Another “Ship of Fools” gets grounded in Arctic ice, needs rescue

Remember this? The ill-fated “Spirit of Mawson” expedition to Antarctica (in the Akademik Shokalskiy) that set out to bring attention to “global warming” only to be trapped in ice?

It’s deja vu all over again. (with h/t to Yogi Berra)

We have another winner! This time in the Arctic.

A few weeks ago I covered this:

Student propaganda cruise to the Arctic to be carried by webcast

From August 23 to Sept. 13, the University of Rhode Island’s Inner Space Center (ISC), with major funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation and additional support from the Heising-Simons Foundation, will conduct the innovative Northwest Passage Project research expedition with a team of natural and social scientists, students, and a professional film crew. This ground-breaking opportunity is also supported by One Ocean Expeditions as a key marine partner, having operated in Arctic waters for over 20 years.

Research to aid understanding of / document climate change effects

Aboard the Akademik Ioffe, the team will collect water, ice, and air samples to advance understanding of and document the effect climate change is having on the environment and biodiversity in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.

The expedition team will engage a wide public audience through an extensive and unprecedented Internet presence from the area, including Facebook Live broadcasts from sea. Special interactive broadcasts will be beamed via the Inner Space Center (ISC), the U.S. facility that supports ocean exploration and education, to three prestigious science museums across the country – the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, Washington DC, the Exploratorium, San Francisco CA, and the Alaska SeaLife Center, Seward AK.

Then predictably, this happened according to the Facebook page of the tour company, One Ocean Expeditions Inner Space Center:

On the morning of August 24th, the Akademik Ioffe — the vessel carrying the participants of the National Science Foundation funded Northwest Passage Project being conducted by the University of Rhode Island — became grounded in the western Gulf of Boothia in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. The ship has since been re-floated, and following a full and successful systems check the vessel has repositioned to anchor. We are happy to report that all passengers, including all Northwest Passage Project participants, are safe and are being well cared for. We will provide updates as we resolve the situation.

Then the Canadian Coast Guard service had this to say:

Good morning, Due to heavier than normal ice concentrations in the Canadian arctic waters north of 70 degrees, the Canadian Coast Guard, recommends that pleasure craft do not navigate in the Beaufort Sea, Barrow, Peel Sound, Franklin Strait and Prince Regent. CCG icebreakers cannot safely escort pleasure craft. Operators of pleasure craft considering a northwest passage should also consider the risk of having to winter in a safe haven in the Arctic, or in the case of an emergency, be evacuated from beset vessels. Safety of mariners is our primary concern. REGARDS, NORDREG CANADA 181256UTC\LR

And then, comes the familiar evacuation plan:

25 Aug 2018 – KUGAARUK, Nunavut – Cpl. Serge Yelle of the RCMP detachment says he expects between 80 and 90 of the passengers will fly from the remote Arctic coastline community back to Yellowknife.

The Transportation Safety Board is considering whether it will send investigators to the site.

A board spokesman says the ship has suffered some damage.

On its website, the tour operator – One Ocean Expeditions – describes the 117-metre Akademik Ioffe as a “modern, comfortable, safe and ice-strengthened” vessel that can host 96 passengers and 65 staff and crew.

Passengers on grounded Arctic cruise ship to be flown back to Yellowknife

It seems global warming zealots are condemned to repeat the past, over and over again.

Of course, despite their claims of “unprecedented Internet presence from the area” not a word of any of this on the official project page. The last entry was on August 22nd headlined: Getting there is half the fun

The guy on the left, wearing sandals, obviously thinks the Arctic is warm enough for that sort of footwear.

 

If only they’d checked first…per the Canadian Coast Guard report, sea ice volume is above normal, according to DMI:

Extent remains a bit below normal:

NOTE: About 15 minutes after publication, the title was changed from “stuck” to “grounded” to be more in-tune with news reports. However, since we so far have no photos of the grounding, we don’t know if it was a grounding by ice, or by land to avoid ice. Either way, since the ship is now damaged, the expedition is a bust.

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Matt
August 27, 2018 7:59 am

All the news articles say “run aground” not “stuck in ice”.

hunter
Reply to  Matt
August 27, 2018 8:01 am

What is a little deception amongst climate deceivers?

Reply to  hunter
August 27, 2018 10:00 am

It’s Russian bots who did them in (note the russian letters)

Bryan A
Reply to  vukcevic
August 27, 2018 11:23 am

Perhaps they should plan their next Arctic Passage Cruise up De Nile

Pop Piasa
Reply to  vukcevic
August 27, 2018 12:14 pm

Vuk, the picture really is priceless. We should mass email it to Gore!

Philip Schaeffer
Reply to  Pop Piasa
August 27, 2018 9:37 pm

Perhaps you could email the picture of the actual ship, run aground, with no ice to be seen, to Anthony.

Bryan A
Reply to  Philip Schaeffer
August 27, 2018 9:59 pm

I hear the next Russian Research Vessel will be called the Akademik SOS

Tom
Reply to  Philip Schaeffer
August 28, 2018 5:05 am

It’s aground to avoid ice damage, why would it winter there if it was just aground?

Phil.
Reply to  Philip Schaeffer
August 28, 2018 10:06 am

Interesting but that photo which I posted here yesterday has now disappeared!
Here it is again, just after the passengers had been taken off, the Coast guard helicopter is in the background.
comment image

Reply to  vukcevic
August 28, 2018 6:01 am

Mueller should get on it right away. The American people need to know if this was discussed at the Trump Tower meeting with the Russians.

Reply to  Matt
August 27, 2018 8:10 am

They started on 23rd, ran aground on 24th, probably “due to heavier than normal ice concentrations.” That’s a true explorer’s spirit.

Javert Chip
Reply to  Curious George
August 27, 2018 9:48 am

Man oh man: that’s some great seamanship…only 24 hours away the ground.

Why isn’t this being called child endangerment?

ScienceABC123
Reply to  Javert Chip
August 27, 2018 11:00 am

LOL!

Wrusssr
Reply to  Javert Chip
August 27, 2018 11:16 am

These rescue attempts are getting expensive. Tell them to just sit tight and wait for the ice to melt. . . drop them a few C’s (c-rations), maybe some charcoal and matches to melt snow and ice for water . . . some books to read on global warming, etc . . .

Pop Piasa
Reply to  Wrusssr
August 27, 2018 12:11 pm

The Coast Guard should hand out books describing the Franklin expedition of 1845. They might draw some perspective from it, if they really are as intelligent as their parents hope that they are after spending all that $ for school.

Pop Piasa
Reply to  Pop Piasa
August 27, 2018 1:08 pm

How many of these folks know that in 1942 the RCMP schooner St. Roch circumnavigated N. America during a period of arguably lower ice extents than now (just not documented by satellites).
I fear fewer yet will find the connection between SSTs, atmospheric H2O, and winter warming in the arctic.
They also failed to notice that summer temperatures this year have been below normal until recently. That would have been a red flag for me.

jpm
Reply to  Pop Piasa
August 27, 2018 7:12 pm

PP
As I understand it the St Roch sailed from Vancouver to Halifax, west to east through the North West Passage, and then after a two year delay returned via the North West Passage, East to west, taking the more northerly route. That trip doesn’t seem to have circumnavigated North America.
John

Lee L
Reply to  Pop Piasa
August 28, 2018 12:00 am

St. Roch went through the nw passage in 1942. The circumnavigation of North America using the Panama Canal was 1950.

This wooden boat now lies in the Maritime Museum in Vancouver.
https://www.vancouvermaritimemuseum.com/permanent-exhibit/st-roch-national-historic-site.

Phil.
Reply to  Pop Piasa
August 28, 2018 2:24 pm

Capt Larsen wouldn’t agree with you about the conditions in the 40s. According to him: “The three seasons of the short Arctic Summers from 1940-42 had been extremely bad for navigation, the worst consecutive three I had experienced as far as ice and weather conditions were concerned, and in my remaining years in the Arctic I never saw their like. Without hesitation I would say that most ships encountering the conditions we faced would have failed. I also believe that had we missed the single opportunity we had to get out of Pasley Bay, we most certainly would still be there, in small bits and pieces.”

Reply to  Pop Piasa
August 27, 2018 2:18 pm

There was a major Arctic melt in 1817 reported by whalers who hunted in the area every year (See the book Barrow’s Boys). This caused an increase in expeditions in search of an ice-free Northwest Passage only to become trapped in ice, for months on end and ultimately the disaster of the Franklin Expedition. These modern-day, supposedly educated fools are fortunate there are modern things like helicopters and airplanes to enable them to escape.

Alan the Brit
Reply to  Reginald Vernon Reynolds
August 28, 2018 5:53 am

That was around the time of the Sir Joseph Banks expedition, when he wrote tothe Lords of the Admiralty in about 1817, describing tothem that the ice was “much abated”, suggesting a “new source of warmth” had occurred!

Pop Piasa
Reply to  Wrusssr
August 27, 2018 12:47 pm

If “getting there is half the fun” for this crew, I can’t imagine the other half of the “fun”.

ole jensen
Reply to  Pop Piasa
August 27, 2018 1:13 pm

The other half of the fun, is “getting back home “.

Menicholas
Reply to  Wrusssr
August 27, 2018 7:08 pm

I do not know what you guys consider fun, but the ratio of gender normative cis-females to actual males appears to be quite favorable.

Reply to  Menicholas
August 28, 2018 6:19 am

James Lovelock predicted this outcome:

… the few breeding pairs of people that survive will be in the Arctic where the climate remains tolerable” …

Hivemind
Reply to  Javert Chip
August 27, 2018 7:44 pm

They aren’t children, just extremely stupid.

Philip Schaeffer
Reply to  Curious George
August 28, 2018 10:17 am

Curious George said:

“They started on 23rd, ran aground on 24th, probably “due to heavier than normal ice concentrations.” That’s a true explorer’s spirit.”

That message you quoted was from the 18th, 6 days earlier, and doesn’t show that ice had anything to do with it.

Walt D.
Reply to  Matt
August 27, 2018 8:12 am

Their heads have “run aground” not “stuck in a place where the Sun does not shine” !

Thomas Homer
Reply to  Matt
August 27, 2018 8:56 am

[ All the news articles say “run aground” not “stuck in ice”. ]

Have they been adjusting their depth charts based on their own Sea-Level-Rise projections?

