Cabotella beach beer, author Jordan Gardenhire, source Wikimedia

The Horror: NYC Residents are ENJOYING their Global Warming Heatwave

Essay by Eric Worrall

Could naming heatwaves help? Climate activists are aghast that people party and enjoy themselves during heatwaves, instead of appreciating their climate significance.

Vomit, drunks, crowds: Heat wave turns NYC’s luxury pools into a ‘frat party’

By Jeanette Settembre
July 26, 2022 8:00am

The city’s coolest pools are getting too hot to handle.

On a recent scorcher of a Saturday, the rooftop common area at One North Fourth, a luxury rental building in Williamsburg, was wall-to-wall party animals, bobbing and weaving to music so loud it threatened to puncture eardrums — or the Instagram-ready swan-shaped pool floatie bobbing about. 

Kevin, 29, a resident in the building who works in real estate, had intended on having a serene pool day amid the recent heatwave, but he could barely find a chair, let alone dip a toe in the water. The deck was covered in sweaty bodies, some that didn’t seem to belong. 

“It’s not just residents — it’s people who know there’s a pool and just walk up,” Kevin, who declined to give his last name, told The Post.

Read more: https://nypost.com/2022/07/26/heat-wave-turns-nycs-luxury-pools-into-a-frat-party/

Perhaps Kevin should have voted yes, during the last residents association meeting on whether to hire a doorman.

The push to name heatwaves;

Heatwaves are a ‘silent killer’, and climate change is making them more common. Could naming them help? 

Heatwaves can be lethal, but are often underestimated.

Published 29 July 2022 at 5:59am
By Isabelle Lane

From Cyclone Tracy to Hurricane Katrina, the world has long been familiar with naming storms, but what about heatwaves?

In June, Seville announced a new heatwave ranking system that would see heatwaves given names and severity levels, similar to the way hurricanes are ranked.

University of Melbourne climate science lecturer Andrew King said naming heatwaves could help raise awareness of their impacts, as climate change makes them more frequent and intense.

“For a very long time we’ve been naming tropical cyclones, and that’s maybe partly because they’re distinct weather systems … you can see them very clearly on weather maps and satellite images,” he said.

“Heatwaves are a bit more abstract in the sense they’re harder to see, but I think naming heatwaves really will help raise awareness of upcoming severe heat when it’s forecast.”

Heatwaves are a “silent killer”, Dr King said.

“We see increased hospital admissions and increased heat-related illnesses that result in fatalities … so I think putting focus on heatwaves and their impact is definitely a very good idea.”

Read more: https://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/heatwaves-are-a-silent-killer-and-climate-change-is-making-them-more-common-could-naming-them-help/f1n5qt2wr

There might be fewer hospital admissions if vulnerable people in Victoria could afford to switch on their air conditioners. But the state of Victoria where University of Melbourne lecturer Andrew King lives wrote a ban on fracking into the state constitution. Now, big surprise, Victoria is running short of gas to run their generators. Victoria still gets a lot of electricity from coal, which has mitigated the gas pain, but they’re planning to shut their coal plants down.

Obviously if your health is reasonably robust, you can simply enjoy the heatwave by visiting the nearest body of water and having a frolic. Joining the party seems much more fun than wasting time and effort thinking up names for heatwaves.

Some advice from subtropical Queensland, where we call our heatwave “Summer”, drink a glass of water between the cocktails, your head will thank you the next morning. And practice a little sun safety of course.

5 21 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
88 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Gilbert K. Arnold
July 28, 2022 6:13 pm

Eric…. the old OZ adage:…. Slip,Slap, and Slop…..best advice for heatwaves and summer

Editor
July 28, 2022 6:22 pm

It always amuses me that every report of calamitous heat is accompanied by pictures of people enjoying themselves.

July 28, 2022 6:26 pm

Now, big surprise, Victoria is running short of gas to run their generators. “

From the link
The national energy operator has activated emergency measures to guarantee gas supplies for Victoria amid concerns the state faces a winter shortage.

The Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) triggered the gas supply guarantee overnight as reserves at the state’s Iona underground storage plant were drained.

It means Queensland suppliers will have to send more gas to New South Wales to release supplies for Victorian power plants, instead of exporting it overseas.

That was easy, wasn’t it? If you’re running out of gas, just stop exporting so much.


