Test

SMPTE color bars – Click for your own test pattern kit

This page is for posters to test comments prior to submitting them to WUWT. Your tests will be deleted in a while, though especially interesting tests, examples, hints, and cool stuff will remain for quite a while longer.

Some things that don’t seem to work any more, or perhaps never did, are kept in Ric Werme’s Guide to WUWT.

Formatting in comments

WordPress does not provide much documentation for the HTML formatting permitted in comments. There are only a few commands that are useful, and a few more that are pretty much useless.

A typical HTML formatting command has the general form of <name>text to be formatted</name>. A common mistake is to forget the end command. Until WordPress gets a preview function, we have to live with it.

N.B. WordPress handles some formatting very differently than web browsers do. A post of mine shows these and less useful commands in action at WUWT.

N.B. You may notice that the underline command, <u>, is missing. WordPress seems to suppress for almost all users, so I’m not including it here. Feel free to try it, don’t expect it to work.

Name Sample Result
b (bold) This is <b>bold</b> text This is bold text
Command strong also does bolding.
i (italics) This is <i>italicized</i> text This is italicized text
Command em (emphasize) also does italics.
a (anchor) See <a href=http://wermenh.com>My home page</a> See My home page
A URL by itself (with a space on either side) is often adequate in WordPress. It will make a link to that URL and display the URL, e.g. See http://wermenh.com.

Some source on the web is presenting anchor commands with other parameters beyond href, e.g. rel=nofollow. In general, use just href=url and don’t forget the text to display to the reader.

blockquote (indent text) My text
<blockquote>quoted text</blockquote>
More of my text
My text

quoted text

More of my text

Quoted text can be many paragraphs long.
WordPress italicizes quoted text (and the <i> command enters normal text).
strike This is <strike>text with strike</strike> This is text with strike
pre (“preformatted” – use for monospace display) <pre>These lines are bracketed<br>with &lt;pre> and &lt;/pre>
These lines are bracketed
with <pre> and </pre>
Preformatted text, generally done right. Use it when you have a table or something else that will look best in monospace. Each space is displayed, something that <code> (next) doesn’t do.
code (use for monospace display) <code>Wordpress handles this very differently</code> WordPress handles this very differently
See https://wattsupwiththat.com/resources/#comment-65319 to see what this really does.

Youtube videos

Using the URL for a YouTube video creates a link like any other URL. However, WordPress accepts the HTML for “embedded” videos. From the YouTube page after the video finishes, click on the “embed” button and it will suggest HTML like:

<iframe width="560" height="315"
        src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/yaBNjTtCxd4"
        frameborder="0" allowfullscreen>
</iframe>

WordPress will convert this into an internal square bracket command, changing the URL and ignoring the dimension. You can use this command yourself, and use its options for dimensions. WordPress converts the above into something like:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yaBNjTtCxd4&w=640&h=480]

Use this form and change the w and h options to suit your interests.

Images in comments

If WordPress thinks a URL refers to an image, it will display the image
instead of creating a link to it. The following rules may be a bit excessive,
but they should work:

  1. The URL must end with .jpg, .gif, or .png. (Maybe others.)
  2. The URL must be the only thing on the line.
  3. This means you don’t use <img>, which WordPress ignores and displays nothing.
  4. This means WordPress controls the image size.
  5. <iframe> doesn’t work either, it just displays a link to the image.

If you have an image whose URL doesn’t end with the right kind of prefix, there may be two options if the url includes attributes, i.e. if it has a question mark followed by attribute=value pairs separated by ampersands.

Often the attributes just provide information to the server about the source of the URL. In that case, you may be able to just delete everything from the question mark to the end.

For some URLs, e.g. many from FaceBook, the attributes provide lookup information to the server and it can’t be deleted. Most servers don’t bother to check for unfamiliar attributes, so try appending “&xxx=foo.jpg”. This will give you a URL with one of the extensions WordPress will accept.

WordPress will usually scale images to fit the horizontal space available for text. One place it doesn’t is in blockquoted text, there it seems to display fullsize and large images overwrite the rightside nav bar text.