ATheoK
Reply to  Thomas Homer
August 27, 2018 10:31 am

Annd ignored their chartplotter and depth finder; both of which have alarms for shallow depths.

iron brian
Reply to  Thomas Homer
August 27, 2018 5:54 pm

take a knee… ironee that is,

iron brian

Farmer Ch E retired
Reply to  Matt
August 27, 2018 11:40 am

Canadian Press says “A pair of Canadian Coast Guard icebreakers are responding . . .” We’ll find out sooner or later whether “ice” was involved.

Farmer Ch E retired
Reply to  Farmer Ch E retired
September 1, 2018 5:49 am

Ice was a variable according to One Ocean Expeditions:

Aug 25, 2018 5:58 PM by: Canadian Press

KUGAARUK, Nunavut — Dozens of passengers from an Arctic cruise ship that ran aground last week were expected to be flown back south Saturday night, weather and sea ice permitting.

“We’re considering it,” said Catherine Lawton of One Ocean Expeditions tour company.

“Right now, everything’s dependent on weather and ice. What we’re trying to do is watch the variables and put possible options in place.”

Hot under the collar
Reply to  Matt
August 27, 2018 1:26 pm

They meant to say “stuck in ice” but “run aground” was a Freudian slip when they were thinking about their “well grounded” AGW theory!

MarkW
Reply to  Hot under the collar
August 27, 2018 2:27 pm

If you are well grounded, then you can’t have much potential.
(EE joke for those who don’t know EE.)

Pop Piasa
Reply to  MarkW
August 27, 2018 3:57 pm

Ironically, that joke also applies to politics.

James Beaver
Reply to  MarkW
August 27, 2018 5:00 pm

LOL. BSEE here… well played.

Patrick MJD
Reply to  MarkW
August 27, 2018 6:51 pm

Be careful touching the frame of a grounded 230V AC machine next to another with out ground. ~110V AC gives you a nice tingle!

Alan the Brit
Reply to  Hot under the collar
August 28, 2018 5:57 am

Those jolly sea-salts amongst readers here will know full well that the ultimate shame & embarrassment for any skipper, is to run aground, known colloquially as ” a right royal balls up!” in nautical parlance!

boffin77
Reply to  Matt
August 29, 2018 10:16 am

The company I work for collected an image (as best we could due to cloud) soon after the ship was refloated (unfortunately I cannot share it as it is owned by our client). There is some broken ice visible but no pack ice that would stop a ship. However it is possible that the ship steered away from some float ice and hit a submerged rock – bathymetry in the Arctic is far from complete.
We have heard from government sources that ice is unusually heavy this year.

Tom O
Reply to  Matt
August 31, 2018 11:15 am

You’re right, she ran aground. Either struck a sandbar or ridge with perhaps an extra low tide. And she was refloated, not broke free of ice. It appears this happened in open water. What is surprising to me is to evacuate the passengers and send them home instead of continuing the voyage. They must suspect the ship may have taken damage from whatever it was that she grounded on.

Frank K.
August 27, 2018 8:00 am

What irritates me about this debacle is this: “…with major funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation…”. So how much of our tax money went towards supporting a pleasure cruise that yielded zero scientific information? (Well, I guess they DID all learn that there is PLENTY of ice in the Arctic after all).

Bill Powers
Reply to  Frank K.
August 27, 2018 8:27 am

But they won’t report on that last bit. Take a closer look at their picture above. What we have there is a marauding band of Millennials led by a well fed science propagandist ready to add more stories to the doom and gloom that they have branded CAGW. If the evidence isn’t clear to you they will make some up. Mum’s the word on the part about getting stuck in all that “melted” ice.

Reply to  Bill Powers
August 27, 2018 8:36 am

To me it looks like a diverse group of snowflakes.

Ron Long
Reply to  Bill Powers
August 27, 2018 10:09 am

Hey Bill, do you suppose that the “Social Scientists” onboard the Ship of Fools are there to make up some grand story about what a noble effort this was and then Trump messed it up?

Alan the Brit
Reply to  Ron Long
August 28, 2018 6:03 am

I’ve spent years trying to understand what on Earth a “Social Scientist” actually is! 😉

Bryan A
Reply to  Frank K.
August 27, 2018 11:28 am

I think that it perhaps proves that Arctic Climate Science is in fact “well grounded” in AGW fallacy
At least it does show the AGW prognosticators to be Akademik

Pop Piasa
Reply to  Bryan A
August 27, 2018 5:58 pm

Aren’t the ‘k’s supposed to be printed backward in that word?

Sgt
Reply to  Pop Piasa
August 27, 2018 6:02 pm

Nope. Cyrillic K is like Roman K.

The backwards Russian R isn’t r, but “yah”.

Reply to  Frank K.
August 27, 2018 6:50 pm

In fact a second rescue operation was needed:
comment image

Alan the Brit
Reply to  Frank K.
August 28, 2018 6:01 am

Added in to this of course is the cost of sending the rescue teams out toget them, & the risks they are put at doing so!

$ e^e
Reply to  Frank K.
August 28, 2018 11:31 pm

yes while you and i work and pay taxez those who know so much better than us decide how to burn it (our money)

Greg Strebel
August 27, 2018 8:00 am

If I may quibble. Sea ice volume is slightly above average for this date, not above normal. It is solidly within the normally expected range. Of course, wind and current may make the ice pack in localized areas heavier than ‘normal’.
I have a colleague whose son is aboard the Canadian Coast Guard vessel which was just in Iqualuit. I will ask for his observations.

Latitude
Reply to  Greg Strebel
August 27, 2018 8:16 am

..it’s enough that all the usual suspects are not mentioning it at all

Reply to  Greg Strebel
August 27, 2018 8:17 am

Also, it does not appear that changes in sea ice extent is a global warming thing.
There are other factors. I posted this link before in another sea ice post, but here it is again

https://tambonthongchai.com/2018/08/04/does-global-warming-drive-changes-in-arctic-sea-ice/

Reply to  Greg Strebel
August 27, 2018 9:02 am

I agree with your quibble, Greg.

I see it all the time: people write, “above normal” or “below normal” to describe perfectly normal numbers (for temperature, rainfall, etc.) which are merely above or below average.

“Above normal” and “below normal” mean abnormal, i.e., outside the normal range. Those terms are not synonyms for “above average” and “below average,” respectively.

It is unusual for meteorological numbers to be exactly average. They are almost always at least a little bit above or below average. That is not abnormal, and should not be described as above or below normal.

Tom
Reply to  Dave Burton
August 27, 2018 9:27 am

Don’t overlook that the word “typical” can be a utilitarian word that can be used with ‘above’ and ‘below’ as circumstances demand.

Steve Sollars
Reply to  Dave Burton
August 27, 2018 9:34 am

Yes,kind of drives me a little nuts also. How about that something is “a hundred times less” when what is really meant is one hundredth. Annoys me,but apparently few others.

Reply to  Steve Sollars
August 27, 2018 9:44 am

Nope, that drives me bat guano crazy too.

HotScot
Reply to  Steve Sollars
August 27, 2018 11:07 am

Steve Sollars

Upvote.

A bit like “I got my invite”…….No! You got your effing invitation!

I might invite you, I may have invited you, but I sent you an invitation!

And they usually have to Google RSVP!!!!!!!!!!!

Patrick MJD
Reply to  HotScot
August 27, 2018 6:56 pm

But they would have to learn French first.

Reply to  Dave Burton
August 27, 2018 10:36 am

The use of “abnormal” when it properly should by “atypical” or outside of “average” bounds, is major annoyance no matter where I see it, typically for me in health-related articles. Sadly I’ve even seen this “normal” usage sometimes in conclusions of journal papers when “average” is clearly what it should be, but more often in quotes from the researchers provided by science writers. Are they trying to confuse readers?

HotScot
Reply to  Kitty Antonik
August 27, 2018 11:09 am

Kitty Antonik

The curse of a formal education.

John F. Hultquist
Reply to  Kitty Antonik
August 27, 2018 12:44 pm

Kitty,
Climate folks formally defined “normal” in the mid-1930s.
Some folks know this and use the term as it was intended.
Some folks do not know of this definition and thus usage is muddled.
http://w1.weather.gov/glossary/index.php?word=NORMAL

Sam Pyeatte
Reply to  Kitty Antonik
August 27, 2018 2:51 pm

You mean “abnormal” as in “Abby-normal”?…(Young Frankenstein) 🙂

jorgekafkazar
Reply to  Dave Burton
August 27, 2018 11:06 am

The typical reader would not normally know that.

MonnaM
Reply to  Greg Strebel
August 27, 2018 9:08 am

This is perhaps a bit pedantic, but it’s spelled Iqaluit (no “u” after the “q”).

HotScot
Reply to  MonnaM
August 27, 2018 11:17 am

MonnaM

Not pedantic at all. Had an Englishman misspelt my home town Kirkintilloch as they pronounce it, Kirkintillok there would have been hell to pay. Nor can I understand why my wife’s home town of Greenock is pronounced Grenock by the English.

Mike L.
Reply to  HotScot
August 27, 2018 12:11 pm

I never pronounce either of them!

Patrick MJD
Reply to  HotScot
August 27, 2018 6:58 pm

To an Englishman, they are both somewhere north of Watford.

Crispin in Waterloo
Reply to  Greg Strebel
August 27, 2018 9:31 am

Thank you Greg!

Quite correct: “Normal” means a range, not a number. An average is an arithmetical mean. Normal implies a range centered on the mean within which there is a 68% chance (Sigma 1) or 90% chance (Sigma 2) or 99% chance (Sigma 3) any measurement is expected to fall. So even saying “Normal” implies a Sigma number to go with it. The most common is 68%.

The advantage of such an approach is that all historical data can be used as the background to generate the range of “Normal”. It is not necessary (or advisable) to use the past 30 years. Use all years available, and calculate the average and then the standard deviation. Add and subtract the standard deviation from/to the average to find the Normal range, Sigma 1.

Believe it or not, this is how such things are reported in a scientific report. One of the best examples is The Lancet, which you can read free on line. Every single number for disease and impact is reported with a confidence value and the limits involved. Page after page, they faithfully follow the correct format for all reports, because health impact analysis is highly dependent on statistics, just like climate science.

Weathermen should never say, “Today it is 1 degree above average.” They should say today it is 31 degrees which is within the normal range for this location.” If it is, of course. When it is super-hot, they should report that “it is abnormally hot” which would be true if it was above the normal range, which has a standard definition.

