Ooops! First animal claimed extinct due to ‘climate change’ found ‘alive and well’

seychelles_snail

In this photo taken Saturday, Aug. 23, 2014 and provided by the Seychelles Islands Foundation (SIF), an adult Aldabra Banded Snail (Rhachistia aldabrae) is examined at the discovery site in dense mixed scrub forest on the coastal fringe of Malabar island, Aldabra Atoll, Seychelles. The Seychelles Islands Foundation says the Aldabra banded snail, previously thought to be extinct, has been rediscovered “alive and well” at the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Aldabra Atoll in the Indian Ocean island nation of Seychelles. (AP Photo/SIF, C. Onezia)

Seychelles snail, believed extinct due to climate change, found ‘alive and well,’ says group

NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — A snail once thought to have been among the first species to go extinct because of climate change has reappeared in the wild.

The Aldabra banded snail, declared extinct seven years ago, was rediscovered on Aug. 23 in the Indian Ocean island nation of Seychelles. The mollusk, which is endemic to the Aldabra coral atoll — a UNESCO World Heritage Site — had not been seen on the islands since 1997, said the Seychelles Islands Foundation.

Conservationists are celebrating the banded snail’s reemergence.

The snail’s apparent demise was linked to declining rainfall on Aldabra, and was widely considered to be among the first species whose extinction could be directly tied to global warming, said biologist Justin Gerlach, a scientific coordinator for the Nature Protection Trust of Seychelles.

 

Full story here (h/t to WUWT reader O2bnaz2)

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91 thoughts on “Ooops! First animal claimed extinct due to ‘climate change’ found ‘alive and well’

  1. Every species on earth will go extinct. Period. And if we keep making darwinesque fools of ourselves, ours will be sooner rather than later.

  2. The snail’s apparent demise was linked to declining rainfall on Aldabra, and was widely considered to be among the first species whose extinction could be directly tied to global warming, said biologist Justin Gerlach, a scientific coordinator for the Nature Protection Trust of Seychelles.

    I’m wating with bated breath for Mr. Gerlach to produce rainfall records for the Seychelles indicating a decline in rainfall in the last 50 years. Even if he can come up with such a record, I’d like to know how he or anyone can conclusively say that ‘t’was global warming what done it’…

  3. How could it be the 1st when 99.9% of all species to ever exist have already went extinct to climate change. Oh, I forgot the religious zealots believe the climate was stable then just recently changed.

    • I hear tell that some professor of Meteorology (I think he may even be distinguished) has several graphs indicating that very thing. You’d think that something so important would be worthy of a Nobel prize, and that a person wouldn’t have to stoop so low as to lie about having been awarded one…

    • Hear, hear! We might just be the 0.1% of species to actually embrace climate change!
      +1.0C per century doesn’t sound too bad. Quite nice in fact…
      Shame we are cooling, or about too.
      That will be fun.

    • Species will always become extinct.

      Abstract
      Biological extinction in earth history
      Virtually all plant and animal species that have ever lived on the earth are extinct. For this reason alone, extinction must play an important role in the evolution of life. The five largest mass extinctions of the past 600 million years are of greatest interest, but there is also a spectrum of smaller events, many of which indicate biological systems in profound stress. Extinction may be episodic at all scales, with relatively long periods of stability alternating with short-lived extinction events. Most extinction episodes are biologically selective, and further analysis of the victims and survivors offers the greatest chance of deducing the proximal causes of extinction. A drop in sea level and climatic change are most frequently invoked to explain mass extinctions, but new theories of collisions with extraterrestrial bodies are gaining favor. Extinction may be constructive in a Darwinian sense or it may only perturb the system by eliminating those organisms that happen to be susceptible to geologically rare stresses.
      http://www.sciencemag.org/content/231/4745/1528.short

      Here is an Essay in Nature

      Concept Extinction: past and present
      The fossil record, together with modern data, can provide a deeper understanding of biological extinction and its consequences.

