Test

SMPTE color bars – Click for your own test pattern kit

This page is for posters to test comments prior to submitting them to WUWT. Your tests will be deleted in a while, though especially interesting tests, examples, hints, and cool stuff will remain for quite a while longer.

Some things that don’t seem to work any more, or perhaps never did, are kept in Ric Werme’s Guide to WUWT.

Formatting in comments

WordPress does not provide much documentation for the HTML formatting permitted in comments. There are only a few commands that are useful, and a few more that are pretty much useless.

A typical HTML formatting command has the general form of <name>text to be formatted</name>. A common mistake is to forget the end command. Until WordPress gets a preview function, we have to live with it.

N.B. WordPress handles some formatting very differently than web browsers do. A post of mine shows these and less useful commands in action at WUWT.

N.B. You may notice that the underline command, <u>, is missing. WordPress seems to suppress for almost all users, so I’m not including it here. Feel free to try it, don’t expect it to work.

Name Sample Result
b (bold) This is <b>bold</b> text This is bold text
Command strong also does bolding.
i (italics) This is <i>italicized</i> text This is italicized text
Command em (emphasize) also does italics.
a (anchor) See <a href=http://wermenh.com>My home page</a> See My home page
A URL by itself (with a space on either side) is often adequate in WordPress. It will make a link to that URL and display the URL, e.g. See http://wermenh.com.

Some source on the web is presenting anchor commands with other parameters beyond href, e.g. rel=nofollow. In general, use just href=url and don’t forget the text to display to the reader.

blockquote (indent text) My text
<blockquote>quoted text</blockquote>
More of my text
My text

quoted text

More of my text

Quoted text can be many paragraphs long.
WordPress italicizes quoted text (and the <i> command enters normal text).
strike This is <strike>text with strike</strike> This is text with strike
pre (“preformatted” – use for monospace display) <pre>These lines are bracketed<br>with &lt;pre> and &lt;/pre>
These lines are bracketed
with <pre> and </pre>
Preformatted text, generally done right. Use it when you have a table or something else that will look best in monospace. Each space is displayed, something that <code> (next) doesn’t do.
code (use for monospace display) <code>Wordpress handles this very differently</code> WordPress handles this very differently
See https://wattsupwiththat.com/resources/#comment-65319 to see what this really does.

Youtube videos

Using the URL for a YouTube video creates a link like any other URL. However, WordPress accepts the HTML for “embedded” videos. From the YouTube page after the video finishes, click on the “embed” button and it will suggest HTML like:

<iframe width="560" height="315"
        src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/yaBNjTtCxd4"
        frameborder="0" allowfullscreen>
</iframe>

WordPress will convert this into an internal square bracket command, changing the URL and ignoring the dimension. You can use this command yourself, and use its options for dimensions. WordPress converts the above into something like:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yaBNjTtCxd4&w=640&h=480]

Use this form and change the w and h options to suit your interests.

Images in comments

If WordPress thinks a URL refers to an image, it will display the image
instead of creating a link to it. The following rules may be a bit excessive,
but they should work:

  1. The URL must end with .jpg, .gif, or .png. (Maybe others.)
  2. The URL must be the only thing on the line.
  3. This means you don’t use <img>, which WordPress ignores and displays nothing.
  4. This means WordPress controls the image size.
  5. <iframe> doesn’t work either, it just displays a link to the image.

If you have an image whose URL doesn’t end with the right kind of prefix, there may be two options if the url includes attributes, i.e. if it has a question mark followed by attribute=value pairs separated by ampersands.

Often the attributes just provide information to the server about the source of the URL. In that case, you may be able to just delete everything from the question mark to the end.

For some URLs, e.g. many from FaceBook, the attributes provide lookup information to the server and it can’t be deleted. Most servers don’t bother to check for unfamiliar attributes, so try appending “&xxx=foo.jpg”. This will give you a URL with one of the extensions WordPress will accept.

WordPress will usually scale images to fit the horizontal space available for text. One place it doesn’t is in blockquoted text, there it seems to display fullsize and large images overwrite the rightside nav bar text.

Special characters in comments

Those of us who remember acceptance of ASCII-68 (a specification released in 1968) are often not clever enough to figure out all the nuances of today’s international character sets. Besides, most keyboards lack the keys for those characters, and that’s the real problem. Even if you use a non-ASCII but useful character like ° (as in 23°C) some optical character recognition software or cut and paste operation is likely to change it to 23oC or worse, 230C.