Special characters in comments

Those of us who remember acceptance of ASCII-68 (a specification released in 1968) are often not clever enough to figure out all the nuances of today’s international character sets. Besides, most keyboards lack the keys for those characters, and that’s the real problem. Even if you use a non-ASCII but useful character like ° (as in 23°C) some optical character recognition software or cut and paste operation is likely to change it to 23oC or worse, 230C.

Nevertheless, there are very useful characters that are most reliably entered as HTML character entities:

Type this To get Notes
&amp; & Ampersand
&lt; < Less than sign
Left angle bracket
&bull; Bullet
&deg; ° Degree (Use with C and F, but not K (kelvins))
&#8304;
&#185;
&#178;
&#179;
&#8308;

¹
²
³
Superscripts (use 8304, 185, 178-179, 8308-8313 for superscript digits 0-9)
&#8320;
&#8321;
&#8322;
&#8323;



Subscripts (use 8320-8329 for subscript digits 0-9)
&pound; £ British pound
&ntilde; ñ For La Niña & El Niño
&micro; µ Mu, micro
&plusmn; ± Plus or minus
&times; × Times
&divide; ÷ Divide
&ne; Not equals
&nbsp; Like a space, with no special processing (i.e. word wrapping or multiple space discarding)
&gt; > Greater than sign
Right angle bracket
Generally not needed

Various operating systems and applications have mechanisms to let you directly enter character codes. For example, on Microsoft Windows, holding down ALT and typing 248 on the numeric keypad may generate the degree symbol. I may extend the table above to include these some day, but the character entity names are easier to remember, so I recommend them.

Latex markup

WordPress supports Latex. To use it, do something like:

$latex P = e\sigma AT^{4}$     (Stefan-Boltzmann's law)

$latex \mathscr{L}\{f(t)\}=F(s)$

to produce

P = e\sigma AT^{4}     (Stefan-Boltzmann’s law)

\mathscr{L}\{f(t)\}=F(s)

Linking to past comments

Each comment has a URL that links to the start of that comment. This is usually the best way to refer to comment a different post. The URL is “hidden” under the timestamp for that comment. While details vary with operating system and browser, the best way to copy it is to right click on the time stamp near the start of the comment, choose “Copy link location” from the pop-up menu, and paste it into the comment you’re writing. You should see something like https://wattsupwiththat.com/2013/07/15/central-park-in-ushcnv2-5-october-2012-magically-becomes-cooler-in-july-in-the-dust-bowl-years/#comment-1364445.

The “#<label>” at the end of the URL tells a browser where to start the page view. It reads the page from the Web, searches for the label and starts the page view there. As noted above, WordPress will create a link for you, you don’t need to add an <a> command around it.

One way to avoid the moderation queue.

Several keywords doom your comment to the moderation queue. One word, “Anthony,” is caught so that people trying to send a note to Anthony will be intercepted and Anthony should see the message pretty quickly.

If you enter Anthony as An<u>th</u>ony, it appears to not be caught,
so apparently the comparison uses the name with the HTML within it and
sees a mismatch.

136 thoughts on “Test

  1. I just had another thought about underlines.

    I think I discovered that if I could get around the automatic spam trap by writing Anthony with an empty HTML command inside, e.g. Ant<b></b>hony .

    What happens when I try that with underline?

    Apologies in advance to the long-suffering mods, at least one of these comments may get caught by the spam trap.

  2. WordPress only displays images for URLs on their own line and ending with a image file extension. If I delete the attribute string above, i.e. ?token=I7JQbQli1swRgik%2BKnIKAmCk52Y%3D then what’s left should work:

    • Now one that would permit image display:

      Update: Right clicking to get the image’s url gave me a URL that goes through WP’s cache via (slashes replaced by spaces, periods by dashes) i2-wp-com wermenh-com images winter0708 P3020227_snowbank7-jpg

    • Now just the image without a suffix:

      Update: This image uses the same URL as the previous cached image. That means we can’t use a changing suffix to force a trip around the cache any more for HTTP images. I’ll play with HTTPS later.