Today is the 27th of August. There may never have been a recorded high for today that matched the long term average high, because it is a mathematical construct, not the value of the mode. In general, weather reports are historically misleading and for no reason at all, contain a lot of verbal chaff such as, “We will see a cooling down towards 15 degrees on in through the overnight.” What the heck is “the overnight”?

The majority of weathermen seem not to know how to communicate. [The suffix ‘men’ is a gender-neutral term for “people”. Weathermen does not mean Weathermales”. If you didn’t know that before, now you do.]

Dr Bob
Reply to  Crispin in Waterloo
August 27, 2018 12:50 pm

“They should say today it is 31 degrees which is within the normal range for this location.”
and for complete disclosure, they should add … However, the data set only describes 1% of the Holocene and is therefore statistically meaningless …

HotScot
Reply to  Crispin in Waterloo
August 27, 2018 2:16 pm

Crispin in Waterloo

“Today is the 27th of August. There may never have been a recorded high for today that matched the long term average high, because it is a mathematical construct, not the value of the mode.”

Without any knowledge of maths whatsoever, or much else for that matter, I made that point to someone elsewhere today and have made it a number of times over the past few years.

My perception is that one could travel the world in a millisecond and never encounter the ‘average’ temperature of the earth, anywhere on the earth. An average is, as you say, a mathematical construct.

Yet I see an enormous amount of climate science utterly reliant on one average or another to prove the concept of CAGW. Surely an average high or low temperature is meaningless to the human race, it’s the sustained period of high or low temperatures that’s important e.g. Roman and Medieval Warm Periods where sustained high temperatures were beneficial.

We have had sustained high(ish) temperatures in the UK for several weeks now (dropped suddenly over the past week) of 30 degrees C or so. Far fewer deaths caused by that than in the winter which was largely mild other than a few weeks of below zero temperatures.

Sgt
Reply to  Greg Strebel
August 27, 2018 9:47 am

Regardless, sea ice in the Canadian Arctic is such that the NW Passage is closed.

This ship of taxpayer-funded fools got stuck in ice near where Franklin did in the 1840s. Lucky for them, we now have the means of rescuing them.

Arctic sea ice extent yesterday was higher than on that date in 2007, 2011, 2012, 2015, 2016 and 2017.

Arctic sea ice summer minimum has been trending slightly upward since 2007, and growing since the 2012 record low. Even with two cyclones in 2016, that year didn’t even get as low as 2007, let alone 2012, in which years there was just one August cyclone.

Kenji
Reply to  Greg Strebel
August 27, 2018 10:04 am

I suggest these “Climate Warriors” consult with the Russian icebreaker fleet. I expect they have ice charts, that haven’t been … smoothed … by NASA, NOAA, etc.

ATheoK
Reply to  Kenji
August 27, 2018 10:35 am

And current depth charts too.

Lee L
Reply to  Kenji
August 27, 2018 10:58 am

No kidding. Russia operates 40 icebreakers and 11 more planned or under construction. They well know what it’s going to take to drill the Arctic seabed for oil.

Patrick MJD
Reply to  Lee L
August 27, 2018 7:00 pm

IIRC, Russia launched the biggest icebreaker ever built. The new ones are being built to break similar thickness ice. Must be getting really warm in the ice.

Bryan A
Reply to  Patrick MJD
August 27, 2018 9:50 pm

The warmth is causing more snowfall onto the Ice and allowing for thicker heavier warm ice to form instead of the thinner cold ice

Editor
Reply to  Bryan A
August 27, 2018 9:55 pm

Bryan A

The warmth is causing more snowfall onto the Ice and allowing for thicker heavier warm ice to form instead of the thinner cold ice

What “warmth”??? – the arctic summer temperature forecasts at 80 degree north have not changed even 1/5 of 1 degree since 1957. And, in case you haven’t noticed, it is still mid-august up there. Temperatures are still right at their usual mid-summer points.
See the DMI long-term record.

J Cuttance
Reply to  Greg Strebel
August 27, 2018 10:39 am

Fair quibble, but ice volume, as opposed to extent, is a good indicator of ocean heat content, or lack of it.

buckthorn
Reply to  Greg Strebel
August 28, 2018 1:41 pm

I was just on that ship two weeks ago and there was abnormally heavy ice on the east side of Baffin, as well as in the area around Resolute. We couldn’t land anywhere on Baffin except Pang and Pond. We had to return to Pond Inlet after reaching Devon Island. What you say about localized areas matches what they talked about on the ship. Half the time we were just creeping along, and it was fairly intense on the bridge. I think the Captain is in his first year as a Captain. Fairly young, too.

ATheoK
Reply to  buckthorn
August 28, 2018 3:54 pm

Likely, an example of who drew the short straw to captain a vessel filled with rich lookee-lookees into a definitively icy Arctic.

Creeping is not a method to do major damage in a grounding.
Thick pack ice pushing a ship could cause damage to a ship between a rock and irresistible force.

buckthorn
Reply to  ATheoK
August 28, 2018 7:53 pm

Not likely… it’s actually a pretty darned good gig for a young Russian (the entire crew is Russian). From what I saw, if the ice got to more than, say, 30-40 percent, they’d move further out to sea. We were halfway to Greenland avoiding the ice along Baffin. They weren’t taking chances. I can’t say what happened in Boothie. Having seen the ice charts, I think they would have been better off not to leave Iqaluit in the first place.

Quite a vocal and opinionated lot here….

Phil.
Reply to  Greg Strebel
August 28, 2018 2:30 pm

Using your definition it is ‘below normal’ since it is below the 2sd band for the last 30 years.

hunter
August 27, 2018 8:00 am

Clearly a plot by fossil fuel companies, funding denialist scum.
Also, heavier ice is predicted by climate change fon’t you know?
This ice in particular shows all the hallmarks of human generated CO2: it is not behaving as predicted by the climate faithful.
I hope the ring leaders if this latest stunt have child endangerment chsrges filed against them.
Scum bags.

DD More
Reply to  hunter
August 27, 2018 2:53 pm

engage a wide public audience through an extensive and unprecedented Internet presence from the area, including Facebook Live broadcasts from sea.

So what is this ‘Big Brother’ Arctic?

the University of Rhode Island’s Inner Space Center (ISC) – It’s All in Their Heads.

Yirgach
Reply to  DD More
August 27, 2018 3:07 pm

Yeah, two guys and four bitchin’ babes.
Stuck in the ice on a fully provisioned ship
For a long Arctic night.
Oh lord, what can one do???????

Gary Pearse
Reply to  Yirgach
August 27, 2018 6:12 pm

Yirgah, All I know is it’s not about sex these days. Heck they may all be of different genders, ya know diversity and all.

Greg Cavanagh
Reply to  Gary Pearse
August 27, 2018 7:44 pm

Makes it so much harder to find a partner these days.

Alan the Brit
Reply to  Yirgach
August 28, 2018 6:19 am

You’re all getting carried away, what on Earth could a group of young women & young men possibly get up to stranded up there in all that cold?

Ed Bo
August 27, 2018 8:00 am

The news report says the ship was grounded and refloated. That’s different from getting stuck in sea ice.

wws
Reply to  Ed Bo
August 27, 2018 8:16 am

Grounded or stuck in sea ice – the only real difference is the blame. If they were stuck in ice, then it’s the fault of the organizers and planners who sent the ship into a dangerous situation. If it is truly just an ordinary grounding, then it is incompetence on the part of the captain and the crew, who had sea bed charts and sonar that should have kept them well away from waters that were too shallow for their craft. Now, it may be that sea ice forced them to take a route that was too shallow for the ship to safely navigate, and in that case everyone deserves a share of the blame.

Mr Mick
Reply to  wws
August 27, 2018 9:05 am

My thoughts exactly.
If the vessel was mugged by ice pack, rather than running aground, the captain would be entitled to sue anyone who accused him of running his vessel aground, which is an inaccurate accusation of gross error on his part.
Better Call Saul.

tty
Reply to  wws
August 28, 2018 1:53 am

“If it is truly just an ordinary grounding, then it is incompetence on the part of the captain and the crew, who had sea bed charts and sonar that should have kept them well away from waters that were too shallow for their craft. ”

It might come as a terrible shock to you, but charts of these waters are anything but reliable. Surveying waters that are (at best) ice-free for a few weeks per year is not easy. And in any case there is next to no shipping there.

Gary Pearse
Reply to  Ed Bo
August 27, 2018 6:13 pm

Com’on Ed, you know the drill.

R. Shearer
August 27, 2018 8:02 am

Technically, the term being being floated about (pun intended) is “grounded” not “stuck in Arctic ice.” One might reasonably suspect that it became grounded to avoid non-existent ice (pun intended), but we’ll have to see what the reports say.

Steve S
Reply to  R. Shearer
August 27, 2018 8:13 am

Or more probably, ice was blocking their planed course, and trying to maneuver around the
blockage, they ventured into shallower waters and ran aground.

R. Shearer
Reply to  Steve S
August 27, 2018 8:32 am

Yes, any ice would make the water surface uneven and it therefore would not be “planed.” However, I intended for the word “avoid” to include the meaning of “maneuver around” but maybe I should have avoided that ambiguity.

You could be right and perhaps even their planned course was blocked.

Reply to  R. Shearer
August 27, 2018 8:46 am

Strange from – “This ground-breaking opportunity is also supported by One Ocean Expeditions as a key marine partner, having operated in Arctic waters for over 20 years.”

Reply to  UzUrBrain
August 27, 2018 9:06 am

I guess you could call digging up the seabed with your hull “ground-breaking.”

Crispin in Waterloo
Reply to  UzUrBrain
August 27, 2018 9:32 am

Ground-breaking! Ha ha ha! Geddit?

Ed MacAulay
Reply to  R. Shearer
August 27, 2018 9:33 am

See the third photo down in the CBC article. Lots of fairly solid ice pack, could be a reason to try and skirt around it, then going aground.
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/kugaaruk-passenger-ship-1.4798750

Editor
Reply to  Ed MacAulay
August 27, 2018 10:28 am

Ed MacAulay
From your link to the CBC article:

The Canadian Coast Guard tweeted on Friday afternoon that CCGS Pierre Radisson and CCGS Amundsen are on the way to assist the ship.

A number of Royal Canadian Air Force aircraft have also been dispatched to the ship, including two Hercules planes and two Comorant helicopters with extra crews, as well as helicopters on board the Coast Guard icebreakers.