Nevertheless, there are very useful characters that are most reliably entered as HTML character entities:

Type this To get Notes
&amp; & Ampersand
&lt; < Less than sign
Left angle bracket
&bull; Bullet
&deg; ° Degree (Use with C and F, but not K (kelvins))
&#8304;
&#185;
&#178;
&#179;
&#8308;

¹
²
³
Superscripts (use 8304, 185, 178-179, 8308-8313 for superscript digits 0-9)
&#8320;
&#8321;
&#8322;
&#8323;



Subscripts (use 8320-8329 for subscript digits 0-9)
&pound; £ British pound
&ntilde; ñ For La Niña & El Niño
&micro; µ Mu, micro
&plusmn; ± Plus or minus
&times; × Times
&divide; ÷ Divide
&ne; Not equals
&nbsp; Like a space, with no special processing (i.e. word wrapping or multiple space discarding)
&gt; > Greater than sign
Right angle bracket
Generally not needed

Various operating systems and applications have mechanisms to let you directly enter character codes. For example, on Microsoft Windows, holding down ALT and typing 248 on the numeric keypad may generate the degree symbol. I may extend the table above to include these some day, but the character entity names are easier to remember, so I recommend them.

Latex markup

WordPress supports Latex. To use it, do something like:

$latex P = e\sigma AT^{4}$     (Stefan-Boltzmann's law)

$latex \mathscr{L}\{f(t)\}=F(s)$

to produce

P = e\sigma AT^{4}     (Stefan-Boltzmann’s law)

\mathscr{L}\{f(t)\}=F(s)

Linking to past comments

Each comment has a URL that links to the start of that comment. This is usually the best way to refer to comment a different post. The URL is “hidden” under the timestamp for that comment. While details vary with operating system and browser, the best way to copy it is to right click on the time stamp near the start of the comment, choose “Copy link location” from the pop-up menu, and paste it into the comment you’re writing. You should see something like https://wattsupwiththat.com/2013/07/15/central-park-in-ushcnv2-5-october-2012-magically-becomes-cooler-in-july-in-the-dust-bowl-years/#comment-1364445.

The “#<label>” at the end of the URL tells a browser where to start the page view. It reads the page from the Web, searches for the label and starts the page view there. As noted above, WordPress will create a link for you, you don’t need to add an <a> command around it.

One way to avoid the moderation queue.

Several keywords doom your comment to the moderation queue. One word, “Anthony,” is caught so that people trying to send a note to Anthony will be intercepted and Anthony should see the message pretty quickly.

If you enter Anthony as An<u>th</u>ony, it appears to not be caught,
so apparently the comparison uses the name with the HTML within it and
sees a mismatch.

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111 thoughts on “Test

  1. I just had another thought about underlines.

    I think I discovered that if I could get around the automatic spam trap by writing Anthony with an empty HTML command inside, e.g. Ant<b></b>hony .

    What happens when I try that with underline?

    Apologies in advance to the long-suffering mods, at least one of these comments may get caught by the spam trap.

    • Bartleby said;

      I’m a fan of tax subsidies and I’d like to express my personal appreciation to all of you who’ve volunteeredwho have been forced to underwrite my attempts to make obscene amounts of money off your labor. You, who are about to die, salute me. Thank you

      There, I fixed it for you. By the way, was this a really lame attempt at humor or do you really take pride in having leeched off of society for your own benefit? It would not surprise to me find that it is the latter. since you also seem to fancy yourself as Claudius.

      What I got was a system that delivers about 3kWh on the winter solstice and 60kWh on the summer solstice….In a drought year it sees about 50 inches of rain, in an average year closer to 80 inches an a wet year (like last winter) we’ll see 120 inches.

      I can believe the 3kWh per day figure in winter but have a hard time believing you can consistently generate 60kWh in summer, especially with the amount of rain you are reporting. Would you care to share the monthly generation figures over a single year? I doubt they support the level of output that you are suggesting.

