UAH Global Temperature Report: March 2013 – temperature unchanged from February 2013

tlt_update_bar-0313

Global climate trend since Nov. 16, 1978: +0.14 C per decade

March temperatures (preliminary)

Global composite temp.: +0.18 C (about 0.32 degrees Fahrenheit) above 30-year average for March.

MARCH 2013 (1)

Northern Hemisphere: +0.33 C (about 0.59 degrees Fahrenheit) above 30-year average for March.

Southern Hemisphere: +0.04 C (about 0.07 degrees Fahrenheit) above 30-year average for March.

Tropics: +0.22 C (about 0.40 degrees Fahrenheit) above 30-year average for March.

February temperatures (revised):

Global Composite: +0.18 C above 30-year average

Northern Hemisphere: +0.37 C above 30-year average

Southern Hemisphere: -0.02 C below 30-year average

Tropics: +0.17 C above 30-year average

(All temperature anomalies are based on a 30-year average (1981-2010) for the month reported.)

Notes on data released April 1, 2013:

UAH climate dataset offers new products

Two new climate ‘products’ will soon be available from the UAH temperature dataset, while a long standing product has been improved to make it more accurate, according to Dr. John Christy, a professor of atmospheric science and director of the Earth System Science Center at The University of Alabama in Huntsville. The “USA48” data, which tracks month-to-month temperature anomalies and the long-term climate trend over the contiguous 48 states, has been made more accurate by using a more precise tool for including the pieces of land adjacent to oceans.

The two new products are a USA49, which includes Alaska with the lower 48, and a listing for Australia, which includes Tasmania. Both of these new products will include temperature anomaly and trend data going back to the beginning of the UAH dataset in December 1978.

Compared to seasonal norms, during March the coldest area on the globe was in northeastern Russia, where the average temperature was as much as 6.49 C (about 11.7 degrees Fahrenheit) cooler than seasonal norms. Looking at the global anomaly map also shows the eastern U.S. and central Canada becoming much cooler than normal in March.

Compared to seasonal norms, the “warmest” area on the globe in March was middle of the Davis Strait, between Greenland and Baffin Island. Temperatures there averaged 6.49 C (about 11.7 degrees Fahrenheit) warmer than seasonal norms for March.

Archived color maps of local temperature anomalies are available on-line at:

http://nsstc.uah.edu/climate/

The processed temperature data is available on-line at:

http://vortex.nsstc.uah.edu/data/msu/t2lt/uahncdc.lt

As part of an ongoing joint project between UAHuntsville, NOAA and NASA, John Christy, a professor of atmospheric science and director of the Earth System Science Center (ESSC) at The University of Alabama in Huntsville, and Dr. Roy Spencer, an ESSC principal scientist, use data gathered by advanced microwave sounding units on NOAA and NASA satellites to get accurate temperature readings for almost all regions of the Earth. This includes remote desert, ocean and rain forest areas where reliable climate data are not otherwise available.

The satellite-based instruments measure the temperature of the atmosphere from the surface up to an altitude of about eight kilometers above sea level. Once the monthly temperature data is collected and processed, it is placed in a “public” computer file for immediate access by atmospheric scientists in the U.S. and abroad.

Neither Christy nor Spencer receives any research support or funding from oil, coal or industrial companies or organizations, or from any private or special interest groups. All of their climate research funding comes from federal and state grants or contracts.

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Kasuha

“temperature unchanged from February 2013”
That should read “anomaly unchanged”. The temperature is definitely different.

Joe

Kasuha says:
April 2, 2013 at 6:26 am
“temperature unchanged from February 2013″
That should read “anomaly unchanged”. The temperature is definitely different.
——————————————————————————————————
Not round here it hasn’t. Into our 3rd month now of temps running below the Jan / Feb average and not much sign of a change yet!

beng

The lack of any anomaly in the east Pacific says El Nino/La Nina was pretty much “neutral”.

NK

I see sine waves everywhere. Must be my Greek ancestry.

Rick Bradford

If year-on-year seasonal averages in large areas can routinely shift by +/- 6.49 degrees C, can someone explain why we are supposed to get our undies in a bunch about a (purported) 2 degree rise in the next 90 years?

Bill Gannon

What about the 114 or so well sited stations? Did not catch February’s data.

Doug Proctor

I hope Alaska is not merged into the contiguous US: would be inappropriate and meaningless to do so.

G. Karst

I must admit, I am a little surprised that the globe still manages to produce a positive temperature anomaly. Everywhere people reside seems to be experiencing unusual cold. Our local April fools joke was subzero weather and about 2 ft of AGW snowfall. My truck is currently stuck at the end of my farm lane, and I must go fire up, the big JD, and get it the hell out. GK

A C Osborn

Is this some kind of JOKE?
The Northern Hemisphere, you know that place where cold Records have been tumbling across the whole area, is “+0.33 C (about 0.59 degrees Fahrenheit) above 30-year average for March.”
What world do these Satellites revolve around, it certainly is not this Earth.
I have been saying it for quite a while now, the Lower Troposphere values bear no relationship with the reality that we experience, where is the CALIBRATION?

Richard M

It will be interesting to see where this goes next. With neutral ENSO conditions for several months one might look at the current value as only slightly warmer than a true average. This would be due to the positive AMO. Since the AMO appears to have peaked the most likely movement from this point on is cooling.
In addition, the fact that the warming last month was mainly over oceans it’s fairly surprising that the Arctic sea ice has held up so well. With the winds currently favorable for less melting this summer’s minimum could significantly beat last year.

Gary Pearse

Man, what does March have to do to get respect! With the SH at -0.02C change and much of the Eurasian and N.America in frigid conditions – even the Japanese that had to take a boat trip to see arctic ice in the 1990s can just walk down to the shore in Hokkaido and see it in April 2013. We’re below zero in Ottawa today (ice “extent” reaches us but they blasted ice on the Rideau River two weeks ago) and a brief respite out west will turn again in the next day or two. I’m awfully suspicious of the high temps in the arctic.
http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/map/images/fnl/sfctmp_01.fnl.html
It’s still -20 to -25C over most of Greenland and below 0C from Hokkaido Japan through the Himalayas, Russia, Scandinavia, over almost all of Canada and halfway down the Central Plains of USA at the beginning of April. The thermometers must have fur coats on.

USA48 dropped from -.41 to -1.00
USA49 dropped from -.33 to -.87
Those are pretty big drops.

geran

For the first time, I too question March’s result. Europe and the US were colder than normal. At my house, March was an average of almost 3 degrees F below “normal”.
Dr. Spencer would not falsify anything, but I really question the data he is forced to work with.

Marcos

here in Houston it was reported that March temps were -1.8 degrees C below average. the chart above shows the area right on the -0.5 line

Philip Peake

I think a few of the commenters here are falling into the “where I live is the world” trap.
While it is true that the Eastern US (and the UK) have had a frigid winter, here in Oregon it has been much warmer than usual – this past weekend it was 78 degrees! There has been perhaps one day when it snowed, and the number of days below freezing can be counted on one hand. it has been a remarkably mild winter.
Of course, with all of the US media based in NY, when it rains there its floods of biblical proportions hitting America!, when its warm, America sizzles in record temperatures, and a few flakes of snow is a sign of a new ice age.

Rob Potter

Looking at the global map, the colder than normal areas are very tightly focussed over the high population centers of Europe and North America. Much of north Africa and central Asia shows marginally warmer than usual so the overall anomaly for the NH is based on the averaging.
For those people who are complaining, just wait until the situation is reversed and Europe N America is warm, but the NH anomaly is cooler. Then we will be hearing all the ‘end of the world’ scenarios again and we will need to remind people about this winter…..
I am no expert, but isn’t the reason behind the very cold European temps something about a blocking high pressure area pushing cold arctic air down? If so, that will ‘explain’ the warm spot (relative to seasonal norms don’t forget) around Greenland.

Rob Potter

Oops, sorry Philip (Philip Peake, April 2, 2013 at 9:06 am),
Didn’t see your post before I posted mine – basically more of the same!

Thrasher

I’m not sure why some of you are questioning the data just because its been cold in Europe and North America. Just look at the map and you’ll see its been warm in northern Africa and a large portion of central Asia. This is the same backward thinking that alarmists use when heat records are being set in highly populated areas. They conveniently forget to look at the rest of the globe.

Is this some kind of JOKE?
The Northern Hemisphere, you know that place where cold Records have been tumbling across the whole area

Over land areas, yes, but the UAH product also includes the ocean areas. A land only index might show a cold anomaly.

A C Osborne: Sea surface temperatures are still a bit above average globally and as the Earth’s surface is mostly ocean, one would expect this to raise the surface temperatures a bit:
http://bobtisdale.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/global-monthly.png

Keith Gordon

Just to add to the above comments Central England Temperatures for March -3c below average
http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/hadobs/hadcet/cet_info_mean.html
Keith Gordon

Joseph Bastardi

What would be interesting, given the warmer and more moist air is, the more “energy” it has, is if someone would look at the warming over the pole where it has least effect on the energy budget vs the cooling further south and the implications on the true “temp” of the earth. 5C warmer where its frigid has little meaning compared to 1C cooler where wet bulb might be 50 degree higher like over the gulf. Notice the warm areas are where its drier.. or where wet bulbs would naturally be lower ( arctic ,Africa, Asia)
I still think that this whole AGW idea is merely a distortion of the temperature pattern, a natural occurrence to a planet where more land is in the north than the south, and it wobbles on its axis. It seems inconceivable to me that a balance can ever be reached and the only true constant is change. If one steps back and understands what temperature is, a measure of energy, that there is no real change in this and its a matter of sloshing back and forth. That being said, the reduction of temps where the wet bulbs are higher should be the precursor to cooling in the coming decades where it has been warmer,IMHO

A C Osborn

Philip Peake says: April 2, 2013 at 9:06 am, you jest surely, do you actually read about the rest of the northern hemisphere. Record breaking Cold in Germany, Japan, China and most of the rest of Asia, Record snow in Russia, this is not just about Eastern US and the UK.

Box of Rocks

Philip Peake says:
April 2, 2013 at 9:06 am
I think a few of the commenters here are falling into the “where I live is the world” trap. –
Obviously you have not.
On the plains here in Kansas the days are averaging about 15 degrees F below average per day. Why the map does not show it is beyond me.
I suspect it the way that the calculate the anomaly and I suspect it has a warm bias in it.

Kajajuk

whether or naught weather is climate is not the issue, is it?
a normal temp that is -20 that is now -14 is a temp increase (on average).
The first diagram suggests that warming is ongoing since 2001 or so, am i missing something here?

John Morrow

Also, Lower Troposphere temperature is different from surface temperature, whether local or global.

For me, the most significant number is the one Roy does not show:-
The 10 year average, 2003-12, is 0.19C.
We are now at 0.18C, with ENSO neutral conditions, and no sign of any warming for the last 10 years.
In February, GISS, HADCRUT & RSS all showed the same pattern, with 12 month averages also at around the 10 yr average.
http://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2013/03/30/global-temperature-updatesfeb-2013/

Mike Maguire

I was thinking the same thing about the “where I live is the world” trap.
However, the coldest anomaly in the US on the map above, shown to be in the south central part of the country is -2.5 Celsius.
I did some checking on regional March climo reports and found the following Fahrenheit temp anomalies.
Evansville IN, Cincinnati OH =-6.4
Indianapolis IN, Louisville KY, Paducah KY =-6.7
This indicates a uniformly colder pocket of air across several states.
1. This means there should be a -3.5 anomaly on the map.
2. The location of the coldest anomalies on the map above is shifted hundreds of miles south and west of the actual coldest pocket/anomalies but I will assume its mainly the result of this being a 2 dimensional maps that loses perspective from the curvature of the earth.
3. The NWS stats are based on the same 30 year period for average(1981-2010).
4. Maybe on a global scale, missing a pocket of several states barely into a 1 degree C colder anomaly is nit picking(probably it is) but since its “where I live” just thought it would be worth sharing.

Kelvin Vaughan

Coldest ever March Maximum in the Central England Temperature!

Jean Meeus

At the Meteorological Institute of Uccle, near Brussels, Belgium, the mean air temperature in March 2013 was only 3.0 deg C, while over the years the March average is 6.8.

What these figures do show is just how much they were affected last autumn by the El Nino during the summer. (You know, the El Nino that NOAA pretended did not exist).
In September and October, for instance, UAH peaked at 0.34C.
It will be interesting to see the Ocean/Land split when Roy updates his site. Ocean numbers fell more sharply than Land in Feb.
Continued low ocean numbers would suggest a prolonged drop in land temps in coming months.

Phil.

