Fly your flag

Update: Ed makes us see stars. See below the “continue reading” line.

I slept so late today recovering from my jet lag I almost forgot to place my flag outside.

Flying to Australia and traversing the country, gives me an appreciation for liberty no matter what hemisphere you reside in. Aussies have made many contributions to freedom, such as I witnessed with this WWI war memorial in Emerald, QLD:

There is also a WWII memorial just to the right of the photo. Aussies have been side by side with the USA in every world conflict. They are owed thanks on this day as well.

As the founders of our country declared in this document:

File:Us declaration independence.jpg

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

The Declaration justified the independence of the United States by listing colonial grievances against King George III, and by asserting certain natural rights, including a right of revolution.

Like with the colonists, with this blog,  the readers, and the publications, I often assert my right of revolution against unreasonable acts of taxation, such as Kerry’s cap and trade bill.

Today, once again Ed Darrell and I are in agreement, and I particularly like the flag on the moon he chose. It is depressing that President Obama has proposed killing the next step in the manned space program, Aries.

So today, take a cue from myself and Ed, no matter whether you are a free market optimist or a tax happy sourpuss, fly your flag. Later today, I’m going to pursue some life, liberty, and happiness, you should too.

UPDATE: Speaking of Ed Darrell and Australians, perhaps some of our readers “down under” might like to educate Ed as to what the 5 stars mean in the logo for the AU Climate Skeptics Party.

I laughed out loud when I read this from Ed’s blog. Not only does he misappropriate the source of the logo, even though all he had to do was click the image on WUWT, he also seems to have no clue as to the reference to why the stars of the “southern cross” is a symbol of Australia. After learning about it with the help of some WUWT commenters, perhaps he’ll make a lesson plan of it for his students.

http://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/prod/web/common.nsf/0/4ef510b6234ba424ca256ea100144428/$FILE/STG48556/STG48556.gif?OpenElement

From Ed’s blog:

==================================

That may explain why Anthony Watts’ logo for his Australian tour shows a kangaroo whose rear end has just been kicked (you can tell by the stars).

Climate skeptics butt-kicked in Australia logoIn cartoons, stars show where a character has been punched or kicked, right?

No agreement to control greenhouse gases came out of the Copenhagen conference last fall.  So-called climate skeptics patted each other on the back, claimed victory, and proceeded to send Christopher Monckton on his Bonnie Lies All Around the World Tour.  In cool light of morning, however, the facts can’t be silenced:  Warming continues, science shows the extremely high probability that humans cause it, official investigations show that climate scientists who had their e-mails stolen were victims of crime, not perpetrators, and climate skeptics failed to stop warming with their big-dollar, nice-banquet meetings with the Heartland Institute, or anywhere else.

If they are skeptics, they are pretty bad at it, falling like chumps for a story that fourth-grade science project made the case they have failed to make everywhere else, and for the story that one of their comrades was sent a bomb in the mail (it turned out to be a misdirected fuel filter).

No wonder Americans remain concerned about warming.

=======================================

The Southern Cross stars with a boxing kangaroo is a common design in Australia. This car decal for example:

http://beaututes.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=153&products_id=934

or this t-shirt

http://www.gooses.com.au/categories.asp?cID=32&c=55834

or this flag:

http://www.1uptravel.com/flag/flags/au-kang.html

BTW here’s the update on the bomb scare story, it also fooled a journalist and a terrorism expert. In fact, suspicious packages are cause for alarm every day around the world, and often get misidentified (and often blown up) by professional people erring on the side of caution. Here’s a few examples:  1 2 3 4 5 and even in Ed’s home state of Texas they react to suspicious packages the same way. It’s hard to be skeptical when you risk life and limb to find out. Sheesh Ed.

Heh, “big dollar nice banquet meeting”. The once a year meeting not using a dime of taxpayer money, totally privately funded, and yes, no big oil either. I guess he’s still sore for not getting invited to the IPCC meeting in Bali. Ed’s a slippery sort of bloke, so he’ll probably try to claim post facto that it was humor, or that we misinterpreted his reference to the 5 stars. Give him no quarter.

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114 thoughts on “Fly your flag

  1. I will take this opportunity to wish the greatest nation this world has ever known a most happy birthday! I stand at attention, and raise my hand in salute to a brave and fierce nation. Be proud of what you have my American cousins. You are the shining beacon of liberty, justice and freedom. God bless The United States of America!

  2. I’m a bit surprised that you should indicate that Australians don’t enjoy liberty though.
    REPLY: I don’t know how you found that interpretation. Not the intent at all. I added a sentence and pix to make it clearer. -A

  3. Happiness and prosperity to all our American cousins and confusion to our joint enemies both internal and external. God bless America!

  4. I used to fly the American flag on holidays like today. But ever since the wake-up call that came on 9/11/01 I’ve flown it 24/7/365.
    I’m on my 4th flag since 2001. My favorites are the original star spangled banner with 15 stars — the stars really stand out; and the Betsy Ross. The old 48 star flag is also a favorite.
    I looked for the 57 star Obama flag but can’t seem to locate one. Maybe this is what he has in mind.☺
    I like cotton flags because of the way they hang. But cotton tends to fade faster. And it’s legit to fly any former U.S. flag.

  5. If you wondered why Australians are less inclined to fly our flag: We have no tradition of doing it. When I grew up it was illegal to do so without official permission.

  6. Of the countries I have visited and lived in, it’s only the USA whose flag is widely flown by its own citizens.

  7. Enjoy the Day and God bless the United States. America was the birthplace of freedom, and brought it to places where it was lost or endangered, like in my country Germany, which would be “quite different” without you. Thanks & keep it up!

  8. Martin A,
    It’s also the only country established with a binding legal document following a Declaration of Independence.
    It’s pretty sad that countries like the UK have made flying a proud national flag against the law because it’s considered ‘racist.’

  9. I live in Utah County, Utah at the base of a mountain named Timpanogos which is reflected in the name of Ed Derrell’s blog URL. So I might have run into him somewhere along the line without knowing it. A picture of the mountain is at this link:
    http://www.crockettclan.org/running/3Timp2.html
    Here in Utah Valley below that mountain, many people display flags, and it is a popular Boy Scout fundraising method to plant flags on all holidays. In my particular neighborhood everybody does this, so you see flag after flag after flag.
    My favorite grocery store, Macy’s at the intersection of 800 North and State Street has a giant flag in front, and that flag has a fun story to go with it. They had requested permission from Orem City (I live there) to have an oversize flagpole. Permission was granted, but suddenly the City backed out of it and the public reaction was intense. The flag was reapproved, and every time I drive by it, I appreciate what it took to have it there.

  10. @INGSOC
    Maybe you should travel a bit more around to see rest of the world?
    USA is not the only country who enjoys freedoms.
    I find it quite arrogant when people shout about how it is the best nation in the world and act like USA is the only free country with democracy.

  11. Slightly off toic but Aries needed to be scrapped. It was so over budget its just a money pit. Let Space X do our heavy lifting for far less money. The big Falcon 9 of Space X wasdeveloped and built and successfully luanced for less money that the Aries launch tower cost!!

  12. From New Hampshire, the “Live Free or Die” state – out state constitution starts with a Bill of Rights, and article 10 says:
    http://www.nh.gov/constitution/billofrights.html
    [Art.] 10. [Right of Revolution.] Government being instituted for the common benefit, protection, and security, of the whole community, and not for the private interest or emolument of any one man, family, or class of men; therefore, whenever the ends of government are perverted, and public liberty manifestly endangered, and all other means of redress are ineffectual, the people may, and of right ought to reform the old, or establish a new government. The doctrine of nonresistance against arbitrary power, and oppression, is absurd, slavish, and destructive of the good and happiness of mankind.
    June 2, 1784
    Hasn’t had to be modified in 226 years.

  13. tommy says:
    July 4, 2010 at 2:11 pm
    “[…]I find it quite arrogant when people shout about how it is the best nation in the world and act like USA is the only free country with democracy.”
    Well, they exported it to quite a lot of places already.

  14. An English man’s home used to be his castle. Nowadays there are rules and regulations covering everything we can and can’t do – mostly EU regulations but also petty UK bureaucracy. Everything has be PC – except Top Gear. Thank goodness for the likes of Jermy Clarkson and Christopher Booker.

  15. During my 20 years in the US Navy, I learned the criteria for trustworthy allies: English as a first language; contact sports; beer as the national drink. The Aussies are three for three.
    For those wanting to learn more about Old Glory, check out Peter Keim’s (fellow Texan and friend) excellent book “A Grand Old Flag: A History of the United States Through Its Flags.”

  16. Although I’m from Scotland, I also celebrate the 4th July as it happens to be my birthday 😀
    One of these days I would love to emigrate to the USA. For now though, Happy Independence Day!

  17. Tommy, “I find it quite arrogant when people shout about how it is the best nation in the world and act like USA is the only free country with democracy.”
    Come on brother, it’s Independence Day for goodness sake. Nothing wrong, nor arrogant, about a little flag waving on the 4th. Lighten up.

  18. That sunset (or was it sunrise?) brings back memories of my travels “downunder”
    From Ed’s blog: “official investigations show that climate scientists who had their e-mails stolen were victims of crime” – Interesting, I haven’t heard that the police have completed their investigation yet….

  19. Thanks (Smokey & stevengoddard)
    I am also on my fourth flag. They have been proudly displayed on my porch 24/7/365 since 9/11/2001..
    “Least we never forget”

  20. Martin A wrote: “Of the countries I have visited and lived in, it’s only the USA whose flag is widely flown by its own citizens.”
    Martin, this used to be true. When I was a kid back in the 40s and 50s, we were amazed at how many people flew a flag as we drove through New England and NY between New Brunswick and Ontario (then the best route). However, since we (Canadians) finally got our own flag, many people fly it at their homes. I wouldn’t want to compare how many in the USA vs Canada, for it would prove nothing, but the number of Canadian flags is quite appreciable.
    Americans have much to be proud of, and that’s enough for a good celebration
    IanM

  21. You are the shining beacon of liberty, justice and freedom.
    We couldn’t do it without you guys. As Tony Blair said, when sending troops to fight at our side for freedom, “Doing nothing IS doing something.” Fortunately for the world, you guys continue to do the something that is not nothing.

  22. tommy says:
    July 4, 2010 at 2:11 pm
    Ahhh, Tommy, you must be new here. INGSOC is not an American. I lived half my life abroad and would be quite happy to discuss, from first hand experience, why American democracy is something to be proud of, even in these contentiuous times. It is fashionable to denigrate the idea of American Exceptionalism as some kind of jingoist fad, but the truth is that here in America we have built on a millenium of humanism and individualism from all over the world to build a society that believes in both achievement and compassion; believes in the importance of public service and sacrifice while safeguarding individual liberty and freedom of expression. We may not be perfect, and other nations have contributed mightily, but I defy anyone to show me who’s done it better.

  23. White collar environmentalist flashin’ down the street
    Pointin’ their plastic finger at me
    They’re hopin’ soon my kind will drop and die
    But I’m gonna wave my free flag high!

  24. heartening to hear parts of the globe chirp up.
    thanks to all the non Americans for expressing support.
    Wishing all the best and success to all.
    cheers.

  25. I have traveled to and worked in many, many countries in the world. Some countries had some degree of the freedom and liberties as does the USA, but most do not. Just try criticizing the government or its leaders, or staging a protest, in quite a few countries. Try getting into trouble with the law, and see if the USA’s legal system would not be a welcome relief. The USA has the right to a speedy trial by an impartial jury of your peers, right to an attorney, right to remain silent when arrested, right to call witnesses on your own behalf, right to confront witnesses against you, right to see ALL the evidence against you, right to not self-incriminate, right to an appeal, right to exclude hearsay evidence, right not to be subjected to cruel and unusual punishment, right to not be tried twice for the same crime (double jeopardy), just to name a few.
    Additional rights spelled out in the Bill of Rights are not available to many countries in the world, either. I have in mind Free Press, Free Speech, Free Exercise of Religion, and others.

  26. Anthony, that bit about the stars indicating the kangaroo had been kicked – it was a joke, wasn’t it? … Otherwise it was equivalent to a sign on the fellow’s a** saying ‘Kick Me’.
    Unfortunately anti-Americanism is rather common here in Australia these days. This partly reflects post-Vietnam angst, sometimes personal clashes between American forthrightness and Australian she’ll-be-right easy-going ways. But it is also fed ironically by self-hating Americans like Michael Moore, Chomsky and Hollywood scriptwriters who put in more conspiracy theories than McCarthy. Australian Yank-bashers have typically never heard of the Marshall Plan, one of the most enlightened and generous political policies ever – whoever else in history gave the likes of conquered fascist countries like Germany and Japan a fortune to peacefully rebuild? Yank-bashers here also don’t appreciate the difficulty America has as world superpower – she is expected to fix everybody’s problems and by politically correct methods. Australia is just starting to get some inkling of this through increasing demands on us to fix everybody’s problems just in our own region – East Timor, New Guinea, the Solomons, etc.

  27. Hu McCulloch says:
    July 4, 2010 at 2:42 pm
    What’s the big star under the Union Jack? Alpha Centauri?

    It’s the Commonwealth Star

  28. From Ed’s blog:
    “In cartoons, stars show where a character has been punched or kicked, right?”
    ==============================
    Somebody has been watching too many cartoons.
    Play time is over.
    How old are you?

  29. Today, once again Ed Darrell and I are in agreement, and I particularly like the flag on the moon he chose. It is depressing that President Obama has proposed killing the next step in the manned space program, Aries.
    Anthony, this is not one to pin on Obama. President Bush and his head of OSTP Dr. John Marburger came out with the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) that was focused on the economic development of the solar system. Dr. Marburger’s speech at the Goddard Memorial Dinner in March of 2006 was probably the best exposition of the reasons that we are going to economically develop the solar system that has been written since the 1950’s by a government official.
    However, in implementation, the NASA administrator, Dr. Mike Griffin perverted the VSE into the ESAS architecture, which was nothing more than a plan to build the biggest rocket possible with little thought about the actual implementation of an overall development plan. Dr. Griffin’s plan was never ever viable as the guidance from the White House and congress were immediately violated and all that he could ever do is whine that the government was underfunding his plan.
    The new Obama plan, which is called the flexible path, is not perfect as he was badly advised by Dr. Buzz Aldrin that we had “been there and done that” and that Mars is the goal, without however, providing the funding to do it.
    We will see what happens but please let me be clear that the Griffin ESAS plan that NASA was embarked upon (of which the Ares 1 and Ares 5 are the rocks), was not sustainable, was technically nearly unworkable, and would have left us in a worse position down the road. It was the right thing to do to cancel it now. What remains is to make sure that what comes next is workable.

  30. Hugh,
    The large star under the Union Jack is the Federation Star, which has points for each of the states that were joined at Federation into the independent country of Australia, and one point for all the territories – both on the mainland and overseas. See http://flagspot.net/flags/au.html .

  31. To the very fortunate Citizens of the United States of America I offer my heartiest congratulations. You can still fly your own flag on your own soil. We in England cannot fly either the flag of St. George or the Union Standard lest we “offend” our ubiquitous “minorities”.
    13 years of Socialist government has crippled this country and our new ConDem coalition government is doing nothing to support any overt display of patriotism, such as the simple display of the national flag.
    You in the USA are truly the last bastion of freedom. Guard this responsibility very carefully. Our Freedom in the United Kingdom was stolen from us by devious stealth. We are now ruled from Brussels, not by our own elected Parliament.
    Please don’t let the same thing happen to you.

  32. Ric Werme says:
    July 4, 2010 at 2:19 pm
    From New Hampshire, the “Live Free or Die” state – out state constitution starts with a Bill of Rights, and article 10 says:
    _______________________________________
    I lived in NH for many years and commuted to work in MA because I just could not stomach living in the Peoples Republic of Taxachusetts.

  33. tallbloke says:
    July 4, 2010 at 3:25 pm
    White collar environmentalist flashin’ down the street
    Pointin’ their plastic finger at me
    They’re hopin’ soon my kind will drop and die
    But I’m gonna wave my free flag high!
    ___________________________________________________
    That is the best poem I have seen on WUWT yet. May we continue to fly “Old Glory” proudly in the years to come.

  34. Hu McCulloch:
    The big 7 pointed star represents our 6 states and and the territories (NT & ACT) of Oz. There doesn’t seem to be any move to add a point to the star, although there’s quite a strong movement to change the flag to something less Union Jackish. We use the boxing kangaroo in green and yellow a lot but it doesn’t quite work for a solemn flag.
    Happy 4th everyone!

  35. Hu McCulloch; The big star under the Union Jack on the Aussie flag is the ‘Federation Star’ (not one that you will find in the sky!) One point for each of the six states, and one point for the territories. There is lots of noise about changing the flag – the Union Jack apparently means, in small minded minds, that we are subsevient to GB. To most of us (probably – I haven’t done a survey) it is significant of the nation’s cultural and political history and heritage.

  36. To Hu McCulloch:
    “What’s the big star under the Union Jack? Alpha Centauri?”
    The big star is the star of federation. Australia is a federation of states, each of which was an independent colony prior to federation in 1901. Each point on the star represents one of the states (“Western Australia, South Australia, Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania), and one point is left over for the “territories” (Northern Territory and the Australian Capital Territory).
    The other stars are the Southern Cross, which is a constellation (near Alpha and Beta Centauri) that hangs forever in the sky overhead.

  37. With regard to your photo of the WW1 memorial, one of the reasons why so many Aussies answered the call to the colours in 1914 was the ‘unprecedented’ drought across large parts of Australia at the time, which forced large numbers off the land.
    Another ‘climate’ event that has been airbrushed out of history.
    Respect.

  38. Thanks god you are back…the sun was waiting for you too, just for the “watts effect”, it is suffering a kind of jet lag too: it almost produced a cycle 25 spot!
    And…about us: During your trip we have suffered from “friendly fire”, really “friendly ice” from ice fan Steve.

  39. Re:
    Hu McCulloch says:
    July 4, 2010 at 2:42 pm
    What’s the big star under the Union Jack? Alpha Centauri?
    No. That star is called the Federation Star. It is not a literal star in the sense of the 5 stars that make up the Southern Cross. Australia became a Fully Self Governing Federation of States on 1/1/1901.
    The Federation star was drawn with 7 points to represent the (at the time) 6 states and Territories that were part of the Federation, ie 6 points for the 6 states and 1 point for all the territories).
    The Southern Cross has long been a symbol of Australia. It is referred to as “The Bushman’s Guide” as the axis of the longer part of the cross points South and so was a guide for navigation on land.
    A stylised version of the Southern Cross was flown at Ballarat in Victoria in December 1854 during the rebellion known as the Eureka Stockade, where gold miners were protesting about unjust practices. Qute below.
    “The Eureka rebellion, which is often referred to as the ‘Eureka Stockade’, is a key event in the development of Australian democracy and Australian identity, with some people arguing that ‘Australian democracy was born at Eureka’ (Clive Evatt). In addition, the principles of mateship, seen to be adapted by the gold diggers, and the term ‘digger’ was later adopted by the ANZAC soldiers in World War I.
    The rebellion came about because the goldfield workers (known as ‘diggers’) opposed the government miners’ licences. The licences were a simple way for the government to tax the diggers. Licence fees had to be paid regardless of whether a digger’s claim resulted in any gold. Less successful diggers found it difficult to pay their licence fees”
    Many people consider the original Eureka Flag to be the true flag of the birth of Australia.

  40. Happy Independence (and Freedom) Day to all, no matter your home country.
    and thanks for the reminder – I need to go out and take down the flag – do not have light on it for night viewing, yet.
    Oh, and to Ed – Happy 5th.

  41. tommy says:
    July 4, 2010 at 2:11 pm
    “@INGSOC
    Maybe you should travel a bit more around to see rest of the world?
    USA is not the only country who enjoys freedoms.”
    I have travelled around the world. There is a reason so many wish to immigrate to America. Freedom is her foundation. Appreciating this does not denigrate others who seek the same. God Bless America, and all those who chose her same path.

  42. Always honor Independence Day by taking down my Canadian Red Ensign and putting up Ole Glory. I’m out of town with the family, visiting Drumheller, Alberta this week, but made sure to put up the Stars and Stripes before I left on Friday.
    Best wishes to my American peers south of the 49th.
    God Bless America.

  43. The Aussies saw the good sense of staying with the British way of life:
    1. Cricket, skillful and dignified, compared with baseball, where the ability to spit appears to be of paramount importance.
    2. Driving on the left hand side of the road, essential if you are right handed and want to smite a right handed enemy coming towards you.
    3. Drinking tea, gentile and aromatic, compared with the muck which is called coffee south of the Canadian border.
    Revolutions rarely work out well: look at Cuba, Russia, Iran, Spain and America.
    Just imagine what America would be like now if it had stayed within the British Empire.

  44. The first shot from British Imperial forces in WW1 was fired by the Royal Australian Navy in Melbourne harbour, 11 minutes after the Empire declared war in Germany.
    (A German merchant ship tried to make a run for it to avoid internment)
    “Aussies have been side by side with the USA in every world conflict.”
    As the USA is usually late in joining in scraps while the Aussies have their boots on and bayonets fixed whenever the call goes out, shouldn’t that more correctly read the:”Yanks have been side by side with the Aussies (and the rest of us ) in every world conflict”…… 😉
    Ironic that every other major British colony, (Canada, Oz etc) managed to achieve political independence without anyone being hurt and nothing getting broken…
    Yeah ok, George III was a bad’un and mad as a box of frogs. There is a saying here in Blighty, that at every time of crisis throughout British history, a charismatic giant of political and diplomatic talent and/or military genius has always emerged to save the day from the actions of idiots- except in the late 18th century and America was lost as a result.
    Happy birthday USA- you couldnt have doen it without us. 🙂

  45. Tommy,
    With all due respect…
    America has many problems.
    However the nice nations and other places of freedoms? Don’t dare for a second remember who has always been at the fight of freedom for the other nations of the world.
    There have been at least occasions in World history where if it was not for those arrogant, live free and die Americans… whatever nation you live in would probably be under Communist, Nazi, or Chinese control.
    Maybe while we enjoy our long, hard, bloody battles of freedom, which founded our nation, you could show a little respect please.
    Thank you!

  46. “[…]I find it quite arrogant when people shout about how it is the best nation in the world and act like USA is the only free country with democracy.”
    Well, they exported it to quite a lot of places already.
    Actually, no, they haven’t. Don’t believe me? Name them! Name places that are only democracies because of the US.
    Japan. Iraq. Erm …
    I’m not bagging the US here. Quite a few countries owe their freedom in large part due to the USA. Much of western Europe, some of Latin America, most of the Pacific, Taiwan, South Korea. A case can even be made for eastern Europe. It’s a record that does the US credit.
    But the exporting of democracy has proved to be largely futile.

  47. Yes Peter,
    Just look at where America would be if we’d stayed a British Commonwealth
    1. most likely 90% of the inventions that came from American individualism would never have been invented and we’d still be riding in the horse and buggy relying on cow manure for heat and light.
    2. We’d still be living under the tyranical control of the British Government only now since they’ve turned the reins to the EU, we’d be at the mercy of the EU and whatever socialist agenda they are pushing at the moment.
    3. We’d still be living in Ignorance of freedom and still be in a Pre-Industrial nation
    4. We’d be living in even more of a corrupt justice system as is evidenced by the white washing of Phile Jones.
    5. We could look forward to Prince Charles as the next fake leader of our nation
    6. We could look forward to being even more bankrupt than we are now.
    7. we could be driving some of the ugliest cars ever made
    8. we could be playing games of rugby,soccer, and cricket that make no sense whatsoever
    9. we could have even more Muslims in our country causing problems than we have already
    10. We never would have known and tasted freedom and be able to hold our heads up high and say we live in a might nation that was once a really special thing, until we let the British bankers and the socialists screw it up.
    Hmmm no I think I’ll go with a non revisionist view of history and say GOD BLESS AMERICA, LAND OF THE FREE AND HOME OF THE BRAVE AND HAVE A BLESSED 4th of July!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    (sorry CTM and Anthony, but the last few weeks of people ripping our country to shreds and trying to destroy it have made me a bit sensitive to stupid comments snip me if you must but I believe our country is a great country, full of mistakes and bad people but far more good than bad)

  48. The problem is how does one define “freedom” and “democracy”
    We know whar these concepts mean to ourselves, but they can and do have different meanings to others.

  49. So I don’t sound like I hate Britain or poeple from GB, I will apologize for going off on Peter.
    Despite the fact that I’m currently very angry with our current administration and congress and senate. I still love this country very much and I would die defending her.
    And your words on this day of American Independance seemed more than a little insenitive and obnoxious to me but I have to be a little strong and let the bad in with the good.,
    England has stood beside us far more than other Eurpopean nations and they have some good beer.
    So here’s a Pint raised to Peter and everyone else on the other side of the big pool known as the Atlantic.
    Hoorah —-

  50. I guess also the fact that I’ve been unemployed for almost two years now and the senate and congress playing ping pong with benefits pisses me off.
    I would love to be able to find another IT job, it’s not for being lazy. I’m even applying at Walmart, Jackinthebox and taco bell and shudderrrrrrrrrrrr Mcdonalds.

  51. To our American friends
    Fly your flag proudly and be defiant to those that would seek to drag it down or, reduce it’s significance as a symbol of hope to the oppressed, its ability to rally the hearts and minds of Americans and focus on the good that can and will be done under that flag.
    Be in peace with yourselves, sure of your purpose and rightly proud to fly the flag as often as you wish and in deference to no one, except you and your country and let no man tear it down!
    Here in Australia, it is a curious mixed pride that is not well understood by outsiders or some of our newer inhabitants, nor by our aboriginals who were settlers themselves in this country (and that fact is little understood or publicized!) and wish to fly their own flag! and other immigrants who don’t quite understand how older Australians can revere a flag that has a Union Jack in pride of place and its representation of unity and strength in a common purpose as our ancestors fought and died for the freedom of the world and the united stance of the country.
    We are no man’s lackey and proud of our heritage, but suffer sometimes with a cultural cringe, except in sport, where the boxing Kangaroo has become a defacto rallying symbol (embraced and accepted across the wider Australian Community) and the larrikan image and defiance to authority is recognised by the Southern Cross, central to the miner’s flag of defiance raised at the Eureka stockade.
    We fly our flags more in our hearts than in public display and envy your united freedom and desire to personally recognise your own proud flag – fly it proudly and as often as you see fit.

  52. Peter Miller wrote: “Just imagine what America would be like now if it had stayed within the British Empire.”
    Yeah! We could throw tomatoes and other fruits & veggies at John Kerry & Joe Liebertard and not be thrown in jail!

  53. We are having a July 4 washout in Colorado. Flash floods and cold.
    [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WANTWvZWOxk]
    Nearly froze shooting off fireworks in Wyoming last night. Must be due to global warming.

  54. Anthony
    It’s great to see Americans proudly revering their country and displaying their flag. Keep it up. We New Zealanders are reticent in showing such pride and emotion and as for our flag – all we ever do here is argue about changing it. Its as though we are suffering from an identity crisis.
    BTW you site is brilliant – I read it every day – congratulations for your tireless work.
    Doug

  55. Anybody remember Emperor Norton?
    I pledge obedience to the flag,
    of the United States of America,
    and to the Corporations for which it stands…
    one nation, uninformed, in denial, with liberty and justice
    forsaken, forbidden, and forgotten.”
    Joshua A. Norton 1819-1880
    Amazing how what goes around comes back around. Like Apathy
    I’m still waiting for the return of demanding a responsible government.

  56. Happy Birthday America.
    Remember that at least some of the sour grapes from this side of the channel is due to the inescapable conclusion that you owe us 200+ years of back taxes!
    Only joking.
    As for the few voices lamenting the difficulty in flying the Union flag or the cross of St George, I have never read such utter toss. I regularly fly the flag of St George as do my neighbours – indeed, during the late lamented and abortive World Cup campaign half the cars in England carried little flags in support of our “tired” players. To be honest, I get quite annoyed with that sort of self pitying denial of reality, you have a perfect right to fly a national flag in any part of the UK, no ifs no buts.

  57. Brad aka 1personofdifference:
    #11: Every bathroom washbowl would have two spigots instead of one, forcing the use of a dirty bowl to get warm water.
    Smokey: “I used to fly the American flag on holidays like today. But ever since the wake-up call that came on 9/11/01 I’ve flown it 24/7/365.”
    Same here. I actually had one up that day and still have it stored away and labeled. Maybe someday my grandkids will find it, who knows. I shudder every time I think about how easily this could all be taken away if people don’t wake up. The road to serfdom is an easy one. The road to freedom is not.
    “Government is not reason; it is not eloquence,” George Washington presciently warned. “It is force. And force, like fire, is a dangerous servant and a fearful master.”

  58. The exporting of Democracy by the United States of America would be totally futile I agree.
    Mainly because we are a Constitutional Republic but what’s a little government and historical accuracy amongst friends eh what?

  59. And let’s not forget that while Bush wasn’t 100% innocent in his Presidency, the day our forces invaded Baghdad there were a number of Iraqi people, all former soldiers or advisors, who were found hanging from meat hooks in the torture room across the street from the palace.
    Let’s not forget about the French that had been tortured by the German’s before we came and liberated France (at the tune of 630,000 American men burried in French cemeteries).
    You want to mock my country? Swallow a little of our history first. What the majority of the nations in this world have, is owed to America.

  60. God Bless the United States of America. I’m a Canadian and deeply admire your Constitution, your generosity, and your patriotism. There is no country, a Republic, as blessed as yours—please fight to preserve what your founders laid down. It is a beacon of hope for the world, and not the kind of “hopey-changey” rubbish that is so fashionable in Washington right now. .

  61. Smokey says:
    July 4, 2010 at 1:41 pm
    I used to fly the American flag on holidays like today. But ever since the wake-up call that came on 9/11/01 I’ve flown it 24/7/365. . .

    I was taught (probably as a Boy Scout) that flag etiquette required that The Flag be brought in at dusk, and not flown overnight. It was also not supposed to be flown in the rain, nor allowed to touch the ground. Have all those rules gone by the board?
    But I’m glad to see that pride in this exceptional nation, “the last best hope of man on Earth” (Ronald Reagan), has not been abandoned here, at least.

    tommy says:
    July 4, 2010 at 2:11 pm
    Maybe you should travel a bit more around to see rest of the world?
    USA is not the only country who enjoys freedoms.
    I find it quite arrogant when people shout about how it is the best nation in the world and act like USA is the only free country with democracy.

    Most of those who enjoy a measure of freedom in the world today do so in large part because The United States of America has been the bulwark of liberty against the forces of tyranny and oppression that raged across the globe over the previous century. And you can be sure that if we in the USA fall prey to the insidious lure of statism under the guise of a specious ‘equality’, the rest of the free world will soon follow suit.
    /Mr Lynn

  62. Mark Bowlin says “During my 20 years in the US Navy, I learned the criteria for trustworthy allies: English as a first language; contact sports; beer as the national drink. The Aussies are three for three.”
    Mark don’t forget to look north. Contact sports, who got beat in olympic hockey? Who is your countries biggest trading partner? Who is your countries biggest single energy supplier?

  63. I am thankful for the United States and its freedoms to produce such innovative people such as the likes of Al Gore, who invented the Internet, so that I can have access to information such as this web site that offers other information rather than the biased left of center news coverage from national broadcasters such as the CBC and CTV.
    But realistically, if the USA did not leave the British system, it might be more like Canada, but with 10 times the population. It might even be Canada, but spread across the whole North American continent. (Sorry Mexico).

  64. Hu McCulloch says:
    July 4, 2010 at 2:42 pm
    What’s the big star under the Union Jack? Alpha Centauri?

    Well, if you must see it that way, no, it is not. It is Beta Centauri.
    As for the imaginative interpretation of the stars by Ed (that of representing the boxing kangaroo getting kicked in the butt), the idea might have more than a few Aussie cartoonists salivating profusely if they haven’t already been there, done that. Except that they’d place the stars under the tail where kangaroo butts are usually located, not over it.

  65. As a boy I remember US carriers (USS Enterprise is one) calling into Sydney Harbour and needing to anchor mid-stream and swing 360deg. they were so large. They were nuclear powered, and, because of this, unable to stay over in New Zealand.
    Your sailors were welcome then as they were when they were enjoying R&R in King’s Cross in Sydney during the Vietnam war. Just watched a moving story about fighting in WW II ,moving from the Kokoda track (trail) to the north coast of New Guinea, once again fighting for freedom, Aussies and Americans together!
    We have much in common.
    Happy 4th of July ! you have much to celebrate.

  66. @ Robert Morris, July 4, 2010 at 7:55 pm
    Sir,
    I speak from personal experience when I state the the flying of the English flag and the Union Standard is viewed as “offensive” here in England.
    Last year I was told by a visiting Council official that the flagstaff from which I was flying the Union Standard on Her Majesty’s (official) birthday required planning permission and, as I did not have this, the flagstaff had to be dismantled forthwith.
    I was also informed that the display of the Union Standard in such a fashion was viewed as “provocative” and was not permitted.
    On October 24th last year I again erected the flagstaff and flew the Zambian flag to mark the Zambian Independence day. No visit by any official was made and no comment was forthcoming.

  67. But realistically, if the USA did not leave the British system, it might be more like Canada, but with 10 times the population. It might even be Canada, but spread across the whole North American continent. (Sorry Mexico).
    But that would make international hockey boring. We got it good the way it is. Did you see the Washington fireworks – made in China. YES. I know the Chinese invented fireworks but.
    We need to get out from under the economic thrall of those communist thugs, and that sort of symbolism just brings it to a finer point.

  68. People of nations shouldn’t be stained by the misdeeds and incompetence of their “leaders”. A flag carries those stains as well but on a national day, one looks only upon the worthy ideals that it represents; as a mark of respect to the founders and those who built the nation in the pursuit of those ideals.
    All free nations suffer from the consequences of common human attributes such as greed, laziness and apathy. Apathy rules. People are so consumed by the trivial and mundane that they do not pay attention to what’s going on outside of their immediate world. Only when it hits them hard will they complain, whine and seek compensation simply because they felt it more important to watch Wife Swap USA than to pay attention to the hogwash salesmen, think and to vote accordingly.
    The apathy allows free nations to become subservient to a corrupt elite. All organizations tend to support themselves before those who they are supposed to serve.
    Anthony gets to the crux of the matter in his statement about a right to revolution. Democracy provides a mechanism for revolution; but it only works when apathy is practiced by a minority; the electorate are knowledgable and the candidates, if not competent, are at least honest and honourable.
    Uphold the revolution.
    Wave your flag knowing that it represents a struggle for freedom and fairness. Not only in the USA.

  69. Mark Bowlin says “During my 20 years in the US Navy, I learned the criteria for trustworthy allies: English as a first language; contact sports; beer as the national drink. The Aussies are three for three.”
    There are six countries in the world, only six, that have been democracies for at least the last 100 years. USA, Australia, Canada, New Zealand and Britain are five of them. Are we detecting a theme here? The sixth is Sweden – thanks to neutrality during WW2 – and being a noncombatant.
    For myself, I have a British passport and an Aussie passport, and lived for six years in the USA with my American wife, so I don’t know who the hell I’m rooting for. But have a happy birthday USA, we wouldn’t be here without you. Seriously.

  70. We all have good reason to be proud, USA, UK, Ca, Au, Nz and more. We’ve all banded together to fight tyranny at various times. The US even repaid our debt to France for funding our silly quest for freedom (don’t count on our ability to do that again).
    The ideals of Democracy may have surfaced more rebelliously in the US first but they exist globally. Any country that celebrates their annual remembrance of freedom should be allowed, for one day, to do a happy dance and just be insufferably smug: Wave their flag, overcook meat on the grill, and argue about what is football and who is doing it wrong. In the US on the 4th of July, its our day. In less than a year you will have your day of celebration of democracy (unless thats not allowed).

  71. The current Australian flag is a result of a competition held in Victoria. The review of Review for Australiasia, a Melbourne journal, had initiated an Australian flag competition in 1900, The Commonwealth Government and the Review of Reviews for Australasia provided ₤75 each and the Havelock Tobacco Company added ₤50.
    So, the flag is a result of smoko, and a competition.

  72. When are our American mates going to ditch that pommie system of weights and measures that even the Brits dropped for a French system of all things!
    Just asking, is all….

  73. I’m another 24/7/365 Flag Waver. She comes in for storms, but the porch light keeps her illuminated out there most every other night.
    I re-read the Declaration of Independence this morning. Later I retold the meaning of today’s holiday (as best I could) to my 7 year old with my 4 year old on my lap. And you know what, they got it! Of course it was nuanced in the form of an evil King who took our money and didn’t listen to what we wanted or needed, but having just read the document it was quite accurate (at least in intention). My intention being to convey to them that “that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness”.
    Anyway, I hope that similar events happened all over the country today; planting the seeds of the ideals of freedom and how important that idea is to us all. We should never forget how special the USA truly is. All nations and peoples should be proud, but today is our day.
    Happy Independence Day!
    PS- And, Yes NC, Canada is the best neighbor any country could ask for.

  74. Stephen Brown, July 4, 2010 at 10:57 pm
    You seem to be conflating planning permission requirements with “PC” objections. As for your official telling you a flag was offensive, call me cynical but I would love to see that go to court.

  75. Bulldust says:
    July 5, 2010 at 12:30 am
    When are our American mates going to ditch that pommie system of weights and measures that even the Brits dropped for a French system of all things!

    You ask somebody on the street, “What’s a meter?” they’re going to give you a funny look. Why? Because nobody without a measuring stick knows.
    But if you ask the same person “What’s a foot?” they can show you. Most people have two of them handy!

  76. Reading the above comments reminds me, once again, that Britain and her former colonies are like a family of boisterous teenagers – cheerfully trading thumps and insults with one another all day long, but when it matters we’re all on the same side. Long may it continue.

  77. Papertiger:
    “Most people have two of them handy!”
    Did you know that the average person has fewer than two feet?

  78. “Poor old GIIIR” was really a “constitutional monarch” and mad and not even functioning in his restricted role a good part of the time. You must blame the Prime Ministers and their parties. But look at it this way, without late 18thC politics and attitudes being so “colonial”, there would be no USA!
    As mentioned you would be a Canada or an Australia -its all a matter of timing and spread of the enlightenment.
    That same enlightenment which promoted the alleged age of reason (and science).
    And today’s Counter-Enlightenment and today’s age of non-reason and post science.

  79. “It’s the Soldier”
    By: Charles M. Province
    A protest raged on a courthouse lawn,
    Round a makeshift stage they charged on,
    Fifteen hundred or more they say,
    Had come to burn a Flag that day.
    A boy held up the folded Flag,
    Cursed it, and called it a dirty rag.
    An OLD MAN pushed through the angry crowd,
    With a rusty shotgun shouldered proud.
    His uniform jacket was old and tight,
    He had polished each button, shiny and bright.
    He crossed that stage with a soldier’s grace,
    Until he and the boy stood face to face.
    “FREEDOM OF SPEECH”, the OLD MAN said,
    “Is worth dying for, good men are dead,
    So you can stand on this courthouse lawn,
    And talk us down from dusk to dawn,
    But before any Flag gets burned today,
    This OLD MAN IS GOING TO HAVE HIS SAY!!
    My father died on a foreign shore,
    In a war they said would end all war.
    But Tommy and I wasn’t even full grown,
    Before we fought in a war of our own.
    And Tommy died on Iwo Jima’s beach,
    In the shadow of a hill he couldn’t quite reach
    Where five good men raised this Flag so high,
    That the WHOLE WORLD COULD SEE IT FLY.
    I got this bum leg that I still drag,
    Fighting for this same old Flag.
    Now there’s but one shot in this old gun,
    So now it’s time to decide which one,
    Which one of you will follow our lead,
    To stand and die for what you believe?
    For as sure as there is a rising sun,
    You’ll burn before this Flag burns, son.
    Now this riot never came to pass.
    The crowd got quiet and that can of gas,
    Got set aside as they walked away
    To talk about what they had heard this day.
    And the boy who had called it a “dirty rag”,
    Handed the OLD SOLDIER the folded Flag.
    So the battle of the Flag this day was won
    By a tired OLD SOLDIER with a rusty gun,
    Who for one last time, had to show to some,
    THIS FLAG MAY FADE, YET THESE COLORS DON’T RUN
    The history behind writing this:-
    http://pattonhq.com/speech.html
    And Patrick Davis and Michael Lewis ………
    http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-flags/red_ensign.htm

  80. Bulldust,
    The French system defies all logic and is unconnected to realism, a full analysis of the imperial system of measure shows it uses the same mathematical system as modern computer language. Odd that Hmmm. As a senior citizen of Oz I have seen the dumbing down of our children using the metric system. In my youth I read a book called “Thanks to the Yanks” a far cry from the revisionist history propounded by the left. Truth is such a wonderful gift and my thanks to America are continuos. In our very early days as a penal colony when starvation seemed inevitable, Yankee trading ships arrived at the end of the world and helped save us poor convicts.
    In preceding years these naughty traders liberated some of our convicts, mainly Irish transported to Oz, mainly because they were Irish so they were naughty. These Irish were part of your early America and, no doubt were fearsome anti English.
    Many Americans came to Australia from the gold fields of California when gold was discovered in OZ. Many Americans were prominent in our early governments one in particular organised trade exchange and banking in my home town Melbourne and caused it to prosper. The mentioned Eureka stockade tax revolt was organised by an American. We have much to thank you for. WW1 was not much fun, with English generals killing everyone. We revolted and our troops were put under command of our generals. We were given a line to hold, the Germans made a huge push breaking the English and French lines, and were in retreat. Australian troops faced 1.5 million Germans, around thirty thousand of us. As the English and French retreated our general dug in and called to line all troops on leave in Paris. The American boys arriving late in the war asked our men were they were going. They were keen to join the battle. They were told not possible unless you wear one of our hats, most of our men went without hats, the bloody yanks took them.
    Needless to say we stopped the germans in their tracks and then chased them, that was the turning point of the first world war. A few ozzies and cowboys taught them how to fight. This reality of history is buried in the formal history. The locals do not forget, for many schools in this part of France fly the OZ flag every day. Many who fought and died were American, some what AWOL, wearing OZ hats.
    With all your faults America is a beacon of hope for untold millions, many parties are held in OZ on the 4TH of JULY.

  81. Modern democratic New Zealand is, in part, a by-product of the American War of Independence. The Brit government of the day, truly frightened by the spectre of the loss of the American colony some 70 years earlier, a disaster in their eyes, became very determined not to lose another colony to local intransigence and French military assistance. With the French being active in major South Pacific voyages of exploration close to the time of Cook’s annexation of New Zealand for Great Britain and the arrival and residence of a French Catholic bishop, Pompallier, in the Bay of Islands just across the bay from the English Mission station, plus the unrest of local Maori under the leadership of Hone Heke, who ‘borrowed’ an American flag from some Yankee whalers wintering there to fly on his war canoe as he crossed the bay to fell the British military Flagstaff on the hill behind the British fort at Korareka. The British got their skates on after the flagstaff went down. They hastily re-erected it, then set about making Cook’s annexation legal through the Treaty of Waitangi, now regarded as New Zealand’s founding document. This was hastily penned on the spot by Governor Hobson (a rapidly-promoted naval comander and Jonny-on-the-spot) and translated into a Maori version by the Revd. Williams, missionary and first Anglican bishop of the country. Copies of the Treaty were signed, first at a major gathering of Maori chiefs and colonial officials in the Bay of Islands then later around the country by various influential Maori and British functionaries.
    The NZ flag is almost identical to Australia’s, with the exception of Australia’s single ‘Federation’ star below the Union Jack, which is not relevant to NZ as it was, from its founding, a single country divided into Provinces. N Zedders share their heritage with Australia as ANZACs (Australian/New Zealand Army Corp) and the annual Anzac Day, which comemorates the disastrous Dardanelles landings during WWI and marks the newly emergent identity of the two independant countries who share many commonalities. The Dardannelles disaster also firmed up the resolve of the armed forces of both countries to never be under British command again.
    Like Australians, Kiwis are intensly proud of our nation, our Rugby (and other sports) and our various beers and wines which are enjoyed around the world, but, like Australians and despite our great national pride, we are not great flag-flyers. We see national flag-flying as very ‘American’ and if that’s the way you honour your country, go for it with your chests out and heads up.

  82. Hey, we’ve a new sunspot forming 1086 to go along with 1084. My prediction is still in the running.
    An elongated solar cycle 20 repeat.
    And I’m not in Sunman, IN

  83. @papertiger says:
    July 4, 2010 at 4:21 pm
    I agree that the maple leaf looks good in those locations. Thanks to the moderators for permitting that slightly off topic topic.
    Back on topic, I note that the Southern Cross has been adopted as an American icon as well. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1st_Marine_Division_(United_States)
    I am proud Canadian and a proud American too. Happy July 1 and July 4 to all of us.

  84. DaveF says: July 5, 2010 at 2:24 am
    Reading the above comments reminds me, once again, that Britain and her former colonies are like a family of boisterous teenagers.
    Yup, we are all ‘cuzzies’ and we have a huge amount in common in understanding the love of freedom and democracy ‘Magna Carta’ ‘n all that, Boston Tea Party ‘n all that a few world wars ‘n all that. We tend to stick together.
    Doug

  85. I think America & it’s beautifully written Constitution represents the finest achievement of humanity’s quest for liberty & freedom thus far (I think we can go much further to protect the liberty of the individual against cruel & powerful men) but I ask all Americans to understand that your country, & many others is under attack from a cabal of overseas banksters & corporations that is deliberately sabotaging it from within.
    Climategate is just one symptom of this & needs to be understood in the larger context unless we are to remain fools.
    The Fall Of The Republic by Alex Jones

    The Obama Deception

    Endgame

    Unless you know who you are being attacked by, you remain defenceless.
    This enemy threatens us all & unless opposed by humanity, will soon have in place a fascist world government that will then move to impose mass genocide against our human family…
    Love to all reading this.
    God Bless Humanity.

  86. As predicted, Ed Darrell can’t own up to his silliness with the boxing kangaroo and stars.

  87. In fact, suspicious packages are cause for alarm every day around the world, and often get misidentified (and often blown up) by professional people erring on the side of caution. Here’s a few examples: 1 2 3 4 5 and even in Ed’s home state of Texas they react to suspicious packages the same way. It’s hard to be skeptical when you risk life and limb to find out. Sheesh Ed.

    In each of those cases the person who found the package or device thought to be a bomb called the cops or FBI. Each case was reported by those law enforcement agencies, with the spokesmen for the agencies often quoted in the article. In each case, the alarm was raised almost immediately.
    In the case of Dr. Gabriel Calzada, I have found no indication that any police agency was ever involved. As I understand it, Calzada got the package, called the sender to ask about it, didn’t inquire any further from the sender, waited a few days, then passed it through an x-ray machine operated by a security guard (“expert” you called him).
    Genuine skeptics call the cops. Genuine skeptics inform the authorities, and let them take it from there. Genuine skeptics don’t write op-eds or editorials accusing their presumed (erroneously) foes to be criminals, accusing them falsely of crimes (that’s slander in the U.S.), and only back down when a cursory investigation shows the story doesn’t hold up.
    Anthony, read each of those stories you cite, and if you apply a bit of reporter’s wisdom, you’ll see why the gullibility factor of Christopher Horner and others suggests a lack of credibility and presence of gullibility to rationalists and real skeptics.
    REPLY: OH puhleeze Ed. This from the man who can’t admit the simplest of errors, such as not understanding what the boxing kangaroo and stars were all about. Neither you nor I nor anybody else can know what the full details are there, you especially since you aren’t in direct communication with any of the people involved. There’s also the language and country barrier. Point is that just like dozens of other bomb threats, it turned out not to be true. A dud due to misidentification, just like in Texas. In this case he WAS expecting a package, but the package didn’t look right, he called, the answer given was odd, he got suspicious, had it x-rayed by somebody trained enough to use the machine (would you call TSA agents that run xray machines airports “non experts”? Heh, go ahead next time you go through security) and saw something that looked like a bomb; a cylinder with wires. Then he got worried and called on it. You’d do the same thing at that point and you’d be screaming bloody murder over that blog of yours. I’m not the least bit impressed by your skepticism, mostly what you do is take cheap pot-shots, call people liars and deniers, and generally write childish things about people you disagree with. If you were any sort of professional, you would not need to do such things, but could argue on the strength of your arguments alone. As I say though, you are highly amusing. -A

  88. More to the point for Ed Darrell, how would you react to this sort of thing if the situation were reversed at the school you teach at ? This portion you’ve completely ignored:
    …intimidation Dr. Calzada has faced since releasing his report and following up with articles in Expansion (a Spanish paper similar to the Financial Times). A minister from Spain’s Socialist government called the rector of King Juan Carlos University — Dr. Calzada’s employer — seeking Calzada’s ouster. Calzada was not fired, but he was stripped of half of his classes at the university. The school then dropped its accreditation of a summer university program with which Calzada’s think tank — Instituto Juan de Mariana — was associated.
    Additionally, the head of Spain’s renewable energy association and the head of its communist trade union wrote opinion pieces in top Spanish newspapers accusing Calzada of being “unpatriotic” — they did not charge him with being incorrect, but of undermining Spain by daring to write the report.
    Their reasoning? If the skepticism that Calzada’s revelations prompted were to prevail in the U.S., Spanish industry would face collapse should U.S. subsidies and mandates dry up.

    …all this for pointing out the mathematical impossibility of the economics of green. But you support such things, right Ed?

  89. “..A minister from Spain’s Socialist government called the rector of King Juan Carlos University — Dr. Calzada’s employer — seeking Calzada’s ouster.”
    Anthony, this alone would keep me from wanting to call the police. You do not call the police if you doubt their honesty and integrity. The incident in 1946 in Tennessee called The Battle of Athens where there was a pitched gun battle between a corrupt sheriff, his deputies and returning GI’s over voter fraud is an extreme example.
    Heck the corruption in my town is so bad a neighbor had to call in the DEA to shut down the five drug dealers on our six mile long dirt road. My county’s “law enforcement” is so corrupt it is an open joke according to the cop who lives down the road.

  90. OH puhleeze Ed. This from the man who can’t admit the simplest of errors, such as not understanding what the boxing kangaroo and stars were all about.

    Okay, I admit it: I didn’t realize you worship kangaroos, Anthony. My apologies for not understanding your unusual faith.
    (Did I get it right yet? I can’t figure out what it is that’s so sacred about that kangaroo and the Southern Cross — there is nothing on the internet about how sacred this symbol is to anyone. )
    REPLY: I don’t appreciate your patronizing comments about religion Ed. Now you are just being deliberately obtuse. If you haven’t got it by now, I’ll have to assume its on purpose. Better then that you just stew in your own juices at your own blog. You’ve worn out your welcome here with your patronizing remarks. – Anthony

  91. Anthony, in your support, I would suggest that as Ed Darrell can obviously read and write, he can’t be as good-ole-boy, aw-shucks dumb as he is pretending to be. His insulting remarks require a genuine apology before you open the door to him again. but I wouldn’t hold your breath waiting for said apology. He has obviously seen a market for his kind of mindless red-neckery by casting himself in the Huck Finn mould, but he is so wide of that particular iconic character that Samuel Clemens would be disgusted. National symbols are an important part of the identity of most of us and being deliberately obtuse about the Southern cross and the Australian kangaroo is insulting to us Antipodeans.

  92. Ed Darrell says:
    “So you’ll never explain what it is I’m supposed to ‘get’?”
    Lost.

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