      • I’m a fan of tax subsidies and I’d like to express my personal appreciation to all of you who’ve volunteered who have been forced to underwrite my attempts to make obscene amounts of money off your labor. You, who are about to die, salute me. Thank you

      • I’m a fan of tax subsidies and I’d like to express my personal appreciation to all of you who’ve volunteered who have been forced to underwrite my attempts to make obscene amounts of money off your labor. You, who are about to die, salute me. Thank you

      • Bartleby said;

        I’m a fan of tax subsidies and I’d like to express my personal appreciation to all of you who’ve volunteered who have been forced to underwrite my attempts to make obscene amounts of money off your labor. You, who are about to die, salute me. Thank you

        There, I fixed it for you. By the way, was this just a lame attempt at humor or do you actually take pride in having leeched off of society for your own benefit? It would not surprise to me find that it is the latter since you also seem to fancy yourself as Claudius.

        What I got was a system that delivers about 3kWh on the winter solstice and 60kWh on the summer solstice….In a drought year it sees about 50 inches of rain, in an average year closer to 80 inches an a wet year (like last winter) we’ll see 120 inches.

        I can believe the 3kWh per day figure in winter but have a hard time believing you can consistently generate 60kWh per day in summer, especially with the amount of rain you are reporting. Would you care to share the monthly generation figures over a single year? I doubt they support the level of output that you are implying.

        MODS; THANKS FOR THE PRACTICE, YOU MAY DELETE WHEN READY!

  2. WordPress only displays images for URLs on their own line and ending with a image file extension. If I delete the attribute string above, i.e. ?token=I7JQbQli1swRgik%2BKnIKAmCk52Y%3D then what’s left should work:

    • Now one that would permit image display:

      Update: Right clicking to get the image’s url gave me a URL that goes through WP’s cache via (slashes replaced by spaces, periods by dashes) i2-wp-com wermenh-com images winter0708 P3020227_snowbank7-jpg

    • Now just the image without a suffix:

      Update: This image uses the same URL as the previous cached image. That means we can’t use a changing suffix to force a trip around the cache any more for HTTP images. I’ll play with HTTPS later.

      • Reply to Ric W ==> Thanks — I was fielding comments on an essay using an unfamiliar tablet, and wasn’t sure which and/or both were part of HTML5. I usually use the old ClimateAudit comment Greasemonkey tool, even though its formatting is funky these days, for the tags. Don’t suppose you could update that add-in?

      • IIRC, Greasemonkey was written for CA, which uses a different theme that does WUWT.

        I don’t have the time to figure out the JavaScript code or whatever it’s written in, and I don’t have the ability to make changes that deep in WUWT.

        Instead of Greasemonkey, I often use https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/its-all-text/ . It can open up an external editor, so it has saved my butt a few times when WP loses a post I was making.

  3. Hey, what happened to the old smiley face?? When I tried to post it, this appeared:

    I wonder if WordPress changed any others?

     ☹ ☻

    The old smiley was more subtle; less in-your-face. The new one is way too garish.

    If WP keeps that up, I’ll just have to use this lame replacement:

    :-)

    Or even worse:

    ;-)

    • The fact the entire green house gas scam is that and nothing but that is proven by the fact that there’s no such thing – ever – in all thermodynamics – as adding more and more refractive media to a fluid bath conduction chilling a sun-warmed rock, and having the temperature of the rock go up, as more and more insulation lets less and less warming, available firelight, ever reach the rock to warm it. It’s called a temperature inversion scam and it’s so simple a child can figure it out, you don’t even need a high school diploma to figure out it’s impossible.

      • I don’t know why my posts are disappearing when I’m posting from my phone, this never happens to me on other WordPress sites.

