Rivers melt Arctic ice, warming air and ocean

UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA FAIRBANKS

Research News

IMAGE
IMAGE: WATER FROM CANADA’S MACKENZIE RIVER ENTERS THE BLUE ARCTIC OCEAN IN JULY 2012. WHITE AREAS IN THE TOP HALF OF THE PHOTO ARE LARGELY SEA ICE, WHILE THOSE BELOW ARE… view more CREDIT: PHOTO BY NASA EARTH OBSERVATORY

A new study shows that increased heat from Arctic rivers is melting sea ice in the Arctic Ocean and warming the atmosphere.

The study published this week in Science Advances was led by the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, with contributing authors in the United States, United Arab Emirates, Finland and Canada.

According to the research, major Arctic rivers contribute significantly more heat to the Arctic Ocean than they did in 1980. River heat is responsible for up to 10% of the total sea ice loss that occurred from 1980 to 2015 over the shelf region of the Arctic Ocean. That melt is equivalent to about 120,000 square miles of 1-meter thick ice.

“If Alaska were covered by 1-meter thick ice, 20% of Alaska would be gone,” explained Igor Polyakov, co-author and oceanographer at the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ International Arctic Research Center and Finnish Meteorological Institute.

Rivers have the greatest impact during spring breakup. The warming water dumps into the ice-covered Arctic Ocean and spreads below the ice, decaying it. Once the sea ice melts, the warm water begins heating the atmosphere.

The research found that much more river heat energy enters the atmosphere than melts ice or heats the ocean. Since air is mobile, this means river heat can affect areas of the Arctic far from river deltas.

The impacts were most pronounced in the Siberian Arctic, where several large rivers flow onto the relatively shallow shelf region extending nearly 1,000 miles offshore. Canada’s Mackenzie River is the only river large enough to contribute substantially to sea ice melt near Alaska, but the state’s smaller rivers are also a source of heat.

Polyakov expects that rising global air temperatures will continue to warm Arctic rivers in the future. As rivers heat up, more heat will flow into the Arctic Ocean, melting more sea ice and accelerating Arctic warming.

Rivers are just one of many heat sources now warming the Arctic Ocean. The entire Arctic system is in an extremely anomalous state as global air temperatures rise and warm Atlantic and Pacific water enters the region, decaying sea ice even in the middle of winter. All these components work together, causing positive feedback loops that speed up warming in the Arctic.

“It’s very alarming because all these changes are accelerating,” said Polyakov. “The rapid changes are just incredible in the last decade or so.”

###

Authors of the paper include Hotaek Park, Eiji Watanabe, Youngwook Kim, Igor Polyakov, Kazuhiro Oshima, Xiangdong Zhang, John S. Kimball and Daqing Yang.

From EurekAlert!

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Steve Case
November 7, 2020 6:26 am

“It’s very alarming because all these changes are accelerating,” said Polyakov. “The rapid changes are just incredible in the last decade or so.”

Warmer weather less ice – and we are being told this is alarming.

Gordon A. Dressler
Reply to  Steve Case
November 7, 2020 7:51 am

Re: the text you quoted . . . say it ain’t so. Wasn’t “the science settled” over a decade ago?

Bryan A
Reply to  Gordon A. Dressler
November 7, 2020 8:52 am

Here’s another good quote

“If Alaska were covered by 1-meter thick ice, 20% of Alaska would be gone,” explained Igor Polyakov, co-author and oceanographer at the University of Alaska Fairbanks’ International Arctic Research Center and Finnish Meteorological Institute.

I think Igor doesn’t quite understand the concept of what covered by Ice really means.
If Alaska were covered by a meter of ice and 20% melted away, 20% of Alaska would be freed from the grip of the ice sheet and become habitable

Oldseadog
Reply to  Bryan A
November 7, 2020 12:00 pm

On the other hand, if the 1 M ice thinned to .8 M, Alaska would still be covered by ice, just a bit thinner.

Sara
Reply to  Steve Case
November 7, 2020 8:48 am

I’m trying to puzzle out the interpretation of this sentence: A new study shows that increased heat from Arctic rivers is melting sea ice in the Arctic Ocean and warming the atmosphere. – article

So something that is normal behavior in water/ice/air temps is somehow…. um, WRONG??? THREATENING???? MUST BE STOPPED????