Reply to  Eric Worrall
July 28, 2022 7:09 pm

the commercial stability of the suppliers when the government steals their gas”
Their gas? How did they come to own Victoria’s gas?

“so the gas companies can satisfy domestic demand”
What is to stop them just exporting “their gas” then too?

Doonman
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 28, 2022 7:26 pm

Apparently, according to Nick, in Australia commodities are sold without contracts for cash on delivery. That would be the only case imaginable where it wasn’t “their gas”.

Reply to  Doonman
July 28, 2022 7:44 pm

So “We have to sell because we have contracts. We have contracts because we sold”

Somewhere in there there has to be the option of not selling for export.

Felix
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 28, 2022 7:53 pm

Sure, they could just leave it in the ground. Until the state tells them to get it. Then they’d have to look for it, find it, get some drilling equipment, bring it up … and by then, the capricious state would have changed their mind and would tell them to put it back in the ground and destroy all that equipment and erase all the logs of where it is.

Is that a good enough plan for you?

Reply to  Felix
July 28, 2022 7:57 pm

The supply arrangements for Victoria are in place and have been working for 50 years. The AEMO has intervened to say it can’t all be diverted for export.

Felix
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 28, 2022 10:21 pm

If the government doesn’t want it, what is the company supposed to do with it, stuff it back into the ground? No, they sell it. That’s what the contracts are for, because predictable reliable contracts are how business works. Then the government just ups and takes it back and violates the contracts. Is that how you think businesses and governments should keep promises?

It says a lot about your personal morals.

Lrp
Reply to  Felix
July 29, 2022 4:12 pm

To Nick government is god

mario lento
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 29, 2022 12:14 am

Nick I cannot tell if your statements are sarcastic.

Your wrote:

Their gas? How did they come to own Victoria’s gas?”

Then you wrote:

The AEMO has intervened to say it can’t all be diverted for export.”

Now read what you wrote, and try to understand that is the point. If they (the state) can tell you what to do with it, then they essentially own the gas.

Reply to  mario lento
July 29, 2022 2:11 am

 If they (the state) can tell you what to do with it, then they essentially own the gas.”
Indeed. But Eric describes it as
“the government steals their gas”

mario lento
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 29, 2022 9:22 am

Nick: What would you call it if the (the state) tells you when you can use your car and when others can have access to it, or when you were allowed to eat?

Let’s stop mincing words

Meisha
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 29, 2022 3:51 am

Nick, not only do you know much less about climate than you portray, you know nothing about economics. If Australian gas producers are selling gas overseas it’s because someone other than Australians value gas more than they do (are willing to pay more for it than Australians)…and Australians now have more money than they would otherwise have has a result of selling that gas overseas, which they can then use to buy whatever they want that they obviously value more than gas (e.g., wind farms?). The money gas companies make does not get put under their bed…it goes to pay their employees, suppliers, bankers, government (i.e., taxes) and investors…who are…wait for it…mostly Australians!

I never thought you were very clever. Thanks for proving it beyond measure.

Mr.
Reply to  Meisha
July 29, 2022 12:18 pm

From my observations here, Nick is very intelligent and possesses exceptional numeracy skill levels.

That said, I wonder about his capacity to think and reach conclusions rationally, and also to exercise a basic level of innate skepticism about propositions that patently won’t pass a fundamental practicality / functionality, let alone an economic feasibility test.

It’s almost like he’s been indoctrinated by the environments & organizations he’s mostly worked in.

Some scientists with such backgrounds have managed to break out though, e.g. Steven E. Koonin.

Last edited 9 days ago by Mr.
Reply to  Meisha
July 29, 2022 5:40 pm

“which they can then use to buy whatever they want that they obviously value more than gas”
Maybe (whoever “they” turn out to be). But Eric’s specific complaint is that they are short of gas. And that leads them to carbon monoxide poisoning and general grinding energy poverty. So the obvious solution is to send less of it overseas, even though Eric then complains of damage to the companies’ profits.

MarkW
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 28, 2022 8:56 pm

Why? Exports are how you pay for the stuff you want to import.