  4. Testing preformating

    Newer-'12			Older-'07 (did not include ties)				
    7-Jan	-5	1884	Jan-07	-6	1942		New record 1 warmer and 58 years earlier
    8-Jan	-9	1968	Jan-08	-12	1942		New record 3 warmer and 37 years later
    3-Mar	1	1980	Mar-03	0	1943		New record 3 warmer and 26 years later
    13-Mar	5	1960	Mar-13	7	1896		New record 2 cooler and 64 years later
    8-May	31	1954	May-08	29	1947		New record 3 warmer and 26 years later
    9-May	30	1983	May-09	28	1947		New tied record 2 warmer same year and 19 and 36 years later
    	30	1966					
    	30	1947					
    12-May	35	1976	May-12	34	1941		New record 1 warmer and 45 years later
    30-Jun	47	1988	Jun-30	46	1943		New record 1 warmer and 35 years later
    12-Jul	51	1973	Jul-12	47	1940		New record 4 warmer and 33 years later
    13-Jul	50	1940	Jul-13	44	1940		New record 6 warmer and same year
    17-Jul	52	1896	Jul-17	53	1989		New record 1 cooler and 93 years earlier
    20-Jul	50	1929	Jul-20	49	1947		New record 1 warmer and 18 years earlier
    23-Jul	51	1981	Jul-23	47	1947		New record 4 warmer and 34 years later
    24-Jul	53	1985	Jul-24	52	1947		New record 1 warmer and 38 years later
    26-Jul	52	1911	Jul-26	50	1946		New record 2 warmer and 35 years later
    31-Jul	54	1966	Jul-31	47	1967		New record 7 warmer and 1 years later
    19-Aug	49	1977	Aug-19	48	1943		New record 1 warmer and 10, 21 and 34 years later
    	49	1964					
    	49	1953					
    21-Aug	44	1950	Aug-21	43	1940		New record 1 warmer and 10 years later
    26-Aug	48	1958	Aug-26	47	1945		New record 1 warmer and 13 years later
    27-Aug	46	1968	Aug-27	45	1945		New record 1 warmer and 23 years later
    12-Sep	44	1985	Sep-12	42	1940		New record 2 warmer and 15, 27 and 45 years later
    	44	1967					
    	44	1955					
    26-Sep	35	1950	Sep-26	33	1940		New record 2 warmer and 12 earlier and 10 years later
    	35	1928					
    27-Sep	36	1991	Sep-27	32	1947		New record 4 warmer and 44 years later
    29-Sep	32	1961	Sep-29	31	1942		New record 1 warmer and 19 years later
    2-Oct	32	1974	Oct-02	31	1946		New record 1 warmer and 38 years earlier and 19 years later
    	32	1908					
    15-Oct	31	1969	Oct-15	24	1939		New tied record same year but 7 warmer and 22 and 30 years later
    	31	1961					
    	31	1939					
    16-Oct	31	1970	Oct-16	30	1944		New record 1 warmer and 26 years later
    24-Nov	8	1950	Nov-24	7	1950		New tied record same year but 1 warmer
    29-Nov	3	1887	Nov-29	2	1887		New tied record same year but 1 warmer
    4-Dec	8	1976	Dec-04	3	1966		New record 5 warmer and 10 years later
    21-Dec	-10	1989	Dec-21	-11	1942		New tied record same year but 1 warmer and 47 years later
    	-10	1942					
    			31				
    ?			Dec-05	8	1976		December 5 missing from 2012 list
    
    • (BTW those were record lows.) Testing record highs.

      Newer-April '12			Older-'07 (did not include ties)				
      6-Jan	68	1946	Jan-06	69	1946		Same year but "new" record 1*F lower
      9-Jan	62	1946	Jan-09	65	1946		Same year but "new" record 3*F lower
      31-Jan	66	2002	Jan-31	62	1917		"New" record 4*F higher but not in '07 list
      4-Feb	61	1962	Feb-04	66	1946		"New" tied records 5*F lower
      4-Feb	61	1991					
      23-Mar	81	1907	Mar-23	76	1966		"New" record 5*F higher but not in '07 list
      25-Mar	84	1929	Mar-25	85	1945		"New" record 1*F lower
      5-Apr	82	1947	Apr-05	83	1947		"New" tied records 1*F lower
      5-Apr	82	1988					
      6-Apr	83	1929	Apr-06	82	1929		Same year but "new" record 1*F higher
      19-Apr	85	1958	Apr-19	86	1941		"New" tied records 1*F lower
      19-Apr	85	2002					
      16-May	91	1900	May-16	96	1900		Same year but "new" record 5*F lower
      30-May	93	1953	May-30	95	1915		"New" record 2*F lower
      31-Jul	100	1999	Jul-31	96	1954		"New" record 4*F higher but not in '07 list
      11-Aug	96	1926	Aug-11	98	1944		"New" tied records 2*F lower
      11-Aug	96	1944					
      18-Aug	94	1916	Aug-18	96	1940		"New" tied records 2*F lower
      18-Aug	94	1922					
      18-Aug	94	1940					
      23-Sep	90	1941	Sep-23	91	1945		"New" tied records 1*F lower
      23-Sep	90	1945					
      23-Sep	90	1961					
      9-Oct	88	1939	Oct-09	89	1939		Same year but "new" record 1*F lower
      10-Nov	72	1949	Nov-10	71	1998		"New" record 1*F higher but not in '07 list
      12-Nov	75	1849	Nov-12	74	1879		"New" record 1*F higher but not in '07 list
      12-Dec	65	1949	Dec-12	64	1949		Same year but "new" record 1*F higher
      22-Dec	62	1941	Dec-22	63	1941		Same year but "new" record 1*F lower
      29-Dec	64	1984	Dec-29	67	1889		"New" record 3*F lower
      