Can someone please ‘splain to me, in a way that won’t have me fall off my chair laughing myself silly, why something natural is such an incredible problem?

I’ll be over here in my corner with some nice hot tea and cookies, warming the air and having a quiet good time.

David A
Reply to  Steve Case
November 8, 2020 2:45 am

Yet there is no trend over the last 12 to 13 years.

rbabcock
November 7, 2020 6:26 am

“A new study shows that increased heat from Arctic rivers is melting sea ice in the Arctic Ocean and warming the atmosphere.” until winter when all that extra heat is radiated into outer space.

John Tillman
November 7, 2020 6:30 am

Oil drilling in the McKenzie Delta since the 1970s can’t have contributed to its warming, nor dams on its tributaries.

DHR
November 7, 2020 6:39 am

“If Alaska were covered by 1-meter thick ice, 20% of Alaska would be gone…”

Huh? Somehow, it seems to me that if Alaska were covered with a meter of ice, we would have 100% of Alaska covered with ice.

Bryan A
Reply to  DHR
November 7, 2020 8:54 am

Exactly and releasing 20% of it from Ice’s deadly grip would be a good thing

Rud Istvan
November 7, 2020 7:16 am

Hard to see where the supposed increasing river heat is coming from. Arctic rivers freeze every winter, and thaw every spring carrying snow melt at about 32F into the Arctic sea. They aren’t thawing earlier and freezing later. That is a verifiable ground truth, shown by the annual breakup bet on the Tanana River at Nenana.

Bryan A
Reply to  Rud Istvan
November 7, 2020 8:58 am

Looking at the image it appears that the “warmth” inducing melt might be from a factor of erosion and run off. There is a lot of muddy silt in that water.

Ben Vorlich
Reply to  Rud Istvan
November 7, 2020 9:40 am

In the 1990s I spent a week here
https://www.ridgway-adventure.co.uk/
on a week’s “Team Building”*. which involved all the usual stuff associated with that type of thing. Several days activities includied canoeing. One day on both a Sea Loch and a Fresh Water Loch which were seperated by about 50 metres. It is an abiding memory how much warmer the sea water was compared to the fresh. Not that that is particularly relevant in this case, but personal experience does make you ask the question “are you sure about that?”

*With a group of workers of various ages, levels of fitness, ambition and some of whom didn’t like each other before it began what it did was to successfully create three groups who didn’t really like the other two with a couple of notable exceptions.

John F Hultquist
Reply to  Ben Vorlich
November 7, 2020 10:29 am

The last * paragraph is worthy of a cheer. Hoorah!

Gerald Machnee
Reply to  Rud Istvan
November 7, 2020 11:48 am

Correct!!!!

Loydo
Reply to  Rud Istvan
November 7, 2020 3:33 pm

What “a verifiable ground truth” are you basing this on?

https://www.epa.gov/climate-indicators/alaskan-rivers

… and this excludes what are probably the the warmest 3 years.

fred250
Reply to  Loydo
November 7, 2020 3:56 pm

Warmest years since the COLD of the 1970’s hey loy

NATURAL cycles of AMO and PDO will do that, As will decreased cloud cover

No evidence of any human causation though, is there.

Be VERY GLAD we are not still stuck in the LIA. !!

Or are you one of those morons that thinks extreme levels of Arctic sea ice all year round is normal and desirable ?

fred250
Reply to  Loydo
November 8, 2020 3:11 am

Notice the step change at the 1998 El Nino, loy dumb

Thanks for again proving that atmospheric CO2, or any other human factor…

… has ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to do with it.

You are such a useful idiot !.

Loydo
Reply to  Rud Istvan
November 7, 2020 3:54 pm

“They aren’t thawing earlier…Hard to see where the supposed increasing river heat is coming from….”

… with your eyes closed.

comment image?itok=2Cho4kUg

https://twitter.com/IARC_Alaska/status/1116857791359008768/photo/1

Ffs.

fred250
Reply to  Loydo
November 7, 2020 4:51 pm

So an abnormal WEATHER event over a year or so,

Notice that around 1940 was similar, even if missing data.