      Extinction is a fundamental part of nature — more than 99% of all species that ever lived are now extinct. Whereas the loss of ‘redundant’ species may be barely perceptible, more extensive losses of whole populations, groups of related species (clades) or those that share particular morphologies (for example, large body sizes) or functional attributes such as feeding mechanisms, can have profound effects, leading to the collapse of entire ecosystems and the extermination of great evolutionary dynasties.
      http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v427/n6975/full/427589a.html

  4. Yet more foolishness from the doom&doom crowd. There was never anyway to suspect, much less prove, that the animal went extinct due to the rainfall amounts and absolutely no way to prove that the rainfall amounts were impacted by the magic molecule CO2 in the atmosphere.

    How long can this anti-science madness go on?

  5. That little guy is going to need to be in the safe house protection program now. The hit squads of the policy priests will be sent in to rub it out to match earlier policy claims and spending programs.

    • The same climate rapid reaction force who uprooted the tree which Alex Morner showed proved sea level rise is a lie, will now be flying to the Seychelles to stamp on some snails. Nice work if you can get it.

  6. It is important in these types of matters to identify the fools associated with such statements:

    “This purple snail — the Aldabra banded snail — is a resident of the Seychelles Islands in the Indian Ocean and is easily recognizable because of its conspicuous purplish blue shell. Though it was once easy to find 3 decades ago, [Oxford University biologist Justin] Gerlach says that now “it has been impossible to find. The last one was found in 1997 and it was collected simply because the person who collected it thought it was strange and didn’t know what it was.” Gerlach believes the species went extinct during the late 1990s following a series of unusually long and hot summers that killed off a large number of younger snails.He reached this conclusion after observing that the smaller shells once commonly picked up by collectors were vanishing with the advent of the longer, hotter summers — a phenomenon he attributes to global warming. If his intuition is correct, that would make the Aldabra banded snail the first climate change related casualty.

    “And, as Diane Debinski — a biologist at Iowa State University who researches the links between climate change and extinctions — grimly observed, it certainly won’t be the last: “I think what we are seeing is the tip of the iceberg in terms of extinction events. I expect that we’re going to be seeing more stories like this.” While she isn’t convinced that global warming was to blame for the banded snail’s extinction, she does admit that most research has demonstrated that the most vulnerable species tend to reside in isolated habitats — such as islands or mountain tops.”
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=12600707 (delanda est NPR)
    http://www.treehugger.com/clean-technology/is-the-aldabra-banded-snail-the-first-global-warming-related-extinction.html

    • Well, they should recover a bit now that we quit warming….more time to adapt.
      We are IMO on the top of a climate sine curve, and are spending money on the past instead of providing the ability to adapt to a colder future. How many have to die of the cold before we have enough of false leaders?

    • Wonder if ” observing that the smaller shells once commonly picked up by collectors” had anything to do with their decline. Nah, that’s just indigenous hunter gathers. we all know that’s just innocent nature at work.

  7. so an increase in rainfall made the snails existence possible….
    …and a decrease in rainfall made the snails existence perilous

    who’d a thunk it…..it must be pappa snail, mama snail, and baby snail…..just right

  8. “He reached this conclusion after observing that the smaller shells once commonly picked up by collectors were vanishing”……………………..LOL, they found a market for the shells and wiped them out

  9. Only one? Is this species hermaphroditic?

    Otherwise, there’s a new eco film looming … The Last of The Aldabras’

    Probably and somehow starring Daniel Day-Lewis. I suppose the music sound track will necessarily be Tempo Larghissimo.

  10. “Conservationists are celebrating the banded snail’s reemergence.”
    I’m sure there were some mixed responses. Perhaps there was an aw chytt moment when it was realized that the death pronouncement was inaccurate. It is surprising the “rediscovery” found them “alive and doing well” after having been pronounced gone. Who would know the difference? Obviously it was a little early to announce their demise, but how many set backs like this will there be before there is some fudging of the data to keep up appearances.

    Of course it could be turned into a money maker. Instead of being alive and well, it could have been a call for help. What a missed opportunity. I can see the wildlife fund adverts for the save the snail foundation. Just send in the money and we will take care of the rest. Do it now before they are gone!