      • I was testing if preformating from excel would show the formula in a cell or the result (4).
        Also if it would allow html code to be displayed inside the “pre /pre” without being executed.
        It doesn’t.

  5. “Gosh and you were doing so well … PLEASE QUOTE THE EXACT WORDS YOU ARE DISCUSSING!! I will not stand here and be the target of your handwaving specific-free abuse, particularly when coupled with your holier-than-thou attitude. When you do that, there is NO WAY TO RESPOND, because you have not been decent enough to tell me exactly what you think I’ve done.”

    Firstly, I am a big fan of you and am well aware of your voice and gravitas. For your information only, I was nervous to offer an opinion but thought I had couched it enough that it was obvious.

    Clearly your argument is predicated on the assumption that:

    Hansen overpredicted the warming by a factor of three instead of a factor of ten but is that in fact what he did? This is the hotly debated and contested argument in question! You are arguing for something that is not clear. Nothing is clear about Hansen’s “arguments” that allows you such absolutism.

    That is all I have and that is all I meant.

    Willis, I mean’t you no offence.

    I stand corrected and apologise, if it is as you say, that Hansen unaquivacly argued for a warming that was out by a factor of 3.

    However It would seem that, that interpretation depends on the choice of database you make, independent of Hansen’s moral scruples or otherwise!

    My comment was proposed as a question, yet you chose to ignore that fact. You are a very aggressive proponent and for that reason may not have read my words:

    So here we are…Hansen was about right* and Willis was wrong!Is that correct?

  6. “Gosh and you were doing so well … PLEASE QUOTE THE EXACT WORDS YOU ARE DISCUSSING!! I will not stand here and be the target of your handwaving specific-free abuse, particularly when coupled with your holier-than-thou attitude. When you do that, there is NO WAY TO RESPOND, because you have not been decent enough to tell me exactly what you think I’ve done.”

    Firstly, I am a big fan of you and am well aware of your voice and gravitas. For your information only, I was nervous to offer an opinion but thought I had couched it enough that it was obvious.

    Clearly your argument is predicated on the assumption that:

    Hansen overpredicted the warming by a factor of three instead of a factor of ten

    but is that in fact what he did? This is the hotly debated and contested argument in question! You are arguing for something that is not clear. Nothing is clear about Hansen’s “arguments” that allows you such absolutism.

    That is all I have and that is all I meant.

    Willis, I mean’t you no offence.

    I stand corrected and apologise, if it is as you say, that Hansen unaquivacly argued for a warming that was out by a factor of 3.

    However It would seem that, that interpretation depends on the choice of database you make, independent of Hansen’s moral scruples or otherwise!

    My comment was proposed as a question, yet you chose to ignore that fact. You are a very aggressive proponent and for that reason may not have read my words:

    So here we are…Hansen was about right* and Willis was wrong!Is that correct?

  7. “Gosh and you were doing so well … PLEASE QUOTE THE EXACT WORDS YOU ARE DISCUSSING!! I will not stand here and be the target of your handwaving specific-free abuse, particularly when coupled with your holier-than-thou attitude. When you do that, there is NO WAY TO RESPOND, because you have not been decent enough to tell me exactly what you think I’ve done.”

    Firstly, I am a big fan of you and am well aware of your voice and gravitas. For your information only, I was nervous to offer an opinion but thought I had couched it enough that it was obvious.

