economists.

    I now deeply admire Jack Eddy for being so persistent and successful in getting his research published and helping to break and unfortunate paradigm that I once held dear.

    I can understand those who find repugnant and absurd the idea that our planet’s climate dynamics might be entirely out of the influence of governments whether because the dynamics arise form internal oscillations of very complex systems or because of a determinative role of the Sun.

    As with agricultural productivity, there is much that governments can do to improve things and manage our adaptive efficiency. But if the temperatures plummet, if the droughts come, if things warm up a lot, if the floods come, we can’t stop what’s happening; we can learn to predict better and adapt better, but that’s about it. I am eternally grateful to Jack Eddy for helping to break an old paradigm. In my case, I was a very slow learner – almost 30 yrs – before I really understood what he was saying back in 1976.

  51. “When I die, I’ll think that’s one thing that I did that I’ll feel absolutely certain about. That the Sun really does go through prolonged period of anomalous behavior, and will again some day.”

    The Sun’s Secret

    A secret cloaked by history’s sweep
    Submerged as if within the deep
    In murky currents swirling slow,
    An Eddy brought it from below.

    He proved the sun a fickle friend
    With tempers hard to comprehend.
    Exuberance brings the Earth repair
    And disregard a grim dispair.

    Will a maunder bring the chill?
    Will the storms begin to still?
    Will Sol’s face with blotches fill,
    Or Eddy’s words will Sol fulfill?

    Sol may soon drift off to sleep
    It will not help to pray or weep.
    He’ll close his eyes in slumber deep.
    Life’s promise, then, is our’s to keep.

    Rest In Peace Jack Eddy

  52. Leif, while it is noble of you to want honour your friend by naming the minimum for him, you are spitting on Ted Landschiedt’s memory in the process. Ted Landscheidt is the one who predicted the minimum, not Jack Eddy.

    However well intentioned your proposed action might be, I find it despicable that you are trying to steal the fame from Ted. He, like Jack, was a good man, and you are proposing joining with a host of AGW supporters in trying to erase the memory of Ted and his work.

    Finally, many people already call the upcoming (perhaps) minimum the “Landscheidt Minimum”. You’re swimming upstream. You might even succeed, but to me and many others, it will always be the “Landscheidt Minimum”.

    As a result, you are dishonoring Jack Eddy’s name by falsely giving him credit in the naming. This does neither Jacks, nor your, reputation any good. Ted’s friends will certainly not thank you if you are successful, and I count myself among them. Your good intentions are leading you down a very ugly path.

  53. It appears Anthony has tastefully deleted some ‘off topic’ comments on here including one of mine.

    I think the last comment here may join their ranks.

    I signed the petition and having a Grand Minimum named after you is not predicated simply by prescience like a stock market analyst. I think this man engaged most of the scientific community keeping its eyes open to how much they have to explore and therefore is an excellent candidate for this honor.

    The less connected colorful mavericks that may have been able to see what most of us couldn’t until others corroborated the evidence sometimes aren’t the ones to coallesce knowledge into a nugget of truth. I defer to the century long fight over the nature of the Universe and the acceptance of the Big Bang Theory. Those of us that have the conviction that the Solar Barycentric Model for Solar Variation will triumph will get our ‘background radiation’ to sweep all other theories aside in due time.

    Patience, we are about to observe what Jack Eddy was focused on first hand! Hopefully, for the most part, we can have fun with it … I mean the cold. Lemaitre eventually recieved his recognition. For me Jack Eddy is comparable to Hubble in that largely resolved debate. Those who pursue knowledge in the true spirit of observation, discovery … science … all deserve our thanks.

  54. len, Anthony is of course free to delete my post if he wishes. However, Ted Landscheidt predicted this minimum twenty years ago. Not last month or last year. Twenty years ahead of time. If the minimum actually occurs, this surely must rank as one of the most significant predictions in solar history. Why should such a remarkable achievement bear anyone else’s name, no matter how good a scientist that other man might be?

    To try to strip Ted of this honor just because Jack Eddy is a good man and Leif was his friend seems to me to be the kind of thing an AGW supporter might do, on a par with giving the Nobel Prize to Al Gormless … but I expect more of a scientist.

  55. Willis Eschenbach (18:54:59) :
    to want honour your friend by naming the minimum for him, you are spitting on Ted Landschiedt’s memory in the process. Ted Landscheidt is the one who predicted the minimum, not Jack Eddy.
    Landscheidt’s prediction in 1981 was wrong, and we are not going into a Grand Minimum this time around. The former Grand Minima were not named after their discoverer, and neither should this one be. The true discoverer of the Grand Minima was Gustav Spoerer, not Maunder. Eddy has told me [and others] that he thought of honoring Spoerer, but decided on Maunder Minimum because it sounded better [the nice alliteration of the two ‘M’s], and nobody could spell Spörer correctly anyway. My proposal was not to name the coming minimum after Eddy no matter what, but as I said “if the coming minimum turns out to be significant [and I meant ‘Grand’], then to name it after Eddy” and not because of his discovery of it, but because of his contribution to solar science, which is considerable, while Landscheidt’s is precisely nil. Astronomers have long memories and it is very likely that the actually naming is many decades or centuries in the future, when a real Grand Minimum finally emerges. The so-called, ‘Dalton Minimum’ should not even be counted as a ‘Grand’ minimum. [And Dalton didn’t discover it – and IMHO did not make any significant contribution to solar science either, so I would not even use his name in this connection].

  56. Lief. I bet to differ with you on the contribution issue. Many of us here only became interested in this topic because of that other guy if nothing else. My prediction is your work will ultimately be a piece of the barycenter solar cycle model. I kind of see you as the Hoyle in this debate and hopefully, in the end, you can happily stand with those that marry you to the ‘cycle nut’ metaphorically speaking :D (Sorry for having fun with the politics here).

    Anyway, in summary, the total contribution is paramount and this Grand Minimum I’m living in would be well named after Jack. It kind of has a ring to it … ‘Eddy Minimum’.

    Gravity, politically, scientifically, inertia, light … forget it … I need a few more neurons firing to carry on that thought …

  57. In the end, there is no ‘official’ body that does naming of minima [as there is for craters on the Moon, etc, and asteroids, and the like]. So it comes down to what people decide should rule. All the SPD can do is to state what their suggested choice is. And the solar community ‘votes’ by using whatever individuals prefer to call it in future papers, over which nobody has [nor should have] any control.

  58. Without humility there can be no Humanity.

    Without Humanity science is meaningless.

    How rare then, the meaningful scientist.

    Jack Eddy: One of a rare breed.

    May You Rest In Peace.

    And, THANK YOU!

  59. I was fortunate enough to know and work with Dr. Eddy at the High Altitude Observatory. I am not a scientist, but I can tell you that I have worked with many fine people, and Dr. Eddy is the finest of all. Always the consummate gentleman. Always the humorist. Never conceited. Those of us who knew him are now experiencing the “Eddy Minimum”, for without Jack Eddy, the world is not quite so bright a spot.

  60. I, too, mourn the loss of this great astronomical figure. His knowledge and contributions have caused an unquestionable inprint in the fabric of our field. He has added a breadth of expertise to something that was once nebulous and an unknown frontier. My day is ruined.

    Rest in Peace. God Speed.

  61. “All of us who live here need to decide whether a nation with less than 5
    percent of the world’s population should continue to give off nearly one
    fourth of the gases that contribute to global warming.”
    – John A. Eddy

    I would also like to express my condolensces to the family of Dr. Jack
    Eddy. I never had a chance to meet him, or even to hear him speak, but I can infer what a remarkable man he was through his work and through having met one of his children.

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