Editor
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 28, 2022 10:17 pm

If you are told to foff because your own government does not want your foul evil destructive gas, it’s pretty reasonable to sell it to grateful customers overseas. Then when your government tells you that you have been foul evil destructive people for selling your country’s beautiful gas overseas (while paying your government royalties for it) and that you have to abandon your loyal customers at your own expense and give the gas to your own government instead (while still paying your government royalties for it), it seems a tad unfair that you can’t tell your government that it is their turn to foff.

lee
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 28, 2022 7:39 pm

“the commercial stability of the suppliers when the government steals their gas”
Their gas? How did they come to own Victoria’s gas?

When Victoria connected to the gas grid for export. 😉

Reply to  lee
July 28, 2022 7:41 pm

The agreements between BHP/ESSO and the Victorian Government were made in about 1969.

lee
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 28, 2022 8:59 pm

For which they get royalties. The gas belongs to the company paying those royalties. The well outputs are declining.The new offshore leases will take time to develop,

“Victoria ‘ignoring’ looming gas squeeze”
https://www.afr.com/companies/energy/victoria-ignoring-looming-gas-squeeze-20210401-p57g1a

Dave Fair
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 29, 2022 2:06 pm

What is it about markets and commodity pricing and allocation that has changed since 1969, Nick? Tell me that it is sane to allow any government to manipulate markets and change the rules as it goes along. You are the beneficiary of relatively free markets, but choose to denigrate them.

Geoff Sherrington
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 28, 2022 8:26 pm

Nick,
As you should now, licences to produce gas create forms of ownership that are a needed convenience for such routine matters as calculation of a royalty payment to the State. The royalty from a named producer is calculated on his/her measurement of his/her volume of production in a nominated time period, not on gas volume that belongs to a neighbour or somebody else.
When you fill your car with petrol and pay for it, do you not think of the petrol as “your” petrol?
You should know this if you want to comment wisely.
The serious point being discussed shows State politics hindering the local production of gas from the ground, by banning exploration and fracking, for reasons related more to dreamtime left wing ideology than to economics.
Would you, personally, be pleased to buy no more gas for your home because of a constructed threat of future global warming? Or, relatedly, did you stop buying electricity a few years ago because you became aware that coal burning was said to be a future threat to the global environment?
There is a freedom word missing from your comments, Nick, which is “Choice”. That is a factor in the policies of the producers who pay for the drilling and production. They say, “I have a Choice to sell domestically or internationally. ” You seem to object to that. Both are entirely legal.
Geoff S

Reply to  Geoff Sherrington
July 28, 2022 10:10 pm

Geoff
calculation of a royalty payment to the State”
As I understand it, there is no State royalty on Bass Strait gas.

You seem to object to that. Both are entirely legal.|
The AEMO also objects. That is entirely legal too.

Geoff Sherrington
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 28, 2022 11:18 pm

Nick,
My comments were of a general nature to show how there is a concept of ownership. They were not limited to offshore natural gas in Victoria.
Of course, in Bass Strait, the royalties are either State or Federal, depending on proximity to shore. If we are talking only far offshore cases, they will be under Federal laws and a State royalty would logically not apply. That is why I made my comments general not specific to any case.
I also asked a couple of questions about what you do about your tank of petrol and your electricity consumption when coal is in the equation.
I am so uncertain of the science behind the climate change fad that I have no inclination to change my ways to “save the planet”. Any you?
Geoff S

Reply to  Geoff Sherrington
July 29, 2022 2:16 am

Geoff,
There isn’t a Commonwealth royalty either. There is a tax.

I don’t drive. I do use electricity. I do urge the Government to make more use of renewables. I think the key here is collective action.

Derg
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 29, 2022 4:33 am

Why don’t you get your own renewables and stop wasting other peoples money 🤔

Andrew Wilkins
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 29, 2022 4:36 am

“collective action” Ah, the XR demand!
Finally, Nick has let the cover slip. He’ll be gluing himself to something soon.

