Northeast Siberia braces for extreme cold of -60C

Can you imagine going out to this Stevenson Screen in Verkhojansk and taking a reading in – 60C cold? Let’s count our blessing here in the USA and Canada that we don’t have to deal with these kinds of temperatures, yet.

Stevenson Screen at Verhojansk Meteo Station looking ENE

http://www.rian.ru
RIA Novosti

Northeast Siberia braces for extreme cold of -60C
15/12/2008 12:45 YAKUTSK, December 15 (RIA Novosti) – Temperatures in the northeast Siberian republic of Yakutia could fall to minus 60 degrees Celsius (minus 76 degrees Fahrenheit) in the next few days, the local meteorological service said Monday.

With average low temperatures in Yakutia dropping below minus 40 degrees Celsius (minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit) overnight, weather in the town of Verkhoyansk dropped overnight to minus 53 degrees Celsius (minus 63.4 degrees Fahrenheit), while in Oymyakon it reached minus 57 degrees Celsius (minus 70.6 degrees Fahrenheit).

“However, this is not the limit – in the next few days weather in the town of Krestyakh could drop below minus 58 degrees Celsius (minus 72.4 degrees Fahrenheit),” the meteorological service spokesman said.

The spokesman added that the current spell of extremely cold weather was due to an influx of cold polar air masses.

Yakutia has two places that contest the honor of being named the North Pole of cold, or the place where the lowest-ever temperature in the Northern hemisphere was recorded – Verkhoyansk with a record of minus 67.8 degrees Celsius (minus 90 degrees Fahrenheit) and Oymyakon with a minimum of minus 67.7 degrees Celsius (minus 89.9 degrees Fahrenheit).

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125 Responses to Northeast Siberia braces for extreme cold of -60C

  1. Graeme Rodaughan says:

    I wonder what the NOAA USHCN weather station data in NE Siberia will show for the December average temperature.

    Looking forward to the January Data.

    It would be funny if they re-posted the november data or something like that.

    Or will the average be lower than normal?

  2. crosspatch says:

    If it gets down to -78.5°C, then the CO2 will freeze out of the air as frost.

    Which makes me suspect of CO2 concentrations trapped in ice core samples.

  3. EJ says:

    Having braved this kinda of cold before, absolutely been there. If we get our wishes, we can now look forward to power supplies by our gerbals and many dinners of weeds. Thank goodness its starting to freeze everywhere! Our food supply is now ensured.

    We couldn’t have our crops grow better with longer growing seasons and increased CO2, especially if they are irrigated. No.

    Is your freedom to breath now going to be determined in some back room in Europe?

  4. tetris says:

    It boggles the mind that we are still being told [by Gore and others] that “Arctic temperatures are far above normal”. Reality is Arctic air with temperatures not seen since the mid-1970s is not only bearing down on Siberia but on good parts of North America and Europe as well.

  5. I’ll gladly give you a quitclaim deed to any part of the Earth’s surface where I can convert from °C to °F in my head.

  6. Pamela Gray says:

    Meh.

    Record lows and snowfall are coming in from Oregon, Idaho and Washington:

    http://www.weather.gov/climate/index.php?wfo=pdt

    Many are breaking 70+ years of data.

    Tomorrow will bring more in. I have 9 inches of snow in my front yard in Pendleton. School was two hours late today. We are a hardy, if not stupid, bunch.

  7. J.Hansford. says:

    Damn….. and I’ve just invested in a Siberian ice company ’cause the Arctic woz gunna run outta ice….. Knew I shouldna listened to that Gore fella.

    …. Hmm. They reckon Ice is a good insulator ‘eh?…. Might have to go with cheap Siberian igloos instead… what with the collapse of the housing market an’ all. ;-)

  8. Mike D. says:

    According to USA Today, the coldest temperature ever officially recorded in the USA was -79.8°F – rounded off to -80°F – observed at Prospect Creek Camp in the Endicott Mountains of northern Alaska on Jan. 23, 1971. The Prospect Creek Camp is along the Alaska pipeline about 20 miles north of the Arctic Circle.

    The North American low of -81.4°F. was recorded at Snag in Canada’s Yukon Territory, on Feb. 3, 1947.

    The lowest ever recorded in the contiguous 48 States, was -69.7°F (rounded off to -70°F) at Rogers Pass, in Lewis and Clark County, Mont., on Jan. 20, 1954.

    The coldest temperature ever recorded east of the Mississippi River was -60°F in Tower, Minn., on Feb. 2, 1996.

  9. crosspatch says:

    bah, vapor pressure, no it wouldn’t condense CO2 out. My bad.

  10. Steve Keohane says:

    crosspatch (20:27:46) Maybe I am missing something, but if CO2 frost were included in the ice cores, wouldn’t that cause higher levels of CO2 to correlate with colder temperatures? I assume the CO2 level would be exaggerated in the core if a large portion of the verticle column of CO2 in the atmosphere precipitated at <-78.5°C.

  11. Richard deSousa says:

    After reading Lubos Motl’s blog on Steven Chu, the US’s next Secretary of Energy, I’m wondering how this guy ever won the Nobel Prize. Along with his boss, the next president of the US, the gods help us… the US is surrounded by idiots.

    http://motls.blogspot.com/

  12. Aviator says:

    J. Hansford quotes “They reckon Ice is a good insulator ‘eh?”. I can assure you that it is not. An igloo is built of snow; if it turns to ice, you freeze to death. I’ve lived in an igloo (actually two, had to build a new one when one started to glaze over) for a week and I do not wish to repeat the experience. I certainly do not want to have to display my snow-building skills to the younger generation but I’m afraid I may have to given Al Gore’s track record on predictions. A balmy -9C (16F) here on Vancouver Island tonight.

  13. Graeme Rodaughan says:

    crosspatch (20:27:46) :
    crosspatch (21:18:41) :

    And I was about to say – “That’s a subtle point”. But nevermind.

  14. David S says:

    Well if it was my job to read the thermometer that day I would open another bottle of vodka and then write down the temperature from last month. Hmmm, why does that sound familiar?

  15. Bill Jamison says:

    Denver had a low of -19F last night, breaking the old record of -6F set in 1951.

    I had no idea that it got that cold in Denver!

    The good news is that ski resorts are thrilled to have 3ft or more of fresh light powder snow just in time for the holidays.

  16. The main Russian meteo address I sent at the beginning of this page (comments) are in English versions as well. So everyone will able to follow the current Yakutsk temps without translations:

    http://www.hmn.ru/en/

    Regards

  17. Kevin says:

    I’ve done some rudimentary calculations, and it turns out that -60C falls under the category of ‘pretty damned cold’.

    Just giving you a head’s up.

  18. Neil Hampshire says:

    The BBC reported that Moscow itself is having a very warm December
    They have still not seen serious snow which is most unusual

  19. Molon Labe says:

    I left a chilly Porto Alegre yesterday, changed planes in a decidedly cold Sao Paulo (remember it’s supposed to be summer down there), and arrived home in Las Vegas to 2 inches of snow.

  20. pkatt says:

    We have snow on the ground and a cold front moving in which comes with its own weather service advisory… Yay! Im so glad its warming up. (sarc off)

    In reality turns out that the Farmer’s Almanac for this area is right on so far. Wonder how the climate models are doing:P http://www.almanac.com/weatherforecast/us/13

    The appointment announcements today were sort of a bummer. Only thing that makes me happy right now is the thought that somewhere in the world its warm and a little irony, most of the states who pledged their souls to Kyoto are experiencing record cold and cold related problems (ice pwr outages, record cold temps). Who says mother nature doesnt have a sence of humor, eh?

  21. JimB says:

    Richard deSousa:
    “… the US is surrounded by idiots.”

    You mean run by idiots.

    No need to be mean to our canadian and mexican neighbors.

    JimB

  22. JimB says:

    “Denver had a low of -19F last night, breaking the old record of -6F set in 1951.”

    Yes…but it’s a dry cold.

    JimB

  23. Adam Soereg says:

    Generally, Oymyakon is said to be the coldest permanently inhabited place on the Earth. From some point of view, it is considered to be true (coldest average temperature in winter months), but the other side ofthe coin is that July can be warmer there than in Western Europe, and the annual mean temperature is ‘warmer’ than some places in Nunavut, Canada.

    The word “Oymyakon” means ‘non-freezing water’ in a local language, named after a hot spring nearby. The average temperature in january for the 1951-2000 period is -46,8°c, and the lowest recorded temerature is -71,2°c. However, this data is obtained by extrapolation. The record high for Oymyakon is 38,0°c (about 101°F), so the largest temperature variation in one place (109,2°c!) is recorded there. In the early 1990’s, after the collapse of the Soviet Union the weather station is moved from Oymyakon to Tomtor, 60kms South from the original location. Tomtor is at about 750 meters above sea level, while Oymyakon is at only 670 meters.

    I calulated the monthly mean temperatures by comparing T24 and (Tmin/Tmax)/2, which can be found in GHCN and GSOD dataset. I adjusted all pre-1990 data, because of the significantly higher minimum temperature readings in the new location. It seems that the relocation of the station affected Tmin better than Tmax. Annual mean temp. was estimated where some monthly values were missing.

    You can download the data from here: http://gtk2007.extra.hu/FIles/ojmjakon.xlsDespite of the record low winter temperatures, Oymyakon shows warming in the recent decades on an annual basis.

  24. B Kerr says:

    jorgekafkazar (20:49:04) :

    I’ll gladly give you a quitclaim deed to any part of the Earth’s surface where I can convert from °C to °F in my head.

    Easy!!

    Double C ……. Subtract 10%
    Add 30 Add 2

    So if C=16
    2C = 32
    10% =3.2

    F = 32 – 3.2 or 32 – 3.

    F=29.2 +30 = 59 +2 = 61

    Works for me!!

  25. Ron de Haan says:

    Richard deSousa (21:45:32) :

    “After reading Lubos Motl’s blog on Steven Chu, the US’s next Secretary of Energy, I’m wondering how this guy ever won the Nobel Prize. Along with his boss, the next president of the US, the gods help us… the US is surrounded by idiots.

    http://motls.blogspot.com/

    Richard,
    Winder how this guy ever won the Nobel Prize:

    http://heliogenic.blogspot.com/2008/12/wonder-how-gore-got-his-prize.html

  26. rutger says:

    record snow in austria and italy.. over 200m of fresh snow fell the last 4 days and its still falling

    http://89.163.145.92/~skiforum/forum/showthread.php?t=25745&page=5

    reports that there is 6 m of snow in slovenia!
    Snow height:
    625 cm

    http://www.kanin.si/index.php?lng=en&cont=222&l=2

    spain got over a meter last weekend..

    south-west alpes italy ; CLOSED.. TO much Snow

    http://www.monterosa-ski.com/index.php?option=com_readxmlmeteo10x&Itemid=153..

    i have never seen this, its the the most snowfall in over 100 years

  27. Peter Hearnden says:

    Someone must have turned off the hot water pipes?

  28. Dodgy Geezer says:

    David S:

    Well if it was my job to read the thermometer that day I would open another bottle of vodka and then write down the temperature from last month. Hmmm, why does that sound familiar?

    Well, he seems to have brought a female meterologist out with him as well, so perhaps he has another method of keeping warm…?

  29. Richard Hegarty says:

    This report from Russia Today on the coldest town on earth has an interview with a meteorologist who recorded -63C.

  30. PearlandAggie says:

    meanwhile, do these folks have any credibility left?

    NASA: 2 Trillion Tons of Ice Has Melted Since 2003

    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,467526,00.html

  31. Reid says:

    They are getting close to temperatures where steel shatters like glass.

  32. Bill Marsh says:

    Am I imagining things or is there a lit incandescent bulb inside that Stevenson screen during daylight? That certainly would help the accuracy of the temp measurements.

  33. Retired Engineer says:

    PearlandAggie (02:59:51) : “Two trillion tons has melted.”
    I’m sure this is true. But how much has frozen since then?

    The Yin and Yang of ice these days, it can melt and freeze at the same time. Or perhaps all that CO2 lowers the melting point.

    Besides, the government has ‘melted’ 4-5 trillion dollars in the last two months. What’s a bit of ice compared to that? Talk about run by idiots.

  34. Dodgy Geezer says:

    “meanwhile, do these folks have any credibility left?

    NASA: 2 Trillion Tons of Ice Has Melted Since 2003″

    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,467526,00.html

    Well, this seems to be happening as we speak. Have you looked at the JAXA figures? For the last few days the total Arctic Ice Extent has been going DOWN! In Winter! Can anyone explain what’s happening here?

    http://www.ijis.iarc.uaf.edu/en/home/seaice_extent.htm

  35. Tom in glad to be here Florida says:

    And I was complaining about +46 degrees F the other morning! BTW, there are still many, many bargains on housing here. And no state income taxes! The tangerines from my tree were delicious this morning and the golf is still only $35 a round right now. What are you all waiting for?

  36. Mikira says:

    Here’s the formulas:

    C=5(F-32)/9 F=9*C/5+32

    So 9 * -67.8 = -610.2/5 = -122.04 +32 = -90.04

  37. PearlandAggie says:

    LOL @ Retired Engineer!

    I’m also an engineer, but not retired :)

    by the way, what happened to record warmth in Siberia? gone, i suppose, just like those trillions of dollars………..

  38. Bill: Anthony has said before he reckons the one in the photo is a mockup for tourists. But you’d still think they’d want to leave it off – at those ambient temperatures the lamp is going to make it look a lot warmer than it really is.

  39. Michael Ronayne says:

    At a pressure of one atmosphere and temperatures below −78°C (-108°F) carbon dioxide will be a solid and it will “snow” dry-ice. For additional more information see:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_dioxide

    The coldest recorded temperature on Earth, -89.2°C (-128.6°F) was measured at Vostok Station Antarctica on July 21, 1983 which is at an altitude of 3,500 m (11,484 ft), so there would be no dry-ice snow at that elevation and temperature. Because of background radiation there are theoretical lower limits as to how cold it can get in the Antarctic or Arctic but the observed values are below the theoretical minimum by several degrees. The chances of seeing it snow dry-ice at sea level are improbable and the dry-ice would sublimate upon contact with the ground but it is fun to speculate on the possibility; which is most likely a direct result of reading too many Hal Clement novels in my misspent youth. On the other hand, we have never had the opportunity to observe polar conditions under the impact of a full ice age, so let’s keep an open mind as to the possibilities during the next 100 years.

    In the ice core records has any evidence of dry-ice snow been found and would such records if they did exist be preserved during the drilling and extraction process?

    Mike
    p.s. Yes I have the three volume Hal Clement anthology collectors set

  40. Stevie B says:

    So um, with the polar temps deciding to visit us in Siberia and the US, dropping temps to near historic or even historic lows…how is it the ice is melting according to the IJIS website? I know NANSEN just made a correction, what’s up with IJIS?

  41. Steven Hill says:

    Why is the sea ice chart going downward?

    thanks,
    Steve

  42. David Y says:

    PearlandAggie–

    Notice where the FoxNews story says:

    “Between Greenland, Antarctica and Alaska, melting land ice has raised global sea levels about one-fifth of an inch in the past five years, Luthcke said. Sea levels also rise from water expanding as it warms.”

    So if we do the math: 1/5 of an inch in 5 years; that’s 1 inch every 25 years, or 4 inches every century. And the historical sea level rise since the last ice age has been what, 8-12 inches per century? Maybe due to, hmmm, melting ice and warming oceans? This lower rate is supposed to scare us?

    This is a perfect example of how the media throws a number out there without any context, expecting it to outrage or scare the public. It’s like if I said “At least 170,000 dead in yesterday’s dying spree”–which, based on a back of the envelope calculation, is likely how many people on the planet died of natural causes yesterday.

    Also, regarding sea level rise: The neat thing about sea level rise is that unlike an asteroid hit, a wealthy society can TAKE A STEP BACK AWAY FROM THE WATER–or follow the Netherlands model of high-tech dikes, etc. What is most galling about this is the Alarmists’ complete and utter lack of faith in humanity. Just disgusting.

  43. John S. says:

    When the Soviet Army and the Chinese PLA were waging their mini-war along the Amuri river in Northeast China in 1969/70 it was one of the coldest winters ever. The Soviet tankers had to build tents over their tanks to keep out the wind and keep in enough heat from an oil stove so that even with the engine running the fuel didn’t get so cold that it wouldn’t support combustion.
    So many soldiers suffered cold weather injuries on both sides that there was hardly any fighting until the cold snap ended. One of the Soviet tankers told me that he was climbing up on his tank one day and the hand hold shattered in his hand when he grabbed it and the charging handle broke off the pintle-mounted 12.7mm. Now that was cold.

  44. Wondering Aloud says:

    NOAA will show December averages as far above average anywhere they think they can get away with it, and many places where they clearly can’t get away with it. Afterwords the NASA team will adjust the data to show it was much warmer still. That’s my cynical prediction.

    A little more warming of this type and the incresased CO2 will take care of itself as it begins to precipitate out of the atmosphere. Isn’t -68 a bit of a magic number? We can have dry ice at the poles like Mars, will that make them happy?

  45. Arthur Glass says:

    “According to USA Today, the coldest temperature ever officially recorded in the USA was -79.8°F – rounded off to -80°F – observed at Prospect Creek Camp in the Endicott Mountains of northern Alaska on Jan. 23, 1971. The Prospect Creek Camp is along the Alaska pipeline about 20 miles north of the Arctic Circle. ”

    From July of 1969 to early January of 1971, I was stationed near or at Fort Wainwright, Alaska, right outside of Fairbanks. I left on Jan 10, 1971; the temperature sign at the airport read -47 through ice fog. So I missed that record cold outbreak (Fairbanks hit -70, I believe) by two weeks. But I’ll tell you, anything lower than -30 is, no matter how warmly you are dressed, beyond cold. A run of days when the high temerature never gets above -40 is brutal.

  46. Perry Debell says:

    Here’s a report from the reliable, non partisan BBC, about the thickness of Arctic ice. It’s getting thinner! Oh bugger, what shall we do?

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7692963.stm

    I have to pay a TV licence fee of £139.50 per year for this garbage.

    http://www.spiderbomb.com/tv/

    The sooner the BBC is broken up, the happier I shall be.

    Perry

  47. Arthur Glass says:

    Here are the official readings for Fairbanks from 1971:

    http://climate.gi.alaska.edu/FaiData/Files/1971.txt

    My -47 memory does not quite tally with the official reading. Also, there must have been a chinook event that day to bring the high temp up so high,

  48. Dan Lee says:

    Totally OT, but has anyone noticed this?

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081215121601.htm

    “Boundary between Earth’s upper atmosphere and space has moved to extraordinarily low altitudes, NASA instruments document”

    I’m not sure what this means or how relevant it is to the theme of this blog, but I don’t know where else to ask.

  49. fred says:

    OT, there’s an interesting article at ScienceDaily about the ionosphere being much lower than expected to to the extreme solar minimum.

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081215121601.htm

    Snip:

    “CINDI’s first discovery was, however, that the ionosphere was not where it had been expected to be. During the first months of CINDI operations the transition between the ionosphere and space was found to be at about 260 miles (420 km) altitude during the nighttime, barely rising above 500 miles (800 km) during the day. These altitudes were extraordinarily low compared with the more typical values of 400 miles (640 km) during the nighttime and 600 miles (960 km) during the day.

    The height of the ionosphere/space transition is controlled in part by the amount of extreme ultraviolet energy emitted by the Sun and a somewhat contracted ionosphere could have been expected because C/NOFS was launched during a minimum in the 11-year cycle of solar activity. However, the size of the actual contraction caught investigators by surprise. In fact, when they looked back over records of solar activity, they found that C/NOFS had been launched during the quietest solar minimum since the space age began.”

  50. Annette says:

    Here in Port Angeles, WA the temp this morning is about 12 F. I don’t recall it being this cold since the late 70’s, although that is based on feeble human memory. It boggles my mind that the Arctic is churning out such a mass of frigid air in North America, Europe and Russia.

    For a quick, albeit not exact, conversion of C to F, double the C and add 30.

    I’ve been a lurker for a number of months and I just want to congratulate you Anthony, on a superb website. Keep up the good work!!

  51. MattN says:

    If it gets any warmer, we’re all going to freeze to death….

  52. David L. Hagen says:

    Some explanations for this record cold:
    Op-Ed: Look to patterns to grasp glacier growth By DENNIS T. AVERY for the Journal Star Posted Dec 14, 2008 @ 12:01 AM

    Alaska’s glaciers grew this year after shrinking for most of the last 200 years. The reason? Global temperatures dropped over the past 18 months.

    The global mean annual temperature has been declining recently because the solar wind thrown out by the sun has retreated to its smallest extent in at least 50 years. This temperature downturn was not predicted by the global computer models, but had been predicted by the sunspot index since 2000.

    The solar wind normally protects the Earth from 90 percent of the high-energy cosmic rays that flash constantly through the universe. Henrik Svensmark at the Danish Space Research Institute has demonstrated that when more cosmic rays hit the Earth, they create more of the low, wet clouds that deflect heat back into outer space. Thus the Earth’s recent cooling.

    Unusually large amounts of Alaskan snow last winter were followed by unusually chilly temperatures this summer. “In general, the weather this summer was the worst I have seen in at least 20 years,” says Bruce Molnia of the U.S. Geological Survey. “It’s been a long time on most glaciers (since) they’ve actually had positive mass balance (added thickness).”

    Overall, Molnia figures Alaska had lost 10,000-12,000 square kilometers of ice since 1800, the depth of the Little Ice Age. That’s enough ice to cover the state of Connecticut.

    See full article

    Could the following discovery have any bearing on this?
    Scientists Discover Cloak of Plasma Around Earth

    The warm plasma cloak starts on the night side of the planet and wraps around the dayside according to the researchers. As the cloak reaches the afternoon side of the planet, it gradually fades away. Due to that fact the cloak only surrounds about 3/4 of the planet.

    The cloak is fed by the low-energy particles lifted into space over the Earth’s poles, carried behind the Earth on its magnetic tail, and then turned 180 degrees by a kink in the magnetic field. The particles are then boosted back towards the Earth into the region called the plasma sheet.

  53. Robinson says:

    Is this correct?

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1095325/Last-10-years-warmest-record-man-climate-change.html

    Apparently the last 10 years have been the warmest on record.

  54. Anne says:

    Denver weather report:
    # Today: Snow showers this morning becoming more scattered later. Cold. High 28F. Winds WSW at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of snow 60%.
    # Tonight: Partly cloudy skies. Low 13F. Winds SW at 5 to 10 mph.

    Where did that -19 degrees come from?

    Also, the snow in slovenia was 200 cm (about 6 feet) not 200 m (600feet), thats still a lot. Southern Austria (where I come from) has had a lot of snow

    No sun spots.
    The new ice age cometh.

  55. Alex says:

    Hmmm some interesting news…

    This afternoon (12 gmt) an article was posted on yahoo news as a top headline ” 2 trillion xyz of ice melted since 2003″ (xyz = some unit, I can’t remember) but anyway this alarmist article was up as a headline for about two hours and has now vanished! It seems the alarmism was too much even for yahoo news so the article has been scrapped…

  56. Alex says:

    Ah my bad , it is 2 trillion tonnes, the article has been moved out of the spotlight and is now under the “science” section

  57. Ken says:

    Woodfortress(Paul Clark):

    “Bill: Anthony has said before he reckons the one in the photo is a mockup for tourists. But you’d still think they’d want to leave it off – at those ambient temperatures the lamp is going to make it look a lot warmer than it really is.”

    I do not see any cables for a power source for the light.

    Is it possible that the light is the AF Illuminator light; (Auto Focusing Assist Light) from the camera he holding?

    Taking a picture would be a whole lot quicker than recording the temp manually
    with paper and pen.

    REPLY: There’s a cable, look again at that photo and the ones in the original linked post – Anthony

  58. Bill Marsh says:

    Anthony,

    Has there been any explanation for the sudden change in ice coverage reported by ASMRE http://www.ijis.iarc.uaf.edu/seaice/extent/AMSRE_Sea_Ice_Extent.png. Following this chart the Acrtic is melting at a prodigious rate in just the last week. NSIDC ice extent does not seem to be reflecting a huge melt off http://nsidc.org/data/seaice_index/images/daily_images/N_timeseries.png. AMSRE really needs to address this, the chart they are putting out is starting to look downright silly.

    REPLY: I have been waiting to see if they will correct it, as I suspect an error. – Anthony

  59. Les Johnson says:

    jorge: your

    I’ll gladly give you a quitclaim deed to any part of the Earth’s surface where I can convert from °C to °F in my head.

    Welcome to Alberta. Its minus 40 deg C, here. Or, minus 40 deg F.

  60. William says:

    I wonder how many times the light has been left on in a Stevenson screen? Looks like a good place for some LED’s.

    Noaa says that November was warmer than average for the U.S. The west was above “normal” while Florida, Georgia and So. Carolina had record cold.
    If I measure my car’s radiator at 150 deg and my air-conditioner is putting out 50 deg air, does that mean the average temperature of my car is 100 deg?

  61. Novoburgo says:

    Re: Stevenson screen temps.

    When the door is opened you flip on the fan to ventilate and the light so you can see the thermometer, get your readings, turn the light and fan off, shut the door, repeat later. Very simple. You don’t stand there admiring the temperature while doing heavy breathing exercises.

  62. Novoburgo says:

    SXUS71 KCAR 161430
    RERBGR

    RECORD EVENT REPORT…CORRECTED AWIPS ID
    NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE CARIBOU ME
    435 PM EST MON DEC 15 2008

    …RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE SET AT BANGOR ME…

    A RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURE OF 52 DEGREES WAS SET AT BANGOR ME TODAY.
    THIS BREAKS THE OLD RECORD OF 51 SET IN 1975.

    What isn’t mentioned in these record event reports is the fact that the prior record was not representative. Most December daily temperatures records for Bangor fall into the mid to upper 50’s with a scattering of 60’s. This is just smoothing out the bell curve. Oh, this will be repeated again for today since we were in the 50’s after midnight.

  63. Douglas DC says:

    I concur with Pamela, I’m a native of NE Oregon.I either helped in or set up three
    SWARS stations in the 1970’s in NE Oregon and SE Washington. La Grande hasn’t
    been this cold for (forcast) this long since the 1970’s. I wonder if it isn’t heading for 1948-49-50 when my Pop couldn’t plant wheat-only barley, as that was the only thing that would mature in the short summers…

  64. B Kerr says:

    The FOX NEWS article – 2 Trillion Tons of Ice Have Melted Since 2003 – has an interesting conclusion.

    The amounts of methane in the region could dramatically increase global
    warming if they get released, he said.

    That, Semiletov said, “should alarm people”.

    Should alarm people??
    Well that sums the whole article up in a nutshell.

    I’m terrified, what should I do.

  65. JimB says:

    And speaking of ice…new announcement from NASA; ” Two TRILLION TONS of Ice gone since 2003:

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28249708/

    My favorite quote:

    “It’s not getting better; it’s continuing to show strong signs of warming and amplification,” Zwally said. “There’s no reversal taking place.”

    Anyone remember Bagdad Bob?

    JimB

  66. Phil. says:

    Perry Debell (06:03:27) :
    Here’s a report from the reliable, non partisan BBC, about the thickness of Arctic ice. It’s getting thinner! Oh bugger, what shall we do?

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7692963.stm

    So what’s the problem?

  67. Stevie B says:

    Novoburgo (08:23:41) :

    “Re: Stevenson screen temps.

    …You don’t stand there admiring the temperature while doing heavy breathing exercises….”

    Speak for yourself! ;-)

  68. paminator says:

    Mercury freezes solid at -38.8 C. There is a thallium/mercury alloy that freezes at -61.1 C, but the range of a calibrated thermometer using this fluid only extends from -55 C up to about +5C. You would need to use a Pentane (-100C) or Toluene (-200C) thermometer, but these only extend up to +30C and have poor accuracy of 0.5 C.

    Does anyone know what types of thermometers are used in Stevenson screens, either here in the US or in Siberia?

    From wikipedia- “To avoid this (damage to the thermometer when the mercury freezes) some weather services require that all mercury thermometers be brought indoors when the temperature falls to -37 °C (-34.6 °F).”

  69. jkrob says:

    Cold in Siberia/N America & melting Arctic ice is very simple to explain. If you look at the jet stream flow across the northern hemisphere, you see 2 big trofs (cold air) – centered on Siberia & N America and you see two big ridges (warm air) – centered over the N Pacific and N/E Atlantic & northern Europe. See: http://www.emc.ncep.noaa.gov/gmb/STATS/maps/opnl/latest/f12.gif

    The trofs bring cold air south and the ridges bring warm air north. There is also a cut-off low over southern Europe bringing the snow to the Alps.

    Just basic meteorology…

    Reguards,
    Jeff

  70. Phil. says:

    Bill Marsh (07:47:51) :
    Anthony,

    Has there been any explanation for the sudden change in ice coverage reported by ASMRE http://www.ijis.iarc.uaf.edu/seaice/extent/AMSRE_Sea_Ice_Extent.png. Following this chart the Acrtic is melting at a prodigious rate in just the last week.

    Something of an exaggeration, here’s the data:
    12,08,2008,11448906
    12,09,2008,11561250
    12,10,2008,11650000
    12,11,2008,11678594
    12,12,2008,11681563
    12,13,2008,11662813
    12,14,2008,11640625
    12,15,2008,11682813

    So there was a reduction in extent for two days then a return to the previous value, hint, Ice moves!

    Here’s a similar event in Jan 07:

    01,08,2007,12631875
    01,09,2007,12572656
    01,10,2007,12504219
    01,11,2007,12462656
    01,12,2007,12530781
    01,13,2007,12596094
    01,14,2007,12700625

  71. dresi4 says:

    Why are you all so suprise about sudden stop in ice growth right now? You are paranoid, there is no error, ice just stopped growing. We need cold in Barents, Bering and Okhotsk sea. Since yesterday we had 40 000 km2 increase. Nothing unusal. Water there is just too warm, especially in Barents sea.

  72. Steven Hill says:

    This just came in today…

    The year 2008 is on track to be one of the 10 warmest years on record for the globe, based on the combined average of worldwide land and ocean surface temperatures, according to a preliminary analysis by NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, N.C. For November alone, the month is fourth warmest all-time globally, for the combined land and ocean surface temperature. The early assessment is based on records dating back to 1880.

  73. Alex Llewelyn says:

    According to the BBC, we’ve just had the coldest first half to any month in 30 years here in the U.K..

  74. Charles P says:

    > Kevin (00:20:18) :

    > I’ve done some rudimentary calculations, and it turns out that -60C falls under the
    > category of ‘pretty damned cold’.

    You obviously missed the latest NASA press release on the “New Revised Temperature Calibration Scale”. Quoting from the source:

    “From this point forward all temperatures below -50 C will be officially described as tepid, -50 to -10 C will be warmish, -10 to +10 C will be balmy … “

  75. Alex Llewelyn says:

    Currently 2.2 degrees Celsius below the 1960-90 average for December according to CET.

  76. Smokey says:

    Steven Hill @ 09:03:22 :

    Is that ‘assessment’ based on raw data, or adjusted numbers?

    It makes a difference, you know.

  77. Richard Sharpe says:

    Phil provides us with some data:

    12,11,2008,11678594
    12,12,2008,11681563
    12,13,2008,11662813
    12,14,2008,11640625
    12,15,2008,11682813

    I wonder if it is a coincidence that the increase from 12.13.2008 to 12.15.2008 is exactly 20,000.

  78. Greg Johnson says:

    C=5(F-32)/9 F=9*C/5+32

    Useful shortcut – double the C temp, take 10% of the new number, then add 32 to get F.

  79. Mike D. says:

    “The neat thing about sea level rise is that unlike an asteroid hit, a wealthy society can TAKE A STEP BACK AWAY FROM THE WATER–or follow the Netherlands model of high-tech dikes, etc. What is most galling about this is the Alarmists’ complete and utter lack of faith in humanity.”

    We can’t move uphill one foot per century, but we can alter the Earth’s climate to make it colder so that sea levels don’t rise as they have been doing for the last 14,000 years! Such madness is not faithlessness, it is irrational Hubris with a capital H.

    Many, many years ago when I first heard about GW, the concern was the drowning of art treasures in Venice. “Why not pack them out to higher ground?” I asked. From the response I got you’d have thought I shot the Pope. No, “we” must thermally adjust the entire planet downwards because “we” made it warmer in the first place.

    As if!!!! Hello, Humanity. Warmer is Better. Fewer ice storms, arctic blasts, frozen pipes, frostbite, car wrecks on icy streets, power outages on the coldest day of the year, frozen homeless people, etc. If we can possibly make this planet warmer, we should do that, and sooner rather than later.

  80. Phil. says:

    Richard Sharpe (09:20:19) :
    Phil provides us with some data:

    12,11,2008,11678594
    12,12,2008,11681563
    12,13,2008,11662813
    12,14,2008,11640625
    12,15,2008,11682813

    I wonder if it is a coincidence that the increase from 12.13.2008 to 12.15.2008 is exactly 20,000.

    It’s just a consequence of the grid size used to digitize the image is a factor of 10,000.

  81. David Gladstone says:

    It’s one thing when it gets cold in Yakutia, when we get snow and ice in San Francisco, one notices. I live in sight of the Bay on a hill and had ice on my porch all morning yesterday and more and colder weather is coming thanks to the extreme cold in Siberia this year. This must be the work of the PDO!

  82. M White says:

    “This year is coolest since 2000″

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7786060.stm

    “The question for the next decade or so will be whether natural cycles such as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation continue to moderate the warming effect of rising greenhouse gas concentrations.”

    Aren’t greenhouse gases dominant anymore?

  83. George E. Smith says:

    “” jorgekafkazar (20:49:04) :

    I’ll gladly give you a quitclaim deed to any part of the “”

    Easier yet:

    1/ Add 40

    2/ Multiply by 9/5 (C->F), or by 5/9 (F->C).

    3/ Subtract 40.

    Based on the fact that -40 is same; C or F .

    As for those Russkys in Siberia, they are pikers compared to their Vostok Comrades who get to deal with almost -90 C (-130 F)

    Coldest official is I think -128.8F, and official highest is +136 F (in North Africa). they didn’t happen on the same day, but they very well could have.

    Ordinary midsummer (northern) extreme range is over 250 F p-p.

    And we are quibbling about hundredths of a degree over decades !

    Fiddlesticks !

  84. George E. Smith says:

    So NASA lost trillions of tons of ice; seems like there’s far too much drinking going on in that place.

    Did somebody explain that ice comes, ice goes, it happens every year.

    You wouldn’t believe how many quadrillions of tons of ice NASA has lost since NASA came into existence. Maybe its time to get rid of NASA so we can keep the ice.

    We all know that when the arctic ice melts, instead of it reflecting sunlight and increasing the earth’s albedo, it turns into a near black body absorber and funnels all that heat into the ocean.

    That’s the science fiction story; which strangely nobody has seen happen; not even last year when Al Gore missed out on all those Kayak Safaris to the North Pole.

    First of all, the amount of sunlight that hits the frozen sea ice is not worth a tinker’s damn, so any effect on albedo, which is mostly from clouds, is quite negligible.
    Secondly, for the same reason, the amount of sunlight hitting the arctic ocean isn’t worth writing home about, and because of the high angle of incidence, the reflection coefficient is a lot higher that the 2% normal incidence value.

    Thirdly; has anyone ever heard of “lake effect” snow in the midwest. You put some warm water in the middle of a bunch of cold air, and you get three feet of “partly cloudy” on your sidewalk.

    Opening up all that warmer arctic water in the summer of 2007 has probably created the mother of all lake effect snow deluges. since there is more land in the arctic >+60 degrees, than there is in the Antarctic < -60 degrees, the whole north of the planet has got top heavy with snow.

    It’s not my fault that these modellers don’t know how to run a Playstation video game.

  85. Les Johnson says:

    Mike D. your

    Many, many years ago when I first heard about GW, the concern was the drowning of art treasures in Venice. “Why not pack them out to higher ground?” I asked.

    Its not so much global warming that threatens Venice. Its built on a flood plain, in a marsh, just above sea level. They have also been draining the subsurface waters, which causes the soil to compact, which causes subsidence.

    But, the worst flood threat comes from the dredging of the shipping channel, around 1900. This allows Adriatic storms to bypass the natural flood control, the marsh, and march straight into the city.

    Any global warming, on the other hand, is predicted to actually REDUCE flooding, by increasing the presence of the stationary Adriatic high, which will keep storms away from Venice.

  86. E.M.Smith says:

    Pamela Gray (20:49:14) :
    Record lows and snowfall are coming in from Oregon, Idaho and Washington:
    [...]
    Tomorrow will bring more in. I have 9 inches of snow in my front yard in Pendleton.

    no No NO! You have 9 inches of ‘Global Warming Induced Anomalous Precipitation’, nothing more ;-)

  87. E.M.Smith says:

    JimB (00:49:18) :
    “Denver had a low of -19F last night, breaking the old record of -6F set in 1951.”

    Yes…but it’s a dry cold.

    ROFLMAO !!!!! How Could You! (Please do it again…)

  88. E.M.Smith says:

    Perry Debell (06:03:27) :
    I have to pay a TV licence fee of £139.50 per year for this garbage.

    Youtube my friend, youtube! & you can buy a lot of DVDs for 140 pounds…

  89. Alan B says:

    Find a place where the temperature is -40 deg. That will be both C and F.

    Hence, a different calculation route is:

    Step 1 Add 40
    Step 2 Multiply by 5/9 for F to C or 9/5 for C to F
    Step 3 Subtract 40.

    Means you don’t have to remember whether to add or subtract the 32 before or after the multiply. As you would expect, this gives identical answers to the other routes

    Alan

  90. Dave says:

    Where can you see temperature forecasts for Bering, Barents, … sea?
    And if so, does air temperature makes a big difference for freezing the sea at that place, or is it only dependent from sea temperature?

  91. E.M.Smith says:

    B Kerr (08:42:56) :
    The FOX NEWS article – 2 Trillion Tons of Ice Have Melted Since 2003

    [...]
    I’m terrified, what should I do.

    Learn to drink your scotch properly, without ice … (Who needs ice? Hic…)

  92. davidcobb says:

    Richard Sharpe et al:
    The press release appears to be an update of Velicogna and Wahr 2006 which uses the GRACE gravity anomaly satellite to determine mass balance of ice sheets. It does not pass the smell test because it uses modeled mass balance (modeled precipitation input- estimated outflow) to determine GIA (Glacial Isostatic Adjustment) which is 80%+ of gravity signal. Neat trick. Using modeled mass balance to determine actual mass balance.

  93. George Patch says:

    Reminds me of a comment someone posted about taking temperatures at a DEW Line station in the 1960’s. They don’t go out to take a reading! At least you don’t get dressed just to go out to the Stevenson Screen. You look at the window thermometer or take a guess.

    I don’t even walk to my mail box on bad days in Virginia…

  94. B Kerr says:

    This is a fascinating question and I have been waiting for someone to explain how it is actually done.

    paminator (08:58:13) :

    Mercury freezes solid at -38.8 C. There is a thallium/mercury alloy that freezes at -61.1 C, but the range of a calibrated thermometer using this fluid only extends from -55 C up to about +5C. You would need to use a Pentane (-100C) or Toluene (-200C) thermometer, but these only extend up to +30C and have poor accuracy of 0.5 C.

    Would someone please be kind enough to explain how low temperatures are measured, and how they were measured in the 1800’s without the use of modern electronics.

  95. Lars Tunkrans says:

    Mean while in Sweden we aint freezeing yet .
    +4 C / + 39 F today.

    Day by day temperature anomalies for December

    http://www.smhi.se/cmp/jsp/polopoly.jsp?d=11488&l=sv

    Monthly mean temperature anomaly for December

    http://www.smhi.se/cmp/jsp/polopoly.jsp?d=11490&l=sv

  96. tty says:

    Actually while human meddling have made flooding in Venice worse, it is not the basic reason for it. The whole northern Adriatic is sinking, and has been doing so for a very long time. During the last interglacial about 120,000 years ago sea-level was slightly higher than today. In the Venice area the last interglacial sea-level is only known from drill cores, since it is now 130 meters below sea level. So Venice is sinking about one meter per millenium, and has been doing so since long before Homo sapiens arrived in Europe. Short-term you could protect the city with dykes, long-term there is nothing to do except moving, unless the next ice-age arrives first and ties up the water in glaciers again.

  97. tty says:

    About that “lake effect snowfall” near the Arctic Ocean, one theory about how glaciations start is that they are initiated by the Arctic Ocean staying ice-free along the Siberian coast in winter, which dumps so much snow on the Putorana plateau that it does not have time to melt in summer, thereby starting up an icecap. It would not take that much extra snow, since the Putorana is only free from snow about 4-6 weeks a year as it is.

  98. uncutdiamond says:

    I think the coldest weather I remember–at least in my adult life–was 10 degree below zero one winter when I lived in New York City and that was for maybe a day. I can’t imagine what 60 degrees below would be like.

  99. phdbrnational says:

    ~snip~

    lol

  100. I’m in the USA and its -40 outside…

  101. Pierre Gosselin says:

    2008 ONE OF HOTTEST EVER!!!
    Analysis from David Whitehouse:
    h/T Dirk Maxeiner

    “One would have thought that any dispassionate and scientifically rigorous look at the general temperature standstill since 2001, and now a slight fall in the average annual global temperature record would provide pause for thought about what is really going on, and, whatever side of the fence you sit, perhaps a humble appreciation that we do not by any means know as much about the complexities of the climate as some say we do.

    And so it happened. The headline in the Guardian said;

    “2008 will be coolest year of the decade; Global average for 2008 should come in close to 14.3C, but cooler temperature is not evidence that global warming is slowing, say climate scientists” http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/dec/05/climate-change-weather

    If I may quote from the article;

    “Prof Myles Allen at Oxford University who runs the climateprediction.net website, said he feared climate sceptics would overinterpret the figure. ‘You can bet your life there will be a lot of fuss about what a cold year it is. Actually no, its not been that cold a year, but the human memory is not very long, we are used to warm years,’ he said, ‘Even in the 80s [this year] would have felt like a warm year.’

    And 2008 would have been a scorcher in Charles Dickens’s time – without human-induced warming there would have been a one in a hundred chance of getting a year this hot. ‘For Dickens this would have been an extremely warm year,’ he said. On the flip side, in the current climate there is a roughly one in 10chance of having a year this cool.”

    Overinterpret? Is that a new way of saying don’t look at all the relevant data because it might be inconvenient?

    As I pointed out, this is not telling the whole story, nor even putting it into a proper context. The important point evaded is not that 2008 would have been hot for Dickens but how hot is it with respect to the current warming spell. Nobody is arguing that the past decade is not warmer than previous ones and that the world¹s glaciers and ecosystems are not reacting to it. If 2008 is the coldest year since 2001 and the global average temperature didn’t change at all between 2001 2007 one should ask why! Talking about 2008 on its own and comparing it to Victorian times is misleading.

    Then a few days later in the Guardian the environmental campaigner George Monbiot wrote, in response to the first article that “In the physical world global warming appears to be spilling over into runaway feedback.”

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2008/dec/09/climate-change-science-environment

    Really? What a load of nonsense. It’s statements like these that make me wonder if I am either living in the same physical world and if we need real world data at all?

    It is said in that article that it’s all right because the Met Office predicted that 2008 would be cool because of the la Nina effect. What it didn’t say is that the previous year was predicted by the Met Office to be the warmest ever and it wasn¹t. la Ninas come along regularly and it’s no great scientific achievement to say that when one occurs the world will cool. A failed prediction of warming however is highly significant especially given the faith put in computer modelling.

    Also this supposed explanation is not in itself adequate. If the predicted cooling by la Nina had not occurred then 2008 would probably have been the same temperature (given the uncertainties) as every year since 2001 and that in itself would require explanation.

    Later on in the Monbiot article we have, as I predicted, the tired old cliché about “professional deniers employed by fossil fuel companies.” Where I wonder are their counterparts, the professional campaigners whose vested interests make them see a runaway warming world despite what the real world the data says?

    I am broadly in favour of the global warming CO2 hypothesis but I know it is just that, a hypothesis – and that needs testing against real observations in the physical world. If it isn’t, then it’s not science.”

  102. siegetank55 says:

    wow… I can’t survive there.

  103. George E. Smith says:

    Well Pierre,

    Just what would constitute real world testing that would convince you that the CO2 global warming hypothesis is something to be broadly in favor of ?

    Would it influence your decision, if someone were to present data that showed a significant increase in atmospheric CO2 leading to a SUBSEQUENT significant increase in global surface temperature; or a significant decrease in atmospheric CO2 leading to a SUBSEQUENT significant decrease in global surface temperature ?

    Because that sort of data might convince me in a real hurry.

    The only problem, that I have, is that so far we have NO SUCH DATA; not ever; but we do have oodles of data showing the exact reverse situation.

    So I am going to wait for data that so far at least the last 3/4 million years of data have failed to turn up ?

    I don’t think so; but I’ll become a believer if and when such data does show up; well if I live that long of course. Meanwhile I have other more important things to do.

  104. E.M.Smith says:

    davidcobb (12:40:11) :
    It does not pass the smell test because it uses modeled mass balance (modeled precipitation input- estimated outflow) to determine GIA (Glacial Isostatic Adjustment) which is 80%+ of gravity signal. Neat trick. Using modeled mass balance to determine actual mass balance.

    David, thanks for this information, otherwise I would never have know… but still:

    URK! I think I feel sick… How come if I fail to keep some spam email for 7 years (per Sarbox legal requirement) I can go to jail but folks can do this kind of thing? Modeled fiction driving fantasy speculation… and use it to drive the state of the world economy. Is there no adult supervision in science any more?

  105. George E. Smith says:

    “” B Kerr (12:47:31) :

    This is a fascinating question and I have been waiting for someone to explain how it is actually done.

    paminator (08:58:13) :

    >deletions<
    Would someone please be kind enough to explain how low temperatures are measured, and how they were measured in the 1800’s without the use of modern electronics. “”

    Well the short answer for the 1800s is “they weren’t”.

    For most of that period, I would think that various types of “liquid” thermometers would be used, but maybe electrical resistance thermometers might have been in experimental stages.

    If I ever knew when the Platinum Resistance Thermometer was devised, I certainly don’t remember now; but it would have been sometime after Ohm’s law was discovered (which doesn’t say anything like 99.99 % of electronics engineers say it says.)

    In principle, today, you can use semiconductor junction thermometers (Bandgap devices) to measure as low a temperature as the semiconductor packaging can survive in.

    The forward Voltage difference between two semiconductor diodes operating at a fixed current density ratio, is a function of the semiconductor Bandgap Voltage, and a linear function of the absolute temperature, and that Voltage goes to zero at absolute zero, so it can make a pretty good and very linear thermometer; in principle down to zero K.

    HP once made (maybe Agilent Technologies still does) a quartz crystal thermometer. HP discovered a particular linear temperature coefficient of frequency quartz oscillator cut; I believe out of all the possible ways of cutting a single crystal of pure quartz, there is only one possible orientation, and mode of oscilation that provides a constant temperature coefficient of frequency; but I imagine that practically that only persists over a limited temperature range, before some secondary packaging phenomena introduce non linearities. But over its operating range it is a pretty nifty thermometer; but far too expensive to put up in a barn owl box in Siberia.

    To get into the very cold technology era, you have to dig up stuff on Kammerling-Onnes; who has to be the all time low temperature guru; and I have to apologise to our Scandahoovian friends, that I don’t exactly remember his species. Something tells me his friendly handle was Heike or something like that, and maybe that is Finnish; but someone in Norway/Denmark/Swededn can straighten me out if I got that wrong. Certainly early thermometry was (and maybe still is) one of the problem areas of Physics.
    Photometry takes the cake for the most screwed up part of physics; there being almost as many standard units of photometry as there are languages on planet earth; and most of them don’t make any more sense that the rod/stone/fortnight system, that now only the USA uses.

  106. George E. Smith says:

    Verdamnis !

    Evidently Heike Kammerlingh-Onnes, was born in the Netherlands (still sounds Finnish to me), and his work was done in Leyden.

    He was the first to liquefy Helium (bloody clever process), and he won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1913 or thereabouts for discovering superconductivity.

    Man were those ever the golden years of Physics.

  107. George E. Smith says:

    Well officially it was his low temperature studies that won him the 1913 Nobel Prize in Physics; but he did discover superconductivity in 1911.

    I would think, that the Kammerlingh-Onnes (its modern name ) lab in Leyden, along with the Max Planck Institute in Germany, the Cavendish, and the Rutherford labortatories, would have been great places to got oschool in the early parts of this century.

    Rutherford by the way was Kiwi, no matter what those Limeys say.

  108. Bobby Lane says:

    OT some, but here is a story from Reuters alleging that heat kills more people than…well, earthquakes. And thunderstorms kill more people than…well, hurricanes. No mention, of course, of cold or wintry weather of any sort.

    http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/N16172535.htm

  109. Walter Dnes says:

    For those who are wondering…

    according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethanol ethanol freezes at -114.3 C (-174 F) and boils at 78.4 °C (173 F)

    And yes, freezup has come to a screeching halt the past few days. It was screaming along for a few days while Hudson Bay and Ungava Bay were rapidly freezing. Once they froze up, things came to a screeching halt. See the sequence of images…

    http://igloo.atmos.uiuc.edu/cgi-bin/test/print.sh?fm=12&fd=09&fy=2008&sm=12&sd=10&sy=2008

    http://igloo.atmos.uiuc.edu/cgi-bin/test/print.sh?fm=12&fd=11&fy=2008&sm=12&sd=12&sy=2008

    http://igloo.atmos.uiuc.edu/cgi-bin/test/print.sh?fm=12&fd=13&fy=2008&sm=12&sd=14&sy=2008

    http://igloo.atmos.uiuc.edu/cgi-bin/test/print.sh?fm=12&fd=15&fy=2008&sm=12&sd=16&sy=2008

    Note that the pictures are reduced by the HTML code. In Firefox right-click on the pictures and select “View Image” to see the full-sized image. Sorry, I don’t know what the Internet Explorer command is.

    The reason for the halt is warm water. See water temperature anomalies at http://www.osdpd.noaa.gov/PSB/EPS/SST/data/anomnight.12.15.2008.gif
    There’s a tongue of above-normal water sticking up between Labrador and Greenland and there’s anarea on the west side of Novaya Zemlaya Island. In addition, there are some way-above-normal hotspots…
    – on the northern tip of the Scandinavian Peninsula
    – on the north and west coast of Svalbard
    – on the north coast of Iceland

    As long as those warm areas remain, no more major freezing.

  110. Alex Baker says:

    At a slight tangent to this report of extreme cold in Siberia, I was looking at other Northern Hemisphere temperature predictions for the near term weather and climate. I couldn’t help but look at the NOAA CPC forecasts as they would seem a place that should have decent scientific data and forecasting capability. In looking though, I had to ask myself a very strange question:

    Why does every NOAA Climate Prediction Center forecast for the next 13 months only show US temperatures as being EC (equal chance for above or below) or A (above normal)?

    My scientific spidey-sense is all a-tingle saying something is wrong. Most well-grounded forecasts include some variations above and some variations below.

    Are the models at NOAA CPC so broken that they have lost all variability and are only showing the future as being warmer than average?

    Here are the links I am referring to:

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/long_range/seasonal.php?lead=1

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/long_range/seasonal.php?lead=2

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/long_range/seasonal.php?lead=3

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/long_range/seasonal.php?lead=4

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/long_range/seasonal.php?lead=5

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/long_range/seasonal.php?lead=6

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/long_range/seasonal.php?lead=7

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/long_range/seasonal.php?lead=8

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/long_range/seasonal.php?lead=9

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/long_range/seasonal.php?lead=10

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/long_range/seasonal.php?lead=11

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/long_range/seasonal.php?lead=12

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/long_range/seasonal.php?lead=13

    http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/predictions/long_range/lead14/index.php

    Something is rotten in the state…of NOAA…

    Do the same models they are using show Siberia (yes, I realize it’s outside the US and even North America) as experiencing warmer than normal average high temperatures at a -30 celsius? Do these near record low temperatures being experienced even show up in their models? Call me model-naive and forgive me if you’ve said these things before and repeatedly, but…something seems off track at NOAA…

  111. B Kerr says:

    Thank you George E. Smith for taking the time to answer my question.

    I still have concerns about past temperature records.

    I read in an article where cold temperatures were estimated to be -83F.
    Fine I’m happy with that I can understand the need to estimate. Months later the temperature was calibrated to -81.3F

    The estimate is now accurate to one decimal place.

    The same is true with early CET temperatures.
    Temperatures in 1600’s are to the nearest degree C and then to the nearest half degree C.

    Yet averages are given correct to two decimal places.

    Mind you these temperatures would have been measured in degrees Fahrenheit then converted and rounded to C.

  112. Karl Heuer says:

    Many of those record low temps were extrapolated, not measured

    Oymyakon is known as one of the candidates for the Northern Pole of Cold, because on January 26, 1926, a temperature of −71.2 ℃ (−96.2 ℉) was recorded there (however, this fact is arguable because the temperature was not directly measured but obtained by extrapolation). ”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oymyakon

  113. Karl Heuer says:

    “Oymyakon is known as one of the candidates for the Northern Pole of Cold, because on January 26, 1926, a temperature of −71.2 ℃ (−96.2 ℉) was recorded there (however, this fact is arguable because the temperature was not directly measured but obtained by extrapolation). ”

    -attributed to wikipedia (missed putting on the front end of the quotation marks)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oymyakon

  114. M White says:

    Changes ‘amplify Arctic warming’

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7786910.stm

  115. gary gulrud says:

    Here in central MN we set an all-time record for a low pn evening/morning of Dec. 15-16 at a balmy -23F, overturning that of 1963 of -21.

    In my memory this is early by 10 days for the coldest snap of the winter, so we can expect lower.

  116. MattN says:

    Alex, same those maps so we can go back to them and see how right/wrong NOAA was. I predict a boatload of FAIL!

  117. Roger Knights says:

    Typo: “same those maps” should be “save those maps” (I mention this because I want those maps saved)

  118. Rhys Jaggar says:

    Walter DNes

    ‘The reason for the halt is warm water. See water temperature anomalies at http://www.osdpd.noaa.gov/PSB/EPS/SST/data/anomnight.12.15.2008.gif
    There’s a tongue of above-normal water sticking up between Labrador and Greenland and there’s anarea on the west side of Novaya Zemlaya Island. In addition, there are some way-above-normal hotspots…
    – on the northern tip of the Scandinavian Peninsula
    – on the north and west coast of Svalbard
    – on the north coast of Iceland

    As long as those warm areas remain, no more major freezing.’

    Thanks – a very good explanation and certain to be right.

  119. Susan Duke says:

    I received a letter in November from a man living more or less on the Equator in Kenya. He said “There was a funny snow cloud which fell near to Lake Ol’Bolosat and covered about 200 hectares, but no one died for the area is not settled by people.” This area is about 7000 feet above sea level, and my family lived there for fifty years, like my friend I had never heard of such a thing.
    Susan Duke

  120. David Holmes says:

    How does town such as Oymyakon get supplies such as coats, food other such items if it is so remote?

    David Holmes

  121. Mikey says:

    Seems as though the cold air is rolling off the top of the world and landing in lower elevations. It’s been colder in Minnesota than Barrow, AK – very strange. Hence, no sea ice buildup and brutal winter conditions in upper North America and Siberia.

  122. Mike Bryant says:

    Frim ICECAP,

    “By Chris Horner, in Human Events

    The most expensive secret you’re not supposed to know is that George W. Bush leaves office with the planet cooler than when he entered. This dangerous trend threatens the multi-billion dollar “global warming” industry, adding new urgency to the ritual shriek of “we must act now!” in the scramble to impose a costly regime of mandates and energy taxes.”

    He was fighting Global Warming the whole time! Don’t tell anybody.

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