Cyclic, related to AMO.

Thanks for showing everyone that it has Absolutely NOTHING to do with human CO2., bozo !

1… Do you have any empirical scientific evidence for warming by atmospheric CO2?

2… In what ways has the global climate changed in the last 50 years , that can be scientifically proven to be of human causation?

3… Do you have any evidence at all that the highly beneficial drop in Arctic sea ice from the extreme highs of the LIA and late 1970s has any human causation

fred250
Reply to  Loydo
November 7, 2020 4:57 pm

And you STILL haven’t explained why having some slight warming since the COLDEST period in 10,000 years is a bad thing.

Or why having the Arctic actually available to sea life from some small part of the years is a bad thing.

I would have thought a pretend environmentalist like you would rejoice in the return of sea creatures to the Arctic because of the slightly decreased sea ice since the extreme high levels of the LIA and late 1970s.

But no,

Your inner hatred of Arctic sea life must run very deep.

Chris4692
November 7, 2020 7:25 am

How significant compared to the effects of the AMO?

Richard M
Reply to  Chris4692
November 7, 2020 10:35 am

Good question and needs to be considered to understand the effect of the rivers. I know there has been a lot of industrialization along the Russian rivers since 1950. In any event they work together to melt ice and allow more ocean heat to warm the atmosphere.

We can also ask the same question of the PDO. While it doesn’t have the direct route to transport a lot of energy into the Arctic, it still has some effect.

November 7, 2020 7:34 am

“A new study shows that increased heat from Arctic rivers is melting sea ice in the Arctic Ocean and warming the atmosphere.”

Before I read this, I would have assumed that an increase in temperature of the seawater of the Arctic Ocean, especially the top layer of it, was something that had happened every year since time immemorial, always melting lots and lots of sea ice in the process and making the atmosphere over the polar region less cold than it would otherwise be, until winter returned. I would have assumed that the emptying of rivers into the Arctic Ocean was a major contributor to this observable phenomenon.

Do I need to read this study that proves something I thought was bleedin’ obvious anyway?

Bruce Cobb
November 7, 2020 7:35 am

Too bad 2020 couln’t be covered by a meter of ice.

Alex
Reply to  Bruce Cobb
November 7, 2020 7:50 am

😎👍
Switch 2020 off.
Finally.

fretslider
November 7, 2020 7:45 am

…fully coupled climate models incorporating more so-phisticated land surface modules, namely, CM2M and CM2G from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. Another state-of-the-art model, Nucleus for European Modeling of the Ocean (NEMO), has an optional parameterization of Qrh in which river water tem-perature (Tw) was represented by sea surface temperature (Ts) ob-served at river mouths (14), although this parameterization does not realistically account for the seasonal change of Tw.

https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/6/45/eabc4699/tab-pdf

Nuff said, I think.

john harmsworth
November 7, 2020 7:51 am

I expect that water flow in the Arctic rivers is a function of the precipitation, except to the extent that water drains from melting permafrost. The annual precipitation may decrease if the Arctic warms and dries out so the increased flow could be a cyclical thing. Likewise if permafrost is melting and draining, that would decrease over time as the permafrost dries out. Just guessing but that could be a cycle that takes a hundred years or more to run through. It’s not climate change. It’s a cyclical interaction between the sea and land. Just one more thing we DON’T KNOW about the climate.

Gary Pearse
November 7, 2020 7:53 am

I’m sure melt of the headwaters of the Mississippi cools the Gulf of Mexico at the mouth of the river in the same fashion. Egads, I thought Japan immune to the great dumbing down evidenced by these climatography type ‘breakthroughs’.

HD Hoese
Reply to  Gary Pearse
November 7, 2020 10:20 am

Actually, not all from ice, the Mississippi delays spring in New Orleans, amount variable. Not usually mentioned is the temperature change effect from the levees preventing spread before the Gulf. In 1899 large blocks of ice passed New Orleans on February 17, 2 days later into the Gulf. [Berry, J. 1899. Climate and crop service. Monthly Weather Review. 27(2):53-55; Henry, A. J. 1899. The weather of the month. Monthly Weather Review. 27(2):50-53. ] It was a very cold year, even on the south Texas coast.