Barnes Moore
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 29, 2022 4:46 am

Quick question for you Nick given your desire for more “renewables”. How do you plan to produce wind turbines and solar panels without using fossil fuels since they don’t produce enough energy to power the machinery needed to reproduce themselves? They are 100% dependent on fossil fuels from cradle to grave – for the mining and processing of raw materials which requires A LOT of heavy equipment, to transport, manufacture, site preparation, life cycle maintenance, and ultimate decommissioning. They also need fossil fuel backup for when the sun does not shine and the wind does not blow. And no, batteries are not the answer given that they are not a source of energy, they store energy, just like a gas can that must first be filled, and the energy loss during charge/discharge cycle is not insignificant. With a capacity factor of maybe 20% for solar and between 30-35% for wind, you would need to excessively overbuild the energy infrastructure to produce sufficient excess energy to charge enormous battery arrays – that also require enormous number of heavy machines to mine and process an enormous amount of raw materials, transport, manufacture, etc. Add to that the relatively short life of unreliables compared to fossil fuel and nuclear plants, which means the full cycle of production is repeated more frequently, and guess what, little of the solar panels or wind turbines can be recycled. The reality is that wind, solar and batteries are far more environmentally destructive than fossil fuels. For a more in-depth analysis read this: https://www.manhattan-institute.org/mines-minerals-and-green-energy-reality-check and from Willis https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/01/27/bright-green-impossibilities/  

Ann Banisher
Reply to  Barnes Moore
July 29, 2022 5:45 am

…and all that CO2 used in the manufacturing and installation is generated upfront. The hypothetical saving is 30 years down the road.

Barnes Moore
Reply to  Ann Banisher
July 29, 2022 6:02 am

Actually, since neither wind turbines or solar panels have a life expectancy of 30 years, the reality is that there is no “saving”. The problems with unreliables are so obvious to anyone willing to take even a cursory look it’s just mind boggling how people are so easily duped into believing in them. Nick is not a stupid person, yet he has fallen for this nonsense via blind ideology.

TallDave
Reply to  Barnes Moore
July 29, 2022 7:39 am

all the “environmental scientist” consulting groups who were paid millions to tell utilities how great renewables are will have disappeared by the time the turbines and panels fail and the lawsuits are prepared

Frank from NoVA
Reply to  Barnes Moore
July 29, 2022 9:11 am

‘How do you plan to produce wind turbines and solar panels without using fossil fuels since they don’t produce enough energy to power the machinery needed to reproduce themselves?’

He doesn’t. Nor does anyone else within the alarm-o-sphere food chain, whether useful idiot or prime mover. It’s all about implementing some distopian version of Rousseauian socialism.

Mr.
Reply to  Barnes Moore
July 29, 2022 12:26 pm

Wind turbine blades aren’t meant to play in traffic –

TallDave
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 29, 2022 7:31 am

“I think the key here is collective action”

which means, of course, mass coercion

but since not every gov’t in the world subscribes to your pseudo-scientific claims of imminent doom, the mass coercion isn’t quite universal, and so the entirety of those efforts can have no effect on global warming whatsoever since it only lowers the prices for other consumers who then increase their own consumption

even assuming ECS wasn’t below 1.5 as seems increasingly likely

and even assuming cooling the planet was a good idea, which it isn’t given that cold is 20 times deadlier than warming and no place on Earth is currently too hot for life, while much is too dry or cold

Drake
Reply to  TallDave
July 29, 2022 8:25 am

YEP!

Like all communists/statists, Nick wants “collective” action.

He won’t do what is “necessary” in his opinion, until he and the government can coerce everyone to do as he wishes.

So at this time it is do as I say, not as I do for Nick.

Dave Andrews
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 29, 2022 8:54 am

“I do urge the Government to make more use of renewables.”

Have you bothered to read any of the essays by Prof Helm that I have pointed you in the direction of? It would certainly improve your understanding about unreliables.

paul
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 29, 2022 1:16 pm

I see… you don’t drive, so no one else should be driving either.
Got it !… how about you take a flyin’ f k of the rollin’ doughnut.

I won’t hold my breath waiting on you to announce on WUWT that you have installed your very own whirly-gig in your backyard so you don’t have to buy anymore of that evil dirty coal generated electricity, I mean shit man/woman,start walkin’ the walk, you done wore out the talk,& no one is buying your bullshit here

Dave Fair
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 29, 2022 2:20 pm

Nick, you appear to misunderstand “collective.” Collective is not where distant politicians make arbitrary decisions based on the politics of the moment. Political decisionmaking is based on general ideology, large campaign donors, collections of like-minded citizens and pressure from international special-interest groups. You, personally, have no say in it.

Old Cocky
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 29, 2022 4:16 pm

***sigh*** “The State” is an overloaded term, which in a federation can refer to various levels of the hierarchy. Depending on areas of authority and responsibility, both the State of Victoria and the Commonwealth of Australia can be “the State”.

