Finally, an explanation for the mindsets of our favorite green doomsayers: Al Gore, Prince Charles, Jim Hansen, Bill McKibben, David Roberts, and Joe Romm

Delusion is a big problem with the green crowd

By Stephen Murgatroyd, Troy Media

The draft text for discussion at Rio +20 – the UN conference on sustainable development – makes clear that the summit itself is a waste of energy and time. Even the environmental non-government organizations attending it think so.

Jim Leape, international director-general of World Wildlife Fund, hoped that the document would be renegotiated: “It’s pathetic. It’s appalling. If this becomes the final text the last year has been a colossal waste of time.” Friends of the Earth are even stronger in their disapproval, calling the plans “an epic failure.”

None of this surprises anyone. A process by which representatives from 193 countries have to agree on every word, comma and full stop over several months of discussion is not likely to produce much of anything. Yet expectations are always high, especially when thousands of people are attending Rio +20 in the hope of transformative change coming from such a meeting.

Delusion takes many forms. But the core symptoms of delusion are clear for the green movement.

Here is a list

1) PERSISTENT BELIEF THAT SOME-THING SERIOUS IS HAPPENING.

This has occurred over the last five decades as we have moved through the threat of the ice age, global warming, climate change, climate disaster, man-made natural disaster (another delusion) and the threat of sea-level rise flooding coastal cities around the world.
Full story: http://www.theprovince.com/technology/Delusion+problem+with+green+crowd/6823927/story.html#ixzz1yYjOzVlX

==============================================================

Some recent examples:

(to be added – this post was published prematurely, accidentally hitting the publish button rather than the save button – readers are welcome to add examples to complete this story. Apologies – Anthony)

UPDATE: Here are recent examples provided by commenters, the one from Skiphill on David Roberts is one I had planned to use.

Skiphil says:

the author’s 1) to 6) are all much in evidence in the recent babblings of Dave Roberts of Grist.com to a TEDx event:

http://www.bishop-hill.net/blog/2012/6/19/dave-roberts-at-ted.html

The ravings about 6C or more increase in global temps as guaranteed by the “science” is one of the many delusional aspects of this guy’s outlook.

———

Smokey says:

Since we are invited to add examples pertaining to the mind-set of these folks, here’s an interesting one on Prince Charles:

http://www.expressindia.com/news/fullstory.php?newsid=44686

 

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73 Responses to Finally, an explanation for the mindsets of our favorite green doomsayers: Al Gore, Prince Charles, Jim Hansen, Bill McKibben, David Roberts, and Joe Romm

  1. omnologos says:

    2) UNSHAKEABLE BELIEF IN AN AMAZING SERIES OF COINCIDENCES

    such as “It’s not possible to find the remaining $700M that would cancel malaria from the planet, yet it’s realistic to think in a few years hundreds of billions of dollars will exchange hands going from rich to poor countries to lower CO2 emissions and to protect the poor from AGW’s nastier side” and “Having been faithful recorders of temperature variations for hundreds of years, suddenly tree rings start showing the “divergence problem” during the past 50 years

    Full story: http://omnologos.com/why-agw-is-logically-impossible/

  2. pwl says:

    Excellent article. I love how the Vancouver Sun and The Province (another Vancouver mainstream rag) are leading the fight for sanity finally!!! It’s very refreshing to see journalists get it right on just about all the points finally. The tide has turned when the Main Stream Media finally get where the con job is.

    Some of you might have seen this before but it’s such an awesome weather web site that I’m posting it yet again. Note that it provides forecasts from three or four different weather services. Nice. (Four in the USA, Three in Canada).
    http://weatherspark.com/#!dashboard;a=Canada/BC/Vancouver

  3. Skiphil says:

    I do think it’s odd to cite WWF and FoE for why the Rio+20 is a waste of time, though. The Greenie NGOs are frustrated because they want radical statements and concerted actions, whereas to “us” (presumably) it’s a waste of time and resources because they shouldn’t even be trying to do a lot of the stuff they are trying to push through with bad politicized “science”…..

    So maybe this is just a quibble, but I don’t see the point in citing WWF and FoE to explain why Rio+20 is such a waste — their idea of a useful outcome would be the opposite of “our” idea of a useful outcome.

  4. ferd berple says:

    pwl says:
    June 22, 2012 at 3:50 pm
    I love how the Vancouver Sun and The Province (another Vancouver mainstream rag) are leading the fight for sanity finally!!!
    ===========
    Vancouver is celebrating Junuary – probably plays a role.

  5. Curiousgeorge says:

    Hoorah! Maybe the light has dawned, and these weasels will return to their dens. The world has some real problems to deal with that have nothing to do with “sustainability”, etc.

  6. scarletmacaw says:

    The conference is hardly a waste of time for those getting a vacation at taxpayer expense.

  7. Ally E. says:

    It’s easy to hit the wrong button Anthony, who hasn’t? This is a great bit of news all the same and I look forward to reading more details. :)

  8. Skiphil says:

    the author’s 1) to 6) are all much in evidence in the recent babblings of Dave Roberts of Grist.com to a TEDx event:

    http://www.bishop-hill.net/blog/2012/6/19/dave-roberts-at-ted.html

    The ravings about 6C or more increase in global temps as guaranteed by the “science” is one of the many delusional aspects of this guy’s outlook.

  9. jones says:

    One has to be cautious with the term ‘delusion’…..for example, if you believe that you are a saviour or prophet and a million people agree with you then the term may well become redundant.

    After all, wasn’t the earth flat once? Or at the centre of the Universe?.

    Does anyone see what I’m driving at?

  10. Wagathon says:

    Unfortunately, the academics, activists, politicians and bureaucrats leading the push for carbon dioxide taxation and use of renewable energy are non-producers who are woefully ignorant of both the economic reality of productive activity and the practical limits of technology. They are techno-economic-illiterates with a cargo cult understanding of production. Their prescriptions amount to a ritualistic belief that admitting sin (GW) and making an appropriate sacrifice (carbon dioxide taxes) will in some undefined (magical) way bring forth all the right changes, discoveries and implementations that are needed to effect a bright new world of clean endlessly renewable energy with minimal inconvenience to anyone… ~Walter Starck

  11. RobRoy says:

    Heaven’s to Murgatroyd. That was a good article The Author is a shrink. Nails Warmists well.