    It is hard to get away with claiming polar bears and penguins are going extinct because somebody can find otherwise, as we have seen. But, some obscure thing like this snail could easily be hoaxed out of existence, or to the edge of extinction, and nobody would be the wiser. How many field mice, and pikas, and pup fish, and owls, frogs, turtles and the like are really going extinct? Or, are we being fooled?

  11. I’ve done a bit of field work in Biology. The snail never left. It didn’t “join the bleedin’ choir invisible.”
    It is alive!!!
    Arrgh..

  12. If I’m looking for an animal, and I don’t find it, can I then write a paper and become a famed mass extinction event alarmist. It seems so.
    I haven’t seen Giraffes today. It is rather cold here in Germany; so I guess the Climate Change killed the last one.

  13. “linked to declining rainfall on Aldabra, and was widely considered to be among the first species whose extinction could be directly tied to global warming,”
    Now if they could only link declining rainfall to global warming, they would have something.

  14. It is a plant. Big Oil has a huge refrigerated tanker ship that was passing by and it dropped off a couple of stored containers of Aldabra Banded Snails just so they could be ‘rediscovered’. The person making the ‘rediscovery’ was probably in the pay of big oil.

    /sarc

  15. NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — A snail once thought to have been among the first species to go extinct because of climate change has reappeared in the wild.
    ===============
    proof positive. global warming has ended.

  16. Did you know that snails are the most prolific livestock animal producing more than 150 eggs at a time in one clutch? Its also the livestock that requires less stress in breeding them. You can buy a baby snail for less than N30 and make more than N200 as profit on such snail when it reaches table size.

    The prolific aspect is that you can decide to breed 4 snails and before a year runs out you will have more than a thousand snails in your snail farm.
    http://www.nairaland.com/1326621/wealth-snail-farming-business

  17. headline – “Climate Change Causes Virgin Birth” – lock up your daughters. It is worse than we thought.

  18. Diane Debinski — a biologist at Iowa State University who researches the links between climate change and extinctions — grimly observed, it certainly won’t be the last: “I think what we are seeing is the tip of the iceberg in terms of extinction events. I expect that we’re going to be seeing more stories like this.”
    ===========
    Diane is worried that even more species will come back from the dead. Totally invalidating her work. Zombie snails, feasting on the living.

    • For most of the 20th century there was a trend to assign species status to just about everything that was slightly different. With DNA testing so readily available, they are beginning to find out that a number of so-called species may not even deserve sub-species status…race, breed or variety would be good enough. As such the ‘parent’ species grows in number and many of these ‘endangered’/nearly extinct outlying populations disappear.

      Not saying that this is the case with this snail, but if it is just a variant of a more common species, that can account for its supposed extinction and return.

  19. About the only thing that has gone extinct due to climate change is rational thought…and it can be conclusively proven this is so…just look at the daily headlines claiming the phenominal cosmc powers of CO2 and the never ending list of things CAGW/CAGCC have done, could do or maybe, someday, at some uncertain time, in the future may possibly be able to be able to do something simlar to…

  20. “Only time will tell if they can survive the threats of climate change and sea level rise,” Gerlach said.

    He’s worried about sea level rise…when the snail is endemic to the Aldabra coral atoll. <.<

  21. I am your plants,I grow best in a greenhouse where I am warm. I need & get lots of CO2 & water to grow. I love sunlight .I am your food.

    I am God ,I control the weather; Genesis 9:11-15. Man-made global warming is blasphemy!

  22. There was a Brown University report last week that claimed “Extinctions During Human Era One Thousand Times More Than Before.” I know they blame the extinctions of many large mammals on early humans, but have there really been that many species that have gone extinct recently, say since global warming became the latest alarmist fad? Is there a list somewhere?

  23. A lot of nonsense as usual.
    a) Aldabra is not part of the Seychelles, its an isolated atoll 400 miles away.
    b) There have been a lot of invasive species introduced (rats, cats, goats) causing extensive habitat deterioration and at least one extinction (Aldabra Bush Warbler Nesillas aldabrana).