Similarly, Bavaria, Germany and the EU can be referred to as “the State”

Emily Daniels
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 29, 2022 7:47 pm

How is it Victoria’s gas when your quote indicates it’s Queensland gas being ordered to go to Victoria because they won’t produce their own?

John Hultquist
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 28, 2022 7:09 pm

Can we assume they were paid for that they exported?

Reply to  John Hultquist
July 28, 2022 7:44 pm

Paid who?

MarkW
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 28, 2022 8:58 pm

The owners of the gas.

Reply to  MarkW
July 29, 2022 2:17 am

In fact the gas is extracted and exported under licence.

Dave Fair
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 29, 2022 2:26 pm

Words, words, words. And a recession is not two successive quarters of declining GDP.

MarkW
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 28, 2022 8:55 pm

Even better would be to stop restricting production, then you don’t have to make the hard choice.

BobM
Reply to  Nick Stokes
July 28, 2022 10:05 pm

“If you’re running out of gas, just stop exporting so much.”

I think a much better solution would be for AEMO to tell the solar and wind suppliers to produce more power. That is the only logical action to take when gas generators are on the way out eventually anyway.

Mr.
Reply to  BobM
July 29, 2022 12:39 pm

Well yes the wind & solar farms can produce significant amounts of power, provided their arrays are enormous and sited strategically.

But then, this can still only happen when the sun is shining and the wind is blowing in “Goldilocks” conditions.

So if want say 100 units of power at any given time, you need to install 3 times the nameplate capacity of w&s generators, because they only put out about 30% of their ratings.

So space will always be a problem.

But wait, there’s more –
what do they do with the power they produce when they’re producing if consumers don’t want it all right then?

On this question the promoters of w&s are saying –
“we’ll get back to you later on . . .”

Shoki Kaneda
July 28, 2022 6:28 pm

The Climatistas think proles are too stupid to recognize the imminent existential peril.

markl
July 28, 2022 7:55 pm

You can fool some of the people some of the time ……. but you can’t fool those who don’t care.

Geoff Sherrington
July 28, 2022 8:11 pm

Let us stop this mythical nonsense here and now.

Quote “University of Melbourne climate science lecturer Andrew King said naming heatwaves could help raise awareness of their impacts, as climate change makes them more frequent and intense.”

There is NO repeat NO evidence of this “more frequent and intense” about Melbourne heatwaves. None at all.

Decent scientists should show their work. Here is mine ( a small part of it). Geoff S

http://www.geoffstuff.com/melbheat.docx

Old Man Winter
Reply to  Geoff Sherrington
July 28, 2022 8:42 pm

Andrew King said naming heatwaves could help raise awareness of their impacts…

“Heatwaves are a “silent killer”, Dr King said.

clim8ar3.jpg
anthropocene
Reply to  Geoff Sherrington
July 28, 2022 10:09 pm

Who said anything about Melbourne? Central England’s heatwaves are getting hotter and it’s statistically significant.

https://tamino.wordpress.com/2022/07/23/extra-ordinary-heat-wave/

Geoff Sherrington
Reply to  anthropocene
July 28, 2022 11:28 pm

It is easy to cherry pick data and to invent definitions of heatwaves to suit a purpose.
You have shown me several graphs that are not about heatwaves. They are about seasonal temperatures etc.
Researchers are free to synthesise favourable graphs, but in the end run they have to explain the comparative absence of heatwaves getting hotter etc in the data I have showed. That is the starting point. It there is no signal there, any derivation from the data is troubled and fails to answer the basic absence.
I have studied a number of Australian cities this way. I showed Melbourne because that is where Andrew King was commenting. Here are 5 more Australian cities. Note the clear evidence that homogenisation (“Acorn”) induces trends that are absent or less in the raw data. Geoff S
http://www.geoffstuff.com/asixheatwave2022.xlsx

Geoff Sherrington
Reply to  anthropocene
July 28, 2022 11:30 pm

anthropo,
What is the related pattern in CET for 10 consecutive hot days in each year?
Don’t have the data? If not, you can’t call my data arguable.
Geoff S

Derg
Reply to  anthropocene
July 29, 2022 4:34 am

Lol…when do the fires start 😉

Frank from NoVA
Reply to  Derg
July 29, 2022 9:17 am

Yeah, really. Someone should point out to these idiots that the ignition point of wood is about 300C, not 30C.