    Clearly your argument is predicated on the assumption that:

    Hansen overpredicted the warming by a factor of three instead of a factor of ten

    But is that in fact what he did? This is the hotly debated and contested argument in question! You are arguing for something that is not clear. Nothing is clear about Hansen’s “arguments” that allows you such absolutism.

    That is all I have and that is all I meant.

    Willis, I mean’t you no offence.

    I stand corrected and apologise, if it is as you say, that Hansen unaquivacly argued for a warming that was out by a factor of 3.

    However It would seem that, that interpretation depends on the choice of database you make, independent of Hansen’s moral scruples or otherwise!

    My comment was proposed as a question, yet you chose to ignore that fact. You are a very aggressive proponent and for that reason may not have read my words:

    So here we are…Hansen was about right* and Willis was wrong! Is that correct?

    ___________________

  8. “Gosh and you were doing so well … PLEASE QUOTE THE EXACT WORDS YOU ARE DISCUSSING!! I will not stand here and be the target of your handwaving specific-free abuse, particularly when coupled with your holier-than-thou attitude. When you do that, there is NO WAY TO RESPOND, because you have not been decent enough to tell me exactly what you think I’ve done.”

    Firstly, I am a big fan of you and am well aware of your voice and gravitas. For your information only, I was nervous to offer an opinion but thought I had couched it enough that it was obvious.

    Clearly your argument is predicated on the assumption that:

    Hansen overpredicted the warming by a factor of three instead of a factor of ten

    But is that in fact what he did? This is the hotly debated and contested argument in question! You are arguing for something that is not clear. Nothing is clear about Hansen’s “arguments” that allows you such absolutism.

    That is all I have and that is all I meant.

    Willis, I mean’t you no offence.

    I stand corrected and apologise, if it is as you say, that Hansen unaquivacly argued for a warming that was out by a factor of 3.

    However, It would seem that, that interpretation depends on the choice of database you make, independent of Hansen’s moral scruples or otherwise!

    My comment was proposed as a question, yet you chose to ignore that fact. You are a very aggressive proponent and for that reason may not have read my words:

    So here we are… Hansen was about right* and Willis was wrong! Is that correct?

  9. THIS is what I’m saying “further” about….. (what in the world happened to my reply??)

    Re: The overwhelming consensus among scientists who actually study this stuff is that man made climate change is real

    You apparently need to do a bit more reading, Adrian…. if you want to learn the facts about the AGW (Anthropogenic Global Warming) issue.

    You might like to begin here:

    97 Articles Refuting the “97% Consensus”
    http://www.populartechnology.net/2014/12/97-articles-refuting-97-consensus.html

    After you finish reading those, here are some more:

    1350+ Peer-Reviewed Papers Supporting Skeptic Arguments Against ACC/AGW Alarmism
    http://www.populartechnology.net/2009/10/peer-reviewed-papers-supporting.html

    • Just a note: How WEIRD that the above comment (with poptech links, etc.) PUBLISHES HERE, on “Test,” but NOT on the “Caught Redhanded (about Google) thread today. So weird. I tried both a “Reply” post there and a separate comment, not “replying” to A.

  10. It never hurts to visualize the prior:

    prior = function(n, k, p){
      choose(n, k) * p ^ k * (1 - p) ^ (n - k);
    }
    p = seq(0, 1, 0.01);
    plot(p, prior(47 + 53, 47, p), type = "l");
    /pre>
    but in this case it turns out pretty much as we expected
  11. It never hurts to visualize the prior:

    prior = function(n, k, p){
      choose(n, k) * p ^ k * (1 - p) ^ (n - k);
    }
    p = seq(0, 1, 0.01);
    plot(p, prior(47 + 53, 47, p), type = "l");
    

    But in this case it turns out pretty much as we expected.

  12. Damning Incoherence, Fallacy and Paradox but that’s Just the Major Climate Data Products!

    There are two unique problems that separately may not be irreparable but together they, deal a mortal blow to the scientific validity and real-world impact of any analysis based on the major global data products.

    The first issue is essentially a case of the classical ecological fallacy in that conclusions about individual sites are incorrectly assumed to have the same properties as the average of a group of sites.

  13. For Peter Plail (and for me, too :) ):

    Relocating its corporate headquarters and distribution facilities from {CA} to a friendlier location, Farmer Brothers expects to save $15 million a year. Company executives are looking at Dallas and Oklahoma City. The relocation will bear real consequences for California. Nearly 350 workers will lose their well-paying jobs in Los Angeles alone.

    Farmer Brothers is following Toyota, whose U.S. sales and marketing headquarters was barely a mile from the company’s main office, and has gone to Texas. Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems, eBay, Occidental Petroleum and firearms retailer RifleGear followed.

    Nissan bailed to Tennessee.

    Most companies leaving California, reports the Orange County Register, usually depart to Texas, Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, Utah or Florida. A study of business tax climates by the Tax Foundation finds that California’s businesses face the third-highest state and local business tax burdens in America. ….

    California annually ranks last in Chief Executive magazine’s ranking of “Best States / Worst States.”

    (Source: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/feb/17/editorial-businesses-flee-californias-high-taxes-a/ )

    lol — follow the money–> –> –> Capital flows where it finds a way.


    Capital rushing out of California forced into its path by the pressure of the regulatory walls of the California Enviroprofiteers

    ************************************************
    High tech/computer tech and real estate (rentals to rich people, mainly)/finance services will save the day? Heh. Sure. And your high-tech/realtor/finance workers can have a lovely life driving to Nevada looking for a car repairperson, finding schoolteachers, road repair workers, and garbage truck drivers who can afford to live in your state, and doing all your own cooking and cleaning, etc. (those workers can barely afford to live in CA now). You’re going to just put them all on welfare? Better hope a LOT of wealthy people who are willing to pay enormous rents/mortgages move in. The tech industry can only sell so many units…..

    {TWO LINKS WAS TOO MUCH??}

    • Okay. This is the second time in a week that I CAN publish on Test, but the same comment does not publish on the regular thread. I’ll try the regular thread publish one more time.

  14. Moderation on the test page?
    Why are the graphs not showing?

    [Anything with lots of links can get thrown into moderation regardless of where it is posted. -mod]

  15. Australia’s Energy Luck Runs Out

    By David Fickling

    April 9, 2017

    With its abundance of mineral wealth and sun-kissed shores, Australia takes pride in thinking of itself as the “lucky country.”

    That sounds good until you consider the full quote from which the phrase is derived — a warning that this natural endowment was being squandered by the second-rate way the nation is governed.

    Politics lies at the heart of Australia’s current energy paradox: How can one of the world’s largest exporters be having trouble keeping its lights on?

    Clearing Out

    Australian wholesale electricity prices have doubled since the closure of the Hazelwood coal generator was announced

    Australia_01

    […]

    Wholesale electricity prices in Victoria have more than doubled since Nov. 3, when Engie SA announced plans to close its 1.6-gigawatt coal-fired Hazelwood power station. More shocks will follow: About 3.6 GW of coal generation capacity is scheduled for closure at present, rising to 7 GW by 2030 according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

    […]

    Such changes shouldn’t cause this degree of difficulty. The U.S. has shut about 39 GW of coal-fired capacity since the end of 2012 without significant upsets, while the U.K. closed about 8.4 GW in the five years through 2015. Australia ought to be able to handle 1.6 GW dropping off the grid.

    Part of the explanation is different trade dynamics. Thanks to its greater exposure to global export markets, gas in Australia has failed to undercut coal on price in the way it has in the U.S. and U.K.

    Indeed, the country’s LNG plants are so hungry for volumes that they’ve been in direct competition with local generators. Since the closure of Hazelwood was announced, domestic gas prices have reset to match the regional spot LNG market:

    Liquid Market

    Australian natural gas prices have reset above those in the Asian LNG market

    Australia_02

    Rising fuel costs have been so damaging for the economics of gas-fired electricity that the Australian Energy Market Operator expects such generation to decline by about 15 percent between 2016 and 2021.Where coal is being replaced, it’s with renewables: Almost 70 percent of the additional planned capacity in the national electricity market is for wind-power plants, with a further 13 percent going to utility-scale solar.

    It’s worth recognizing that this is good news. Faster withdrawal from fossil fuels is clearly better for the global climate, and the volume of wind and solar set to hit the market means there’s little risk of outright shortages over the next five years or so.