    Unfortunately extinction of native snails (and other organisms) on oceanic islands through introduced predators is a very common occurrence.
    Extinction by climate change, on the other hand, has as far as I know never been reliably observed.

  24. Louis says:

    “have there really been that many species that have gone extinct recently, say since global warming became the latest alarmist fad? Is there a list somewhere?”

    Depends on what you mean by “recently”, but oh yes, there has been a lot of extinctions, most of them on islands and the “small continents” (Australia, Madagascar, New Zealand)., but there have been quite a few on the continents too. For example a large proportion of the fresh-water mussel species in eastern North America. Causes: human-introduced predators, habitat destruction and overhunting, probably in that order. Through climate-change, no. For example North America has lost six birds species in the last 150 years:

    Labrador Duck (overhunting)
    Eskimo Curlew (overhunting)
    Carolina Parakeet (overhunting)
    Passenger Pigeon (overhunting and habitat destruction)
    Ivory-billed Woodpecker (habitat destruction)
    Bachman’s Warbler (habitat destruction)

    One of the many pernicious effects of the CAGW hysteria is that in this area too, a lot of attention is focussed on a non-issue while more pressing problems get ignored.

    • It’s a ‘may be extinct’ on the Ivory-billed Woodpecker…

      http://www.fws.gov/ivorybill/

      Anyway, for ‘verifiable’ extinctions due to climate change you’d probably have to go back to the last glaciation to find them, either at the beginning or the end.

      • Unfortunately not much of a “maybe”, I’m afraid. It has not been reliably observed for half a century, and those large Campephilus woodpeckers are pretty noticeable.

      • “Anyway, for ‘verifiable’ extinctions due to climate change you’d probably have to go back to the last glaciation to find them, either at the beginning or the end.”

        Not that many extinctions can be assigned to glaciations either, and those usually happen at maximum glaciation (as you might expect), not at the beginning or end.
        There was a lot of extinctions back at the beginning of the Pleistocene c. 2.5 million years ago as glaciation got started, and another wave about 0.8-1.0 million years ago as glaciations shifted from relatively low-amplitude 40,000 year cycles to much higher amplitude 100,000 year cycles (“the Mid-Pleistocene turn-over”).
        Not much since then, though the tree flora in Europe typically loses one or two species each glaciation. We don’t have very many tree species left by now, compared to North America or East Asia..

  25. Here is an interesting paper on climate variability on oceanic islands written back in 1992, before CAGW became hip. It notes that this part of the Indian ocean has very variable rainfall and recurring drought periods (for example in 1949 Aldabra only got 41 mm of pecipitation in a 6 month period):

    http://www.sil.si.edu/DigitalCollections/atollresearchbulletin/issues/00356.pdf

    It would thus seem likely that organisms living there can’t be very sensitive to drought.

  26. “Conservationists are celebrating the banded snail’s reemergence.”
    Shouldn’t that be ‘resurrection’? After all, we were told they were ‘extinct’ and AGW killed them…..

    The folks who perpetrated this fr@ud should be forced to return all funds associated with it…. but you’d never be able to collect it. They would just repeat the age old evasion
    “The checks in the snail mail now!”

  27. Durn critters keep refusing to read the memos ordering them to report for census.

    (How the heck can people be confident there aren’t any of a small thing living in mud?)

    The analogy to penicillin is glib.

  28. I’ll take mine with hot butter, and be sure to include one of those little spoons to pop it out of the shell

  29. I propose an experiment. Maybe just a thought experiment but it’s interesting nonetheless. Some people think a species extinction is a tragedy beyond price. Let’s find out.

    I will make a new snail species if I can get a government grant. What will the feds pay for a new snail species? My guess – not much.

    It shouldn’t be hard. I take some snails and I divide the colony into two parts. One I feed and water well and the other I starve. After a couple generations I should have two snails – fat ones and thin ones. If they can’t interbreed, I have created a new species. Dog breeders have been doing stuff like this for millennia although they try to avoid fertility isolation.

    If I got two mutually infertile strains of snail what would be the payoff? None actually. No one needs another snail species. So why is it so terrible when we think we’ve lost a snail species? We can always make more.

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