      • Reply to Ric W ==> Thanks — I was fielding comments on an essay using an unfamiliar tablet, and wasn’t sure which and/or both were part of HTML5. I usually use the old ClimateAudit comment Greasemonkey tool, even though its formatting is funky these days, for the tags. Don’t suppose you could update that add-in?

      • IIRC, Greasemonkey was written for CA, which uses a different theme that does WUWT.

        I don’t have the time to figure out the JavaScript code or whatever it’s written in, and I don’t have the ability to make changes that deep in WUWT.

        Instead of Greasemonkey, I often use https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/its-all-text/ . It can open up an external editor, so it has saved my butt a few times when WP loses a post I was making.

  3. Hey, what happened to the old smiley face?? When I tried to post it, this appeared:

    I wonder if WordPress changed any others?

     ☹ ☻

    The old smiley was more subtle; less in-your-face. The new one is way too garish.

    If WP keeps that up, I’ll just have to use this lame replacement:

    :-)

    Or even worse:

    ;-)

  4. a test to see if images on facebook can be linked without the proper suffix

    [Curious, it worked!– I’ll have to experiment with this some. – Ric]

  5. US EPA are not alone in ignoring fossil fuel benefits. Today, starting with a green NGO report I tried to track back to the primary study showing coal to be as unhealthy as they said. First I tracked it back to another NGO study, which cited a 3rd NGO study (from 2013) which cited the the European Environment Agency who said:

    This report investigates the use of a simplified modelling approach to quantify, in monetary terms, the damage costs caused by emissions of air pollutants from industrial facilities reported to the E-PRTR pollutant register. In using E-PRTR data, this study does not assess whether the emissions of a given facility are consistent with its legal requirements. Nor does it assess the recognised economic and social benefits of industry (such as producing goods and products, and generating employment and tax revenues etc.).

    And they ask why I do not trust experts.

  6. I notice “sustainability” is not listed as a myth but seems to me the foundation myth of green thinking. In fact, I bet the book’s author agrees that sustainability is a goal. If so, who’s sustainability and what sustainability? Perhaps he gets close when talking about the “balance” myth/obsession. Sustainability can be a code for “keep the balance”.

    Modern enviros campaign on specific issues: global warming, pollution, for: organic farming and renewable energy, against: nuclear power and GMOs. Yet these are really proxy issues, every one. Their real concern is a sense that our civilization is unsustainable.
    * “You can’t have infinite growth on a finite planet”
    * “We are using up resources at a rate of 2 earths”

    Hence their religion of sustainability. It’s as much a prophylactic against their fears than a remedy for an unbalanced earth. Sustainability for greens works a bit like political correctness for lefties. A badge of identity. A way to recognize a fellow traveler.

    One example of how sustainability went wrong is biofuels. Greens never batted an eyelid when these measures were enacted. They lobbied for biofuels. Despite large scale biofuel farming being totally unsustainable. A 3-line mantra, each line implying the next, went: Biofuel is renewable. Renewable is sustainable. Sustainable is Good. So they hoodwinked themselves.

    So concerned are they with over-growth and reducing resource use to sustainable proportions, I might think they’d want to put a cap on population. No way, most are lefties too. Any discussion of population a thought crime. Outlawed as eugenic and/or racist. So they place themselves in the absurd position of making a Malthusian argument without daring to mention population. No wonder they are fundamentally incoherent, dizzy, people.

  7. A scholarly study on biofuels.

    <a href=http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10584-016-1764-4

    This analysis evaluates the direct carbon exchanges (both emissions and uptake) between the atmosphere and the U.S. vehicle-fuel system (motor vehicles and the physical supply chain for motor fuels) over 2005–2013. While U.S. biofuel use rose from 0.37 to 1.34 EJ/yr over this period, additional carbon uptake on cropland was enough to offset only 37 % of the biofuel-related biogenic CO2 emissions. This result falsifies the assumption of a full offset made by LCA and other GHG accounting methods that assume biofuel carbon neutrality.

    Once estimates from the literature for process emissions and displacement effects including land-use change are considered, the conclusion is that U.S. biofuel use to date is associated with a net increase rather than a net decrease in CO2 emissions.

  8. A scholarly study on biofuels.

    <ahref=http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10584-016-1764-4

    This analysis evaluates the direct carbon exchanges (both emissions and uptake) between the atmosphere and the U.S. vehicle-fuel system (motor vehicles and the physical supply chain for motor fuels) over 2005–2013. While U.S. biofuel use rose from 0.37 to 1.34 EJ/yr over this period, additional carbon uptake on cropland was enough to offset only 37 % of the biofuel-related biogenic CO2 emissions. This result falsifies the assumption of a full offset made by LCA and other GHG accounting methods that assume biofuel carbon neutrality.

    Once estimates from the literature for process emissions and displacement effects including land-use change are considered, the conclusion is that U.S. biofuel use to date is associated with a net increase rather than a net decrease in CO2 emissions.

  9. Try reading something else apart from GWPF.

    Andrew Gelman blog on misuse of statistics in psychology (but actually in many other places claiming to do science.

    Examples of bad peer review and why it is damaging to researchers

    Most studies, including cancer studies can not be replicated.

    Just 33 issues retraction watch found time to look at this week. Hardly even the tip of the iceberg

    Example: Paper claiming nuclear power supporting countries did worse at reducing GHG. Possibly withdrawn within 3 months, with NO help from journal editor nor ‘peer‘ reviewers. This paper was so obviously rubbish I’m amazed it got past the peer reviewers. I assume they must’ve been asleep when they read it.

  10. The Brexit vote shocked the British establishment, by delivering an enormous mandate to leave campaigners, despite vigorous efforts by remain campaigners to claim Brexit would damage Britain’s commitment to green policies.

    Perhaps part of the Brexit vote was due to ‘Britain’s commitment to green policies‘?

    In USA, the Environmental Protection Agency, EPA, employ NRDC activists to write their latest ‘anti-CO2 pollutionClimate Action Plan, which penalizes, not only current nuclear power plants, but those under construction. A disincentive to low-CO2 electricity.

    Under the proposed formula, if a state closed a 1,000-megawatt nuclear plant and replaced 5.8 percent of it, or 58 megawatts, with carbon-free electricity, it would be deemed to be “carbon neutral.” The state would reach the benchmark even if the other 942 megawatts of power generated came from a carbon-emitting source like natural gas combustion.

    At the UN cancer agency IARC, an NRDC activist was employed to author pseudo-scientific reports classifying glyphosate carcinogenic. Glyphosate is a herbicide which allows less CO2 intensive farming. This UN agency manages to classify literally 99.9%, almost everything it looks as causing cancer. A feat of, near unsurpassed, scientific ignorance.

    … the classification that IARC assigned glyphosate — a “2A, Probably carcinogenic to humans” —is the same classification the organization gave to grapefruit juice, fruits (including apples), and working the night shift.

    The EU itself is rife with green sympathizers. EU even fund greens to lobby it : European Union funding £90m green lobbying con. Just about every green group funded by the EU formally oppose non-CO2 emitting nuclear power.

    Climate activism came from the green movement. Jim Hansen was an anti-nuke, as were many of his ‘ecomodernist‘ allies. I believe the first ever climate model was anti-nuclear war propaganda. In most cases climate activism remains firmly within the anti-nuclear power / anti-GMO / Luddite axis of 350.org / ClimateProgress thinking.

  11. The Brexit vote shocked the British establishment, by delivering an enormous mandate to leave campaigners, despite vigorous efforts by remain campaigners to claim Brexit would damage Britain’s commitment to green policies.

    Perhaps part of the Brexit vote was due to ‘Britain’s commitment to green policies‘?

    In USA, the Environmental Protection Agency, EPA, employ Natural Resources Defense Council, NRDC, activists to write their latest ‘anti-CO₂ pollutionClimate Action Plan, which penalizes, not only current nuclear power plants, but those under construction. A disincentive to low-CO₂ electricity.

    Under the proposed formula, if a state closed a 1,000-megawatt nuclear plant and replaced 5.8 percent of it, or 58 megawatts, with carbon-free electricity, it would be deemed to be “carbon neutral.” The state would reach the benchmark even if the other 942 megawatts of power generated came from a carbon-emitting source like natural gas combustion.

    At the UN cancer agency IARC, an NRDC activist was employed to author pseudo-scientific reports classifying glyphosate carcinogenic. Glyphosate is a herbicide which allows less CO₂ intensive farming. This UN agency manages to classify literally 99.9%, almost everything it looks at, as causing cancer. A feat of, near unsurpassed, scientific ignorance.

    … the classification that IARC assigned glyphosate — a “2A, Probably carcinogenic to humans” —is the same classification the organization gave to grapefruit juice, fruits (including apples), and working the night shift.

    The EU itself is rife with green sympathizers. EU even fund greens to lobby it : European Union funding £90m green lobbying con. Just about every green group funded by the EU formally oppose non-CO₂ emitting nuclear power.

    Climate activism came from the green movement. Jim Hansen was an anti-nuke, as were many of his ‘ecomodernist‘ allies. I believe the first ever climate model was anti-nuclear war propaganda. In most cases climate activism remains firmly within the anti-nuclear power / anti-GMO / Luddite axis of 350.org / ClimateProgress thinking. Greens trusted by the likes of Nick to sort out climate change are still more interested in promoting Luddism.

  12. Sainsbury’s, one of the largest UK supermarket chains, have also signed up for foolish virtue-signalling energy targets. But earlier this year they revealed that they don’t really believe it either: They’ve just built a set of new (fossil-fueled) power plants to avoid disastrous grid failure events.
    https://tallbloke.wordpress.com/2016/05/05/sainsburys-go-diy-on-power-generation/

    When it comes down to reality, i.e. real money and real profits, not imaginary ‘Stern Economics’, all these large “green” corporations only jump one way. They know the truth but are reluctant to publicly admit it in the current scaremongering political environment because they don’t want to attract the ire of the green blob.

  13. Sainsbury’s, one of the largest UK supermarket chains, have also signed up for foolish virtue-signalling energy targets. But earlier this year they revealed that they don’t really believe it either: They’ve just built a set of new (fossil-fueled) power plants to avoid disastrous grid failure events.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/05/04/sainsburys-builds-its-own-power-plants-amid-energy-shortage-fear/
    When it comes down to reality, i.e. real money and real profits, not imaginary ‘Stern Economics’, all these large “green” corporations only jump one way. They know the truth but are reluctant to publicly admit it in the current scaremongering political environment because they don’t want to attract the ire of the green blob.

  14. Janice, I’ve never said you are wasting your time, by the way! ;-)

    “My people suffer from lack of knowledge” is a quote that a like.

    And your god – that made me – would want me speak my truth, wrong or right!

    I’m sorry and in the friendliest way possible, I have to say that the “Beer Tax” trope is just a “trick” of poor logic.
    You are asking me to accept an absurdity! I would not be honest if I did not try to warn that people are being duped by this math myth!

    I should be doing other things, as I’m going OS in a few days for a long time! ;-)

    I don’t have the time to explicate in english a treatment that might make it easier to understand.

    The point you make: “reduce each man’s bill by a higher percentage the poorer he was” is exactly what occurs in very truth!

    My figures below lay it out based on the solution that the “tax” is distributed as a percentage. It should be clear that the poorest did get the largest percentage discount contrary to the muddled headed professor (Who I suspect is a myth as I’ve seen this maths puzzle before!)

    $ Paid % saved $ paid % saved % saved of $20 dollar discount
    1st – 4th 0.00 100%
    5th 1.00 99% 0.80 99.2 % 19.84 %
    6th 3.00 97% 2.40 97.6 % 19.52 %
    7th 7.00 93% 5.60 94.4 % 18.89 %
    8th 12.00 88% 9.60 90.4 % 18.08 %
    9th 18.00 82% 14.40 85.6 % 17.12%
    10th 59.00 41% 47.20 52.8 % 10.56%

    Peace be with you,

    Scott

  15. $ Paid  % saved  $ paid  % saved  % saved of $20 dollar discount
    1st – 4th 0.00 100%
    5th 1.00  99%   0.80  99.2 %  19.84 %
    6th 3.00  97%  2.40  97.6 %  19.52 %
    7th 7.00  93%  5.60  94.4 %  18.89 %
    8th 12.00  88%  9.60  90.4 %  18.08 %
    9th 18.00  82%  14.40  85.6 %  17.12%
    10th 59.00  41%  47.20  52.8 %  10.56%

  16. $ Paid               % saved    $ paid          % saved          % saved of $20 dollar discount
    1st - 4th 0.00    100%
    5th     1.00          99%          0.80            99.2 %            19.84 %
    6th     3.00          97%          2.40            97.6 %            19.52 %
    7th     7.00          93%          5.60            94.4 %            18.89 %
    8th   12.00          88%          9.60            90.4 %            18.08 %
    9th   18.00          82%        14.40            85.6 %            17.12%
    10th  59.00         41%        47.20            52.8 %             10.56%
  17. $ Paid      % saved    $ paid          % saved        % saved of $20
    1st - 4th 0.00    100%
    5th     1.00          99%          0.80            99.2 %            19.84 %
    6th     3.00          97%          2.40            97.6 %            19.52 %
    7th     7.00          93%          5.60            94.4 %            18.89 %
    8th   12.00          88%          9.60            90.4 %            18.08 %
    9th   18.00          82%        14.40            85.6 %            17.12%
    10th  59.00         41%        47.20            52.8 %             10.56%
  18.  #       $ Paid      % saved    $ paid       % saved        % saved of $20
    1st - 4th 0.00    100%
    5th    1.00          99%         0.80            99.2 %            19.84 %
    6th    3.00          97%         2.40            97.6 %            19.52 %
    7th    7.00          93%         5.60            94.4 %            18.89 %
    8th   12.00         88%         9.60            90.4 %            18.08 %
    9th   18.00         82%        14.40           85.6 %            17.12%
    10th  59.00        41%        47.20           52.8 %            10.56%
    
  19. I suggest you publish your important paper on the Journal of the American Statistical Association to show the world your work is accepted by the statistical community

  20. Because obsessing over limits is a natural mindset (as well as naturalistic). An easy trap for pessimists to fall into to. Obsessing over limits leads to the conclusion: there is not enough to go around (A). “We are using resources up at the rate of two earths.“, as they say. Enviros have always been obsessed by resource limits too. The see CO₂ is a kind of limit. They dictate the maximum CO₂ in the air should be 350 ppm.

    (A) Limits obsession explains their: love of renewable energy, phobia of nuclear power (nuclear waste obsession), Malthus.

    PS: They are politically correct Malthusians though. They will not talk about Malthus. They even claim we should open borders. So impractical Malthus as well!. Malthus is implicit in modern environmentalism, not explicit like 45 years ago.

  21. A major mistake in this piece is thinking that the reporter writing the article is correctly interpreting or reporting exactly what Musk said. It is unfair to call a man a liar for things he may not have said — he is not directly quoted. (Someone we know here has a “rule” about this.) There are two quotes in the article, neither of them any where near false — one contains opinions:
    “Electricity,” Musk said, “is just a bonus.”

    “So the basic proposition will be: Would you like a roof that looks better than a normal roof, lasts twice as long, costs less and—by the way—generates electricity?” Musk said. “Why would you get anything else?”

    The comparison to other roofing is NOT to cheap asphalt shingles (whose lifetime is estimated to be 20, not 40, years), but to terracotta and slate. I am willing to give Musk a little leeway, as he is making a sales pitch….

    California and the entire southwest is covered with homes with real or fake Spanish-era red tile roofing, which in some cases is required by building codes or neighborhood covenants. [There are other products that imitate terracotta. ] I lived in a home with red tile roofing in my youth, and we boys were absolutely forbidden to go aloft and risk cracking any of the roofing. Real Mission-style tiles are fragile, when shipped, many in each delivered pallet arrive broken (by my own eye-witness account) , builders take this into account when ordering. Many are broken during installation. some crack after a single season in the sun and have to be replaced, by experts.

    Slate, by the way, does not make terrific roofing. It cracks, then it leaks, it is difficult to repair — it takes an expert to work on a slate roof. I knew men who lived quite well on this fact alone, as their fathers and grandfathers had taught them the slate roofing trade in their early years. Slate roofs are quaint and in some places required by historic preservation laws….otherwise they would be ripped off and modern materials used — I would have done so if I had intended to live a whole life in our slate-roofed home.

    As for Musk’s other endeavors….I stood last year on the edge of the Cape Canaveral Barge Canal and watched as a SpaceX first-stage rocket flew itself back to Earth and landed itself on its tail at Cape Canaveral Air Station, less than a mile from where I was standing with my family. Hardly the result of flim-flam.
    I particularly like this part: “Next, firemen hate rooftop solar for a good reason. Think about having to punch a hole into a roof to get inside when the rest of the house is on fire … you do NOT want to be punching through glass solar panels hooked up to an inverter and a giant battery. In fact, if such a house is on fire, the battery is both a toxic hazard and an explosive hazard, while the roof is a no-go zone …” I guess the author rejects rooftop solar of all kinds (Anthony, take note, your solar installation is a toxic and explosive hazard…)

    I have been a volunteer fireman…and all homes have hazards, particularly garages with cars, gasoline, lawn chemicals and who knows what … solar panels and their batteries/inverters do not add substantially to these risks.

    I have to wonder what all the strong negative emotion is really all about.

  22. Dear Eric,

    WE TRIED THEN to get it featured on WUWT. So, we are left with:

    1. July, 2016 — Pat Frank’s video is published.
    2. August, 2016 — Three WUWT commenters try to get WUWT to feature it.

    3. August, 2016 – November, 2016 — Janice and others post the video trying to get it noticed.

    4. November 22, 2016 — after trying and trying, WUWT tells us, “Sorry. You are too late. That video is too old, now.”

    The content is not time-sensitive. It is still VERY good learning material.

    So, the question remains: why not feature it?

    It looks bad for WUWT to silently refuse to publish such a fine lecture. It APPEARS (not concluding) that a lukewarmist editorial policy intentionally made sure it was not published on WUWT. PLEASE SHOW ME THAT I AM MISTAKEN about that guess.

    Thanks for responding,

    Janice

  23. test

    “It could put us back into the ‘dark ages’ of almost the pre-satellite era,”. “

    That’s a little bit rich, coming from the leader of a cabal who treat global temperature satellite measurements as if they might have been touched by someone with leprosy.

  24. “It could put us back into the ‘dark ages’ of almost the pre-satellite era,” (xx) said. “

    That’s a little bit rich, coming from the leader of a cabal who treat global temperature satellite measurements as if they might have been touched by someone with leprosy.

  25. “It could put us back into the ‘dark ages’ of almost the pre-satellite era,” [K T] said. “

    That’s a little bit rich, coming from the leader of a cabal who treat global temperature satellite measurements as if they might have been touched by someone with leprosy.

  26. “A certain amount of killing has always been an arm of business,” the Baron
    said, “but a line has to be drawn somewhere. Someone must be left to work the
    spice . ” -Baron Vladimir Harkonnen [Dune, Frank Herbert]

  27. “A certain amount of killing has always been an arm of business,” the Baron
    said, “but a line has to be drawn somewhere. Someone must be left to work the spice . ” -Baron Vladimir Harkonnen [Dune, Frank Herbert]

    I see little difference between Fidel Castro and the Baron Vladimir Harkonnen.

  28. IPCC was biased from the very beginning. This is clearly seen in the:
    Report of the second session of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 28June1989.

    Here are some quotes from the opening remarks:

    “In welcoming the delegates to the UNEP (United Nations Environmental Program) Headquarters … The Executive Director of UNEP, hailed the fruitful alliance between WMO (World Meteorological Organization) and UNEP. The firm commitment of prof. Obasi, the Secretary-General of WMO, coupled with the determination of UNEP leadership, has resulted in a partnership which is helping to unify the scientific and policy-making communities of the world to lay the foundation for effective, realistic and equitable action on climate change.”

    “The Executive director stated that the impacts of climate change and global warming would have serious consequences for humanity. In Egypt alone, global warming could flood much of the Nile Delta and Drown 70 centuries of civilization in less than one, and could inundate one fifth of the nations arable land.”

    “It would be desirable for the Panel´s report to be ready by august 1990 for presentation to the Second World Climate Conference and to the United Nations General Assembly. It should be born in mind that both the governing council of UNEP and the executive Council of WMO expected the first report of IPCC to form the basis for international negotiations on a global convention on climate change. The report can also play a valuable guiding role for the large number of conferences, meetings and symposia on climate change being held all over the world. For all of these reasons, the report should be completed in good time.”

    “The issuance of the report would only be the beginning of a far more arduous task. To tackle the problem of climate warming effectively, radical changes would be necessary in international relations, trade, technology transfer, and bilateral and multilateral strategies. The panel´s continued work would be the only guarantee of the concerted response to the global threat of climate change”

    “In his opening remarks , Prof. Bolin said that the primary objective of IPCC, in making its first assessment, is to produce a document which could provide guidelines for the formulation of global policy and which would enable the nations of the world to contribute to this task”

    “IPCC´s first report will contain the 20-page summaries for policy-makers to be produced by the working groups and an overall integrated summary of these placed in perspective. Professor Bolin suggested that the integrated summary be written by a drafting group consisting of the officers of IPCC and the chairmen of the Working Groups. He asked that this plan of his be enforced by the panel.”

    “The panel invited interested UN organizations, regional or global intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations and private institutions that wish to to contribute in the matter, to collaborate with appropriate analyses. …. The panel invited the contribution from these organizations in order that its own work may be improved.”

    Imagine the pressure to conform with the prejudice of the leaders. Imagine beeing the one saying: Hold on a moment, how do we know for sure that ….?

  29. Table 2: Measured Greenhouse Fluxes at the
    Earth’s Surface
    Greenhouse Gas Emission Band (cm-1) Measured Simulated
    Flux (W/m2) Flux (W/m2)

    CFC11 830 – 860 0.14 0.12
    CFC12 900 – 940 0.12 0.11
    CFC12 all bands 0.28 0.26
    CFC11 & 12 all bands 0.42 0.38
    CCl4 786 – 806 0.046 0.039
    CFC113 800 – 830 NA 0.033
    HCFC22 780 – 830 NA 0.031
    HNO3 850 – 920 0.085 0.060
    N2O all bands 1.06 0.99
    CH4 1200 – 1400 0.85 0.80
    CO 2000 – 2200 0.032 0.033
    CO2 all bands 26.0 24.8
    O3 950 – 1100 3.26 3.20
    Trop. O3 950 – 1100 0.61 0.58

  30. Graph details of recordings 11/19/16

    Yellow is what I consider “Sun Brightness”. Would prefer to call it irradiance. It occurs every day (except when it is cloudy) and peaks at 9:00 AM.

    Orange is labeled “insolation” which is the sun energy as seen from the Earth surface (my yard).

    My sensors are just run-of-the-mill deer feeder 12v solar panels modified for my use. The other sensors are used to segment the recordings between AM and PM in order to better see the different aspects of the sun as it passes overhead.

    The study began in December 2013. It is still evolving.

  31. Yep, that is why I am testing. I have not set up my camera yet but this picture is at least a little better.

    It shows brightness along with the segmented views of two sensors facing east and west.

    And thanks Anthony and all your moderators, and you too Janice

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