I’m a bit puzzled by the title since according to the UAH data March was an anomaly of 0.184 vs 0.175 in Feb so it went up, especially since the average temperature is higher for March?
REPLY: Phil Felton, be puzzled all you want. Round up/round down, round out, go round and round, but .18 it is. – Anthony

oldfossil

The Widget shows the CO2 for January 2013. The anomaly only gets updated about 3 weeks into the next month. Whoever is responsible for maintaining the Widget, you’re doing it wrong.
REPLY: I’m responsible, and yes I’m not always able to update it because the code is broken (written right before climategate1 and got back burnered) and it must be done manually. Try running this blog and dealing with the hundreds of emails I get every day, and trying to keep up with the current news, demands of readers, demands of my business and family and see if you can do a better job. Walk a mile in my shoes while doing it all for free. – Anthony

Gary Hladik

Philip Peake says (April 2, 2013 at 9:06 am): “Of course, with all of the US media based in NY, when it rains there its floods of biblical proportions hitting America!”
South Park: “Tom, I’m currently 10 miles outside of Beaverton, unable to get inside the town proper. We do not have any reports of fatalities yet, but we believe that the death toll may be in the hundreds of millions.”
http://southpark-zone.blogspot.com/2008/01/s9-two-days-before-day-after-tomorrow.html

Micha_G

The map shown isn’t correct for our region: in De Bilt (The Netherlands) the march average temperature was 2.5 degrees Celsius, where the long year mean is 6.2 degrees. That’s a 3.7 degrees difference. The map only shows a 2.0-ish negative anomaly.

“Compared to seasonal norms, during March the coldest area on the globe was in northeastern Russia, where the average temperature was as much as 6.49 C (about 11.7 degrees Fahrenheit) cooler than seasonal norms.”
I think that should read northwestern Russia, not northeastern.
The colouring for Norway seems slightly off the detailed instrument record for March:
http://www.met.no/filestore/tama0313m.jpg
which was -3,0C compared to the 1961-90 average (which is significantly cooler than the 1981-2010 average).

Vohaul

btw – here in germany – the cold march and the long lasting winter 2012 / 2013 are stylized to an “example of extreme weather events” predicted by “CO2 climate change” to become true – obviously there is no bussines but snow bussiness … and ignorance rules – in the land of PIK and windmills and solar panel fostering… it should be a LOL – but it is much more, my purse can take … 🙁

Bill Illis

I like to track the Daily official UAH temps. There are more interesting patterns such as oscillations that work on about two-week timelines that don’t really show up in the monthly averages.
Temps have been heading down since the impact of the last small El Nino peaked at the end of August and in mid-November, 2012. I see there is about 90 day or 3 month lag for when the ENSO provides it impact on global temperatures so the trend down started in mid-January and will continue into April.
Daily UAH temps over 2012 to 2013 to date.
http://s8.postimg.org/fhnk3hudh/Daily_LT_UAH_12_13_Mar13.png
This one is the Daily temps from 2010 to 2013 to date so we can see how temperatures have changed since the last large El Nino hit at the end of 2009 and how temps reacted to the last large La Nina (which peaked in early October 2011). End of March 2013 temps are down about -0.5C since the peak temperatures in mid-January 2010 but up from early January 2012.
http://s16.postimg.org/8ccra2d79/Daily_LT_UAH_10_13_Mar13.png
I’ve been waiting for the Lower Stratosphere temps to go back up after the impact of the last large volcano, Pinatubo’s, impact on Ozone depletion wears off. There might be a small uptick in March, 2013 with Tropics and the Southern Hemisphere in the positive territory. Lower stratosphere temps have been stable/rising for 16 years now.
http://s17.postimg.org/7bz49lfjj/Daily_LS_UAH_Regional_Mar13.png
This is how I see the volcanoes impacting both the Troposphere and the Stratosphere.
http://s9.postimg.org/qfkkx05kv/Daily_LS_LT_UAH_Lines_Mar13.png

Robert Wykoff

I just don’t get it. It seemed a very large swath of the northern hemisphere broke all kinds of cold records everywhere for the entire month of march, (and I don’t remember reading about any extreme southern hemisphere heat) yet we still have a positive anomaly. I cannot imagine how cold it must get to get below average…does it require 10 feet of snow in Furnace Creek, Death Valley to get below the mystical zero mark? How on earth did people survive the 60’s?