    […]

    One challenge remains. If coal-power retirements accelerate, solar and wind will be unable to fill the gap quickly enough, especially given the way their variability can undermine the stability of the grid. The government’s plans to add 2 GW of hydroelectric capacity in the mountains southwest of Canberra will help, as will battery-storage proposals like the one Tesla Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk has offered for South Australia. They won’t make the problem go away altogether.

    […]

    Bloomberg Gadfly

    Australia’s energy plight is indeed “good news” for both U.S. coal and natural gas producers:

    JAN 31, 2016

    The U.S. and Australian Race to Export Liquefied Natural Gas

    Jude Clemente , CONTRIBUTOR
    I cover oil, gas, power, LNG markets, linking to human development

    Free market economies Australia and the U.S. will be in competition for the export of Liquified Natural Gas (LNG). Since 2010, Australia’s gas demand has increased 10%, but its gas production has increased 35%, compared to an 8% increase for use and 38% gain in production for the U.S. Per BP data, Australia and the U.S. have netted 75% of the 260 Tcf gain in proven global gas reserves since 2005.

    In fact, through 2020, the two countries are expected to account for 90% or more new LNG exports. Overall, the global LNG market is set to increase by 50% between 2015 and 2020, nearly 20 Bcf/day. This year alone will see a 2.6 Bcf/day increase in LNG supply

    Australia could add six new LNG export terminals by 2020, tripling its liquefaction capacity to over 13 Bcf/day. Although Cheniere Energy’s U.S. LNG export facility at Sabine Pass, the first of its kind in the continental U.S., was delayed until late-February or so, the country could be exporting 10 Bcf/day by 2020, almost equaling current global leader Qatar.

    […]

    This year’s expansion of the Panama Canal will up competition in the U.S. to ship LNG to Asia, where over 70% of the world’s LNG is consumed. The U.S. has lower production costs and lower capital costs for new infrastructure, namely liquefaction facilities. Bolstered by the “shale revolution,” for instance, the more difficult Gulf of Mexico now produces just 5% of U.S. natural gas, versus over 25% 20 years ago

     This is in contrast to the expensive offshore gas projects in Australia, now responsible for over 50% of all floating liquefaction capacity under construction. Over 90% of Australia’s traditional gas resources reside in the harder-to-develop North West Shelf offshore.
    Escalating labor costs have been a key factor in Australia’s drastic LNG cost overruns. In Australia, oil and gas workers can make $165,000, 30-35% more than in the U.S. and double the world’s average. One Harvard expert finds that “Australian LNG seems to be the worst business case globally,” with costs range being 2-3 times higher than in the U.S. (see here).

    […]

    Daniel Yergin just said that the Saudi’s “will not destroy the US shale industry…It takes $10bn and five to ten years to launch a deep-water project. It takes $10m and just 20 days to drill for shale.” U.S. gas production is rising by 1.5% per year, three times faster than consumption (projections here).

    Thus, U.S. gas prices will remain lower than in other markets, and arbitrage opportunities for companies to ship LNG will remain. North America’s gas prices are mostly set at liquid trading hubs, more linked to supply and demand fundamentals.

    The key importing nations are not expected to be producing much more gas, so the internationally traded market will increase its current share of 30% of total gas consumed, closer to the 60% of oil demand that is traded internationally. Making gas more of a global commodity like oil, LNG now accounts for about 33% of all traded gas and 10-12% of total gas demand. The LNG market is just another example of the obvious: the world continues to become more connected, not less.

    Screen-Shot-2016-01-25-at-12.47.04-PM1

    […]

    Forbes

    LNG exports will push US natural gas prices up into the range where coal is very competitive with gas in the electricity markets. However, fracking and shale plays will restrain the upside of natural gas prices. Coal power plants in the US are currently running at about 50% utilization rates. Even with the planned retirement of 38 GW of coal-fired capacity by 2050, a 75% utilization rate, driven by only slightly higher natural gas prices will enable 228 GW of coal-fired capacity to generate 30% more electricity (and burn 30% more coal) than 266 GW at a 50% utilization rate.

    So… As someone who makes their living finding oil & natural gas, I say to Australia, “Thanks mates!”

  16. One of the reasons I consider WUWT a worthwhile source of information on climate and energy is due to the appearance of posts such as this one by Mr. Sowell.

    Mr. Sowell, I may not agree with some of your assumptions but I heartily commend you for including them and for explaining the means and methods by which you reach the conclusions that you present.

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