The WUWT Hot Sheet for August 16th, 2013

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Who needs a constitution or congress when you alone know what’s good for the American people?jasonseiler1[1]

New EPA boss promises dictatorial action on global warming

While speaking at the University of Colorado in Boulder, Gina McCarthy, the new head of the EPA, said Wednesday the administration is finished waiting on Congress and is set to take unilateral action on measures aimed at global warming, the Washington Times reported.

In June, Obama gave “what I really think is a most remarkable speech by a president of the United States,” she said.

“Essentially, he said that it is time to act,” she said. “And he said he wasn’t going to wait for Congress, but that he had administrative authorities and that it was time to start utilizing those more effectively and in a more concerted way.”

McCarthy insisted the administration could reduce so-called greenhouse gas emissions without harming economic growth, and could do it without any congressional approval.

http://www.examiner.com/article/new-epa-boss-promises-dictatorial-action-on-global-warming

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Controlled Tornadoes Create Renewable Energy

Waste heat from power plants could be twisted into a nonpolluting source of energy.

http://discovermagazine.com/2013/september/08-tornado-tech

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Replication may be possible some day in the distant future. Of course if Cook acted like a scientist rather than a propagandist with Nazi fantasies, Tol could have all the data and do it now.

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The chill goes deep:

Atlanta breaks a century-old temperature record – CBS Atlanta 46 http://www.cbsatlanta.com/story/23151205/atlanta-breaks-a-century-old-temperature-record

Record low set in Wilmington | StarNewsOnline.com

Thursday’s 71-degree high temperature was the area’s lowest for an Aug. 15 and the seventh-coldest in August since records began to be kept in 1874, according to the National Weather Service.

Chilly temperatures set new record lows | Ohio – wkyc.com

The temperature at Mansfield’s Lahm Airport fell to 46 degrees at 7:00 a.m. and tied a record low set in 1979.

Snow already falling in China – in August!

“Rare summer snowfall in Xinjiang,” reads the headline.

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Windows XP, the next climate forcing?

Stacey writes in tips and notes:

Next Year Microsoft is ending support for Windows XP. Many companies will need to purchase new computers to run Windows 8. This will result in millions of perfectly working older machines being trashed.
Part of Microsoft’s statement on Climate Change follows, the irony is obvious:-

Climate change is a serious challenge that requires a comprehensive and global response from all sectors of society. To address it, Microsoft is committed to measuring, transparently reporting, and reducing the carbon footprint of our own operations. We are also pursuing opportunities with our partners to increase the energy efficiency of computing.

While energy efficiency is important, long-term solutions to climate change will require dramatic innovations to transition the world to a sustainable low-carbon economy while expanding substantially the number of people who have access to electricity. Software will play a key role in enabling this transformation. Microsoft is working to apply information technology innovation to help people and businesses around the world address climate change. We are also supporting research efforts on this topic being conducted by leading environmental groups, scientists, and governments around the world.

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Mike Jowsey says in Tips and Notes

Quote of The Week contender:
In its article, Spiegel calls the growing disagreement between model results and measured observations “the wound of climate science“.
http://notrickszone.com/2013/08/15/vahrenholt-thrashes-leading-ipcc-former-ncar-scientist-in-hamburg-debate-the-wound-of-climate-science

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Gee, apparently farming practices, demand, availability, and selective breeding to make better crops had nothing to do with our crops of today, it was all the unseen guiding hand of climate change wot did it:

Ancient climate change picked the crops we eat today – environment – 15 August 2013 – New Scientist

Thank climate change for our daily bread. High levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere after the last ice age drove us to cultivate wheat.

All the plants grew larger under high levels of CO2, but the relatives of wheat and barley grew twice as large and produced double the seeds. This suggests the species are especially sensitive to high levels of CO2, Frenck says, making them the best choice for cultivation after the last ice age.

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Busted! Green Hypocrisy Marks a New Low | Power Line

The four-minute video below shows brave anti-coal folks protesting . . . with gourmet food on a luxury yacht.

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Letter to the Editor – Watts Up With That?  16th August 2013
Green Energy is Part of the Past, not Fuel for the Future

The growing failure of green energy in Europe should warn Australia to abandon its bi-partisan policies dictating targets, mandates and subsidies for “green” energy.

I grew up at the end of the last green energy era – solar energy powered our growing crops and dried the washing, but it was weak in winter and ceased under clouds and at night; wind energy pumped water, but only when the wind blew; draft horses powered farm machinery, but they had to be fed whether they were working or not; wood gave us home heating and cooking, but it consumed energy to collect and chop it up; kids walked to school or rode bikes or ponies and ladies took the horse and sulky.

Our only help from carbon energy was kerosene for the kitchen lamp and coke used in smelters and forges to produce our metal tools and machinery.

We also practiced “sustainability” – we purchased little, and most of the farm produce was consumed on the farm by family, farm labourers and draft horses.

We were rescued from this life of hard labour by carbon energy – a kerosene-powered tractor, a petrol-powered truck, and coal-powered electricity for lighting, heating, cooking, refrigeration, milking machines and pumps. The horses and farm labour were no longer needed and, at last, the farms produced a decent surplus of food for the growing cities.

Wind, solar, wood and muscle power are tools of the past and they work no better now than they did then. Forcing people to use these ancient technologies will just return us to laborious poverty on the farms and hunger in the cities.

Green energy should not be forced on consumers – those who want it should pay for it.

Green energy will eventually be abandoned, but the cost rises for each day’s delay

Viv Forbes, Rosewood    Qld   Australia

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158 Responses to The WUWT Hot Sheet for August 16th, 2013

  1. EW3 says:

    Being over 60 and observing many administrations I have to say these people are quite frightening. The rule of law seems to have gone out the window.

  2. Bob says:

    EW3, your right. This is the most lawless administration ever. My advice – anyone negatively affected by illegal EPA mandates should consider an act of civil disobedience by not obeying any proclamation by Gina McCarthy.

  3. Chad Wozniak says:

    Congress and the Supreme Court are putting on a remarkable display of rank yellow cowardice in response to der Fuehrer’s seizures of legislative authority and his general disregard of the Constitution.

    Nobody elected him to make the law – that isn’t the executive’s job. And nobody elected Gina McCarthy for anything.

    I would hope that since anything der Fuehrer and Schutzstaffelgruppenfuehrer McCarthy attempt on climate is without constitutional basis, and therefore cannot have the force of law, the states will simply ignore it, and use their own police powers to punish as criminal violators of civil rights any EPA or other federal agents that attempt to enforce their decrees.

    Daily Kos advocates a dictatorship – let’s throw them in jail first, to set an example.

    [snip OTT - mod]

  4. DirkH says:

    How many lawsuits against the Obama administration’s breaking of the rule of law are already ongoing or pending? Anyone knows?

  5. Colin says:

    The willingness to even discuss the possibility of a “benevolent dictatorship” and ignore the whole American process sent a chill up my back. That and the sheer hyprocracy of the greenies is frightening. Unfortunately something like this doesn’t just affect the U.S. but has ramifications far outside their borders. OMG!!!

  6. Outrageous Ampersand says:

    @DirkH

    Ah, but remember the recent Supreme Court ruling: citizens have no standing to sue the government over policy.

    Since the court has obviously been compromised (I’m looking at you Justice Roberts), and no citizen has standing to sue, can we honestly expect the 22nd amendment to protect us?

    Personally, I’d stock up on element 82, or a shovel to dig your grave.

  7. Mike Bromley the Kurd says:

    Commissar Gina…carving out your little dynasty, are you? EW3, I concur. Extremely frightening…and I’m a Canadian! I feel for the citizenry of Our southern neighbor…they are being blindsided. Dulled by the droning opiate.

  8. DirkH says:

    Outrageous Ampersand says:
    August 16, 2013 at 9:38 am
    “@DirkH
    Ah, but remember the recent Supreme Court ruling: citizens have no standing to sue the government over policy. ”

    Then who has?

  9. Tom G(ologist) says:

    And I thought Lisa Jackson was one of the worst EPA administrators….

  10. Richard M says:

    The contrast between the German debate and Gina McCarthy’s claims says it all. There’s a good reason she doesn’t want to discuss climate. She knows she will look foolish.

    This could be a huge republican talking point. If they could force a media discussion on the failure of models and the better scientific explanation for temperature changes over the last 100 years (ENSO), they could destroy the credibility of the administration.

  11. alexwade says:

    Sorry, I have to cry foul on one of those tips. Nobody is going to replace their working Windows XP machine with a Windows 8 one. Have you used Windows 8? Despite what Microsoft wants you to think, the vast majority hate it. Anybody who still has a Windows XP machine will hold on to it until the bitter end. And the companies still using Windows XP computers are still using it because the programs they have will not work on newer versions of Windows, they won’t be upgrading either. And when they do upgrade, it will be to Windows 7.

  12. Outrageous Ampersand says:

    @Colin;

    If we go, the world goes with us. When the Pax Americana ends, every regional and ethnic conflict that’s been frozen for decades will flare up. Plus the entire global financial system will collapse. And a massive chunk of food supplies will be compromised. One hungry desperate person is a tragedy; 5 billion of them is Judgement Day.

    These fools are playing with forces they can’t hope to control. Once you uncork the genie bottle, you can’t make him go back in.

  13. Outrageous Ampersand says:

    @ DrikH

    Precisely.

  14. kadaka (KD Knoebel) says:

    McCarthy insisted the administration could reduce so-called greenhouse gas emissions without harming economic growth, (…)

    0 * [1 >= x > 0] = 0

    They’re right, no harm at all, the (pre-adjustment) growth rate will stay exactly the same!

  15. Doug Huffman says:

    I dumped Windoze (XPpro) for Fedora linux distribution. The learning curve is steep – for a 65 y.o. thirty year snoozer that started with Win 1.0 in the middle-Eighties. ANYTHING other than M$!

    About political philosophy, Karl Popper wrote The Open Society and Its Enemies during WWII, published in 1945 in two volumes that were impossible, has been published in April 2013 in a single volume edition. It followed his Logic of Scientific Discovery that established falsification as the standard of demarcation.

  16. Green energy is the only way forward, it conserves the earths resources, cuts don on pollution and if its in the past why has Spain implemented the very firs Solar energy plant? Congress are frighteningly naive when they see capital disappearing. You would think it was their own money the way the lie, cheat and distract people to keep it :(

  17. Outrageous Ampersand says:

    @ 1 Faith Morgan;

    I’ll leave it to smarter people to use mathematics to show why you are incorrect.

    But answer me this question: since the Sun itself is a non-renewable resource, what do you propose we do?

  18. William Astley says:

    Does the Obama Administration have a set of magic wands? The speeches and unilateral EPA policies to ‘fight’ world climate change would be comical if the US was not facing economic ruin due to the Obama administration policies. The advantage of a democracy is the opposition has an opportunity to ask questions to force an estimate of costs and benefits. A democracy requires an active media to keep the public informed and to get the public engaged. There does not seem to be any upside for the US or for the world to spend money on green scams. The fact that trillions of dollars has been spent on green scams indicates there are deeper problems.

    http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=a2PHwqAs7BS0
    March 27 (Bloomberg) — Subsidizing renewable energy in the U.S. may destroy two jobs for every one created if Spain’s experience with windmills and solar farms is any guide.
    For every new position that depends on energy price supports, at least 2.2 jobs in other industries will disappear, according to a study from King Juan Carlos University in Madrid.
    http://www.economist.com/news/business/21582018-sustainable-energy-meets-unsustainable-costs-cost-del-sol
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/energy/10115983/David-Cameron-hints-at-further-cuts-to-green-energy-subsidies.html
    The Prime Minister said he would “think very carefully” about green subsidies for energy sources such as wind farms and solar panels, as they “end up on consumer bills”. .. ….He admitted that fuel bills are being driven up by green subsidies, even though the Department of Energy and Climate Change largely blames the rising cost of gas for soaring energy costs.
    The Coalition’s official policy is to subsidise wind farms, solar panels and other renewable energy to help Britain meet its targets on reducing carbon dioxide emissions. The UK has signed up to green targets to tackle climate change.

    http://notrickszone.com/2013/05/02/germanys-20-million-solar-jobs-die-welt-finally-realizes-expensive-green-energy-subsidies-useless/
    “The German solar industry is dissolving faster than you can even see. One third of all companies disappeared from the market within one year. Solar power subsidies of more than 100 billion euros [$130 billion] over 20 years have led to only a mere flash in the pan. According to the official numbers, today there are barely 6000 employees in the German solar cell and module production.”

    P.S.
    The developing world have asked for $200 billion per year to be paid from the developed world to help them deal with ‘climate’ change and the developing world is demanding the developed world to reduce their CO2 emissions by 60% before the developing world will commit to reducing their CO2 emissions. A magic wand factory would be required to reduce the developed world CO2 emissions by 60%. Regardless, world CO2 emissions will not go down, the developing countries are developing and burning coal.

    Chinese CO2 emissions are 30% greater than the US and growing at 7% per year.
    http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2012/nov/22/china-defends-carbon-emissions-growth
    China defends carbon emissions growth
    China says its emissions will keep rising until its per capita GDP is around five times its current rate, further dampening hopes that the world’s largest polluter will agree in principle to ambitious binding emission reduction targets at this month’s Doha Climate Change Summit

  19. pat says:

    She is trying to act before the truth is obvious to all, even the ignorant idiots that unquestionably believe in this nonsense.

  20. Robert of Ottawa says:

    I’m with Alex Wade on that one. I maintain an XP system just for my professional work – all the software tools I need to do my job work on it.

  21. Pamela Gray says:

    Imagine the outrage of hippies everywhere if a conservative president tried this same tactic to suppress voting rights and ESPECIALLY the right to representation. He is becoming more and more like King George and his administration. Way back then it wasn’t the taxes that we rebelled against. It was that they were imposed without vote or elected representation. Obama is taking us back in history, not forward.

    It would be ironic that this “back from the past” slippery slope he intends on leading us down ends in God forbid, civil war, or worse revolutionary war. Let us hope that we can manage a sea-change with our vote and not our swords.

    We need to get back to two non-negotiables: the individual rights of life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness guaranteed by our constitution, and regulation/tax/fee by referendum majority vote.

  22. Outrageous Ampersand says:

    @Pamela Gray;

    Back in the 18th century, a bunch of guys revolted against the most powerful nation in the world for much more minor offences than we endure today.

    Either they were crazy, or people today are made from less stern stuff.

  23. _Jim says:

    1 Faith Morgan says August 16, 2013 at 9:47 am

    Green energy is the only way forward, it conserves the earths resources,

    Who are we saving them (the resources) for? Are we in the western world to be turned back into 3rd world villages run by dictators and gangs sort of like, well, some villages in Africa?

    On a separate note, what kind of car do you drive? Anything made in the last five or ten years? Do you KNOW what kind of technology went into that vehicle? Was that technology developed in 3rd world villages in Africa?

    BTW, I think your posts here are just a ‘front’ for your “ up and coming book “The living Nightmare” ” but I could be wrong …

    .

  24. Pamela Gray says:

    1faithMorgan: because it was subsidized, as in someone is getting a high government provided return on their money that is beyond the actual value of the product. Does that hurt anyone you ask? Yes. It creates a government-supported bubble that will bite your kids in the ass when they are old enough to pay taxes imposed to clean up the mess left behind when the bubble bursts. End of reasons why.

  25. Sweet Old Bob says:

    The new “WAVE” of McCarthyism…..

  26. milodonharlani says:

    Outrageous Ampersand says:
    August 16, 2013 at 10:07 am

    IMO people today have been bought off by the DC regime’s making citizens into subjects dependent upon it for welfare, Medicare, Medicaid, SS & pensions for military & federal law enforcement personnel.

    Rather than civil war or revolution, I’d like a return to federalism, in which states or groups of states could control all or most of their own destiny, without Washington dictating everything from light bulb to toilet bowl design, like the Politburo of the USSR.

  27. “Next Year Microsoft is ending support for Windows XP. Many companies will need to purchase new computers to run Windows 8. This will result in millions of perfectly working older machines being trashed.”

    I have Windows 8 on my laptop, It sucks. Heard that the guy that developed it got fired:

    http://www.brianmadden.com/blogs/brianmadden/archive/2012/11/13/microsoft-s-man-in-charge-of-creating-windows-8-steven-sinofsky-was-fired-today-is-it-because-windows-8-sucks-so-bad.aspx

    What gives?

  28. dp says:

    EW3 says:
    August 16, 2013 at 9:05 am

    Being over 60 and observing many administrations I have to say these people are quite frightening. The rule of law seems to have gone out the window.

    The rule of law is doing very well, youngster. They’re fast tracking them hell-bent for election. It is the rule of order that is out the window. Some serious defunding is definitely in order.

  29. Brian Johnson UK says:

    Surely Obama [and his Administration] are worse than Carter or Nixon, maybe the worst ever…….

    Viewed from the UK and very fond of the USA and my many friends who are having to suffer unnecessarily at present.

    Thank goodness Al Gore never made it to the White House!

  30. _Jim says:

    William Astley says August 16, 2013 at 10:01 am

    Does the Obama Administration have a set of magic wands?

    Welcome to the world of those un-anchored and un-rooted in the world of reality; detachment from the real world allows all sorts of fancy (Def: the mental faculty through which whims, visions, and fantasies are summoned up; imagination, especially of a whimsical or fantastic nature) are imagined without practical limit, penalty or cost on themselves or the others they will ultimately entangle and involve … when done so through the civil power “that is” (think: handcuffs, r ifle barrel of govt bureaus and their attached LE personnel) the end won’t be pretty (think Stalin, Mao and the paper-hanger of the 20th century).

    .

  31. Pamela Gray says:

    I also have Windows 8. HORRIBLE product!!! My new hp extended keyboard notebook has a large mouse pad. Great idea for a mouse pad on a computer used for data analysis and report writing, but bad if you have windows 8. Windows 8 is actually made for a touch screen. Which I do not have. But when I rest my wrists below the keyboard as I am typing they connect with the mouse pad and the Windows 8 “finger sweep” functions start playing with my imagination, making me think my software has a poltergeist.

    I would have tarred and feathered him.

  32. Colin says:

    @1 Faith Morgan says:
    August 16, 2013 at 9:47 am

    “Green Energy” is what exactly? Solar Panels – any idea what is in them? To list a few – lead (which was taken out of gasoline many years ago), Arsenic (feed that to your cat and see how green it is), Thiourea (Do you even know what that is?) Phosphine Gas (used in WW ! – the soldiers didn’t think it was too green), Cadmium and many other “green” items. Seriously. “Green” energy. Spain is cutting back on the subsidies and they are verging on bankrupcy. No, don’t pull the “green” energy card. There ain’t no such thing.

  33. Outrageous Ampersand says:

    @milodonharlani

    Certainly, a return to the republic as it was orginally envisioned, or even with some modifications in the trappings but not spirit, is the best possible outcome.

    Let me know when you figure out how to do it, because I’m plumb out of ideas. Regrettably I’m young enough that I’ll live to see the end of everything.

  34. jeff 5778 says:

    “McCarthy insisted the administration could reduce so-called greenhouse gas emissions without harming economic growth, and could do it without any congressional approval.”

    With the passage of Obamacare and it’s grant of power to HHS, the administrative state is in place and no meaningful antidote exists to thwart that power. Thank you to all who trusted that a little more won’t do that much harm.

  35. Tom in Florida says:

    My suggestion is to read up on Article V of the U. S. Constitution. The Founding Fathers, knowing full well that there could come a day when a bloated federal government would not change their ways, provided the States with a method of amending the Constitution WITHOUT any action by Congress or the President. Two thirds of the State Legislatures can force Congress to call a Convention for proposing Amendments (not a constitutional convention) and those amendments shall become valid when ratified by the Legislatures of three fourths of the States.
    We don’t need no stinkin’ congressional or presidental approval.

  36. OldWeirdHarold says:

    alexwade says:
    August 16, 2013 at 9:44 am
    =============
    Count me as an XP dead-ender. I only use XP because I have a couple of programs that run Windoz. The vast majority of what I need to use runs under Linux, and I can and will move XP to a separate net unconnected box to run these few programs and run some Ubuntu variant (I hate 12.04, but there are other options) to run net, office, CAD and most development apps.
    A lot of good apps are php client/server apps and can run on anything, and live on my Linux server.
    If I’m going to be stuck with an endless upgrade cycle, it’s going to be open source. Screw the Microsoft treadmill.

  37. Pamela Gray says:

    Obama-anything could not have come to pass without Senate and House of Rep approval in the text and/or funding and/or committee regulations. That means that conservatives voted for it as well. That means we all may need to get our big boy and/or girl pants on and vote libertarian. That means if you can’t pick yourself up by your own bootstraps, too bad sooo sad. That means if you consume a product that hurts you, oh well. That means there is good and bad to every kind of government design. But what we have right now on each side of the fence is mostly bad and very little good. Repeat at first sentence.

  38. jeff 5778 says:

    Tom in Florida has been listening to The Great One.

  39. richardscourtney says:

    Friends:

    I am surprised that so far in this thread nobody has commented on the item

    Controlled Tornadoes Create Renewable Energy
    Waste heat from power plants could be twisted into a nonpolluting source of energy.
    http://discovermagazine.com/2013/september/08-tornado-tech

    This is an infant technology which needs to be proved technically and economically at demonstration scale. However, it would be a ‘game changer’ if successful because it would reduce the need for power stations by about a quarter and could be retro-fitted to existing power stations.

    Richard

  40. Pamela Gray says:

    Tom in Florida, too bad Obama doesn’t have to jump through those same hoops. If he did, he would be reluctant to fight that battle.

  41. SAMURAI says:

    The US Constitution has been run through a shredder.

    It only truly exists as an historic relic in an hermetically sealed case in the Library of Congress.

    Under Constitutional law, Amendments 9 and 10 would leave environmental matters to the states to determine , since they aren’t expressed powers granted to Congress in Articles 1 Section 8.

    That makes perfect sense as each State has its own unique priorities in regards to environmental Standards. One size doesn’t fit all..

  42. Retired Engineer John says:

    Some versions of windows 7 are reported to be capable of emulating windows XP and running software designed for XP. When I attempted to download the emulator, I was told that my version of windows 7 was not compatible. Has anyone else had that experience?

  43. milodonharlani says:

    Outrageous Ampersand says:
    August 16, 2013 at 10:28 am

    I’m old, & I may well see the end, too.

    I agree that stopping the rot of decadence within & invasion from without is a long shot. But if the disastrous trend is to be reversed, it will require not just a GOP Congress & White House, but control by principled public servants rather than mainstream, self-serving, go along to get along politicians like Boehner & McConnell. Maybe if things get bad enough rapidly enough, pushed along by Obamacare, then such a devout wish might be consummated.

    Failing that, there are principled, rebellious governors who may initiate the counter-revolution by refusing to go along with the unconstitutional mandates of the Mandarins in DC. I’d like to see the loosest possible North American confederation, with most of US & Canadian territory united in one or two associations based upon American principles of self-reliance & personal responsibility (maybe social conservative in the South & libertarian in the West), but with perhaps half a dozen enclaves free to be as Old European-style socialistic as they want to be. Then we’ll see which traditions produce greater peace, prosperity & happiness.

  44. Outrageous Ampersand says:

    @milodonharlani

    I’ve long been in favor of a North American union, including Mexico, but drawn up more as a tarriff free, border free econonomic zone and not like the zombie that’s the EU. I’m not really sure the details of how to draw it up though.

    I’m a registered Republican and vote as one, but am more libertarian in my outlook. I’d vote for a Democrat if any in my state were worth voting for.

    I greatly fear there are only two ways to excise the cancer that is DC: revolution, or a titan of a leader who cares not for power and is willing to get things done. Some sort of reincarnation of Washington I guess.

  45. richardscourtney says:

    1 Faith Morgan:

    I am replying to your post at August 16, 2013 at 9:47 am
    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2013/08/16/the-wuwt-hot-sheet-for-august-16th-2013/#comment-1392264

    I write to inform you that you are very mistaken.

    Firstly, I strongly commend you to read the post from Pamela Gray at August 16, 2013 at 10:12 am
    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2013/08/16/the-wuwt-hot-sheet-for-august-16th-2013/#comment-1392294

    Please consider what she says. Poverty is not a gift I want to give to our children and our children’s children.

    Secondly, I think you will benefit from reading all the item – especially its Section 14 – which is at
    http://scienceandpublicpolicy.org/images/stories/papers/reprint/courtney_2006_lecture.pdf

    I hope this is helpful to you.

    Richard

  46. A people have the Government they deserve. “Suum cuique”.

  47. OldWeirdHarold says:

    richardscourtney says:
    August 16, 2013 at 10:42 am
    =====
    A cursory look at the “tornado” machine shows this to be a typical highly capital-intensive green gizmo that isn’t likely to be economical just because of the capital involved. There are less capital intensive ways to recover waste heat.
    I’m always happy to be wrong about these things, but I’m usually not. This looks like another too-clever idea that will never pencil out because of sky-high capital costs.

  48. chemman says:

    “1 Faith Morgan says August 16, 2013 at 9:47 am”

    Do you actually live on so called green energy. No not the stuff they say you get for a few extra pennies per kilowatt hour on your electric bill. You have no idea if that really is coming from a renewable source. What I am asking is have you cut yourself off from the grid and actually live a “sustainable life?”

    I actually do live off grid and it isn’t for the faint of heart. You must forgo things that are large energy hogs. You know things like air conditioners and fancy dish washers. So why don’t you get out of that fantasy world of yours and try to practice what you preach.

  49. milodonharlani says:

    Outrageous Ampersand says:
    August 16, 2013 at 10:52 am

    Most four-star generals & admirals today are toadies, totally politicized sycophantic moral cowards, many of whom lack any combat experience despite having been in uniform during frequent wars & lesser military actions.

    IMO however the greater threat to liberty is the metastasized growth & militarization of federal, state & even local law enforcement, combined with the unsupervised abuses of the national “security” surveillance state.

    CACCA is part & parcel of the scam. At least the USA had enough more democracy left than the EU to resist carbon cap & tax schemes. But then the EPA just ran around Congress.

  50. milodonharlani says:

    OldWeirdHarold says:
    August 16, 2013 at 10:58 am

    We’ve been using co-generation here in the Northwest for decades, from saw & pulp mills, power & waste water treatment plants, etc.

  51. milodonharlani says:

    Leif Svalgaard says:
    August 16, 2013 at 10:57 am

    Unfortunately, you are correct.

  52. Pamela Gray says:

    Leif, you are correct. We also own the constitution as currently amended, and either let it sit and decay or force our government, owned and elected by and for the people, to adhere to it.

  53. Janice Moore says:

    “… he said … he had administrative authorities … .” [Gina McCarthy]

    LOL, D’oh!bama the U. S. Constitution ignoramus probably DID say he had “administrative authorities.” Anyone who PASSED their law school coursework would say they had “administrative authority.” And he or she would know that that authority is solely derived from Congress.

    Congress IS. Congress, even now, is a powerful antidote to a rabid, snarling, power-mad executive. They could amend the EPA’s enabling legislation such as the Clean Air Act or take away the EPA’s funding tomorrow.

    Defeatism and its “Woe is me, all is lost” language with its appearance of wisdom is powerful and it will not help us to win any battles. Stop it — and don’t believe it! America is.

    All is NOT lost.

    NEVER — GIVE — UP!

    A little allegory to encourage you…

    Laugh now, Envirohyenas**…. your days are numbered.

    **(Gina’s the one with the long bangs —- slobbering scum, they even harm BIRDS (and a British friend!))

  54. george e. smith says:

    “”””””…….1 Faith Morgan says:

    August 16, 2013 at 9:47 am

    Green energy is the only way forward, it conserves the earths resources, cuts don on pollution and if its in the past why has Spain implemented the very firs Solar energy plant? Congress are frighteningly naive when they see capital disappearing. You would think it was their own money the way the lie, cheat and distract people to keep it :(………””””””””””””

    I’ll eschew the obvious inference, that your assertion is something you simply accept on “faith”. (whatever that is).

    But proving your assertion , is a trivia pursuit. You simply put a fence around your “Green energy” plant, which permits nothing else in to your plant; except of course the raw materials of the universe; well a slight gaff there; you’ll have to find the raw materials yourself, where they are at, and access them and bring them into your plant yourself. Of course you use your green energy, made available by your plant, to do ALL of these things, employing NOTHING that is not produced or provided for, by your green energy plant.

    Then, 1 Faith Morgan, you are free to seek your fame and fortune, supplying your remaining green energy to those who can use it, at whatever price you can get for it.

    So have at it; I’ll watch from the sidelines.

    PS Don’t forget to clean up what muck you make (if any), using of course your own green energy plant resources !

  55. Kaboom says:

    Congress should allocate $1 to the 2014 budget for the EPA. It would send the right message to the bureaucrats and rule-by-decree presidency about who wears the pants when it come to spending tax dolalrs.

  56. _Jim says:

    Pamela Gray says August 16, 2013 at 10:41 am

    Obama-anything could not have come to pass without Senate and House of Rep approval in the text and/or funding and/or committee regulations. That means that conservatives voted for it as well.

    One wonders if you are familiar with the facts surrounding the passage of a particular piece of legislation titled the Affordable Care Act …

    – – – – – – – – – – – –

    On Dec. 24, 2009 the Senate approved similar health care reform legislation called the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (HR 3590), in a 60-39 party-line vote. HR 3590 began as the Service Members Home Ownership Tax Act of 2009, a bill passed by the House on Oct. 8 that modified the homebuyers credit for members of the Armed Forces and certain other Federal employees. In a procedural move, the Senate co-opted HR 3590, removed all existing language, and replaced it with the language of their health care bill, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. No Republican Senator voted for the bill. …

    Negotiations to reconcile the House and Senate bills stalled in Congress after Scott Brown (R-MA) won late Ted Kennedy’s (D-MA) vacant Senate seat in Jan. 2010, causing Senate Democrats to lose their Republican filibuster-proof majority of 60 seats. On Feb. 22, 2010 President Obama unveiled his own proposal bridging the Senate and House health care bills, placing pressure on the House to pass health care reform legislation. House Democrats advanced the their amendments to HR 3590 as a new budget reconciliation bill, which is a form of legislation that requires only a simple majority and not a supermajority of 60 votes in the Senate to be approved.

    On Mar. 21, 2010 the House approved the Senate’s bill (HR 3590) in a 219-212 vote and passed the House’s amendments to HR 3590 as the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (HR 4872) in a 220-211 vote. The Reconciliation Act made financing and revenue changes to HR 3590, while modifying higher education assistance financing. No Republican in the House voted for either HR 3590 or the reconciliation bill.

    – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – -

  57. Janice Moore says:

    Great points about Constitutional law above, many others. Yes, indeed, the executive gets authority from Congress which gets its authority from

    the governed

    who got their authority from

    God (i.e., Natural Law, partly codified in the U. S. Constitution).

    We, the People, ARE!

    MILLIONS of us did NOT vote for the Dope.

  58. Outrageous Ampersand says:

    @Jim,

    Scotus ruled the Unaffordable Care Act was a tax.

    Per the Constitution, all taxation bills must originate in the house.

    The version of the UACA that passed was the one born in the Senate.

    Already the law is illegitimate.

  59. Outrageous Ampersand says:

    @ Janice Moore;

    Votes? How terribly quaint. We use a more ‘nuanced’ method now. 21st century and all that.

  60. milodonharlani says:

    _Jim says:
    August 16, 2013 at 11:20 am

    Yet the Administration & running lapdog media are trying to blame the GOP for failure of Obamacare, an obviously catastrophic monstrosity from its misbegotten beginnings, designed to increase health care costs while cutting quality but increasing federal control, with ultimate aim of destroying private insurance.

  61. _Jim says:

    Retired Engineer John says August 16, 2013 at 10:47 am

    Some versions of windows 7 are reported to be capable of emulating windows XP

    Which version do you own (there are *six* different editions)? SOME versions are intentionally handicapped as to features as a condition of market and sales price …

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_7_editions

    Windows 7 Professional (and above?) offers Win Xp mode:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_XP_Mode#Windows_XP_Mode

    .

  62. jeff 5778 says:

    Yes Congress allows for these methods because the other party will use them one day. The stripping of the original language should have been filibustered. This was not the bill that originated in the house, or anything like it. The law is sufficiently complex and our time to sift through the complexity is insufficient. They win.

  63. george e. smith says:

    “””””””……..
    Outrageous Ampersand says:

    August 16, 2013 at 10:52 am

    @milodonharlani

    I’ve long been in favor of a North American union, including Mexico, but drawn up more as a tarriff free, border free econonomic zone and not like the zombie that’s the EU. I’m not really sure the details of how to draw it up though.

    I’m a registered Republican and vote as one, but am more libertarian in my outlook. I’d vote for a Democrat if any in my state were worth voting for.

    I’m a registered Republican and vote as one, but am more libertarian in my outlook. I’d vote for a Democrat if any in my state were worth voting for. ……””””””

    Well on the Rand McNalley Maps, there currently are two borders; well the US / Canada border is multifaceted.

    So in your borderless Utopia, I guess Canadians can come down and live in the Florida Keys if they want, and I could retire to Baja and go fishing.

    Who would be charged with prying those Mexican land barons off their vast holdings, so that all could share them ?

    Now who all else from the rest of the world, would we allow to come and join us ?

    Ooops ! just forget it. I guess I didn’t read this part:- “””””….. I’m not really sure the details of how to draw it up though. ………”””””

  64. dbstealey says:

    milodonharlani says:

    “Most four-star generals & admirals today are toadies, totally politicized sycophantic moral cowards, many of whom lack any combat experience despite having been in uniform during frequent wars & lesser military actions.”

    ================================

    The Petraeus affair proved that: Gen. Petraeus was made an example for only one reason: to cow the generals and admirals.

    It worked.

    Now the military is no longer a guarantor of the Constitution, or our freedoms.

    The final step was the corrupting of the Chief Justice. John Roberts was the one vote that everyone on both sides thought was safe. He gave no indication whatever of ruling any other way except to declare Obamacare unconstitutional, which of course it is. All of his oral questioning pointed toward total skepticism regarding Obamacare. All the speculation on how the court would vote was over justices like Kennedy.

    Then they got to Roberts. On the last day, he caved. He flipped, and provided the deciding vote to uphold Obamacare.

    Obviously, someone got to Roberts. Is there any doubt? They either found a skeleton in his closet like with Petraeus, or they found something Roberts wanted badly enough to sell out. Probably the former.

    Now the military general staff is demoralized, worrying about their reputations over the good of the country, and even whether they will be allowed to retire [and it does not take scaring all of them. Some of them are enough; those will be promoted, and the patriotic ones will be bypassed.]

    And now the courts are lost: the highest justice in the highest court in the land voted like no one had expected. He did Obama’s bidding.

    Is there much hope for the future?

  65. george e. smith says:

    “””””””…….Tom in Florida says:

    August 16, 2013 at 10:34 am

    My suggestion is to read up on Article V of the U. S. Constitution. The Founding Fathers, knowing full well that there could come a day when a bloated federal government would not change their ways, provided the States with a method of amending the Constitution WITHOUT any action by Congress or the President. Two thirds of the State Legislatures can force Congress to call a Convention for proposing Amendments (not a constitutional convention) and those amendments shall become valid when ratified by the Legislatures of three fourths of the States.
    We don’t need no stinkin’ congressional or presidental approval……..”””””””

    Well that is simply wunnerful Tom. But it ain’t ever going to happen.

    Two thirds of the State Legislatures don’t come anywhere close to agreeing with the will of the people of the USA. That’s why we have the current Senate, that we do have.

    Two thirds of the State Legislatures would vote to keep digging this hole those States have gotten us into. Too much gravy in it for them. Right now we have the very best government that money can buy.

    I would start with a rule, that any and every law or regulation must be absolutely binding on each and every government employee, from top to bottom; no exceptions. (yes that does mean all elected government officials, and their hired staffs.) All public employee pension programs, would simply be the “Social Security” “”trust fund”” plan. Better yet, I would require that only elected members of the Congress, could offer ANYTHING to be voted on for passage into law. NO law written by unelected beaurocrats.

    Yes I know, Utopias come in many forms. I would like to be able to vote for (or against) each and every person, who had the authority to lay and collect ANY tax from me. Preferrably that would be the several members of the local County Council. They can haggle with the State Government, who in turn can deal with the Federal Government. No need whatsoever for me and the Federal Government to have any dealings with each other.

  66. Geof Maskens says:

    I remember seeing an article in a US technology mag decades ago describing an energy generator called a ‘Hurricanado’. This was a gigantic cooling-tower shaped device some 5000 feet high(!) either concrete, GRP or an inflatable structure, working on this principle, but no power station exhaust was required as it was to be sited over shallow, warm brackish water. One drawback was quoted was the strong possibility of destructive lightning inside. A bonus was the provision of large quantities of clean rainwater.

  67. M Courtney says:

    I agree with Alex Wade.
    I would have agreed earlier but this laptop has Windows 8 and so it doesn’t work so well.

    Terrible design.
    Terrible product.
    Terrible contempt for the user – Do they really think I meant to buy a tablet instead of a laptop?

    No?

    Then why did they build an operating system for a tablet?
    Terrible product.

  68. _Jim says:

    dbstealey says August 16, 2013 at 11:52 am

    Is there much hope for the future?

    Secede; just don’t fire any muzzle loaded, rifled muskets at, near or in the direction of Ft Sumter this time …

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Fort_Sumter

    /only mild sarc

  69. DirkH says:

    richardscourtney says:
    August 16, 2013 at 10:42 am
    “Friends:
    I am surprised that so far in this thread nobody has commented on the item

    Controlled Tornadoes Create Renewable Energy
    Waste heat from power plants could be twisted into a nonpolluting source of energy.”

    “Nonpolluting” only if one doesn’t count the pollution created when building whatever contraption is required to get energy out of that controlled tornado. Like with windmills, that probably means more expensive than plain old power generation, and hence also more polluting ( taking money expended as measure for polluting potential).

    In general, every uneconomic green contraption leads to MORE industrial activity necessary to gain 1 kWh of energy; compared to an economic way of gaining the energy. Efficiency == economics == protection of the environment, as a first approach. Highly subsidized == very inefficient == very polluting.

    BTW it sounds pretty similar to a solar updraft tower , which has been shown to produce only 1/10 of the energy you get when you cover the same area with solar panels.

    So, probably a great new way to siphon off a few billion in taxpayer money.

  70. Tom in Florida says:

    Since we are addressing some politics here, I just want to say that some time ago I heard (and agree with) that saying the “United States of America is a Country” is incorrect. The proper wording is “the United States of America ARE a Country.” Think about the difference.

    In the present day the individuality of each State as it’s own entity, as the Framers designed it, has been lost. The U.S Constitution does not give we, the people any rights. It is we, the people, who have all the rights and that we, the people grant limited power to a central government as expressed through the Constitution. The fact is that the power of the federal government has expanded unchecked for generations under the mistaken ideal that it is the government that has rights in itself and only through its own benevolence, does it allow we, the people to have some rights, but only those rights that the government sees fit to allow.

    The intentional disregard for what the Constitution stands for only happens because it is much easier for people to not worry their pretty little skulls of mush so much about such things but rather concentrate on getting as much from the government as possible. Politicians know this and exploit it. Only an armed revolution, fully supported by those in the military who have sworn an oath the protect and defend the Constitution from all enemies, foreign and domestic, can hope to restore our Country. Alas, it will not happen and therefore all is certainly lost.

  71. Tom in Florida says:

    george e. smith says:
    August 16, 2013 at 11:52 am
    “Well that is simply wunnerful Tom. But it ain’t ever going to happen.”

    I am fully aware that it isn’t ever going to happen. See my comments above. As you say, we have the best government that money can buy. Truly sad.

  72. Alan Watt, Climate Denialst Level 7 says:

    New record low max temperature in Atlanta

    Thursday’s 71-degree high temperature was the area’s lowest for an Aug. 15 and the seventh-coldest in August since records began to be kept in 1874, according to the National Weather Service.

    Yup, and we’ll break another all time low max temp. record for today. The rate at which new low max records are being set is unprecedented, and accelerating.

  73. richardscourtney says:

    Geof Maskens:

    At August 16, 2013 at 12:02 pm
    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2013/08/16/the-wuwt-hot-sheet-for-august-16th-2013/#comment-1392440
    You write

    I remember seeing an article in a US technology mag decades ago describing an energy generator called a ‘Hurricanado’. This was a gigantic cooling-tower shaped device some 5000 feet high(!) either concrete, GRP or an inflatable structure, working on this principle, but no power station exhaust was required as it was to be sited over shallow, warm brackish water. One drawback was quoted was the strong possibility of destructive lightning inside. A bonus was the provision of large quantities of clean rainwater.

    The above article refers to a possible device to harness waste heat from a power station as a method to generate additional electricity from the power station. At present waste heat is usually dumped and where it is used it is only used for cogeneration (i.e. combined heat & power, CHP, where the waste heat is used to provide central heating for buildings).

    I suspect you are referring to Carson Towers.

    In 1975 Philip Carson in the US suggested giant towers to make cheap electricity from falling air. He suggested that a hollow tube at least 1 kilometre long should be stood on its end to form a tower. Then, tonnes of sea water should be pumped up it and sprayed into its top. The water would evaporate and thus cool the air. Cold air falls, and the cooled air would fall down the tube at 60 kilometres per hour. Wind turbines mounted at the bottom of the tube could then produce a large, controllable amount of constant electricity. Some of the obtained energy would be used to pump water up to be evaporated at the top of the tower. This is not ‘perpetual motion’: the obtained energy is solar power provided by the different air temperatures at the top and bottom of the tube.

    In theory, Carson Towers (sometimes called “energy towers”) could supply all the world’s electricity needs several times over. And the electricity would be very cheap, costing about a third of the cost of coal-fired electricity, for example. Laboratory studies show that they should work.

    The Technion Institute in Haifa produced detailed designs for construction of a 50 MW prototype Carson Tower which would only be 200 meters tall. But this would only demonstrate the principles. Proving the economics of the process would require construction of a Carson Tower which is at least 900 meters tall, and that would cost at least US$650 million. Nobody has yet been willing to make that gamble.

    Richard

  74. richardscourtney says:

    DirkH:

    re your post addressed to me at August 16, 2013 at 12:19 pm
    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2013/08/16/the-wuwt-hot-sheet-for-august-16th-2013/#comment-1392456

    The device proposed in the above article is not some green dream like windfarms. It is a proposal for increasing the output of thermal power stations by utilising their low grade heat instead of dumping that heat from cooling towers.

    At this stage it cannot be known if the proposal is technically, financially and economically feasible. But, at present, power stations dump more energy as low grade heat than the energy they provide as electricity. The proposal certainly seems worthy of investigation.

    Richard

  75. Outrageous Ampersand says:

    @ Tom in Florida;

    I’m also from FL, by the by.

    Anyway, don’t be so sure about the inevitability of tyranny. Strange things can and do happen, and hummanity has a way of surprising everyone.

    After all, G Washington could have been a king, and the rest of those guys nobles, and precisely no one would have batted an eye. That’s the way the world had worked for centuries, and it wouldn’t have struck anyone as out of the ordinary.

    Instead they decided to try something different and resist the temptation of a crown.

  76. Pete says:

    Relevant to the “We don’t need no stinkin’ Congress” idea and all it entails, Charles Krauthammer has an outstanding column in today’s Washington Post.

    Check it out: http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/charles-krauthammer-can-obama-write-his-own-laws/2013/08/15/81920842-05df-11e3-9259-e2aafe5a5f84_story.html

    It is strongly urged that Krauthammer’s column be forwarded to every person on our email lists, without exception.

  77. Outrageous Ampersand says:

    You push a man too far, and he’ll push back. Even a harmless old lady will fight if you’re hurting her grandchildren.

    A man fighting for his life is much more dangerous than a man fighting for his pay.

  78. So Obama is a dictator by default if congress doesn’t do his bidding for him? Obama has said this multiple times when he says “If congress doesn’t act, I will”. His participation in this mass delusion is very dangerous, not to mention is calls for dictatorial power.

  79. KevinM says:

    Why do comics do that to his chin? An exageration of his face would do the opposite. Looking at an Obama headshot right now and thinking, if I were going to draw a recognizable comic distortion of this guy I see:

    -Little or no chin
    -Very round head
    -Thin neck
    -Long, thin, curly lips
    -Giant teeth
    -Little ears that stick out sideways

    They get the teeth right, but miss the rest.

    I’d like to build a collection of MBA two-axis diagrams, x = cartoonist political lean, y= subject personality’s political lean. Lewandowsky?

  80. RockyRoad says:

    I’ve asked a question none of my friends and relatives have ever gotten right–not even close:

    How long were the concepts embodied in the Constitution and Bill of Rights discussed before they were finalized?

    (Remember, the Declaration of Independence had been penned years earlier, and after that we had a bloody Revolutionary War, the Articles of Confederation (which were a bust), so the whole war effort looked like it was coming to naught.)

    Was it a couple of months of discussion?

    A year? Maybe several years? A decade? TWO??

    Back then there were two main forums of discussion (sorta like our modern Internet): The pulpit, and the newspaper. Later there were pamphlets, but the two main forums for this topic were preachers at church and the editorial page.

    Here’s the answer: More than 60 years! That’s almost 3 generations back then.

    So before somebody tries to tell you the Constitution and Bill of Rights are dusty, out-dated documents, toss that +60-year figure in their face and see what they say. And remind them that the Constitution and US Bill of Rights embody the precepts and principles contained in the Declaration of Independence–a document all the signers were willing to give their lives for.

    A huge amount of discussion and thought that went into those documents–by some of the most intellectual men ever assembled. And they were serious enough that most of the signers were subjected to the cruelest hardships–but they never complained.

    Are will willing to do even half as much?

  81. Outrageous Ampersand says:

    @ Philosophy Science (@PhilosoScience)

    Obama is like a teenager experimenting with whiskey and firearms. He’s trying to channel forces he has no hope of controlling.

  82. OldWeirdHarold says:

    While technically hardware doesn’t need to be upgraded to run Windows 8, practically speaking, old XP boxes that were snappy when new are dying these days with 100% CPU cycles much of the time due to software bloat and anti-virus software.

    I wonder if anybody’s tried to calculate the carbon footprint of software bloat and malware? And one of the worst offenders for software bloat are these CMS-driven (cough wordpress cough) websites that use 5 times as much browser resources as old hand-coded HTML pages.

    I think some of the people most responsible for computer carbon footprint bloat are hopenchangers living in Silicon Valley.

  83. rw says:

    During his (almost obsessive) lying about Benghazi, I realized that Obama was beginning to go off the rails. This isn’t going to be pretty, but I don’t think these wine-and-cheese types are really cut out to be dictators. Instead, they expect that we’ll all submit and everything will be OK.

    Plus, they’ve bet the farm on AGW of all things! So what happens when their fantasies fail to materialize? That will be a lot of egg to wipe off. Egg enough to drown in.

    No, they act like a bunch of arrogant bastards, but at the same time they’re little people spinning out of control because they’re way, way out of their depth.

    (Shows you what a university education can lead to these days.)

  84. milodonharlani says:

    RockyRoad says:
    August 16, 2013 at 1:20 pm

    Longer than sixty years before the Constitution, ie 1727. For Montesquieu (Spirit of the Laws, 1748), you’re right, but Hobbes (Leviathan, 1651) & Locke (Two Treatises of Government, 1689) also underlie the Founders’ thought, among others, such as writers of the Scottish Enlightenment influenced by Locke. On freedom of speech & press, you can even go back to Milton’s 1644 Areopagitica.

    For that matter, the Constitution owes much to the Founder’s study of classical authors & Greek & Roman history, plus the United Provinces of the Netherlands (Dutch Republic, 1581-1795).

  85. Tom J says:

    [snip . . site rules . . mod]

  86. _Jim says:

    Philosophy Science (@PhilosoScience) says August 16, 2013 at 1:03 pm

    … Obama has said this multiple times when he says “If congress doesn’t act, I will”. His participation in this mass delusion is very dangerous, not to mention is [his?] calls for dictatorial power.

    I’d like to have seen Nixon do that. No, wait …

    .

  87. Chad Wozniak says:

    @SAMURAI, Outrageous Ampersand, milodonharlani, et as. –

    With der Fuehrer’s increasingly aggressive usurpations of congressional and judicial authority, have we not a situation parallel to both (1) Hitler, in the first months after he was named chancellor of Germany, appointed through an entirely democratic process; and (2) Egypt’s Mursi, also democratically elected, but a brazen tyrant withal? Democratic processes can still produce a tyrannical regime, a lesson we’ve been way too slow to learn – and that is clearly what is happening here.

    Unfortunately, in situations like this, constitutional processes are almost certain to fail, because the political class controls them and prevents them from being exercised. Therefore, a coup cannot be ruled out here, any more than in Egypt, unless one is willing to surrender freedoms once and for all

    I too believe that a possible solution may reside with the states: as I noted before, they could block Schutzstaffelgruppenfuehrer McCarthy’s actions by declaring them invalid and of no force or effect because unconstitutional, pursuant to the Tenth Amendment. That might force the federal government either to declare martial law or otherwise intervene militarily – or back off, if they want to avoid a bloodbath. I would hope that if der Fuehrer put the military in that position, it would side with the people instead of the regime.

    AGW fanaticism is only the tip of the iceberg in all this. It is really only the public face of a movement whose agenda and objectives are far deeper and more sinister

  88. garymount says:

    Using Win XP mode under Windows 7 does not solve the problem that XP support ends.

    You can run the emulator (virtual machine) on the Home version of Windows 7, just ignore the warning that it is not supported. You will have to provide your own copy of a licensed version of Windows however ( pro / business users have rights to one free XP license to run under the emulator for the XP mode).

  89. Tom J says:

    Tom J on August 16, 2013 at 1:44 pm
    [snip . . site rules . . mod]

    Oops.