According to One Ocean Expeditions’ website, Akademik Ioffe can carry up to 96 passengers, with 65 staff and crew.

The ship offers a Jacuzzi, massage room, pool and sauna. It was launched in 1989.

The price for the Pathways to Franklin expedition through One Ocean Expeditions — the trip the ship is purportedly on right now — starts at $6,795 US, with a charter flight starting at $1,995 US. The price of the suite can go up to $12,995 US.

Wow. Follow the money, the luxury of these “intrepid adventures” teaching us by their example (of looking at the sea ice up outside their stateroom and heated Jacuzzi bath?) of the “evils” of Western society and fossil fuels. In many ways, I wish they had been stuck (safe but locked in) all winter, spring, and next summer waiting for their sea ice to melt and release them. If they were released even next August.

And notice the incredible amount of fossil fuel and energy and scarce resources needed to rescue them from the “pristine Arctic wasteland” they adore!

ATheoK
Reply to  RACookPE1978
August 27, 2018 11:27 am

CBC is a major media Canadian news channel, much like BBC is for England.

This expedition is run by ‘OneOcean Expeditions‘, not by the CBC.

OneOcean might have signed a contract rate with NSF; but that is speculation at this point. There is a major difference between “funding from” NSF and NSF contracting with OnceOcean for reduced pricing.

OneOcean lists the going start rate for this fun trip to the Arctic as:

“Canadian Arctic 2018
Classic NW Passage & Baffin Island, September 1 – 13 2018 12 Nights
Akademik Ioffe From: US$9,595.00 + Charter Flights: US$1995.00

That start rate likely pays for one berth in a “Triple Share Cabin

Several cabin upgrades up from that bottom level and one can journey in style using one of Akademik Ioffe’s “Shackleton Suites

There are sites that provide better status on where Russian ships are located and their surrounding conditions. I did not locate one in my few minutes checking.

Those passengers that bought emergency Arctic Transport insurance will soon be very happy.

Yirgach
Reply to  ATheoK
August 27, 2018 6:22 pm

Here you can see the position of any commercial vessel in the world.
Unfortunately, if the vessel is out of AIS range (and they all are at most northern latitudes), then you need a $109 subscription to view the Sat location data. And yes, the Akademik Ioffe’s position is available by Sat…
https://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais/home/centerx:-122.9/centery:74.4/zoom:2

Smart Rock
Reply to  Ed MacAulay
August 27, 2018 10:38 am

The CBC article includes a tweet that says:

The Academik Ioffe ran aground at 69 43.0553N, 91 20.9521W around 11:30 AM Mountain Time. We are on a rock. No hull breach, no one hurt.

That’s fairly specific. The location puts them between a cluster of islands and the mainland at the western edge of the Gulf of Boothia. Probably not a well charted area,

Robert Maclellan
Reply to  Smart Rock
August 27, 2018 11:31 am

checked the location and made a cursory comparison with the currant ice chart. Much ice east if that location but not there. Suspect you are right re quality of charting as it is hard to conduct accurate surveys when the sea is covered with ice for much of the year. I suspect the efforts are concentrated in the most travelled areas.

Mjw
Reply to  Smart Rock
August 28, 2018 12:32 pm

Have you asked yourself why they were so close to shore.

Slacko
Reply to  Mjw
August 29, 2018 6:41 am

Say what? They don’t have to be close to shore to run aground.

E.S.
Reply to  Ed MacAulay
August 27, 2018 10:44 am

Below the picture it says Akademik Ioffe seen here in a promotional photo, so it is not a recent picture.
The Canadian Ice Service for 26 Aug shows no ice near Kugaaruk. Entrance to the Gulf of Boothia has ice.
https://ice-glaces.ec.gc.ca/prods/WIS38CT/20180826180000_WIS38CT_0010200191.pdf
BTW Chris Turney wrote a book about his ordeal and came out last year.
ICED IN: TEN DAYS TRAPPED ON THE EDGE OF ANTARCTICA.
https://www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/iced-in-ten-days-trapped/9780806538525-item.html

August 27, 2018 8:05 am

All the news reports say they ran aground rather than being caught in the ice but I have a feeling its the latter not the former.

Sweet Old Bob
August 27, 2018 8:06 am

They have too much Space in their (upper) Inner Centers !

Walt D.
August 27, 2018 8:09 am

“You can choose to ignore reality, but you still suffer the consequences of ignoring reality”.

MarkW
Reply to  Walt D.
August 27, 2018 2:30 pm

You can ignore reality, however reality will not ignore you.

Jeff Labute
August 27, 2018 8:13 am

This will not be the last ship full of fools.

Thomas Homer
Reply to  Jeff Labute
August 27, 2018 8:29 am

“This will not be the last ship full of fools.”

Was this one ‘pier’ reviewed?

jorgekafkazar
Reply to  Thomas Homer
August 27, 2018 11:13 am

Buoy, that was a bad pun.

saveenergy
Reply to  jorgekafkazar
August 27, 2018 11:41 am

Holy stones, I was going to give a stern rebuke but as you mast-head that, I bow to your warped sense of humor.

Steven Fraser
Reply to  saveenergy
August 27, 2018 12:35 pm

Woof!

MarkW
Reply to  jorgekafkazar
August 27, 2018 11:49 am

That sailed right over my head.

Bryan A
Reply to  jorgekafkazar
August 27, 2018 12:00 pm

They should have invited a number of skeptics along and had a Social on the Promenade deck to help “Break the Ice”

R. Shearer
Reply to  Bryan A
August 27, 2018 12:50 pm

You guys are cracking me up! 🙂

Jeff Labute
Reply to  Jeff Labute
August 27, 2018 10:20 am

I guess you need Ice Breakers to get something out of the ground. Also, no information on damage. If you can’t tell if your own boat is sinking, how can you measure anything about climate.

National post says:

“Beaubien had no immediate information about whether the ship sustained any damage when it became grounded in the western Gulf of Boothia near Kugaaruk, Nunavut.”

“A pair of Canadian Coast Guard icebreakers had been headed to the area to offer assistance, and One Ocean Expeditions said in a media release Friday evening that the Akademik Ioffe’s sister ship, the Akademik Sergey Vavilov, was providing support and assistance.

One Ocean Expeditions also said there had been no report of any environmental concerns.”

Just a side note, if you plot the number of ships filled with fools over the last few decades, you would get a hockey stick.

jorgekafkazar
Reply to  Jeff Labute
August 27, 2018 11:31 am

Note that the sister ship is named after physicist Sergey Vavilov, younger brother of Nikolai Vavilov. The latter was the scientific opponent of the evil fraud, pseudoscientist Trofim Lysenko. Nikolai was a martyr to science, jailed by order of Stalin and starved to death in a Socialist prison. Vavilov had mentored Lysenko, who started his career as an ignorant peasant and ended it as an ignorant Socialist pawn.

Reply to  Jeff Labute
August 27, 2018 10:52 am

A second ship of fools? Unprecedented. An emergent rule: After a “ship of fools” event, a second one will occur 5 years later at the opposite side of the Earth. [just like major earthquakes]

Steven Fraser
Reply to  Curious George
August 27, 2018 12:36 pm

At last, an hypothesis which can be tested!

Greg Cavanagh
Reply to  Steven Fraser
August 27, 2018 7:48 pm

It can also be modeled; so we don’t need to wait another 5 years to see if it’s true.

August 27, 2018 8:13 am

Stupid is as stupid does, and you can’t fix stupid.

ONLY the most stupid people have to do something for themselves before they understand the facts and their implications, possibly. Higher levels of intelligence can understand at a distance given the facts and the science, and avoid expensive and dangerous consequences.

But hey, if someone else is paying, let’s be stupid together. Cool. I hope they have to pay for any rescue.

Sounds a lot like the basic principles of climate science funding. What do you want us to prove? That’ll be $Squillion please. Contract science.

HEY! Is there a NE passage? It appears so. If so, why is it not used, or is it?

John Bell
August 27, 2018 8:14 am

Again it is a case of having to use lots of fossil fuel in order to study CAGW, oh the hypocrisy.

Derg
Reply to  John Bell
August 27, 2018 9:42 am

John you cant expect them to sail that far. Nor can you expect scientists to bike or walk to their conferences. Face it John, these people are fighting for our/their lives.

Editor
Reply to  Derg
August 27, 2018 9:52 am

Derg

Face it John, these people are fighting for our/their lives.

No. Not true.
These people are fighting for their beliefs (in Gaia, in a heaven-like pristine “Mother Nature” that never existed but in their minds, against technology and the West and the Western (capitalistic, heterosexual, white privileged, etc, etc) they hate,).
These people are fighting for the livelihoods (their “scientific” funding, their idealism and their theories they want to believe in, the taxes from carbon they want from other people, the carbon futures trading the international banking systems wants, the control carbon taxes and regulation gives the government…)

But they are NOT fighting for their lives. They ARE fighting so that others will die. Of thirst, parasites, disease, hunger, cold, heat due to their forced high energy prices and artificial restrictions on life and energy.

Hal
Reply to  Derg
August 27, 2018 1:18 pm

Sure they were “fighting for their lives”. Once they were stuck. Until then it was a pleasure cruise.

Bryan A
Reply to  Hal
August 27, 2018 3:29 pm

At least it wasn’t a three hour tour

Greg Cavanagh
Reply to  Bryan A
August 27, 2018 7:51 pm

No, it was a 24 hour tour, with a professional captain, in an ice breaker.

Bryan A
Reply to  Greg Cavanagh
August 27, 2018 9:56 pm

Everyone knows there’s no ice left in the Arctic waters (except for that nasty Rotten Ice) they need to build Ground Breakers.
Now that would be a ground breaking invention.

August 27, 2018 8:19 am

You know, you throw a half dozen failures at the ice and it gets swept under the rug. The first time they manage to succeed it’ll be “proof” of their contention and sung from the rooftops.

Greg Cavanagh
Reply to  kcrucible
August 27, 2018 7:52 pm

“The first time they manage to succeed…”
LOL, how long do we have to wait?

commieBob
August 27, 2018 8:19 am

This isn’t just about ships. Every year there seem to be adventurers who travel to the Arctic, expeditions to the North Pole are popular. Even the ones who are well prepared and know what they’re doing can end up in serious trouble.

My favorite idiot was the doofus who tried to ride a motorcycle to the North Pole. He had the brilliant idea to store chocolate bars in his tires. There’s a link but there seems to be a problem with the web page.

Reply to  commieBob
August 27, 2018 8:49 am

“Little Shop of Horrors” ? I can see hear ” Candy bar! “

Bryan A
Reply to  rishrac
August 27, 2018 3:30 pm

More like Polar Distress

BCBill
Reply to  commieBob
August 27, 2018 9:46 am

Top Gear driving the HILUXES to the North Pole was the best polar expedition of all time.

commieBob
Reply to  BCBill
August 27, 2018 10:01 am

They travelled to the Magnetic North Pole. It’s hundreds of miles south of the real North Pole. link

The alarmists condemned the expedition.

In an article for the Daily Express Emily Armistead, a speaker for Greenpeace, condemned the show as highly irresponsible given the impact that CO2 has on the Arctic.

OMG, facepalm.

ResourceGuy
August 27, 2018 8:20 am

I guess we were lucky that no polar bears were shot in the making of this student propaganda venture.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/29/polar-bear-shot-dead-after-attacking-cruise-ship-guard-in-norway

ResourceGuy
August 27, 2018 8:23 am

Send the bill to Rhode Island.

R Taylor
Reply to  ResourceGuy
August 27, 2018 1:19 pm

Yes, and get Shelly Whitehouse to organize a parade. Climate models show the expedition was a complete success!

Bill Murphy
August 27, 2018 8:23 am

A fool and our money are soon parted…

ResourceGuy
August 27, 2018 8:25 am

Open an investigation into NSF funding for endangering students in post-El Nino conditions.

Reply to  ResourceGuy
August 27, 2018 8:54 am

My immediate thought on seeing that sentence was “What is the NSF involved in this boondoggle for?”

Wrusssr
Reply to  UzUrBrain
August 27, 2018 11:42 am

“. . . because one boondoggle cannot distinguish itself from another.

MarkW
Reply to  UzUrBrain
August 27, 2018 11:52 am

There’s a lot of swamp that still needs draining.

TheRick
August 27, 2018 8:28 am

See….the global warming carbon tax is working 😉

August 27, 2018 8:29 am

I am always astounded that whenever this happens and it seems to happen quite often that not one of the “scientists’ studying global warming when they get trapped in the ice say anything like “maybe we should rethink this whole global warming thing”

Jimmy
Reply to  Elmer
August 27, 2018 8:35 am

They’ll just say this just proves global warming, or something like that.

TheOldBear
Reply to  Jimmy
August 27, 2018 11:41 am

The old phase was ‘consistent with’ the non-falseafiable hypothesis

Auto
Reply to  TheOldBear
August 27, 2018 4:37 pm

TheOldBear

“The old phase was ‘consistent with’ the non-falseafiable hypothesis”

Noted and appreciated – but . . . .

A newer phrase is –
“Not inconsistent with2 the non-falsifiable hypothesis.

I suppose I should add – ‘Just Sayin’

Auto

Reply to  Elmer
August 27, 2018 9:08 am

Why would they do that Elmer? Clearly an adjustment is necessary here. The trip was a success, the boat wasn’t grounded after all ( just some skeptic in denial reporting fake news, the Arctic is in fact ice free ), and nobody had to be rescued.

Jimmy
August 27, 2018 8:34 am

Hilarious

August 27, 2018 8:42 am

I thought the initial plan was to avoid this kind of ‘grounding’ to sail around in a big circle near, not in the ice. If you’re delusional, go all the way. Sail around the Caribbean and call it the Arctic. Then you can say, ” no ice, very warm waters, and no polar bears “

Sheri
August 27, 2018 8:44 am

Proof that knowing history does not in any way keep you from repeating it.

Tom in Florida
August 27, 2018 8:45 am

“On its website, the tour operator – One Ocean Expeditions – describes the 117-metre Akademik Ioffe as a “modern, comfortable, safe and ice-strengthened” vessel that can host 96 passengers and 65 staff and crew.”

Apparently no so much. How does a modern ship run aground? Perhaps the navigator was a video game player and didn’t realize that in real life there is no “reset game” button.

John Garrett
Reply to  Tom in Florida
August 27, 2018 9:02 am

Notwithstanding the advent of GPS and chart plotters, knowledge, experience and good judgment remain essential to safe piloting and navigation.

In fact, there are many who will assert that it was the very introduction of GPS and electronic navigation that have resulted in a serious diminution of the skills necessary for safe piloting and navigation.

drednicolson
Reply to  John Garrett
August 27, 2018 9:59 am

And those are only as good as the last time their data was updated. A recent landslide, glacier calving, or other topographical disruption can significantly alter a shoreline and its depth contour, and it may be many hours before a fresh pass from a satellite logs the new data.

Nigel Sherratt
Reply to  drednicolson
August 27, 2018 11:06 am

Perhaps the Russians hacked the GPS signal.

tty
Reply to  Nigel Sherratt
August 28, 2018 2:06 am

Yeah. Particularly for a russian ship. Though they may have been using Glonass instead.

tty
Reply to  drednicolson
August 28, 2018 2:05 am

No glaciers near Boothia Gulf. But recently glaciated areas are often very difficult for navigation with very rugged bottom topography. Take a look att Norway or Sweden for example.

BruceC
Reply to  John Garrett
August 27, 2018 5:50 pm

On youtube, there are a few hour or so long vids of Russian voyages to the North Pole from about 2015 onwards. The Russian ice breakers, such as the Yamal do these voyages during the summer ‘off season’ period.

What they do, apart from radar etc. is, weather permitting, launch their helicopter and fly in front of the Yamal looking for leads and/or pressure ridges.

tty
Reply to  BruceC
August 28, 2018 2:09 am

Swedish icebreaker Odin is at the North Pole on a research cruise now. The captain reports extremely difficult ice conditions, the worst for 15 years. They had difficulty reaching the pole even with hcp/uav scouting and even though Odin is the most powerful non-nuclear icebreaker in the World.

tty
Reply to  John Garrett
August 28, 2018 2:03 am

“In fact, there are many who will assert that it was the very introduction of GPS and electronic navigation that have resulted in a serious diminution of the skills necessary for safe piloting and navigation.”

I doubt it in this case. I’ve stood on the bridge of a sister ship in the Antarctic. They used GPS yes, but they carefully plotted their progress on a paper chart as well, and took frequent bearings on landmarks. And had two lookouts with binoculars posted. And this was in deep waters (at least according to the chart).

Mike the Morlock
Reply to  Tom in Florida
August 27, 2018 12:29 pm

Hi Tom, I think they may be building a “case”.
If it was grounding there would be an investigation and the Captain could be in deep sh!t. With ice locking the ship up, the Captain and ship owners could blame the Univ and the climate scientists involved.
Think about it climate scientists state sea ice is diminishing and thus the knowledge and experience of the Captain and ship owners are irreverent. Instead the ship gets locked up in ice. The institutions can be sued for damages to the ship, the shipping companies reputation and loss of revenue. Grounding dumps the responsibility back on the ship owners and protects the reputation of the “scientists”.
This could get interesting. One of the things not discussed is how are the parents of the students going to react? Some will realize that their child was put at risk and want to get answers. Some of the students will also start asking themselves questions. Not at this time but the seed has been planted.
In the end the students got themselves an “education”. Some will profit from it some will not.

michael

joel
Reply to  Mike the Morlock
August 27, 2018 4:38 pm

Start asking themselves questions? Unlikely in the extreme. True believers don’t let reality change their minds.

max
August 27, 2018 8:48 am

…will conduct the innovative Northwest Passage Project research expedition with a team of natural and social scientists, students, and a professional film crew.

So, of what use are social scientists on this expedition? As has been said, “Going on an expedition without a Sociologist is like going hunting without your accordion”. Actual scientists doing actual science might have known they weren’t going to get through, instead of relying on 15 year old claims by Al Gore.

Frank K.
August 27, 2018 8:48 am

So, just to get a perspective on how costly this debacle is:

(1) 80 – 90 passengers and their gear are flown up to the cruise ship departure site in the Arctic circle.
(2) The cruise ship “runs aground” in the sea ice.
(3) Passengers are evacuated to a another ship (what’s the cost to deploy this vessel?) since the original vessel is damaged.
(4) Passengers and gear are flown back to Yellowknife, NW Territory, CA.
(5) Somehow, all these folks will have to find a flight back home.

I’m thinking the costs for rescue and transportation may well run into the hundreds of thousands of dollars.

I’m happy that everyone on the “expedition” is safe. But clearly whoever organized this trip really dropped the ball and not only squandered private and public funds but also put peoples’ lives in danger.

Smart Rock
Reply to  Frank K.
August 27, 2018 10:50 am

When ignoring the Coast Guard warning, then getting into trouble and needing help, it is more than likely that “they” will have to pay for the help. From the CBC:

The Canadian Coast Guard tweeted on Friday afternoon that CCGS Pierre Radisson and CCGS Amundsen are on the way to assist the ship.

A number of Royal Canadian Air Force aircraft have also been dispatched to the ship, including two Hercules planes and two Comorant helicopters with extra crews, as well as helicopters on board the Coast Guard icebreakers.

None of that stuff comes cheap. If they don’t have to pay for it, we (the Canadian taxpayers) will.

PaulH
Reply to  Smart Rock
August 27, 2018 12:14 pm

While I have no difficulty in providing help to those in genuine need, these wealthy folks had better be prepared to reimburse the Canadian taxpayer for this nonsense.

https://globalnews.ca/news/4409872/grounded-arctic-cruise-ship-passengers/

August 27, 2018 8:50 am

“with a team of natural and social scientists,” What are the “Social Scientists” for? Is it to help the participants with Separation Anxiety? Fear of Failure? or crafting the PR propaganda?

Crispin in Waterloo
Reply to  UzUrBrain
August 27, 2018 9:59 am

The use of the term “social scientists” is to promote the idea that sociologists are, in fact, scientists. I believe we should all start naming the specialty craft being practised by the one being recognised. “Scientist” is now being used as a replacement for the term “cleric” with its assumptions of piety, honesty and steadfastness. It would be much better if the news outlets reported that a group of sociologists, geographers and philosophy students went on an Arctic adventure voyage, rather than referring to all of them as “scientists”.

Building billions of dollars worth of desalination plants on the advice of an Australian mammologist instead of a professional weather forecaster is one good example of ignoble cause corruption.

Susan
Reply to  Crispin in Waterloo
August 27, 2018 11:53 am

‘Scientologist’ is already taken I believe.

MarkW
Reply to  Susan
August 27, 2018 12:49 pm

Two religions are going to argue over who gets to use that term?

Johann Wundersamer
Reply to  Crispin in Waterloo
August 28, 2018 10:37 pm

“Scientist” is now being used as a replacement for the term “cleric” with its assumptions of piety, honesty and steadfastness

of child abuse.

simple-touriste
Reply to  UzUrBrain
August 27, 2018 10:31 pm

To experiment socialisation?

BillP
August 27, 2018 8:50 am

Speculating in advance of the data may be better that making the data up, the way the natural climate change deniers do, but it is still not scientific behaviour.

So I think we should wait for more information, not lower ourselves towards the nature deniers level.

August 27, 2018 8:57 am

As sea level rises, does the probability of running aground go down?

Hokey Schtick
August 27, 2018 9:00 am

Gosh science is so important. Science! Science! Once I was blind but now I see, because science. Science is never wrong. You can rely on science. Science is better than God!

Mike Smith
August 27, 2018 9:05 am

Maybe these tourists can sue the cruise line for breach of contract?

Crispin in Waterloo
August 27, 2018 9:06 am

CBC reports “grounded” but there is a strong possibility that ships captains do not “run aground” unless they are taking chances while getting away from thick ice. There is no reason for a modern 300 ft ship to be running close to the grounding limit.

Believe it or not, captains of ships in the Arctic are not novices and don’t take chances when not absolutely necessary. Reading the log will be interesting.

Is there a GPS link running in real time with this “internet connected” fun run? I would like to see what the ship was doing and had been doing, exactly, when this mishap took place. I heard about this trip a while ago and was recently thinking they would have to be “taking measures” to avoid the ice this year. It seems they did something like that.

The passengers should pine for earlier, more clement times: it has been 800 years since it was possible to sail around Greenland, and probably 5000 years since the NW Passage was open long enough to get through without really worrying.

I hope they saw lots of polar bears which are running rampant these days. On the Polar Bear FB page there is a comment about humans sending 95 “food packages”. It got more than 300 *Likes*.

Gary Larsen pictured on a polar bear listening to another leaning over an igloo with the top bashed in, “I just love these! Crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside.” The other polar bear replied, “Low fat too! They’re brainless!”

Roger Knights
Reply to  Crispin in Waterloo
August 27, 2018 9:28 am

“Reading the log will be interesting.”

I read an account of someone’s experiences on a ship. He said that logs were worded carefully so that insurance companies couldn’t cite them to deny a claim. For instance, he said that if the weather was fine and visibility was great, this was not entered in the log, or wasn’t stated plainly, in case they ship had a misadventure, in which case the crew could say it was hazy or windy.

Mike
Reply to  Crispin in Waterloo
August 27, 2018 9:39 am

I tried using http://www.marinetraffic.com it has the ship in the database and states it is currently “out of range” Usually ships positions are updated on a time scale of minutes.

Looks like the ship only managed about 24 hours before the debacle. Personal view, rent seeking people like this group should be prosecuted to return the funds to the public purse.

Reply to  Crispin in Waterloo
August 27, 2018 10:48 am

Crispin wrote, “On the Polar Bear FB page there is a comment about humans sending 95 ‘food packages’. It got more than 300 *Likes*.”

Link, please?

pochas94
August 27, 2018 9:07 am

Only to be expected from “Those for whom truth is what we say it is.”

VitaminJL
August 27, 2018 9:10 am

One of these geniuses is wearing flip flops!

Photios
Reply to  VitaminJL
August 27, 2018 9:32 am

It”s summer and he”s on the beach.
So why not?

dennisambler
August 27, 2018 9:13 am

They are about 110 years too late….

THE NORTH WEST PASSAGE BEING THE RECORD OF A VOYAGE OF EXPLORATION OF THE SHIP “GJOA” 1903 – 1907 BY ROALD AMUNDSEN http://docs.lib.noaa.gov/rescue/IPY/ipy_009_pdf/G6501903A71908v1.pdf

“We encountered no ice with the exception of a few narrow strips of old sound ice, carried by the wash. Of large Polar ice we saw absolutely nothing.

Between the ice and the land, on either side, there were large and perfectly clear channels, through which we passed easily and unimpeded.

The entire accumulation of ice was not very extensive. We were soon out again in open water. Outside the promontories, some pieces of ice had accumulated; otherwise the sea was free from ice. The water to the south was open, the impenetrable wall of ice was not there.

Captain Knowles reports the season the most open he has ever known. He entered the Arctic on the day we left San Francisco, May 22, and thinks the straits were open even earlier than that.”

Mr Mick
Reply to  dennisambler
August 27, 2018 12:34 pm

History?
You’re introducing actual history into a “contemporary science” article?
Blasphemy! Heresy!

joel
Reply to  dennisambler
August 27, 2018 4:43 pm

First, the captain you are quoting is white. Strike one. Second, he is dead. Strike 2. Third, shut up.

Gunnar Strandell
August 27, 2018 9:19 am

The Swedish Ice-breaker Oden also have reported more ice than expected this summer. Their aim was the North Pole but had to surrender to the ice, with 5 nautical miles to go.

Link, in English:
https://polarforskningsportalen.se/en/arctic/expeditions/arctic-ocean-2018

Ed Zuiderwijk
Reply to  Gunnar Strandell
August 27, 2018 11:50 am

That’s the same Oden that a decade ago was recalled from Antarctica, where it was studying the ‘vanishing ice’ that was there in abundance, because its services were needed in the Baltic where they hadn’t seen so much ice for years.

Phil.
Reply to  Gunnar Strandell
August 27, 2018 7:45 pm

Not true their aim was not the North Pole;
“The goal is to travel north into the Arctic Ocean pack ice (aiming for somewhere ~87 – 89 deg N), in order to find a large ice floe to anchor Oden and set up an ice station for scientific measurements. “

Gunnar Strandell
Reply to  Phil.
August 29, 2018 12:28 pm

Phil,
I have read the captains wording: ” vi kom inte hela vägen fram på grund av att isen helt enkelt var för besvärlig och solid. ”
My translation: “we did not reach the whole way trough because the ice simply was too cumbersome and solid.”

For the biological studies the captain also has a comment:
“Djurlivet lyser fortfarande med sin frånvaro.”
My translation:
“Animal life is absent.”
Link, in Swedish:
http://www.sjofartsverket.se/pages/111200/Veckobrev%20från%20Isbrytaren%20Oden%202018-08-22.pdf

But that does not stop them from having an ice-bear with a flag on the pole in one of their pictures illustrating a biologist that has found algae and seen birds.
Link:
https://polarforskningsportalen.se/en/arctic/expeditions/arctic-ocean-2018/blogs/forvanansvart-mycket-liv

Science at work 2018, or just another wood on the fire?

The scientists are cautious and use electrical driven vehicles to move on the ice to not pollute the sensitive environment. The diesel powered 18 MW propulsion and 4,7 MW auxiliary does not count of course. Even as it is used to charge the batteries.

Mr GrimNasty
August 27, 2018 9:23 am

Even if they grounded on ‘ground’ and not ice, I’d wager it was because the presence of ice forced them to take one risk too many.

Philip Schaeffer
Reply to  Mr GrimNasty
August 31, 2018 2:22 am

Does that make it OK to claim that they were grounded because of the presence of ice, without actually knowing if that’s what happened? Because that’s what this article does.

Sara Hall
August 27, 2018 9:24 am

Interesting. According to MASIE (as of yesterday anyway), there is little to no ice in the Gulf of Boothia where the ship is supposed to have grounded. http://masie_web.apps.nsidc.org/pub/DATASETS/NOAA/G02186/latest/4km/masie_all_r09_4km.png
On AIS tracking, the ship appears as a “passenger vessel”, currently in close proximity to a tug, with neither of them underway. https://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais/home/centerx:-102.8/centery:71.0/zoom:5

R Hall
August 27, 2018 9:35 am

How do they plan and schedule these boondoggles? Every time one of these ships gets stuck, they seem to be amazed that there was Ice in the Polar regions. They must be reading propaganda, and believing it.

Joel Snider
Reply to  R Hall
August 27, 2018 11:04 am

OR writing their own propaganda and believing it.

eyesonu
Reply to  Joel Snider
August 27, 2018 1:53 pm

That would reveal a case of projection at its best, or worst.

simple-touriste
Reply to  Joel Snider
August 27, 2018 10:26 pm

“writing their own propaganda and believing it” shall now be called “experimenting with positive feedback”

Joel Snider
August 27, 2018 9:37 am

You can make up your own reality, and even try to live by it… but ACTUAL reality always eventually asserts itself.

August 27, 2018 9:37 am

In January, we were at Tom and Barb’s for dinner and climate came up in conversation. Tom has been more practical than Barb.
I mentioned that the supposed “scientific” ship cruises to the Antarctic and/or the Arctic were basically enthusiasts who were going there to demonstrate that there was no ice.
And then, at great expense, got frozen in.
They said that they had booked on just such a cruise from Copper Mine to Greenland. V. expensive.
I though “Oh dear”.
But it is scheduled for mid September.
Last week, I asked Tom if there was any rebate on cancellation.
The response was that there were many weeks to departure time.
??
Bob Hoye

August 27, 2018 9:52 am

That’s the same ship I sailed on in 1993 to the Antarctic Peninsula.

It was originally built for Soviet military research–submarine detection. After the Soviet Union collapse, it was re-purposed as an adventure, eco-tourist ship.

It was built with multiple screws on all sides for anchorless stability during sounding experiments. It may be “ice hardened” but would be very vulnerable to any serious ice unless they completely refashioned the hull and removed the side and front screws.

Lee L
Reply to  charles the moderator
August 27, 2018 11:27 am

I was a summer student on an expedition in 1970 that circumnavigated the Americas. My part of the journey was only a few months doing geophysical and hydrographic measurements from Victoria BC to Alaska running back and forth over the continental shelf. I was part of the scientific crew, but bottom of the heap as a student. I was therefore bunked below decks with the engine room and galley boys most from Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. They had been on this oceanographer for almost 2 years and as the Arctic part of the jouney approached, were concerned that she was only a ‘semi’ icebreaker. Their biggest concern was that she had brass screws not steel.

I suppose they must have worked that out, as the Hudson made that journey across the Arctic without running aground or being frozen in.