I have worked with hydrologists in warmer climates, all knew about thermometers. Somebody needs to produce a song about “Simulation, Simulation” with whatever rhymes with it. “There is now no alternative to numerical modeling for quantifying Qrh [high riverine heat] transport over the Arctic shelves and further offshore to the deep-sea areas and the associated impacts on Arctic sea ice variability.”

griff
November 7, 2020 8:07 am

That and the extraordinary warm temperatures – see this year’s Siberian temperature record.

Carl Friis-Hansen
Reply to  griff
November 7, 2020 9:24 am

Yes, ony year can be warmer or colder then another year, but the paper is talking about the long term trend from 1980.

Peter W
Reply to  griff
November 7, 2020 9:41 am

It is a well-documented fact that 6,000 years ago earth was warmer than today. So tell us about all of the terrible things which took place back then.

John Bell
Reply to  griff
November 7, 2020 9:51 am

griff stop using fossil fuels every day you flaming hypocrite, get with renewables, they are much cheaper, get on the bandwagon, show us how it is done, and make a web page to show us how.

Reply to  griff
November 7, 2020 11:01 am

Since all these super warm things are happening this year, griff, why isn’t the Arctic ice-free by now? Wasn’t that predicted by scientists to happen by 2013 or 2014 or 2015 or 2016 or 2018?
https://cei.org/blog/wrong-again-50-years-failed-eco-pocalyptic-predictions

fred250
Reply to  griff
November 7, 2020 11:32 am

why not mention the incredible cold only 2 years ago griff

https://www.usatoday.com/story/weather/2018/01/17/oymyakon-yakutia-siberia-russia-extreme-cold-temperatures/1039929001/

You yet again show that you are totally ignorant about what is WEATHER and what is climate.

And why would anyone compare to the 1980’s which was the coldest period since the LIA.

comment image

Why not compare the 1940s?

There may be a local human component due to population and industrial increases in the region for this beneficial warming but its NOTHING to do with atmospheric CO2

1… Do you have any empirical scientific evidence for warming by atmospheric CO2?

2… In what ways has the global climate changed in the last 50 years , that can be scientifically proven to be of human causation?

3… Do you have any evidence at all that the highly beneficial drop in Arctic sea ice from the extreme highs of the LIA and late 1970s has any human causation

fred250
Reply to  griff
November 7, 2020 11:43 am

by a tiny fraction of a degree.. well within any measurement accuracy..

So mathematically same as the previous record in 193x (when ever it was), and same as the Fort Yukon record in 1915.

What about all the COLD RECORDS in the US absolutely SMASHED, by several degrees, only last week.

Loydo
Reply to  fred250
November 7, 2020 3:23 pm

“The Siberian temperature record”
“by a tiny fraction of a degree.. well within any measurement accuracy.”

How about you stop lying to yourself about this.

The linked graphic shows the astonishing length and spread of this years Siberian heatwave: up to 10 degrees warmer over most of northern Asia for more than six months.
comment image

A 6 month long anomaly! …that continued into September
comment image

Is there any surprise at all that anomalously warm waters might be flowing into the Arctic?

David Kamakaris
Reply to  Loydo
November 7, 2020 3:27 pm

And still it’s not warm enough for spruce trees to grow on the Arctic tundra as they did profusely during the mid-Holocene Optimum.

Loydo
Reply to  David Kamakaris
November 7, 2020 4:01 pm

Are you actually supporting Fred’s claim and attempting to refute data that started in January or just trying to change the subject?

fred250
Reply to  David Kamakaris
November 7, 2020 5:10 pm

Were are the spruce tree Loy dumb

Glad to see it realise its not Global warming, but a facet of some WEATHER events.

1… Do you have any empirical scientific evidence for warming by atmospheric CO2?

2… In what ways has the global climate changed in the last 50 years , that can be scientifically proven to be of human causation?

