Venus at Sunrise From the Space Station

From NASA image of the day.

June 7, 2019

Venus at Sunrise From the Space Station

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From the International Space Station, NASA astronaut Christina Koch (@AstroChristina) snapped and posted this image of the planet Venus at sunrise. The blue glow of Earth’s atmosphere shimmers as the station orbits our planet.

Image Credit: NASA

Last Updated: June 7, 2019

Editor: Yvette Smith

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Sara
June 9, 2019 3:24 am

Cool!

Peter
June 9, 2019 3:58 am

Thankyou.
I was born 4 years before Yuri Gagarin went to space. I grew up watching the great space race.
Seeing this photo brings back the wonder….

Derek Wood
June 9, 2019 4:26 am

I have to say that I’m more impressed by the image of earth’s atmosphere against the curvature of the planet. It made me think “Wow! and an element which consists of .04% of that is causing the world to slowly heat up!”…Yeah right!

trafamadore
Reply to  Derek Wood
June 9, 2019 7:19 am

And hard to believe 0.04% arsenic would do one in…

Mark Broderick
Reply to  trafamadore
June 9, 2019 8:28 am

One is a living animal, one is a chemical system….D’OH !

Ellen
Reply to  Mark Broderick
June 9, 2019 9:03 am

Cyanide is deadly — but arsenic is forever.

Carbon500
Reply to  trafamadore
June 9, 2019 9:48 am

0.04% of how much? And over what period of time? – and yes, Mark Broderick is quite right!

Carbon500
Reply to  Carbon500
June 9, 2019 1:56 pm

Trafamadore: thinking further about your comment re. 0.04% of arsenic, I think that you might not be sure of or aware as to how CO2 concentrations are measured and defined.
If so, here are the essential details.
What’s generally referred to as the concentration of CO2 in the air is actually the mole fraction of CO2, defined as the number of carbon dioxide molecules in a million molecules of dry air gases – for example, 410 parts per million of CO2 (abbreviated as ppm) means that in every million molecules of dry air there are 410 CO2 molecules, or 0.041%.
Why are air samples dried before CO2 measurement? It’s because the concentration of CO2 can alter depending on variables such as atmospheric pressure and temperature, and on how much water vapour (from almost none to 4% by volume) is present. Unlike concentration, the mole fraction is not affected by these variables – thus, by using dry air measurements, true comparisons of the amounts of CO2 over time can be made.

Howard Crawford
Reply to  trafamadore
June 9, 2019 2:14 pm

Actually arsenic is used to rid humans of tape worms.

Steve B
Reply to  trafamadore
June 9, 2019 3:36 pm

Trafamadore – The human body is made up of about 10,000 chemicals most of which are active, whereas the atmosphere is made up of about 5 of which 2 are slightly active, Oxygen and Water. One in ten thousand is 0.0001% on average so yes 0.04% will do some damage.

People should stop copying and pasting from activist websites who use useless analogies which of course shows how ignorant you truly are.

OweninGA
Reply to  Steve B
June 9, 2019 4:24 pm

Steve,
Not to be pendant (some say my natural state), but 1 part in 10000 is 0.0001 or 0.01%. You forgot to move the decimal point when making it a percentage.

Steve B
Reply to  OweninGA
June 9, 2019 4:35 pm

oops you are correct? but at least the point remains the same.

Loydo
Reply to  Steve B
June 10, 2019 1:08 am

280ppm CO2 casts an IR shadow, 415ppm casts a darker one, not really that difficult.

Steve B
Reply to  Loydo
June 10, 2019 1:40 am

Prove it, nobody else has yet. Remember those pesky dinosaurs? When CO2 concentrations were over 1000ppm. Really bad for the planet aye.

Editor
Reply to  trafamadore
June 11, 2019 5:16 am

I generally point out that 400 ppm of CO overnight may make that be your last night alive.

An amazing number of people think I’m still talking about CO2….

Or I point out the first 100 ppm of CO2 had much more impact than the last 100 ppm, but people who have convinced themselves that trace gases are unimportant just don’t get it.

I’m still hopeful I can come up with an explanation that will reach them, but so far haven’t found it.

Johann Wundersamer
Reply to  Ric Werme
June 13, 2019 7:40 pm

“400 ppm of CO overnight may make that be your last night alive” where the 400 ppm are of minor interest here accounting CO collects on the ground causing caisson disease – decompression sickness.