Further, in 1944, the RCMP schooner St. Roch ( small mostly wooden ship with sails and engine) navigated the Northwest passage.

It is and has been possible to cross the Arctic seas without being frozen in. It just wasnt and isnt predictable that you’ll succeed. It’s no proof of catastrophic anything climatic that you make it through.

eyesonu
Reply to  charles the moderator
August 27, 2018 1:58 pm

“….. After the Soviet Union collapse, it was re-purposed as an adventure, eco-tourist ship.”

———-

Leading capitalist innovation. Who were they colluding with then?

Reply to  eyesonu
August 27, 2018 2:41 pm

When I went on my cruise it still had the same crew that had operated the ship for the military science research. Our Head Steward had been their chief scientist. They never told us exactly what the ship was originally used for, but it was clear from the tours down below and asking a few questions. There were banks of giant hydrophones, some more than six feet across, maybe much bigger.

There was a sister ship that would park hundreds or thousands of kilometers away and set off explosions to be picked up by the banks of hydrophones.

The computer room had IBM main frames with 9″ tape drives and Amiga graphics computers for visualization. I knew at the time from oceanography courses that analyzing sound propagation through the internal waves within a water column, (with haloclines and thermoclines), was being studied for sub detection. When I saw the Amigas and mainframe I asked the Steward about studying internal waves and he looked at me funny, then smiled and said in broken English, yes yes, INSIDE WAVES.

Sgt
Reply to  Charles Rotter
August 27, 2018 2:48 pm

That’s peanuts next to Soviet fishing trawlers!

Windsong
August 27, 2018 9:52 am

The Twitter account named C2PO @oceansensing has a good recap of what exactly happened when the ship grounded. It was a very short cruise for these folks. They boarded on 23 August and were receiving their safety briefing on 24 August when the ship ran aground in open water. The ship apparently began listing immediately (CBC reports there was a hull breach). “We knew instantly it was not good,” C2PO says. Passengers were evacuated to a sister ship, Academik Sergey Vavilov. Passengers have already returned to Edmonton and as of Monday were looking for return flights home.

Bruce Cobb
August 27, 2018 9:57 am

Wait, wait – I know! There was so much “science” going on that the ship’s captain was blinded by it, thus running aground. That’s where the phrase “she blinded me with science” comes from, right?

eyesonu
Reply to  Bruce Cobb
August 27, 2018 2:03 pm

Check for a blue dress! I was momentarily distracted by the science.

CheshireRed
August 27, 2018 10:07 am

It’s almost as if these people are complete and utter imbeciles….

HenryP
August 27, 2018 10:10 am

Ja. Ja. Like I said.
It is cooling. Globally.

Editor
August 27, 2018 10:11 am

Today’s latest Arctic Sea Ice extents chart from the NSIDC’s website) shows the 25 Aug 2018 sea ice extents right in the middle of the most recent ten year’s daily sea ice extent.

Yes, it is below the 1980-2010 thirty year average sea ice extents, but 2018 is greater than 6 of the most recent 10 year measurements, and less than 4 of the most recent ten years.

Grounding vs Stuck in sea ice.

Hard to tell from the terrible information put out by the propagandists – certainly, if they have photo’s of clear water and open seas we would have many published on line! But sea ice covering the narrow channels between the Canadian islands up there? Not worthy of release, right?

regardless of their reluctance (embarrassment ?) to write about their condition on-line in public, we can assume a few things. Their ship is damaged: damaged seriously enough to prevent either continuing on or turning back and returning by sea to the Greenland side. The damage could be from sea ice being forced against the sides or propeller or rudder of the ship. Damage could be by sea ice “locking the ship in” so winds and currents then force the propeller, rudder, or hull into the rocks and bottom. Or the damage could be in open water between the islands not limited by sea ice itself, but where turning or backing down to avoid sea ice or shallow water was done improperly or too late. In that case, the sea ice was not the immediate cause, but the reason the ship was put in danger.

By the way, at this time of year, “less sea ice than normal” means “more heat lost from the newly-opened Arctic waters than normal”.

Phil.
Reply to  RACookPE1978
August 28, 2018 10:28 am

Grounding vs Stuck in sea ice.

Hard to tell from the terrible information put out by the propagandists – certainly, if they have photo’s of clear water and open seas we would have many published on line! But sea ice covering the narrow channels between the Canadian islands up there? Not worthy of release, right?

Apparently the photos showing the ship run aground in open water aren’t interesting for the propagandists so despite the fact that the photos are available they haven’t been shown here. I posted such a photo here yesterday and it’s mysteriously disappeared!

D. Anderson
August 27, 2018 10:14 am

Sunday, Washington Post:

Ice melt clears new shipping route (NW Passage)

Sgt
Reply to  D. Anderson
August 27, 2018 11:29 am

Please provide a link. NSIDC observations definitely show that no route through the NW Passage is open. Not even close.

Maybe the story was about the Northern Sea Route along the Siberian coast, which was also open in the ’30s and ’40s.

August 27, 2018 10:15 am

“with major funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation”

I wonder how much of our tax money was wasted on this?

August 27, 2018 10:16 am

This graph
http://www.meteo-paris.com/site/images/age1.jpg
shows that Arctic sea ice extent is heading uphill, indicating that the Arctic has entered the cooling phase.

philsalmon
August 27, 2018 10:29 am

SteveS

Or more probably, ice was blocking their planed course, and trying to maneuver around the
blockage, they ventured into shallower waters and ran aground.

Your interpretation is supported by the message broadcast by the Canadian Coast Guard Service, shortly after this grounding – and most likely in reaction to it:

”Good morning, Due to heavier than normal ice concentrations in the Canadian arctic waters north of 70 degrees, the Canadian Coast Guard, recommends that pleasure craft do not navigate in the Beaufort Sea, Barrow, Peel Sound, Franklin Strait and Prince Regent… “

Phil.
Reply to  philsalmon
August 27, 2018 7:13 pm

Or more probably, ice was blocking their planed course, and trying to maneuver around the
blockage, they ventured into shallower waters and ran aground.

Your interpretation is not supported by the message broadcast by the Canadian Coast Guard Service, shortly after this grounding – and most likely in reaction to it: almost a week before the grounding and about a different part of the passage:

”Good morning, Due to heavier than normal ice concentrations in the Canadian arctic waters north of 70 degrees, the Canadian Coast Guard, recommends that pleasure craft do not navigate in the Beaufort Sea, Barrow, Peel Sound, Franklin Strait and Prince Regent… “
Rather deceptive of you posting part of the Coastguard message without its dateline, the message was sent on the 18th, almost a week before this incident!
Also the grounding had nothing to do with ice, they ran aground on rocks.
Here’s a photo of the grounded ship:
comment image

Philip Schaeffer
Reply to  Phil.
August 27, 2018 8:54 pm

Lol, that’s supposedly “grounded in arctic ice” or “trapped in arctic ice” ??

I think the article needs to be corrected.

Editor
Reply to  Philip Schaeffer
August 27, 2018 10:23 pm

Lol, that’s supposedly “grounded in arctic ice” or “trapped in arctic ice” ??

I think the article needs to be corrected.

[Their] latest web site reports are NOT being updated by these “Internet friendly” tourists. We do not know for certain, but the ship DID ground somewhere underwater (probably on rocks ??) and is leaking water, but the specific cause is a guess, and possibly occurred before encountering ice. But we don’t know. All passengers (but not their Jacuzzi) are safe. The ship may, or may not, survive. We do know absolutely that the ships (several were involved in the many changes) and the touring package tried very hard to salvage their 9,900.00 dollar (per person) vacations up across the Arctic that were being funded by the NSF, and each of these changes and reschedules required even more thousands of pounds/kilograms/tons of fuel to support as various ships tried to go pick them up.

That the sea itself, and its rocks, shoals, storms and tides and winds is a threat up in the arctic needs to be emphasized. These “tourists/propagandists” seemingly did not know that.

Sgt
Reply to  Phil.
August 27, 2018 9:44 pm
Taphonomic
August 27, 2018 10:33 am

Is Griff on this ship?

JohnInReno
August 27, 2018 10:35 am

Judging from the picture, the male/female ratio appears to be 2/5. Maybe those guys aren’t as dumb as they appear.

Mark Hansford
August 27, 2018 10:39 am

I hope they sue the Travel Company. The passengers maybe fools but the crew should be seafarers and experienced professional seamen – there is no excuse with modern navigation equipment to run aground (stuck on a rock was one comment), whether avoiding ice or not. I would imagine however that the charts of the area are incompletely surveyed and they may have hit an uncharted peak – after all such peaks have been found around the coast of Scotland, that is not exactly impeded by pack ice, in the recent few years!

How very, very embarrassing for the ship and Captain, one day out on the expedition

zemlik
August 27, 2018 10:41 am
ResourceGuy
August 27, 2018 10:49 am

They should have been made to walk out like Franklin’s doomed crew of 129.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklin's_lost_expedition

Nigel Sherratt
Reply to  ResourceGuy
August 27, 2018 11:26 am

Excellent exhibition last year at National Maritime Museum, wrecks of both ‘Erebus’ and ‘Terror’ have been found. Sobering tales of death from lack of proper equipment. Inuit helped some on occasion but the task was beyond them. Worth looking for the exhibition if it tours. Lots of Canadian input to the exhibition so that seems possible.

https://www.rmg.co.uk/discover/explore/exploration-endeavour/sir-john-franklin

ResourceGuy
August 27, 2018 10:53 am

You just don’t hear much about NW Passage tourism trips anymore. Add that to the “gone quiet” list of warming hype.

lance
August 27, 2018 10:53 am

Quick, get Justin up there for a selfie….and promise Canadian Tax Payer money to rescue and fly them out, and cover the costs of the repair etc etc….shaking head…again…

Bill Wadford
August 27, 2018 11:09 am

So, is a frozen Loffe better than no Loffe at all?

Sara
August 27, 2018 11:11 am

These people are idiots. Thanks for the follow-up story!

Nigel Sherratt
August 27, 2018 11:15 am

Luckily these people canceled too before sacrificing their children to Gaia.

https://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2018/08/23/dogbark-turns-back/

Alan Tomalty
August 27, 2018 11:35 am

The problem with the left is they want everything for free. They were brought up on free television, free internet, free medicare, free libraries, free parks, free welfare cheques, free schooling, …..etc. Now they want free energy(wind and solar). This group still thinks there is free sailing. They ignore the most famous quote in history. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A TRULY FREE LUNCH.