  12. Smokey says:

    Since we are invited to add examples pertaining to the mind-set of these folks, here’s an interesting one on Prince Charles:

    http://www.expressindia.com/news/fullstory.php?newsid=44686

  13. jorgekafkazar says:

    “(to be added – this post was published prematurely, accidentally hitting the publish button rather than the save button – readers are welcome to add examples to complete this story. Apologies – Anthony)”

    I’m sure glad I

  14. eyesonu says:

    Anthony, I love your adaptation to the resolution of a misstep. This will likely be a lively thread.

  15. jorgekafkazar says:

    never do that.

  16. WTF says:

    Forgot David Suzuki from the list.

  17. timg56 says:

    Smokey,

    The last one was classic.

  18. Curiousgeorge says:

    A pertinent example:
    Obama and progressives/socialists/democrats, etc. believe that: “Tax and spend is the right way to run a economy/country”.

    Anyone else actually believe this? Anyone?

  19. TerryS says:

    2) A belief that all ecosystems are fragile and will collapse with the slightest change
    This is despite living on planet that suffers from earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, fire, flood, tsunamis, drought, extremes of temperature, acidity and alkalinity and much much more. Yet everywhere they look they find thriving ecosystems.

    I have yet to see an ecosystem described as robust.

  20. Athelstan. says:

    It is true, delusion and coupled with groupthink, have caused some godawful unnecessary and very man made disasters.

    In this delusion, mankind has a perculiar propensity for self loathing and fear of their fellow human beings. Greens, eco-fascists and watermelons manifest this morbidity via, a near pathological mania. In an attempt, to rewrite a ‘new way’ and thus realign, or mostly call a halt to: the great technological advances, that, collectively: we have made as homo sapiens.

    Indeed we have come a long way. From crude hunter gatherers, then farmers, through to the industrial revolution and hence the miracles of modern science, that have done so much to transform and extend the lives of human beings across the planet.

    In their pathological antiscience ‘crusade’, the greens have been responsible for thousands, if not millions of deaths by stymying and preventing men and women, in some of the poorest nations on this planet from benefiting from the great technological strides we have made.

    JD, knows it and so too, do I.

  21. Gunga Din says:

    Skiphil says:
    June 22, 2012 at 3:56 pm
    I do think it’s odd to cite WWF and FoE for why the Rio+20 is a waste of time, though. The Greenie NGOs are frustrated because they want radical statements and concerted actions, whereas to “us” (presumably) it’s a waste of time and resources because they shouldn’t even be trying to do a lot of the stuff they are trying to push through with bad politicized “science”…..

    So maybe this is just a quibble, but I don’t see the point in citing WWF and FoE to explain why Rio+20 is such a waste — their idea of a useful outcome would be the opposite of “our” idea of a useful outcome.
    ==================================================================
    Since the IPCC is now officially accepting greenish-grey information maybe they’ll scrap their whole agenda?

  22. Athelstan. says:

    Why are we arguing about non existent figments, imagined by evil men with the lust of money in their eyes?

    There are plenty of real disasters just ‘aching’ to happen.

    We should be worried about – a small corner in Wyomong is one and under the ice on the mid Atlantic ridge Myrdalsjokull and a ‘mountain’ overlooking Naples bay.

    Prediction of Terrestrial disasters: that’s what we should be spending money on.

  23. Latitude says:

    Who would have ever thought you could make so much money….
    …on 1/2 a degree

  24. Marian says:

    Why is it that some of those Doomsayers. Have very privileged and self-indulgent backgrounds compared to the average Joe and Jane. And yet they want us to sacrifice our living standards to save Gaia. How about some of those guys downsize their mansions and cut back on their luxurious lifestyles first. Since they’re really the bigger consumers of energy and socalled ‘unsustainable’ resources.

    It might help too if they didn’t jetset around the World too often aswell.

    Mind you sipping champagne on a beach in Rio attending the Rio+20 talkfest must have been a nice sojourn for some of them. :-)

  25. Marlow Metcalf says:

    Next article needs to be from a neurological scientist specializing in psychological neural-chemical addiction and how dependence on the natural occurring reward neurotransmitters makes personnel change difficult.
    The article might go something like this.
    We have free will but not as much as we think.
    If we are involved with something that makes us feel superior, powerful, gives us purpose, validates our existence, belong to a passionate support group, this causes several of the feel good reward chemicals to flood our brain. Add some adrenaline to supercharge the mix and you may as well be shooting heroin and you don’t want a cure. The mere mention of a cure would be extremely threatening and must be resisted with extreme prejudiced.

  26. Jimbo says:

    Sustainable development!!! How about some sustainable conferences? Teleconferencing anyone? These people don’t believe a word that comes from their own mouths. Gore new villa with 6 fire places. Prince Charles………………..I’ll leave it up to you good people to find out how he lives, how many cars, rooms, co2 output and so on……………it’s quite shocking.

  27. Tucci78 says:

    Would it hurt to just quote the sequence 2) through 7) of Dr. Murgatroyd’s core symptoms list here, along with the remainder of his essay?

    2) DISORGANIZED SPEECH.

    Just listen to Al Gore. While eloquent, he is also disorganized, confused, will not answer questions from audience members unless the question and the audience member has been vetted beforehand and will not respond to skeptical concerns.

    3) FEELING THREATENED.

    Warmists are threatened by evidence that their theory of CO2 causing warming is mistaken. So, to protect their delusion, they adjust the data and increasingly rely on made-up evidence, also known as computer models, to justify their delusional beliefs.

    4) GRANDIOSE BELIEFS.

    Many in the environmental movement believe that they are the keepers of truth and wisdom – a major delusion. They can’t accept that other views or evidence may suggest alternative understanding of either environmental issues or climate change. For example, the idea that the pursuit of profit is a way to end poverty and take care of the environment is something that they reject, despite evidence that this is how poverty reduction has occurred on an unprecedented scale over the last 50 years.

    5) MANIPULATION OF FACTS

    Global temperatures are within normal ranges and haven’t risen dramatically for over a decade, yet the delusionists are persuaded that global warming is occurring. One reason for this is the manipulation (technical “adjustment”) of the evidence and the other is the use of fantasy (also known as computer-model) data.

    When evidence is provided from actual observations of natural events, the delusionists will have an explanation.

    6) THE USE OF THE BOGEYMAN.

    Whenever skeptical voices are raised about their delusion, delusionists will make use of the “bogey-man” – big oil, the “fossil-fuel industry” – to try and discredit their adversaries. The fact that their delusions are also supported by “big oil” never occurs to them as a problem.

    7) SAFETY IN NUMBERS.

    There are literally thousands who believe that the moon landings were fabricated. Others are taking the view that homoeopathy is based on evidence and is an effective treatment for a range of illnesses, despite repeated demonstrations of its ineffectiveness and non-scientific base. A large number of people believe that Jesus visited the Americas (it is actually a Mormon belief). So the warmist delusionists meet frequently to reinforce their beliefs. Just because hundreds of people believe something doesn’t make it true.

    The key to delusion, from a psychological point of view, is that the person actually understands that their delusional beliefs are not true, but persists any way. Here is the clinical definition:

    “Non-bizarre delusions typically are beliefs of something occur-ring in a person’s life which is not out of the realm of possibility. For example, the person may believe their significant other is cheating on them, that someone close to them is about to die, a friend is really a government agent, etc. All of these situations could be true or possible, but the person suffering from this disorder knows them not to be (e.g., through fact-checking, third-person confirmation, etc).”

    No one in their right mind expected Rio +20 to be a breakthrough for the planet, yet 50,000 will attend, including world leaders. No one in their right mind thinks that climate change will kill millions, yet many behave as if this is inevitable. No one in their right mind thinks that failure at Rio +20 will mean the end of these kinds of gatherings, although we can always hope.

    The fact that many will not have their aspirations met in Rio +20 doesn’t undermine the support Rio +20 will provide for delusion-al thinking.

  28. Marian says:

    Jimbo says:
    “June 22, 2012 at 6:14 pm
    Sustainable development!!! How about some sustainable conferences? Teleconferencing anyone? These people don’t believe a word that comes from their own mouths. Gore new villa with 6 fire places. Prince Charles………………..I’ll leave it up to you good people to find out how he lives, how many cars, rooms, co2 output and so on……………it’s quite shocking.”

    Yes Jimbo.

    It’s quite shocking.

    Problem with teleconferencing. It’s not like all being in one room together having a nice party talking hot air and drinking champagne along with caviar and pinching a waitress/hostess’s behind. ;-)

    As for 6 fireplaces. Well a few thousand phony carbon credits offset that.

  29. Dyrewulf says:

    The unshakable believe that the world’s governments should be kowtowing and handing the Al Gores of the world dumptruck loads of money while making those NOT approved by his ‘holiness’ live in caves and fear of the light-bulb police.

  30. Dyrewulf says:

    (Drat ‘…unshakable BELIEF…’ not ‘believe…’ my kingdom for an edit… (Well, I don’t have a kingdom, I’ll loan you two cats and a dog for the weekend…)

  31. AndyG55 says:

    “The conference is hardly a waste of time for those getting a vacation at taxpayer expense”

    It would be interesting to know how many attended on tax-payer funds, but didn’t attend ANY or VERY FEW of the seminars. I bet there were lots !!!

    Darn holiday scavengers.

  32. RossP says:

    I would not read too much into the BS coming from Greenpeace , WWF and the other environmental lobby groups concerning Rio +20. I think their comments about it being a disaster are a smoke screen. They know all the little steps ( many of them ) they want are being taken. Note, that the sessions are only open to Government people and tame MSM journalists –what have they got to hide ?? The scam and push for more control continues.
    But I will say it is significant that President Obama is not in attendance. Maybe it has something to with a small thing called an election coming up.

  33. Ted says:

    I read this tonight in the Vancouver Province news paper over dinner and thought it brilliant.
    The guy is exceptional! in such a short article he covers every thing that is malevolent and wrong the global warming agenda driven crowd. Mr Murgatroyd, I had already saved the page glad to see it published here too. Eat your eco Fascist heart out David Suzuki, you’re a blight on the Vancouver landscape.

  34. Werner Brozek says:

    The Edmonton Journal had a cute cartoon on Rio+20 today. See it at http://www.edmontonjournal.com/opinion/editorial-cartoons/6824407.bin?size=620×400

  35. higley7 says:

    Maybe one of the diseases they do not want to fund happens to be all over the conference. Funding would appear quickly? Or simply Montezuma’s Revenge for everybody.

  36. RockyRoad says:

    jones says:
    June 22, 2012 at 4:14 pm

    One has to be cautious with the term ‘delusion’…..for example, if you believe that you are a saviour or prophet and a million people agree with you then the term may well become redundant.

    After all, wasn’t the earth flat once? Or at the centre of the Universe?.

    Does anyone see what I’m driving at?

    Indeed, I do, but not in the vein you imagine. First, the earth was never flat, and it was never the center of the universe. By the same token, “Anthropogenic” isn’t going to cause any catastrophic “tipping point” because the earth has already been there; done that; and it didn’t “take”.

    Just as long-forgotten men that were once well-meaning but essentially clueless (as in beholden to church dogma), today’s scare-mongering by the “chosen few” are clueless for the same reason–their cultish devotion is being thwarted as people are waking up.

    Finally!

  37. I Am Digitap says:

    Let’s see… Al Gore’s personal OIL FORTUNE comes from Occidental Oil, which specializes in OIL, and in ALTERNATE OIL SOURCES, and ALTERNATE ENERGY…. duh.

  38. RoHa says:

    Can’t see much point in armchair psychoanalysis. The Warmers try to attribute non-rational motives to sceptics. “They don’t want to change their way of living,” etc.) Sceptics return the favour. (“Delusional”)

    Where does it get anyone?

  39. jones says:

    Rocky, thank you for that.

    My wording was sloppy…Of course the world was never flat etc….I should have said ‘believed to be/deemed……

  40. Garry Stotel says:

    The problem is that Gore, Prince Charles, Branson et al are NOT scientists or engineers. They might THINK they can have a say in the argument because they FEEL that if you burn something then surely it is gonna poison the air and make the planet warmer. They also cannot accept that someone, (especially someone who offends their feelings of concern for the planet) can be better equipped and speak a clever language to defend the offending point of view. So here comes the denial of science, and the skeptical point of view. Instead they seek out witch “scientists” who would prove ANYTHING using pseudo-science and scientific looking language.

    De Bono who coined the “lateral thinking” term also came up with the idea of “intelligence trap”, i.e. those capable of defending their point of view, regardless if they are right or wrong, do so, because it makes them feel good, and right. One may have enough intelligence to defend one’s point of view, even against own doubt, but not enough brains to understand that it is a wrong point of view, or that defending it is pure idiocy.

    I am sure that there is plenty of other psychological theory that can explain enthusiastic idiots, and it would be great to read a professional view. So many times I have been astonished that people dead cert about things, even despite in-your-face evidence against.

    IMHO

  41. Stefan says:

    Belief that nature is an order in delicate balance.
    Belief that ecosystems are bigger than humans, therefore more important than humans.
    Belief that harmony and fairness can be imposed top down.
    Belief that we can understand complex systems.

    The last one is particularly vexing. All the smart kids these days know that we can’t predict complex systems, therefore the only way to live is to ride the wave of novelty and chaos and uncertainty – to be flexible and go with the flow, to adapt, be nimble, be light, build institutions that can provide value and adapt quickly.

    The environmental movement is so 18th century.

  42. KnR says:

    Lets see a few day in June spent at the tax payers expense , living 5 start hotels in Rion and eating in some very good restaurants for a minimal amount of work which has the square root of nothing in value and therefore for which you can’t be judged .

    You know from one point of view that is not a ‘waste ‘ but a good and easy time with someone else picking up the bill.

  43. Big problem with Prince Charles- eyes too close together.

  44. DB says:

    I am brazilian (I live in the south, 1000km away from Rio) and I loved this Riominus20 thing. Why? Because of it for the first time the brazilian mainstream media is questioning the AGW. Brazilian skeptics cientists are getting some much space on the media on these days I am happy about it. Thanks for that Riominus20.

  45. Tucci78 says:

    At 10:51 PM on 22 June, RoHa had written:

    Can’t see much point in armchair psychoanalysis. The Warmers try to attribute non-rational motives to sceptics. “They don’t want to change their way of living,” etc.) Sceptics return the favour. (“Delusional”)

    Where does it get anyone?

    Where does diagnosis get anyone?

    Most people unfamiliar with the practice of medicine fail to understand the importance of listening and directed interrogation – simply securing a history of the pathology from the patient and/or caregivers – in every clinical case. This is the “S” in the “SOAP” process (“Subjective, Objective, Analysis, Plan”) whereby a medical professional moves from the patient’s presentation toward getting appropriate treatment started.

    So, yeah, undertaking “armchair psychoanalysis” of characteristics broadly and consistently manifest among las warmistas is very much a useful and valuable approach to defining what are reliably manifested patterns of behavior.

    Rational cupidity virtually indistinguishable from criminal mens rea accounts for some of these Watermelon whack-offs. Take, f’rinstance, those “scientists” whose professional careers (particularly access to those four billion dollars a year in taxpayer-mulcted government “research” grants lately being shoveled out by politicians in these United States alone) depend upon yammering their support of this preposterous bogosity. It cannot generally be said that these credentialed charlatans lack proximal knowledge of the evidence which disproves their CAGW premises; after all, they strive with exquisite care to duplicitously dismiss or evade it.

    However, the greatest number of the True Believers in AGW have little or no pecuniary interest in perpetrating this fraud, and are in fact themselves damaged by the political machinations grinding away on the ostensible basis thereof.

    Those warmistas who act politically to do injury to themselves or others on the basis of delusions which do not cohere with easily appreciable objective reality – even if the manifestation of their irrationality conforms with patterns of belief seen commonly among explicitly religious whackjobs, such as those Christian fundamentalists who deny medical care to their children resulting in avoidable morbidity and mortality – have to be considered so deviant from the standards of sanity within the normal range of response that there’s really no other way to regard them without applying the analytical methods of psychopathology.

    Careful observation of what las warmistas say and how they behave provides information about them which the honest investigator must collect, verify, and take into account in assessing the malignancy of the Watermelon movement as regards the political pathology of the “man-made global climate change” insanity so that remediation can be undertaken.

    These phenomena exist. Failure to acknowledge their existence is malpractitionate.

  46. Stephen Richards says:

    Smokey says:

    June 22, 2012 at 4:20 pm
    Since we are invited to add examples pertaining to the mind-set of these folks, here’s an interesting one on Prince Charles:

    That’s cheating. Anyone can find a stupid statement from an idiot. Try finding one from someone intelligent ;))

  47. Ted Davison says:

    From http://eadavison.com/
    8. EVIDENCE UNNECESSARY, HYSTERIA ESSENTIAL
    A century’s worth of screaming headlines from the world’s leading news media illustrates their preference for excitement over accuracy:
    ICE 1895, New York Times
    Geologists Think the World May be Frozen Up Again.
    FIRE 1922, Associated Press
    …the Arctic Ocean is warming up, icebergs are growing scarcer and in some places the seals are finding the waters too hot.
    ICE 1923, Chicago Tribune
    Scientist Says Arctic Ice Will Wipe Out Canada.
    FIRE 1930, New York Times Alpine glaciers are in full retreat.
    ICE 1974, New York Times
    And unless government officials reacted to the coming [cooling] catastrophe, “mass deaths by starvation and probably in anarchy and violence” would result.
    FIRE 2009, Time Magazine (Entire issue on AGW) Be Worried, Be Very Worried.
    Global warming, even most skeptics have concluded, is the real deal, and human activity has been causing it.

    Of course…
    IPCC forecasts possible small temperature rise by 2100
    … would scarcely make an inside page.

  48. G. Karst says:

    jones says:
    June 22, 2012 at 4:14 pm

    One has to be cautious with the term ‘delusion’…..for example, if you believe that you are a saviour or prophet and a million people agree with you then the term may well become redundant.

    After all, wasn’t the earth flat once? Or at the centre of the Universe?.

    Does anyone see what I’m driving at?

    Yes, one does need to be careful. Since the universe seems to measure 13.5 billion light years from our galaxy in all directions… we seem to be at the actual center of the universe. However, the delusion of a flat earth seems to make your point. My point is that unless one stays current on new measurements… we all carry outdated or erroneous myths around with us all the time.

    Reality is hidden behind a cloud of misinformation, and it is up to the individual to try and discern it. There is no bigger cloud than climate science. Mass conformity is our real problem. GK

  49. beng says:

    Snagglepuss:
    Heavens to Murgatroyd, stage right…..

  50. Dodgy Geezer says:

    The definitive document on Mass Delusion in human society was written by Charles MacKay in 1841. It is entitled:

    ‘Memoirs of Extraordinary Delusions and the Madness of Crowds”

    It is a 700 page tome detailing examples of mass delusion such as Tulipomania, the South Sea Bubble, the Crusades, Witch persecutions, Alchemy, the fad for ‘Catch-phrases’ and many other human delusions and social fashions. Available on Amazon and E-Bay for only a few dollars, it should be essential reading for anyone dipping into the way humans think. One quote from the book comes to mind:

    “Men, it has been well said, think in herds.; it will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one…”

  51. Dave Dodd says:

    “the universe seems to measure 13.5 billion light years from our galaxy in all directions…”

    Do we not today see a snapshot of the universe that existed 13.5 billion years ago? What does it look like today? I have this “delusion” that it has grown somewhat in the intervening years! Just sayin’

  52. Dave Dodd says:

    Whoops! Hit the Post button too early :-) Or maybe the “delusion” of curved space is the reality, and if we could peer even further than 13.5 billion years, we might be looking at our own backsides!

    And it’s either AGW or George Bush’s fault!

  53. Larry Ledwick (hotrod) says:

    This discussion brings up an interesting news article I read the other day. It discussed the following report and why online scammers always seem to have totally incredible stories such as being Nigerian princes, things that would wave a big read flag for any reasonably intelligent reader that the “opportunity” is some sort of a scam.

    http://research.microsoft.com/pubs/167719/WhyFromNigeria.pdf

    MIcrosoft came to the conclusion that contrary to the expectations of many, that these red flags were actually beneficial to their effort. They in effect self select respondents who are stupid, gullible and greedy, the ideal mark for their scams. All the people smart enough to see through the scam warning flags, would be a waste of their time, and self select to remove themselves from the population of respondents by their recognition of these warning signs.

    At that point , I realized that there is a considerable similarity between these on line scams and the AGW scammers dire public statements and methods. They issue the same sort of incredulous statements and unreasonable conclusions, and inevitably they are doing the exact same thing (consciously or unconsciously). The folks who buy into these dire predictions are much like the on-line scammer respondents as they are for what ever reason predisposed to buy into the scam for various reasons.

    They are opportunists and see the hidden opportunities to “ride the wave” of this fad.
    They are socialists at heart and buy into the idea of global controls or all are equal solutions.
    They believe there are some simple solutions for intractable complex problems.
    They are mathematically and scientifically ignorant or naive and willingly gobble up the assessment of others with professional degrees and titles rather than thinking for them selves.
    They feel that progress and industry or wealth are inherently evil so anything that shuts them down is good (enemy of my enemy is my friend).
    They are herd animals and blindly follow leaders and respond strongly to appeals to authority (exactly the sort of people you want to populate an massive public movement).

    etc. etc. etc.

    In short all the things that make skeptics sit back and say “whoa what’s wrong with this picture”, are simultaneously acting as siren calls to susceptible people with the appropriate mindset, belief system or personality types. Those same things encourage them to be members of a mindless mob following a pied piper dream to serve some personal goal be it greed or affiliation with a mass movement, or the feel good notion of saving the planet.

    Many of these people in my opinion are no different than the folks who respond to the on line scams, they are greedy or sociopaths (follow the funding) who do not care who gets hurt as long as they come out on top. They are status seekers trying to be leaders in a mass movement, they are gullible or simply stupid, or they have an underlying political or religious philosophy that meshes with the agenda of the green movement in some manner.

    I think it is important to understand that for people that are hooked to the green movement by one of those self selected attractions, scientific evidence and logic will not change their view. You have to address the reason why they are attracted to the movement. That means that the only way to drive away the greedy and opportunistic is to pull the plug on the money. The same goes for the other agendas, you have to find a way to re-direct their political or religious energies to some other task that for “them” will give a greater emotional or social pay off.

    That of course is difficult if their agenda is massive government and social control through political correctness and stigma.

    A portion of the hard core believers in AGW will not be swayed by any logical or scientific evidence and they literately are blind to the faults of the “science by model assertion” method.
    They are incapable of seeing the weaknesses in the modeling methods or the fallibility of computer code that is not properly tested and open to audit. They are blind because they do not want to see.

    No matter how many times you explain to them that the fundamental problem of long term climate projection/prediction is simply an unknowable answer due to the complexities of the interactions and nonlinear behavior of the math, they will not grasp the concept or appreciate the massive economic damage their feel good solutions will cause until those financial damages bite them in the ass.

    Larry

  54. Hugh K says:

    One must walk in front of the others if one wants to say; “Follow me”. And to lead people on to a path, one must walk on the same path. How can Dave Roberts and the others say; “Be faithful” if, by their very refusal to live a carbon-free lifestyle, they are in fact faithless?

  55. Smokey
    For a very rare once, I’m disappointed in you – your remark re Charles. You don’t know the other side of the story. I’m not going to spell it out here. Suffice it to say it lets him off the hook. Just stay with what you know – by all means attack Charles’ awful attitude to climate science, but keep off the rest please. He has done good work elsewhere.

  56. clipe says:

    “Legally, I’m afraid you didn’t see a heat wave,” said Dave Phillips, senior climatologist at Environment Canada.

    “Look, it’s still hot, and we’re all suffering at that point, but in terms of heat and humidity it was
    hotter down below.”

    http://www.thespec.com/news/local/article/748589–high-heat-in-low-places

    The Canafian public revere David Phillips. David Suzuki? Polarizer.

  57. RoHa says:

    @ Tucci78

    And when you have made your diagnosis, what then?

  58. Smokey says:

    Lucy Skywalker,

    You’re right, I don’t know much about Prince Charles. I’m sure he has done good work elsewhere as you say. I posted the links for their entertainment value. You must admit, at least the first one was entertaining, no?

  59. Tucci78 says:

    At 7:05 PM on 23 June, RoHa responds to my earlier post with nothing more than:

    And when you have made your diagnosis, what then?

    It would, of course, be enough to pull an appropriate quote from H.L. Mencken’s Notes on Democracy (1926):

    “My business is not prognosis, but diagnosis. I am not engaged in therapeutics, but in pathology”

    …but I’m a prolix bastich, am I not?

    In no rational consideration of any agonal pathology – and the flaming crap flung by las warmistas has been causing a broad range of suffering (of various kinds, unarguably including death incidental both to the politically-pushed implementation of their various “renewable energy” boondoggles and to the denial of petrochemical fuels exploitation in dozens of underdeveloped countries and regions which causes people to continue getting by without electricity, clean water, and cooking fuel other than stuff like dried animal dung burned in mud huts without chimneys) for decades now – can begin without establishing definitions of the derangement from homeostasis which is operating to cause the presenting symptoms.

    Diagnosis is, therefore, in and of itself an extremely valuable service. Ceteris paribus, effective treatment follows once the pathology has been established.

    Indeed, “therapeutics” cannot begin without some idea of what the hell is going on to put the patient in pain and at peril.

    In addition, in the case of the Watermelon warmistas’ delusional psychopathology, one of the first benefits of diagnosis is epidemiological. By making emphatically clear that these puckers are bat-guano crazy – raving, screaming, bugnuts out-of-their-friggin’-minds – we have a positive public health effect, reducing the likelihood of this insanity being internalized by vulnerable people (small children who haven’t yet learned to regard frothing grown-up idiots as ridiculous, as well as the large numbers of adults who are mentally botched and haplessly gullible) in a sort of folie à menage phenomenon.

    Children can be helped to understand that the AGW alarmists are even more thoroughly a pack of lying and/or whacked-out noxious grown-ups than are their professional pedagogues (and perhaps even less to be trusted as sources of information and touchstones of reality) and the susceptibly stupid can have their noses rubbed in the fact that believing in the “We’re All Gonna Drown as the Oceans Rise!” hysteria of las warmistas will mark them before God and man as contemptible blithering idiots.

    Although the susceptibly stupid are incapable of appreciating reasoned argument, they tend reliably to be sensitive about inviting ridicule. This is one of the reasons why even those dumb enough to vote for our Occupier-in-Chief aren’t dumb enough to go out in public without concealing their privy members despite having succumbed to fashion trends which involve the exposure of their underpants.

    We can’t appeal to their intelligence because they haven’t any. We can, however, strive to “inoculate” these duds and squibs against the “Man-Made Global Climate Change” delusion, right?

  60. Gary Pearse says:

    Steven, you have got this wrong. You are assuming that the broader followers of CAGW even understand the theory. They don’t and they don’t care. CAGW has been found a convenient rationalization for an already well developed political movement that would ruin Western Civilization and create a new world order of elites who would run the show. They have already abandoned CAGW and, because it served them well for a few decades they have found ways to morph it into climate change, then exteme climate … and now “sustainability” a scary policy instrument that gets defined by the elites to control what each can do.

    AGW started off as reasonable issue worthy of examination. The scientific proponents of it were reasonable, thoughtful fellows until the stars among them were swept up in the flood of support and adulation by the “sustainability” bunch who were looking for such an angle. They were wined, fetted, honoured, and finally seduced by the cash laid out before them, and then, unable to escape, colluded to keep this excitement going. They were the classic ‘useful idiots’ (a term perhaps falsley attributed to Lenin to describe naive supporters of the Soviet Union outside of the country:).

    http://bing.search.sympatico.ca/?q=useful%20idiots&mkt=en-ca&setLang=en-CA

    Having been used, the movement has largely abandoned them essentially by adopting “sustainability” which is based on resource scarcity instead of climate. The dupes have been left to make the best of the mess, the science failing them and no face-saving exit.

    Oh there is a lot of psychology in it but more disillusional than delusional.

  61. adolfogiurfa says:

    Do you really think that the people mentioned above, believe in what they say?. I don´t think so, it is just a good business for them, or at least it was or they expected it would be. Now it does not matter, as it is, in practice, over. R.I.P.

  62. RoHa says:

    @ Tucci78

    And while we are trying to treat and innoculate their pathology, they will be trying to treat and innoculate what they see as our pathology. They are just as convinced of our irrationality, and just as vehement about it, as you are.

  63. Tucci78 says:

    At 4:59 PM on 24 June, RoHa tries the time-tested “Nyah-Nyah!-You’re-Another!” rejoinder with:

    And while we are trying to treat and innoculate their pathology, they will be trying to treat and innoculate what they see as our pathology. They are just as convinced of our irrationality, and just as vehement about it, as you are.

    To which the proper response is Number 4 of the Laws of the House of God:

    THE PATIENT IS THE ONE WITH THE DISEASE.

    When dealing with megalomaniacs (particularly charismatic types) suffering their delusions, the scrupulous diagnostician keeps conscious of fact that the subject with whom he’s dealing is dysfunctional by virtue of an idiosyncratic mental disconnection from verifiable objective reality.

    Regardless of which peculiar fixation is at the focus of the disordered mentation demonstrated by the person in need of evaluation, the clinician must simply remember that there is no supported evidence for the fantasies the patient is yammering about.

    There is no equivalence between the skeptical position (on the crippled conjecture that arose in the late ’70s regarding atmospheric carbon dioxide’s “greenhouse gas” effect as a significant potential cause of anthropogenic global warming) and las warmistas‘ yelpings and squealings about either effect or causation.

    No evidence supports the alarmists’ intrinsically untenable proposition.

    This is why the AGW charlatans have corrupted and otherwise “cooked” global surface atmospheric temperature data sets, why they have cherry-picked proxy paleoclimatic temperature markers, why they have lied in their presentations of what they claimed to have been their own observational data, and why they have generally deviated from the standards of scientific methodology in their fabricated simulacra of “research.”

    But that’s the deliberately duplicitous fraudsters. How do we consider the gulled and cullied majority of the Watermelon whackjobs, who actually believe in this Cargo Cult Science crap?

    Well, hell. What other word do we use to describe people who claim (with ostensible honesty) that something is happening (or has happened) when the notion is not only friggin’ ridiculous but there’s also no evidence for that something’s existence?

    Nothing but “delusional” and its synonyms comes to mind, right?

    What a psychopath says about his perceptions are of value only to the extent that it serves to delineate the extent and nature of his psychopathology.

    Beyond that scope, they reflect nothing reliable about the nature of the real world.

  64. Khwarizmi says:

    A lot of people refer to books they haven’t read, having extracted their (mis)understanding of the text by social osmosis, the same process by which we learn the meaning of most words. Extraordinary Popular Delusions is really a book about Mass Deception as an instrument for social engineering, looting, and waging wars. e.g.,…

    “The following account, from Dr. Kortum’s interesting history of the republican confederacies of the Middle Ages, will show the horrible convenience of imputations of witchcraft, when royal or priestly wolves wanted a pretext for a quarrel with the sheep.
    http://www.econlib.org/library/Mackay/macEx10.html#Ch.10,%20The%20Witch%20Mania
    Same story throughout history.

    Tucci78 – the only psychology built on evidence is evolutionary psychology. Freudian psychobabble with thick applications of demeaning rhetoric is just a waste of time, like RoHa said. Most of psychiatry is also fraudulent. I once met a psychiatrist who didn’t even know that tryptophan is the precursor to seratonin — but he was happy to proscribe Prozac.
    Psychopath doesn’t mean “delusional” – it means lacking the capacity for empathy.

  65. Tucci78 says:

    At 9:48 PM on 24 January, Khwarizmi categorically asserts:

    …the only psychology built on evidence is evolutionary psychology. Freudian psychobabble with thick applications of demeaning rhetoric is just a waste of time, like RoHa said. Most of psychiatry is also fraudulent. I once met a psychiatrist who didn’t even know that tryptophan is the precursor to seratonin — but he was happy to proscribe Prozac.

    Psychopath doesn’t mean “delusional” – it means lacking the capacity for empathy.

    That’s nice. So how does that help a medical doctor – even a primary care grunt like me – when a particular individual patient presents with complaints of disordered mental and/or emotional function which can only be perceived as negative effects on personal quality of life and even threaten to manifest as responses to events around them which put the patient and others at peril?

    Setting your scorn for “Freudian psychobabble” aside (I ain’t fond of that crap myself), how the hell are those of us stuck with this job supposed to assess and recommend remediation when these problems are brought to us?

    Something like half of all family doctors’ patient encounters involve, primarily or secondarily, psychiatric diagnoses. Betcha didn’t know that, didja, Khwarizmi?

    Sure, I ” know that tryptophan is the precursor to seratonin.” When commercially available tryptophan dietary supplements were related to a horrendous outbreak of eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome in 1989, I had a female patient present with the condition – one of about 19 cases in the whole friggin’ state, insofar as I recall – and none of the local rheumatologists knew squat about how to asses and treat this lady, leaving management to the local primary care grunt. Me. I was on the phone every other day to a guy at the Mayo Clinic, the only source of reliable information I could find. It was a goddam nightmare.

    So do I know about tryptophan? You betcha.

    Turns out that one Japanese manufacturer had come up with a cheaper process to put tryptophan on the market, and they’d effectively knocked off all the competitors who’d been employing the prior methods of manufacture. Their stuff was being used to formulate effectively every tryptophan supplement on the shelves.

    The FDA slapped a ban on tryptophan as such, pulling all the OTC supplements off the market, and it wasn’t until about ten years ago that such supplementation – produced by way of the older manufacturing methods – could be marketed OTC or prescribed in these United States. The FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) still promulgates a <a hrerf="http://web.archive.org/web/20050225100757/http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/ds-tryp1.htmlcaveat on tryptophan use which reads:

    Based on the scientific evidence that is available at the present time, we cannot determine with certainty that the occurrence of EMS in susceptible persons consuming L-tryptophan supplements derives from the content of L-tryptophan, an impurity contained in the L-tryptophan, or a combination of the two in association with other, as yet unknown, external factors.

    Ever sit in on those risk management courses the professional liability insurance carriers like us practicing physicians to take as part of our continuing medical education, Khwarizmi? No? Ever been sued for allegations of medical malpractice? No?

    Ooh, big surprise!

    With the above-cited Information Paper comprising the FDA’s official opinion on dietary and prescription tryptophan supplementation, would it surprise you to learn that the psychiatrists (and us primary care guys) really do “know that tryptophan is the precursor to seratonin,” but we’re really, really reluctant to make therapeutic use of that modality because if it turns out that a particular patient is susceptible to eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome and develops that hideous disorder, we’re the guys who are going to be sued?

    Khwarizmi, one of the characteristics of a psychopath may be that such a person could be found to demonstrate an emotional state “lacking the capacity for empathy,” but just what the hell gives you to assert so friggin’ arrogantly that such is the definition of the term?

    When first devised (circa 1885) the term “psychopath” was not specifically associated with antisocial personality disorder – as it is today – but conveyed the general meaning of “a mentally ill or unstable person.”

    That usage is still generally acceptable, but – what the hell – let’s consider the criteria for establishing a diagnosis of the antisocial category of personality disorder, which ICD-10 lists as:

    (1) Callous unconcern for the feelings of others.
    (2) Gross and persistent attitude of irresponsibility and disregard for social norms, rules, and obligations.
    (3) Incapacity to maintain enduring relationships, though having no difficulty in establishing them.
    (4) Very low tolerance to frustration and a low threshold for discharge of aggression, including violence.
    (5) Incapacity to experience guilt or to profit from experience, particularly punishment.
    (6) Markedly prone to blame others or to offer plausible rationalizations for the behavior that has brought the person into conflict with society.

    You need three (3) off that laundry list to get a diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder and therefore medically categorize the subject as a “psychopath” within the modern clinical usage of the term.

    D’you think we can’t distinguish at least that many ICD-10 criteria in the general behavior of those Watermelon eco-fascist warmista whack-offs?

  66. Khwarizmi says:

    Tucci78: That’s nice. So how does that help a medical doctor – even a primary care grunt like me – when a particular individual patient presents with complaints of disordered mental and/or emotional function which can only be perceived as negative effects on personal quality of life and even threaten to manifest as responses to events around them which put the patient and others at peril?

    Your question is so disordered that it fails to parse. The greatest serial killer known was a doctor – Dr. Shipman.

    Something like half of all family doctors’ patient encounters involve, primarily or secondarily, psychiatric diagnoses. Betcha didn’t know that, didja, Khwarizmi?

    So what? A General Practitioner only has to get 50 percent of questions on an exam correct, and they graduate. The job of a GP is to point people to the relevant specialist. An estimated half a million Americans were killed by Vioxx. That’s modern “medicine” for you.
    Turns out that one Japanese manufacturer had come up with a cheaper process
    It was a genetically engineered bacteria that caused the disaster that led to the convenient removal a semi-essential amino acid from the market, a loss of freedom and choice that only benefited Big Pharma. Hiding the genetically engineered cause of the disaster from the public benefits those who want proprietary rights over Life(TM)

    Thanks to the mod who rescued my post from the spam bin, yesterday. Much appreciated.

  67. Tucci78 says:

    At 8:40 PM on 25 June, in a masterly display of totally friggin’ irrelevant pointless argumentum ad hominem, Khwarizmi responds to my concerns as a primary care physician anent the management of mental health concerns in the general patient population with:

    The greatest serial killer known was a doctor – Dr. Shipman.

    Just what the hell has this to do with anything under discussion here?

    And, of course, whether or not any question of mine allegedly “fails to parse,” note please that this incontinent sphincter uses that irrelevant and unsupported batpuckey assertion as an excuse to evade answering the question.

    The Kwarizmi goes off on a truly wonderful dung-flinging excursion to assert (again, without support) the following:

    A General Practitioner only has to get 50 percent of questions on an exam correct, and they graduate. The job of a GP is to point people to the relevant specialist. An estimated half a million Americans were killed by Vioxx. That’s modern “medicine” for you.

    Has that first sentence any relation to fact? Has this Kwarizmi character any idea of the education and training undergone by a Family Physician presently entering practice in these United States? Yeah, I’m a GP, but contrary to this oaf’s abject idiocy about what FP and GP guys do, we’re not simply triage officers. Especially with the onset of “managed care” several decades ago, we’re counted upon to handle the routine screening and continuing care of most of the patient population, from neonates to nonagenarians. There simply aren’t enough “relevant specialists” for us to turf out every patient who comes in the door.

    Besides, of course, there’s the fact that once a gall bladder patient’s had her cholecystectomy, and the guy with benign prostatic hypertrophy has recovered satisfactorily from his TURP and the lady with the herniated L5 nucleus pulposus has responded tolerably to a percutaneous diskectomy, all of these people are still going to need expectant evaluation and maintenance treatment for chronic dysfunctions like essential hypertension, hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, atheromatous peripheral, coronary, and CNS vascular disease, various kinds of skin cancer, infections, digestive disorders, alcoholism, allergies, disorders of mood and mentation, et-interminable-cetera to which the human organism is heir by way of genetic predisposition, environmental pathogens, diet, indolence, stress, aging, and other factors either unavoidable or lifestyle-induced.

    Does this Kwarizmi putz expect that every patient is supposed to be bouncing from cardiologist to endocrinologist to pulmonologist to general surgeon to orthopedic surgeon to surgeon urologist to psychiatrist as a matter of routine for the address of multitudinous conditions which have been satisfactorily stabilized or are not in need of particular “relevant specialists’” focused expertise?

    Just how the hell does Kwarizmi explain the reason for medical and surgical specialization in the first place? All other things being equal, these guys tend to get good in their peculiar areas of expertise by concentrating their attention and efforts therein. Sure, a thoracic surgeon can evaluate a school-age child for Osgood–Schlatter disease, but he hasn’t seen many cases of the condition, hasn’t got a physiatrist’s handle on optimum treatment or prognosis, isn’t as qualified as an orthopedic surgeon is to make a decision about surgical intervention, and generally has better things to do with his time than to follow up with the family of such a youngster in the long course of remediative treatment and prevention of exacerbation and recurrence.

    That gets left – by all those “relevant specialists” – to us lowly “Local M.D.” (LMD) types, the primary care grunts.

    In parts of “flyover country,” access to secondary- and tertiary-care “relevant specialists” requires road trips of three to four hours, if a patient can get an appointment at all. A helluva lot of these “relevant specialists” have brief office hours maybe two or three days a week, at most.

    They’re not available in the office forty or fifty hours a week, or rounding on chronically ill elderly and disabled patients as a matter of routine at every extended care facility (“nursing home”) in the county, or pulling a 12-hour shift in the community hospital’s Emergency Department once or twice a month when the Medical Staff office phones to say that they need somebody to fill in.

    And – oh, joy! – us primary care guys are supposed to be responsible for the fact that the manufacturer of Vioxx (rofecoxib, Roche) actively and duplicitously suppressed safety data reporting on adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events in their Phase III clinical investigations (emphasis on the VIGOR trial reported in The New England Journal of Medicine, 1998) despite warnings from guys like cardiologist Eric Topol and one of the FDA’s own epidemiologists – David Graham – so that news of the risks associated with this and other COX-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) didn’t get out to us until 2004.

    Merck – like all the rest of Big Pharma looking for the main chance back in the ’90s – wanted Vioxx to be a “blockbuster” prescription drug that could be written to treat chronic mild to moderate osteoarthritis pain (as well as for other indications) occurring in a broad range of patients, and because they suppressed that safety data there was no way that physicians in active practice could reliably calculate even the roughest sort of risk/benefit ratio.

    And that’s supposed to have been our fault? Anybody else want to pummel this Khwarizmi ignoramus until he’s got some other kind of excuse for his drooling idiocy?

    (Ditto on this inspissated impaction’s whining about how the FDA kept tryptophan not produced by the culprit manufacturing process to which I’d referred – supported by the links I’d provided above – off the U.S. market in a glorious spasm of bureaucratic FUD until 2002 in spite of the fact that there was zero evidence to support a surmise that this amino acid itself was in any way causative of eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome. That was not a decision made by those of us in the practice of medicine, goddamnit.)

    The Big Pharma “suits” certainly deserve to come in for a slagging, and they do. Not so curiously, however, that criticism doesn’t tend much to come from Kwarizmi‘s beloved “relevant specialists” because these guys – being tracked as high prescribers in their “relevant” therapeutic categories – are the doctors who are wined and dined and brought into lucrative relationships with the manufacturers as clinical investigators and medical education activities’ faculty members and consultants and promotional speakers and “opinion leaders” and all the rest of that nice stuff involving fancy dining and luxury hotel accommodations and big fat checks.

    Us lowly primary care generalists? Jeez, but since the last revision of the PhRMA Code, we can’t even get cheap ballpoint pens or a calendar for the front desk anymore.

    Gotta love earnest cement-heads like this Khwarizmi klutz, don’tcha? Proof that willful ignorance doesn’t prevent a deserving dolt from sticking his head up to get it whacked with a two-by-four.

  68. Tucci78 says:

    Sorry! Vioxx (rofecoxib) was manufactured by Merck, not Roche.

  69. Khwarizmi says:

    Dr. Tucci. Your finely-honed torrent of condescending ad hominem abuse brightened my dark mood, just like a therapeutic administration of fluoxetine might have done in theory.
    What a charming example of “doctor” you are.

  70. Tucci78 says:

    At 8:01 PM on 26 June, Khwarizmi proves – like most flaming ignoramuses – he knows precisely squat about the precise definition of the philosophical term argumentum ad hominem,” which the stupid schmuck thinks is a Latin tag for “insult.” This pretentious pseudoeducated pointless luser “responds” to my corrective essay above with nothing more than:

    Dr. Tucci. Your finely-honed torrent of condescending ad hominem abuse brightened my dark mood, just like a therapeutic administration of fluoxetine might have done in theory.
    What a charming example of “doctor” you are.

    Yeah, I’m a doctor. You’re not my patient, putzie, but rather a blithering blockhead pretending knowledge of the profession and practice of medicine (not to mention pharmacology) in an online forum, bent upon ramming your head against the cinderblocks until you’re ready for unpaired organ harvesting.

    I don’t have to be nice to you because I have – to you – no duty whatsoever as a practitioner of the medical art. Were you to present online in such a fashion as to evince symptoms of something beyond arrogant willful ignorance, I would probably be obliged by the canons of the profession to engage you with something other than the hatred and contempt you’ve done so very much to earn, but – what the hell – I work with what I’m given in the encounter.

    There’s nothing to distinguish you from any other self-directing malignant lump, so fire up the Bovie, boys! Time to cauterize.

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