[?? mod]

Johann Wundersamer
Reply to  Ric Werme
June 13, 2019 7:44 pm

“400 ppm of CO overnight may make that be your last night alive” where the 400 ppm are of minor interest here accounting CO

due to it’s weight

collects on the ground causing caisson disease – decompression sickness.

Tom in Florida
June 9, 2019 6:17 am

The scary hing is how small the atmosphere actually is. If you take the maximum height of the troposphere, approx 12 miles, and lay that distance down flat on a map of the area you live, you realize that things only 12 miles away are very close. But that’s all the troposphere there is.

Pop Piasa
Reply to  Tom in Florida
June 9, 2019 8:32 am

Sagan said the troposphere is about the same scale as the coat of varnish on a schoolroom globe. That made me environmentally aware and started my journey to where I stand as a skeptic of the CO2 control knob of climate change.

steveta_uk
Reply to  Pop Piasa
June 10, 2019 2:59 am

I think it was Sagan who pointed out that despite all the mountains and deep-sea trenches the Earth has a very much flatter surface than an orange.

Carbon500
Reply to  Tom in Florida
June 9, 2019 9:53 am

When you look at the vapour trails left by aircraft overhead, they’re flying at around 35,000 feet – just over six and a half miles, and the temperature up there is about -40 to -50C.
Dangerous man-made global warming? Yeah, right….

meteorologist in research
Reply to  Carbon500
June 9, 2019 12:55 pm

Humans can’t affect the fluid dynamics of the atmosphere, because it’s so thin — in your opinion?

What?

Jeff Alberts
Reply to  Tom in Florida
June 9, 2019 11:31 am

Straight-line distance from my house to work, 13 miles. I’d almost be in outer space!

Editor
Reply to  Tom in Florida
June 11, 2019 5:33 am

It’s even more scary when you realize that our lives are dependent on essentially a thin film of chlorophyll.

Think about that the next time you mow the lawn!

Fiona
June 9, 2019 8:42 am

Very beautiful.

Bryan A
June 9, 2019 9:52 am

It certainly provides that, anyone who could look at such an image and still proclaim the Earth is Flat, either doesn’t believe their eyes, or doesn’t understand the difference between Flat and curved.

Jeff Alberts
Reply to  Bryan A
June 9, 2019 11:32 am

“It certainly provides that, anyone who could look at such an image and still proclaim the Earth is Flat, either doesn’t believe their eyes, or doesn’t understand the difference between Flat and curved.”

No, they just think it’s faked.

Bryan A
Reply to  Jeff Alberts
June 9, 2019 2:47 pm

AKA don’t believe their eyes

steveta_uk
Reply to  Bryan A
June 10, 2019 4:18 am

That picture is obviously taken from underneath the disk.

AndyE
June 9, 2019 9:55 am

Fantastic photo – out of this world.

Eben
June 9, 2019 12:31 pm

They forgot to fake the rest of the starz

Ken Stewart
Reply to  Eben
June 9, 2019 4:55 pm

Venus is the fourth or fifth brightest object in the sky (after Sun, Moon, Jupiter, and in this case Earth) so stars in the field of view are impossible to see – and probably the glare of sunrise in the Earth’s atmosphere has been reduced in the photograph as well, further reducing visibility of stars.

jorgekafkazar
June 9, 2019 7:38 pm

Here’s a bit of trivia: who was the first person to report on the blue glow?

Tom in Florida
Reply to  jorgekafkazar
June 10, 2019 5:41 am

Yuri Gagarin?

AndyE
June 10, 2019 8:31 pm

Hey – looking at it again – come to think : should we not glimpse lights from our cities??
Or is the photo perhaps taken over the Pacific Ocean?

Editor
Reply to  AndyE
June 11, 2019 5:27 am

The exposure time (not available at that NASA site) was probably too short to register the light from stars or streetlights. It did get some clouds. Given that Venus is bigger than a point and lit by bright sunlight (it’s closer to the Sun), it wouldn’t take a long exposure to record it. It may have been a handheld exposure.

Heck, I’ve seen Venus during the day both times I went looking for it.

Johann Wundersamer
June 13, 2019 7:54 pm

A CO sink collects 1 million CO ppm.

That’s the reason one should never operate a diesel powered fork lifter or similar equipment in a closed hall.

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