3… Do you have any evidence at all that the highly beneficial drop in Arctic sea ice from the extreme highs of the LIA and late 1970s has any human causation

Where is all that heat now ???

comment image

And where was it in 2018

https://www.usatoday.com/story/weather/2018/01/17/oymyakon-yakutia-siberia-russia-extreme-cold-temperatures/1039929001/

fred250
Reply to  David Kamakaris
November 7, 2020 5:12 pm

Hey Loy dumb

Did you know that the week of 28/10 – 3/11 had the FASTEST 7 day growth in sea ice since at least 1988.

Must be caused by human CO2, hey D’Oh !!!

David Kamakaris
Reply to  David Kamakaris
November 7, 2020 5:43 pm

Lol Loy.

Still can’t get over the fact that it has been much warmer than at present in recent, mid-distant, and distant past without humans burning fossil fuels.

You’ve obviously missed it, but this IS the subject.

fred250
Reply to  Loydo
November 7, 2020 4:04 pm

See all that purple, that is BELOW -30ºC

comment image

Off you go petal, enjoy your warmth.

Let’s see how you go this time, mindless twerp.!

1… Do you have any empirical scientific evidence for warming by atmospheric CO2?

2… In what ways has the global climate changed in the last 50 years , that can be scientifically proven to be of human causation?

3… Do you have any evidence at all that the highly beneficial drop in Arctic sea ice from the extreme highs of the LIA and late 1970s has any human causation

fred250
Reply to  Loydo
November 7, 2020 6:07 pm

““The Siberian temperature record”
“by a tiny fraction of a degree.. well within any measurement accuracy.””

This is a completely correct statement

The old record was broken, supposedly by 0.7C, Accuracy is +/-0.5 and accuracy in 1988 would have been similar or more, take into account the conversion and the fact than many houses now have heat pump or reverse cycle air-con. Unusual, sure, but so was the freezing cold two years before.

Verkhoyansk has the highest yearly range of any measured place on the planet.

On that day, it was truly an outlier, being several degrees more than the surrounding area

comment image

Even the measurement was an outlier from the rest of the day
One has to wonder why there were two readings at that time on that day. ? ???

comment image

Whereas the COLD records in the USA were many and over a much wider area and by several degrees.

Wim Röst
Reply to  fred250
November 7, 2020 6:29 pm

FRED 250 “One has to wonder why there were two readings at that time on that day. ?”

WR: Very strange, two measurements on one day. A difference of some 6 degrees, the highest one is used… What was the source for the second graphic?

fred250
Reply to  fred250
November 7, 2020 6:39 pm
fred250
Reply to  fred250
November 7, 2020 6:45 pm

And the 1915 Fort Yukon record in the Arctic was only 0.5C lower,

….. as if those measurements could be that accurate anyway.

These extreme peaks happen when you get abnormal WEATHER conditions.

Absolutely NOTHING to do with atmospheric CO2.

fred250
Reply to  fred250
November 7, 2020 4:00 pm

The previous record was broken , maybe, by only a fraction of a degree.

YOU are the one who needs to stop LYING through your teeth.

Using Berkley, .. roflmao !! agenda driven garbage.

“A 6 month long anomaly! …that continued into September”

Great to see you realise it was only WEATHER, moron. !!

Did you see those US records absolutely SMASHED by several degrees !!!

Arctic sea ice is now gain rapidly

David Kamakaris
Reply to  griff
November 7, 2020 3:25 pm

Griff, how long is your record?

Mark A Luhman
Reply to  griff
November 7, 2020 4:41 pm

Yep a minor uptick in a 8000 year decline in temperatures. I am hopping the uptick continues, and any sane person would. A cooling world is bad news, no mater how you wrap it.

Carl Friis-Hansen
November 7, 2020 8:17 am

According to the research, major Arctic rivers contribute significantly more heat to the Arctic Ocean than they did in 1980.

Is it that the temperature of the rivers have increased or is it the flow rate that increased in set period?