Andrew Wilkins
Reply to  anthropocene
July 29, 2022 4:42 am

Tamino’s post accidentally destroys his constant assertion that “it’s CO2 what done it” when he posts graphs showing a rise that began in the 19th century, roughly 60 years before our see-oh-toos were supposed to be causing mischief.
He’s a weapons grade wally.

Drake
Reply to  anthropocene
July 29, 2022 8:36 am

Heatwave is 5 or more days.

The UK did not have a HEATWAVE, moron.

Repeating the LIE does not make it true.

And sharing a link to a web site titled “Open Mind KID’S LIVES MATTER so lets stop climate change” is quite telling.

No mention of GLOBAL WARMING, but a prominent mention of “KID’S LIVES”!!

Wow, just reading the site title sends me running because there can be no rational discussions from the CLOSED mind who created that title.

paul
Reply to  anthropocene
July 29, 2022 1:23 pm

2 1/2 days ? awww, you poor baby

anthropocene
Reply to  Geoff Sherrington
July 28, 2022 10:21 pm

Nevermind, here’s the results for Australia. Looks like heatwaves are becoming more intense in Melbourne (by every metric you can think of to measure them by). https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1029/2020EF001924

Geoff Sherrington
Reply to  anthropocene
July 28, 2022 11:34 pm

anthro,
Your quoted Sarah Perkins paper is not compatible with my data. For a start, she cherry picks only data from 1950 onlwards. Mine go back in some cases to the 1860s. It makes a BIG difference.
Geoff S

Climate believer
Reply to  Geoff Sherrington
July 29, 2022 11:46 am

1939 souvenir postcard……… CO² at 310ppm

MA23107178-Postcard-SA-heatwave-1939-1200w.jpg
Editor
Reply to  Geoff Sherrington
July 28, 2022 10:26 pm

Oh Geoff, you are so misguided. Don’t you understand that if you start naming heatwaves then even little heatwaves that no-one even notices will get names, and predicted heatwaves will also get names even if they never eventuate, and therefore the number of heatwaves will go up. Naming heatwaves is a brilliant way of getting a desired outcome that will never happen on its own.

Russell
Reply to  Mike Jonas
July 29, 2022 12:03 am

And just like retail counter staff (and contact centres) asking for your name when they are be expecting to develop “a relationship” with you. You know, understanding for their situation, being respectful, being tolerant when they can’t help you, etc.
Not sure that is a good model to follow. Most people I know have had a gutful of them asking “how’s your day been” and not really caring and just carrying on with the rest of their “script”.
Do these storms and heat waves really care about us?
When they start, we can give them names. Otherwise it’s hot.

Dave Fair
Reply to  Russell
July 29, 2022 2:53 pm

Most people who don’t really care: “How are you?” My typical response: “Mean and ugly.” From their reactions, I can tell they don’t really believe me. They should because, with provocation, I can get there.

Dave Fair
Reply to  Mike Jonas
July 29, 2022 2:36 pm

Just look at the fun warmunists have had with naming tropical storms.

david s
July 28, 2022 8:25 pm

It’s hard to imagine that when the power goes off the voters won’t throw out the crop of politicians who shut off the fossil fuels.

Last edited 9 days ago by david s
Retired_Engineer_Jim
Reply to  david s
July 28, 2022 10:05 pm

Oh, the politicians, with the willing connivance of the MSM, will make sure that everyone understands that the power went off because of the greedy power companies.

Dave Fair
Reply to  Retired_Engineer_Jim
July 29, 2022 2:55 pm

And, as they are doing now, the greedy oil companies and Putin. It is such a full-court press in the media that many people will buy it.

Ted
Reply to  david s
July 29, 2022 2:59 pm

They’re banking on the idea that people dumb enough to vote those politicians into office are dumb enough to believe them when they blame the outages on the remaining fossil plants. See Griff and Texas.