Sorry this link was late. I was away from home for a while. The preliminary March 2013 sea surface temperature anomaly data was posted yesterday:
http://bobtisdale.wordpress.com/2013/04/01/preliminary-march-2013-sea-surface-temperature-anomaly-update/

atarsinc

John Parsons AKA atarsinc
Mike Maguire says: “1. This means there should be a -3.5 anomaly on the map.”
No Mike. You’re measuring surface temp. Tnis is a lower tropospheric measurement. JP

Rob Potter

Can people take a breath here – this report is the satellite record for the lower troposphere – it is not the land record.

Robert Wykoff — Yep, that’s the real tragedy here, if you go back further than satellite records, it’s pretty clear what GISS is telling us — if something isn’t done soon our grandparents will freeze to death.
Seriously though, even when Europe and the U.S. are cold/hot it’s not unusual for the anomaly to go the other way, we’re just not that big a piece of the puzzle as a whole. Been watching this for a long time now, it used to surprise me too.

mikerossander

Hmmm. It’s interesting that the maximum warmest anomaly is, at a global scale, practically next door to the maximum coolest anomaly. The recent discussion about the time-resolution of paleoclimate reconstructions (the averaging that inevitably results from estimating temperature from, for example, the sediment layed down over decades or centuries) also makes me start wondering about the geographic resolution of those reconstructions. Is there any way to control for or to at least estimate the degree to which the measured data is an artifact of location rather than an indication of global trends?
In theory, it should all average out but I am becoming more and more distrustful of that assumption.

Mark Fawcett

“The Widget shows the CO2 for January 2013. The anomaly only gets updated about 3 weeks into the next month. Whoever is responsible for maintaining the Widget, you’re doing it wrong.
REPLY: I’m responsible, and yes I’m not always able to update it because the code is broken (written right before climategate1 and got back burnered) and it must be done manually. Try running this blog and dealing with the hundreds of emails I get every day, and trying to keep up with the current news, demands of readers, demands of my business and family and see if you can do a better job. Walk a mile in my shoes while doing it all for free. – Anthony”
Anthony, am more than happy to take on the task of keeping said widget current.
Cheers
Mark

atarsinc

John Parsons AKA atarsinc
What will it take for people to get it in their head:
1. What’s happening in your backyard does not determine the global/hemispheric averages.
2. Anecdotes from media outlets about certain large regional areas do not determine global/hemispheric averages.
And while we’re at it:
Don’t conflate Lower Tropospheric Temperatures with surface temps.
Geez.

Mike Maguire

John Parsons AKA atarsinc,
Thanks for correcting me. Yes, of course you are right. The UAH data is from the lower troposphere and the temperatures in my previous post came from the NWS, which records temperatures using thermometers inside of shelter boxes around 2 meters/6 feet above the surface.

richard verney

John Morrow says:
April 2, 2013 at 10:20 am
“,,,Lower Troposphere temperature is different from surface temperature, whether local or global.”
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
That is the point.
It follows from this that one cannot make a direct comparison with the surface thermometer based data sets Our own personal experience is at surface level, and, of course, it is local to where we live, not some globalized average.
Keith Gordon (April 2, 2013 at 9:25 am) points out that in the UK, March was some 3degC below ‘normal’. A similar point is made by Jean Meeus (April 2, 2013 at 10:37 am) for March temperatures in Belgium (similar northern latitute to that of UK).
A more significant fact that has not yet been picked up by MSM is that for the UK the winter average has fallen some 1.5deg C since 2000. It would appear that UK winter temperatures are falling, and falling fast. The UK is not well prepared for this since the UK Met Office is always forecasting warmer temperatures.

Thanks, Dr, Christy.
Very cold March in Europe!
I will update your graphic in ARVAL.

richard verney

mikerossander says:
April 2, 2013 at 2:08 pm
I am “..wondering about the geographic resolution of those reconstructions. Is there any way to control for or to at least estimate the degree to which the measured data is an artifact of location rather than an indication of global trends?”
////////////////////////////////////////////
Mike
Look at temperature anomaly figure 1 of the Marcott FAQ. This is apparently the thermometer temperature anomaly taken from stations from the same geographical location (or nearby location) as the proxies used in their reconstruction was taken. It shows just 0.5degC warming from 1880 to date. It shows that to day (2000 – 2012) is just 0.2degC warmer than 1940. The temperature anomaly in figure 1 is quite different to the usual thermometer temperature anomaly sets such as GISS Hadcrut etc which suggests that the reconstruction is to some extent an artefact of location (which is of course what one would expect)..