Wim Röst
Reply to  Carl Friis-Hansen
November 7, 2020 6:03 pm

Good question. I don’t know whether it is known. As far as I can understand authors use model output:

“The CHANGE model includes two modules. The first module represents land surface processes simulating explicit water and energy fluxes and vegetation dynamics in the atmosphere-soil-vegetation system. The second module includes a river discharge scheme adopting a storage-based distributed water routing algorithm with 0.5° (latitude/longitude) resolution (1, 17). Discharge and river water temperatures, simulated using the CHANGE model forced by three different meteorological datasets (Supplementary Materials), were used as riverine freshwater and heat fluxes in the COCO model experiments, which makes it possible to quantify the sensitivity of sea ice to the associated fluxes. ”

From MATERIALS AND METHODS. Source: https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/6/45/eabc4699

Redge
November 7, 2020 8:19 am

And no possibility the rivers are warmer due to the industrial and military complexes that have grown up in Siberia since WWII?

fred250
Reply to  Redge
November 8, 2020 2:54 am

And of course, the population growth in Siberia has nothing to do with the beneficial warming either 😉

comment image

Coeur de Lion
November 7, 2020 8:31 am

“Old man, cold man, Mackenzie River”.

Phil Salmon
November 7, 2020 8:35 am

It’s hard to take seriously any field of “science” where their understanding of how a system works changes every week.

d
November 7, 2020 8:37 am

Very circular reasoning, attached to the magic words “feedback loop,” in quotations from a “climate change modeler.” Allusions to an uncontrolled “acceleration,” yet global average temperature is up about half a degree C over forty years.

Circular reasoning is not a feedback loop, nor is it a recursive computer function. No provable (falsifiable) theory offered, nor data measurement from the environment.

“If Alaska were covered by 1-meter thick ice, 20% of Alaska would be gone…”

November 7, 2020 8:44 am

This kind of research falls into a certain category:
“I’ve discovered a severe personal anxiety.
Please send me a grant.”

Pat from kerbob
November 7, 2020 9:01 am

They are again saying that the air warms the water, ridiculous

John F Hultquist
Reply to  Pat from kerbob
November 7, 2020 10:39 am

As an explanation perhaps:
Warmer air tends to allow rain, rather than snow to fall.
Rain has an erosive effect on snow and ice.
Look up – rain on snow event – for reading material.

Indirectly then, warm air can contribute to less snow and ice, and warmer surfaces.

Pat from kerbob
Reply to  John F Hultquist
November 8, 2020 9:59 am

Sure
But they didn’t say that

November 7, 2020 9:06 am

The Arctic Ocean is permanently supplied with new water from the Gulf Current, which enters the sea close at the surface near Spitsbergen. This current is called the West Spitsbergen current. The arriving water is relatively warm (6 to 8°C) and salty (35.1 to 35.3%) and has a mean speed of ca. 30 cm/sec-1. The warm Atlantic water represents almost 90% of all water masses the Arctic receives. The other ~10% comes via the Bering Strait or rivers. Due to the fact that the warm Atlantic water reaches usually the edge of the Arctic Ocean at Spitsbergen in open water, the cooling process starts well before entering the Polar Sea.

In 2020, the ice recovery was slow in October, but has come roaring back in November.
comment image?w=1000

https://rclutz.wordpress.com/2020/11/06/arctic-flash-freezing-in-november/

fred250
Reply to  Ron Clutz
November 7, 2020 11:39 am

The week of 28/10 – 3/11 had the FASTEST 7 day growth in sea ice since at least 1988.

Carl Friis-Hansen
November 7, 2020 9:31 am

Not any terrifying change in temperature in Canada.
https://toronto.weatherstats.ca/metrics/temperature.html

Mark Pawelek
November 7, 2020 9:56 am

The cold Arctic ocean is warming the atmosphere? That makes no sense. There’s no mechanism, nor rationale for the ‘warming’. It amounts to crazy talk.

However, according to our model simulations … additional heat released to the atmosphere.

The model simulation they use isn’t described in their paper. In what way is this science rather than voodoo? What stops them making up whatever they want to say?

John F Hultquist
Reply to  Mark Pawelek
November 7, 2020 10:46 am

Ice is an insulator. Any process that reduces the floating ice cover between the cold atmosphere over the water underneath (warm) will allow that water to radiate (warm → cold).
All temperatures are relative.