Bryan A
Reply to  Alan Tomalty
August 27, 2018 11:46 am

The only reason Renewables are touted as Free Energy is that the government hasn’t thought of a way to charge for the power input, sun and wind. The method for extracting the low density energy certainly isn’t sustainable as it requires the mining of rare earth minerals of which, like oil, there is only a finite amount recoverable

Joel Snider
Reply to  Alan Tomalty
August 27, 2018 12:11 pm

‘The problem with the left is they want everything for free.’

Which is a very exploitable condition for opportunists.

simple-touriste
Reply to  Alan Tomalty
August 28, 2018 12:43 am

One thing was really free: culture.

But then the postmodern liberalism came, took over academia and culture can now be “appropriated” like a parcel of land.

Bryan A
August 27, 2018 11:38 am

I must admit, since the first article on this farce was published a few months ago here, I was hoping for an updated article covering what I was certain would be their lack of progress though I was expecting it to be as they reached Fort Ross and not within the first 24 hours. I’m just glad that the fools could be rescued from their situation if not their incompetence.

Wharfplank
August 27, 2018 11:51 am

Participation Trophies all around!

Roger
August 27, 2018 11:59 am

I don’t understand, wasn’t the Artic supposed to be ice free in summer by now?

August 27, 2018 11:59 am

That very sad that again a ship stuck in arctic

brians356
Reply to  saba jamal
August 27, 2018 4:55 pm

True dat.

Javier
August 27, 2018 12:00 pm

If sea level is increasing, the risk of running a ship aground is going down. Perhaps it is not increasing fast enough.

Pop Piasa
August 27, 2018 12:01 pm

Just another reality check -Hockey style!

Dennis Bird
August 27, 2018 12:31 pm

Where is a hungry polar bear when you need one?

john
August 27, 2018 12:43 pm

I would suggest they immediately start a Gofundme page for their rescue. I’m tired of paying for these intentionally synaptically challenged idiots.

Next up…
Please pet and feed the bears. In Alaska and Northern Canada too if you are extracted on our dime.

ChuckT
August 27, 2018 12:44 pm

The ship was originally supposed to start and end it’s cruise in Resolute but had to use Kugaaruk because Resolute has been cut off by ice.
https://www.collingwoodtoday.ca/local-news/our-photographer-took-to-the-sea-to-explore-the-arctic-just-before-the-ship-ran-aground-16-photos-1027627

Steven Fraser
August 27, 2018 12:53 pm

When the Canadian Coast Guard notice was understood by the S/V Dogbark, they abandoned their trip Eastward from Prudhoe Bay, and sailed nonstop to get through the Bering Strait. They are now ensconced in a little bay by Port Clarence, AK.

I don’t know their plan, but from there its a couple or 3 days home, to the Fox Islands in the AK Archipelago.

Seems sensibility, like the wind, is variable while on the seas.

Mr Bliss
August 27, 2018 1:16 pm

Are they streaming all this live on facebook?

Sgt
Reply to  Mr Bliss
August 28, 2018 5:56 pm

Instagram.

Please see below.

Dave Fair
August 27, 2018 1:17 pm

Its fascinating that the ice graphs clearly show the effects of the recent Super El Nino beginning later in 2015, strong throughout 2016 and recovering in 2017 and 2018.

Sgt
Reply to  Dave Fair
August 27, 2018 2:50 pm

In 2016, there were also two August cyclones, vs just one each in the even lower years of 2007 and 2012. Yet 2016 summer minimum sea ice extent was higher.

Dave Fair
Reply to  Sgt
August 27, 2018 4:58 pm

No argument there, Sgt (Sargent?). My observation was that annual ice extents were generally expanding from the 2007/2012 lows, but the Super El Nino may have affected 2015 and 2016 negatively.

prjindigo
August 27, 2018 1:24 pm

If this keeps happening we could make a datum chart and use it at presentations.

eyesonu
Reply to  prjindigo
August 27, 2018 2:16 pm

Chart caption: C02 causes increase in ship strandings in icy waters.

It’s another ‘hockey stick’!

Flight Level
August 27, 2018 1:50 pm

“between 80 and 90 of the passengers will fly” In a fossil fuel burning aircraft, not an electric one. Ok, roger that.

Gee, I love my job 😉

JCalvertN(UK)
Reply to  Flight Level
August 27, 2018 2:38 pm

Is ‘Ice Pilots’ still showing? Pile them all into that L188!

Flight Level
Reply to  JCalvertN(UK)
August 27, 2018 4:00 pm

I would rather envision a type with a bomb bay. Then log the event as in-flight malfunction.

MikeN
August 27, 2018 1:53 pm

Are they being billed full airfare? If this is government funding, then an equivalent amount with penalty should be cut from budgets.

Reply to  MikeN
August 27, 2018 2:32 pm

In August 2010 my wife and I had booked passage through the NWP west to east from Kuglutuk (Coppermine) – in 2009 we had made the transit from east to west. Enroute to boarding the ship we were informed in Edmonton that the trip was cancelled because the ship “Clipper Adventurer” had run aground 200 kms east of Coppermine.

This was a true grounding on a shelf over which the ship’s depth finder suddenly went from 50 meters to 3.

As an aside, there was lots of sea ice in the passage during our initial transit and the ship’s course had to be changed several times.These waters are not well charted and we had been told by the captain on our original transit that he had tried several times to present charting information to Canadian authorities who were not interested in his input.

Victor
August 27, 2018 1:55 pm

Send Al Gore up there with his flamethrower.

J Mac
August 27, 2018 2:19 pm

The arctic pack ice is thick this summer… and so are the dolts on the One Ocean Expeditions Akademik Ioffe.

Sam Pyeatte
August 27, 2018 2:30 pm

Brings a modern meaning to the old movie “Ship of Fools”.

Nash
August 27, 2018 2:30 pm

Like socialism and communism … success is around the corner

Peter Plail
August 27, 2018 2:54 pm

“a team of natural and social scientists” – what possible reason would social scientists have to be doing Arctic research? I am relying on you all for some amusing responses.

yarpos
August 27, 2018 3:29 pm

Tricky stuff that navimagation. The ground keeps moving around , especially the white ground.

John
August 27, 2018 4:20 pm

They never learn.

brians356
August 27, 2018 4:21 pm

Grounded or stuck – If the Northwest Passage is navigable, why must the snowflakes be rescued by aircraft? Why not send in a few swift boats to retrieve them? Hey?

Phil.
Reply to  brians356
August 29, 2018 6:05 pm

Well they did send a boat to pick them up but it took 16 hrs for it to reach them.
Then they had to be transported between the ships:

comment image

brians356
August 27, 2018 4:32 pm

Almost certainly the captain erred in running aground. It’s not unlikely that a captain who was more experienced in those waters might have also been astute enough to say “Sorry, but it’s irresponsible to take a sight-seeing tour in a ship that size into these waters. There’s always an ice hazard, even in late summer.”

Jeff Alberts
August 27, 2018 5:07 pm

The wording on the side of the ship is fake, right?

Sgt
Reply to  Jeff Alberts
August 27, 2018 5:08 pm

Yes. Of course.

Phony Cyrillic.

Gary Pearse
August 27, 2018 5:59 pm

Why would it be important to have social scientists on board the research vessel? I think we should find out if it ran aground or if they are lying about. Alinsky rules and all that.

Patrick MJD
August 27, 2018 6:44 pm

Where is Griff and Tony McLeod to tell us the ice is gone?

SAMURAI
August 27, 2018 7:38 pm

Average temps above the 80th northern parallel just fell below -2C (the freezing point of ocean water) so ice extents will soon start expanding rapidly, and existing sea ice will start getting thicker:

http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/meant80n.uk.php

If they don’t get that stranded vessel out soon, it could be stuck there for the duration of the winter..

It’s interesting to note that since Arctic Ice Extents bottomed out in 2007, 8 out of the past 11 years, Summer Arctic Ic Minimums have been higher than 2007…

Leftists predicted that CAGW would cause Summer Arctic Ice Minimums to fall below 1 MILLION KM^2 by 2100… not so much.

This year’s Minimum Ice Extent will be just below 6 million KM^2… oops..

And yet the Leftist MSM continue to write bogus stories about Arctic Ice Extents rapidly disappearing, which lead to yet another “Ship of Fools” incident…

When the PDO/AMO/NAO are all in their respective 30-year cool cycles from around 2020, Arctic Sea Ice will gradually continue to recover…

I can’t wait to see MSM stories about Global Warming is causing Arctic Ice Extents to increase…

Editor
August 27, 2018 8:18 pm

No “New” news on their website today. (see link above).
Expedition Update

The ship carrying the Northwest Passage Project’s expedition participants, the Akademik Ioffe, ran aground in the high Canadian Arctic on August 24, 2018. There were no injuries and all expedition participants are safe. The ship was quickly refloated but needs repair. All passengers were safely transferred to shore and returned home. The expedition is postponed to summer 2019.

D P Laurable
August 27, 2018 8:25 pm

It is absolutely amazing that a cruise vacation can be rebranded a “scientific voyage” I checked the webpage for the cruise ship company: $9,995 per passenger. Not only are these kids stupid, apparently their parents are too.

Editor
August 27, 2018 8:38 pm

All:
Now remember, the many hundreds of kilometers of the much-sought-for Northwest Passage lie through the narrow, wind and storm-swept, twisting little passageways between the many hundred islands of the archipelago.

he Northwest Passage is NOT through wide area of open Arctic waters – those more open areas are blocked up by the millions of sq kilometers (even at time of minimum sea ice in mid-September) that are blown against the island by the prevailing winds from Siberia up and across the pole. So the hazards of the passage that MUST be recognized limit when a ship can get through:
When the sea ice is NOT blown against the north coast of the NW Territory and Alaska.
When the Bering Strait and Bering Sea are themselves open – July-October are pretty much always open though.
When the few deep-water channels that are wide enough to pass shipping safely between the islands are not blocked by sea ice – This is the most limiting.

And, as we have seen the past few years, they cannot guarantee when these passages will be open, and for how long which ones will be open. A ship waiting for one blocked channel to open cannot necessarily get around the islands to another channel that did open for a few hours.

So, a merchant in Europe or the US must “gamble” when he orders a ship to take the passage from China to Rotterdam or England or new Jersey or Savanah that the ship will leave China early enough to an