Johne Morton
July 28, 2022 8:38 pm

The leftists have a fetish with names/namings/titles, etc. Look at how we now have a hundred different genders, pronouns etc. We can name any cold spell, drought, derecho, and the clouds themselves (it’s a giraffe-Santa Claus cumulus cloud!)…I say go for it; once we started naming winter storms here in the US, nobody besides the Weather Channel noticed or cared…

Robert B
July 28, 2022 10:30 pm

“But the state of Victoria where University of Melbourne lecturer Andrew King lives”

How about we out, tar and feather whoever abetted him getting the job?

Bill Toland
July 28, 2022 11:40 pm

“University of Melbourne climate science lecturer Andrew King said naming heatwaves could help raise awareness of their impacts, as climate change makes them more frequent and intense”.

Since ten times as many people are killed by cold weather than hot weather, surely it would be more appropriate to name cold snaps rather than heatwaves.

Dave Andrews
Reply to  Bill Toland
July 29, 2022 9:14 am

“We found relatively little increase in deaths caused by warmer weather and a reduction in deaths caused by cold winters, leading to a net decrease in deaths: in contrast there was a net increase in hospital admissions linked to warmer weather, especially from injuries.”

UK Office of National Statistics Report Jan 2022. ‘Climate-related mortality and hospital admissions, England and Wales:2001 to 2020’

In the recent two hot days in the UK there were unfortunately three deaths of teenagers who drowned from shock after jumping into cold reservoirs or other unsuitable swimming places

Rod Evans
July 29, 2022 12:25 am

Here is a question for the fear mongers.
If warmer temperatures are so undesirable, why do the bulk of the people seek out warmer places to go on holiday to or to retire to?
The naming of so called heat waves might be a great advertising aid for the holiday industry.
We would be looking for which parts of the planet enjoy the most named heatwaves.

fretslider
July 29, 2022 12:44 am

Similar stuff in the UK. Only now…

“Weather forecasters faced unprecedented levels of trolling during this month’s extreme heat in the UK, according to leading figures in the industry.

The BBC’s team received hundreds of abusive tweets or emails questioning their reports and telling them to “get a grip”, as temperatures hit 40.C.”

https://apple.news/A6uCs1qeMRCuwnuPePTbLdA

Get a grip is good advice

Last edited 9 days ago by fretslider
Andrew Wilkins
Reply to  fretslider
July 29, 2022 4:45 am

“unprecedented levels of trolling” was in reality sceptics posting hard data that refuted the “sky is falling” rhetoric from BBC CAGW activists.
The zealot Justin Rowlatt announced that UK droughts were getting worse. People posted graphs of UK rainfall that demonstrated that his claims were rubbish. Proving him wrong with hard data is trolling, apparently.

Last edited 9 days ago by Andrew Wilkins
Dave Andrews
Reply to  Andrew Wilkins
July 29, 2022 9:16 am

Any objection to what the BBC says is trolling don’t ya know?

Tom
July 29, 2022 6:18 am

In the places I’ve lived, heat waves are usually associated with a stagnant high pressure system that puts the windfarms out of business. Who would prepare for more heat waves by building more windfarms?

Luke B
Reply to  Tom
July 29, 2022 9:03 am

Probably exactly the same kind of planners who restrict nitrogen to prevent climate change from affecting agricultural productivity.

George Daddis
July 29, 2022 7:57 am

Is it true that the “climate change” theory suggests more temperature extremes?
I had read the opposite.

Call me a skeptic
Reply to  George Daddis
July 29, 2022 8:36 am

Hmmm, heat waves in the summer, what a surprise. Stay tuned for cold snaps in the winter, although now they are called polar vortexes. My favorite has to be an atmospheric river for a rain storm. We need more cataclysmic ways to describe the weather. Suggestions?

Ted
Reply to  George Daddis
July 29, 2022 3:50 pm

Read long enough and you’ll find climate change theorists suggesting both increases and decreases of everything.

TonyG
July 29, 2022 8:45 am

“he could barely find a chair, let alone dip a toe in the water.”

Sounds like pretty much every public or community-owned pool in SoCal all summer long.

Pat from kerbob
July 30, 2022 1:14 am

It was a long cool spring and early summer, so now they are surprised people are enjoying the heat?

Bad news for Griff
In my 3 week British vacation I’ve yet to find anyone complaining about this “summer of he!!” In the UK.
Everyone loving it.
I myself will likely have a tough time visiting in the future when it of course reverts back to cool and wet, because it will.

%d bloggers like this: