Time lapse video of Venus transit seen from SDO

Thanks to reader Mike McMillan for pointing this awesome HiDef video out. It is the best I’ve seen.

And…

Super high resolution prints of the SDO imagery are available here, suitable for framing.

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49 Responses to Time lapse video of Venus transit seen from SDO

  1. A question for you TN’s ;
    At ~32 seconds, why can I seem to see the edge of the sun through Venus? This also occurs at other places in the movie, 37 seconds, …
    I was ready to call it ‘ghosting’ (intense images ‘burned into’ the sensor’, but then I imagine at 42 seconds I see dynamics through venus? I don’t have frame-by-frame analysis tools.

    Thanks,
    AC

  2. Steve says:

    Queuing up some Clint Mansell to listen to while viewing.

  3. Mark Wagner says:

    How come you can see the sun though the black spot? Looks like a photoshop job where the opacity is less than 100%. I’m skeptical. /scarc

  4. TomB says:

    Fantastic video. Any idea if they were able to observe that atmospheric anomaly pointed out here yesterday?

  5. NeedleFactory says:

    Question: at times in this video, venus seems translucent! (e.g., at 0:32).
    What artifact causes this?

  6. Aidan Donnelly says:

    Brings home just how big and powerful ol Sol actually is…

    And OT (please allow mods given the occasion)

    Food for thought:
    68 Years ago today, many thousands of men – Americans, English, Welsh, Irish, Australian,Canadian, Poles, French and even some Czech’s – put their lives on the line so we could continue to enjoy Freedom of speech and a say in how we are governed. Honour those men and consider if what our various Government’s are trying to do reflect the values of those many men. If we break faith with those who die for our freedom, what do we truly deserve?

    [REPLY: More than 9000 of those men died that day. Thank you. -REP]

  7. e lind says:

    wow.

  8. Jim G says:

    Thanks, it is great. Beats my stills by orders of magnitude. But then I don’t even have the diminished NASA budget.

  9. Chuck Nolan says:

    Great video. Thanks

  10. Bob Diaz says:

    Wow; I’d love to know the background of how each view was created and what exactly it is trying to show. I can only guess some are visible light, some IR, some UV …

  11. Hoser says:

    Even in the video, at the end showing filtered white light, if you do a screen capture and move the images to Photoshop, it appears to me there is some evidence of atmospheric refraction showing a very dim arc above the solar rim just past 3rd contact.

  12. Jim G says:

    Hoser says:
    June 6, 2012 at 9:30 am
    “Even in the video, at the end showing filtered white light, if you do a screen capture and move the images to Photoshop, it appears to me there is some evidence of atmospheric refraction showing a very dim arc above the solar rim just past 3rd contact”

    I caught first and second contact in stills through an 8″ SCT but have not yet processed them and no arc is immediately apparent in these shots in visible light. Of course in stills I may have missed the exact right moment as I was not using a webcam or movie mode on my digital camera.

  13. Gary Hladik says:

    The Sun is the real “star” of the show. Beautiful video.

  14. Andrew says:

    here we go again ice games on. Note how different NORSEX ICE extent
    http://arctic-roos.org/observations/satellite-data/sea-ice/observation_images/ssmi1_ice_ext.png
    is compared to DMI
    http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/icecover.uk.php
    or Cryosphere today. What the H$$$ is going on?

    [Moderator's NOTE: This is really OT for this thread. There are a number of recent posts where this would have been more appropriate. Please take the time to direct comments to appropriate threads. Thank you. -REP]

  15. jorgekafkazar says:

    If I’d known the sun looked like that, I’d have been afraid of it.

  16. Scott Scarborough says:

    I didn’t know music was so prevalent in space!

  17. Ted says:

    Good job Mike McMillan and Anthony.
    As usual WUWT brings the fantastic goods, what a great site. NASA should stick to real science/observations like this instead of entertaining data fudging, reputation destroying twerps like Hanson over at NASA – GISS.

  18. eyesonu says:

    I looked for some good photos of the event without much success. But I somehow I knew to be patient because Anthony had an interest and would share the best he could find. There would also be an army of followers on WUWT to assist and share also. That is what makes WUWT what it is!

    Thanks Anthony.

  19. Just some guy says:

    “A question for you TN’s ;
    At ~32 seconds, why can I seem to see the edge of the sun through Venus? This also occurs at other places in the movie, 37 seconds, …
    I was ready to call it ‘ghosting’ (intense images ‘burned into’ the sensor’, but then I imagine at 42 seconds I see dynamics through venus? I don’t have frame-by-frame analysis tools.”

    Is this because of the curvature of space-time?

  20. Agile Aspect says:

    almostcertainly says:
    June 6, 2012 at 9:05 am

    A question for you TN’s ;
    At ~32 seconds, why can I seem to see the edge of the sun through Venus? This also occurs at other places in the movie, 37 seconds, …
    I was ready to call it ‘ghosting’ (intense images ‘burned into’ the sensor’, but then I imagine at 42 seconds I see dynamics through venus? I don’t have frame-by-frame analysis tools.

    Thanks,
    AC
    ;—————————-

    Actually, it starts before 1st contact around 0:28-0:29. I agree with Hoser, it appears to be refraction.

  21. P. Solar says:

    Why do I get the felling this is a photoshop animation of a black circle ?
    The transparent planet bit near the beginning, that a lot of people noticed, is very suspect.

    And where is this famous “arc of Venus” we where all supposed to bwe seeing?
    Is this really a film of the event , or computer model??

  22. Reed Coray says:

    Did Venus’ transit of the sun give us relief from global warming? If so, can’t we get Venus to transit more often? Please send money so I can study the phenomenon. /sarc

  23. Awsome!
    After watching the sheer ignorance displayed by the NASA “reporters” during the http://sunearthday.gsfc.nasa.gov/transitofvenus/ webcast this was a shock!

  24. Steve H says:

    When I see awesome pictures and films of the sun like this it really magnifies how stupid people are in trying to force us to cut CO2 so that WE can control our planets atmosphere. It’s the SUn stupid!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  25. kadaka (KD Knoebel) says:

    Scott Scarborough said on June 6, 2012 at 9:56 am:

    I didn’t know music was so prevalent in space!

    Haven’t you heard of the Music of the Spheres before?

  26. DesertYote says:

    Its not Photoshop magic, its not after burn in the sensor, and its not refraction. Its how telescopes gather light. SHEESH.

  27. Garry Stotel says:

    gosh, how tiny Venus is… And you say Earth is about the same size? And the Sun is a “yellow dwarf”, i.e. small compared with other stars?
    I cannot begin to imagine just how tiny we are.

  28. It’s kind of like in the old B&W boxing broadcasts, that you could see the ring’s ropes through their bodies as if the boxers were transparent. “Its how telescopes gather light. SHEESH.” Thanks DesertYote!

  29. Dr K.A. Rodgers says:

    Seeming transparency of Venus is instrumental artefact from SDO sensors.
    Explained here:

  30. I’m puzzled because when I looked at the transit around 6.30pm ET Venus was visible just away from the edge of the sun at the top right hand (2 o’clock position approx) yet all the videos show Venus entering at the top left hand (around 10 o;clock). Why is that?

  31. D Johnson says:

    Too bad they had to add the global warming speculation near the end.

  32. NeedleFactory says:

    barrie sellers asked: when I looked at the transit around 6.30pm ET Venus was visible … at the top right hand (2 o’clock position approx) yet all the videos show Venus entering at the top left hand (around 10 o;clock). Why is that?

    A lens inverts an image. I expect you were looking through a lens of some kind, and the telescopes not — or vice versa.

  33. TJ says:

    What is that music with the video? Who does it? What is the title? It’s so awesome, hypnotic… I want to get a copy and put it in my itunes. Anybody know the song/author?

  34. James Ard says:

    I too thought I saw it at the 2:00 position at around 7:00 Central time. I was not using a lens, just multiple layers of tinted plastic.

  35. Mike McMillan says:

    The WUWT Solar Images & Data Page has some good shots of Venus zipping across the various wavelength images. Won’t be there for long.

  36. Lady Life Grows says:

    I knew WUWT would find a good image of something of high scientific interest like this. I find it intriguing that a reader found an even better one than the lead article. We are a fabulous group here.

  37. RoHa says:

    The size of Venus, in comparison to what is actually a smallish, unregarded, yellow star in the unfashionable end of the Western Arm of the Galaxy, is further confirmation of the fundamental lesson learned from the Total Perspective Vortex.

  38. RoHa says:

    @ Scott Scarborough

    Look how the floor of heaven
    Is thick inlaid with patines of bright gold.
    There’s not the smallest orb which thou behold’st,
    But in his motion like an angel sings,
    Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubins:

    (Merchant of Venice, Act V Scene 1)

  39. Hey, the sun’s pretty big.

  40. Brian H says:

    elmer says:
    June 6, 2012 at 10:14 am

    The Mass Transit of Venice
    http://minnesotansforglobalwarming.com/m4gw/cartoons/Transit-of-Venice.jpg

    Cute! But I don’t get why it’s “Venice”. Not a gondola in sight.

  41. Brian H says:

    In the movie at about the 1:20 and 2:30 marks (the dark red versions) Venus shows bright sparks and sparkles. Lightning?

  42. Brian H says:

    RoHa says:
    June 6, 2012 at 9:17 pm

    The size of Venus, in comparison to what is actually a smallish, unregarded, yellow star in the unfashionable end of the Western Arm of the Galaxy, is further confirmation of the fundamental lesson learned from the Total Perspective Vortex.

    Speaking of the Galaxy and Vortices and such, NASA reports that in 4bn yrs the Milky Way will merge with Andromeda. Below is a link to images of what it will look like during the 2 bn yrs or so it will take to complete the process, viewed from Planet Earth. Wish I could hang around to watch!

    http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/654291main_p1220bk.jpg

  43. RoHa says:

    Pretty big compared with …?

  44. Terry says:

    Fantastic video. The portions where the filters show the ‘red’ sun are most impressive.

    The sun appears to be a very hot ball of intense heat. Of course that intense heat has nothing to do with the earth’s cooling and heating. That’s strictly CO2 /s

  45. RoHa says:

    “the Milky Way will merge with Andromeda.”

    Galaxies collide! We’re doomed!

  46. Interstellar Bill says:

    Couldn’t they have processed-out those highly uncosmic motion-jerks?

    What looked so splendid in my telescope eyepiece has been reduced to botched time-lapses.

    Maybe in 105 years future video practiciners will have solved the seemingly vexing problem of uniform interframe intervals, the fine art of which seems to be lost to these particular solar videographers.

  47. Brian H says:

    Interstellar Bill says:
    June 7, 2012 at 7:56 pm

    Couldn’t they have processed-out those highly uncosmic motion-jerks?

    What looked so splendid in my telescope eyepiece has been reduced to botched time-lapses.

    Maybe in 105 years future video practiciners will have solved the seemingly vexing problem of uniform interframe intervals, the fine art of which seems to be lost to these particular solar videographers.

    It’s your system, and its inadequate buffering capacity. The feed is smooth.

  48. JonasM says:

    My prints arrived today! All I can say is that they are simply AWESOME! The print quality is amazing – I can’t wait to get them framed.
    Thanks, Anthony!

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