Gino
November 7, 2020 11:21 am

I believe that this was brought up here a few years back? I recall an article/post about increased industrialization along the MacKenzie increasing river temps and leading to early ice break up at the mouth of the river in spring. At that point it was someone speculating or make observations.

Petit_Barde
November 7, 2020 11:38 am

“A new study shows that increased heat from Arctic rivers is melting sea ice in the Arctic Ocean and warming the atmosphere.”

There are two options :

1) If they assume that the culprit of this increased heat from Arctic rivers is the atmosphere warmed by anthropogenic CO2 emission, then, they are claiming that a warmer atmosphere increases the rivers heat which then warm the atmosphere :
– they just discovered a magical positive circular feedback : they should patent this great discovery !

2) If not, then they just discovered that warmer water … well … warms colder bodies.

In either cases, they are nothing but a bunch of clowns.

Sorcery
November 7, 2020 12:47 pm

The following concept is not on Trenberth’s heat flow diagrams : https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170526144034.htm

Norway is trying to use this to improve hydroelectricity.

Chemistry students notice it when adding water to a strong acid or alkali, heat is generated.

RickWill
November 7, 2020 5:10 pm

Maybe a new study, but old information. I pointed it out over a year ago:
https://1drv.ms/u/s!Aq1iAj8Yo7jNg0lXWzyccVHItf34

This explains why the ocean temperature reaches its peak in late July or early August rather than March when the peak ocean energy is reached. There is poorly mixed surface water that is not indicative of the ocean heat uptake.

Prjindigo
November 7, 2020 6:42 pm

Perhaps someone should explain to these twits how the rivers ARE part of the atmosphere while leaving boot-sole toe impressions opposite of curb impressions on their heads.

MatthewSykes
November 8, 2020 12:34 am

Loss of sea ice is a negative feedback. Sea ice insulates the ocean, its loss allows the system as a whole to lose heat.

Climate believer
November 8, 2020 1:15 am

Looks like during the 35 year period the majority of the “heat” was coming from the Russian side, and specifically from the Lena River Delta, emptying into the Laptev Sea.

comment image

Very little effect elsewhere.

Phil Salmon
November 8, 2020 4:00 am

It,s ocean currents not atmospheric processes that make ice caps grow or shrink. Down in Antarctica warm currents have been recently flowing toward the ice cap leading researchers to believe that this was both a sign and a mechanism of ice sheet warming and melt. But now it turns out its the opposite. Abtarctica is cooling, and the endless freezing catabatic winds are cooling the surrounding ocean and causing downwelling of cold dense water. The inflowing warm water is only doing so in reaction to the cold downwelling via undersea canyons around Antarctica.

Thus the increased warmer surface water flow toward Antarctica in recent years is in reaction to cooled Antarctic shelf water downwelling via underwater canyons. This means that Antarctic supply of cold deep water is increasing, envigourating the deep ocean Thermohaline Circulation. Here’s the link and the abstract:

https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/6/18/eaav2516.full

Warm Circumpolar Deep Water transport toward Antarctica driven by local dense water export in canyons

A. K. Morrison, McC. Hogg, M. H. England and P. Spence

Science Advances 01 May 2020:
Vol. 6, no. 18, eaav2516
DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aav2516

Abstract
Poleward transport of warm Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) has been linked to melting of Antarctic ice shelves. However, even the steady-state spatial distribution and mechanisms of CDW transport remain poorly understood. Using a global, eddying ocean model, we explore the relationship between the cross-slope transports of CDW and descending Dense Shelf Water (DSW). We find large spatial variability in CDW heat and volume transport around Antarctica, with substantially enhanced flow where DSW descends in canyons. The CDW and DSW transports are highly spatially correlated within ~20 km and temporally correlated on subdaily time scales. Focusing on the Ross Sea, we show that the relationship is driven by pulses of overflowing DSW lowering sea surface height, leading to net onshore CDW transport. The majority of simulated onshore CDW transport is concentrated in cold-water regions, rather than warm-water regions, with potential implications for ice-ocean interactions and global sea level rise.

2hotel9
November 8, 2020 6:57 am

And yet, according to NSIDC the Arctic is still covered with ice and snow, so just more lies and crapspew.

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