  90. New EPA boss promises dictatorial action on global warming

    The fight against an unchecked EPA this is worth the risk of shutting down the government.
    The House should put a rider in the Budget for the EPA that all EPA regulations need to be ratified by Congress before they can become effective. SCOTUS deferred to Congress whether or not CO2 is a pollutant under the Clean Air Act. Congress should simply state that CO2 is not covered under the CAA. That all CO2 regulations must be first agreed to by Congress. Don’t threaten, guarantee, that the EPA if not the entire government, will shut down if the administration doesn’t agree.

    The EPA has few friends outside the Beltway. If Congress acquiesces to let the EPA bypass Congress, then Congress makes themselves irrelevant now and forever. If the government shuts down because the EPA refuses to submit its regulations for Congressional approval, the Administration will lose.

    On the other hand, Congress risks little. If Congress blinks they will be Nothing. All power will be ceeded to the Administration. Make it official and elect horses as Senators and lapdogs as Representatives. Hail, Caesar!

  91. milodonharlani says:

    Chad Wozniak says:
    August 16, 2013 at 2:01 pm

    The Joint Chiefs would probably obey their political masters. IMO you wouldn’t find substantial resistance in the officer corps until field grade level, but probably not enough. Among Active Component company grade officers, noncoms & enlisted, my WAG is that 25 to 50% would obey orders to fire on civilian citizens. Lower in the National Guard & Reserves. There was actually a poll on this topic among Active Marines about a decade ago, or maybe longer, which found 25% saying they would.

    Constitutional conservatism is however fairly widespread among Special Forces operators, if not their general officers, as witnessed by GEN McChrystal’s willingness to disarm the citizenry of semi-auto rifles.

    But IMO the actual military is less of a threat to liberty today than is highly militarized federal law enforcement. A decade or more ago, an editor of mine joked about the Library of Congress SWAT Team, but he was prescient & now not far off.

  92. Chad Wozniak says:

    @milodonharlani –
    Yes, your assessment is probably right. The problem is that for two generations schoolkids have not been taught the fundamentals of liberty, constitutional rights, the balance of power among branches of government and between government and people. The average person today – even the average college graduate – cannot describe how the division between legislative, executive and judiciary works, or even list the rights guaranteed to them by the Constitution. This predisposes a big chunk of the electorate to manipulation through frauds like AGW. And of course you can forget all about critical thinking – even something so simple as seeing how temps don’t run away in a commercial greenhouse full of CO2.

  93. DaBilk says:

    Congratulations Willis and Anthony for mention in the Vancouver Sun:

    http://www.vancouversun.com/opinion/op-ed/Carbon+taxes+poor/8789954/story.html\

    I was going to post a reply to Greg’s comment, but I don’t do Facebook.

  94. DirkH says:

    richardscourtney says:
    August 16, 2013 at 12:35 pm
    “The device proposed in the above article is not some green dream like windfarms. It is a proposal for increasing the output of thermal power stations by utilising their low grade heat instead of dumping that heat from cooling towers.

    At this stage it cannot be known if the proposal is technically, financially and economically feasible. But, at present, power stations dump more energy as low grade heat than the energy they provide as electricity. The proposal certainly seems worthy of investigation.”

    There are two kinds of improvements to power plant cycles: The ones that work and are implemented all the time, like this one
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combined_cycle
    and the pie in the sky pipedreams whose main purpose it is to attract subsidies and give these people
    http://www.globeinternational.org/
    ideas for new taxes.
    The artificial tornado falls straight into category 2.

  95. Gail Combs says:

    Outrageous Ampersand says: @ August 16, 2013 at 9:44 am
    …..the entire global financial system will collapse. And a massive chunk of food supplies will be compromised. One hungry desperate person is a tragedy; 5 billion of them is Judgement Day.

    These fools are playing with forces they can’t hope to control.
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    You are correct. Energy and Food, two of the forces these idiots are playing with both at the same time. Everyone here is aware of the constant push for a carbon tax and ‘Green Energy’ The other problem is the attack on our food supply from rising energy costs and the sudden implementation of nasty red tape. Suddenly the US food supply is not looking quite so good.

    The USA produces ~ 25% of the World Food supply and we export a lot of it.

    March 16, 2012
    ….Last year, the U.S. exported a record $137 billion worth of food. Indeed, food has always been one of America’s leading exports, with grains accounting for the vast majority of products shipped.

    But lately, the U.S. has been exporting a lot more non-bulk value-added foods like meats, fruits, vegetables, poultry, and nuts. Processed foods like food ingredients, beverages, frozen foods, and dairy accounted for $50 billion alone in 2011….
    http://www.foodlogistics.com/article/10657446/how-to-feast-on-the-us-food-export-boom-without-fear-of-credit-risk

    In 2011, 96 percent of U.S. crop farms were family farms, and they accounted for 87 percent of the value of crop production. There is a major problem looming called the Food Safety Modernization Act which will be hitting farmers about now.

    A bit about the Author of the following two articles:
    “Hans Bader is Counsel at the Competitive Enterprise Institute in Washington. After studying economics and history at the University of Virginia and law at Harvard, he practiced civil-rights, international-trade, and constitutional law.” link

    Food Safety Modernization Act harms small farmers and safety innovation
    As the FDA puts “in place a massive overhaul of the nation’s food safety system,” due to the Food Safety Modernization Act, “Few groups have expressed more frustration than tree fruit farmers, who grow apples, pears and a variety of other produce. They complain that the FDA’s approach, in some ways, defies common sense.” The 2010 law is proving far more costly than its supporters promised it would be, in order to get Congress to pass it.

    The “Food Safety Modernization Act would impose only modest costs on farmers, or so we kept being assured when it passed in 2010.” But many orchard growers now face tens of thousands of dollars in costs, notes the Cato Institute’s Walter Olson. As he points out, the law’s unexpected costs have caused a furor in some farming communities, and the Town of Brooksville recently became the “ninth in Maine to pass symbolic ‘food sovereignty’ resolution [See Jordan Bloom, The American Conservative; Food Renegade (Dan Brown of Blue Hill)].”

    “The FDA has issued two proposed rules to implement the Food Safety Modernization Act enacted in 2011,” notes Brian Wolfman of Public Citizen, who provides details and links. “The costs to fruit and vegetable growers for complying with the newly proposed produce safety regulation have been estimated at more than $30,000 annually for large farms and about $13,000 per year for smaller farms,” reports The Grower. As Olson, a veteran legal commentator, observes, this could be an enormous burden for some farmers: “How much do typical US farm households make in a year, you may wonder? According to U.S. government figures (here and here, for example) a large proportion of smaller family farms make little or no profit, and are instead supported by the off-farm earnings of family members.”….

    At one point, liberal journalists who supported the law made blatantly false claims about its reach, claiming it wouldn’t reach any small farms that didn’t sell across the state lines. That false claim, parroted by a left-leaning “fact-checker,” was explicitly contradicted by Section 406 of the bill, which stated that “In any action to enforce the requirements of the food safety law, the connection with interstate commerce required for jurisdiction shall be presumed to exist” even for farms that do not sell any produce across state lines…..

    OH DARN! so they did manage to slip in the *&^$@ Commerce Clause. That is really really bad news.

    …Ignorance about the law’s broad reach (and how it will be construed by the courts) has thwarted opposition to the bill… For example, a newspaper claims the bill “doesn’t regulate home gardens.” The newspaper probably assumed that was true because the bill, like most federal laws, only purports to reach activities that affect “interstate commerce.” To an uninformed layperson or journalist, that “sounds as if it might not reach local and mom-and-pop operators at all.” (The bill’s sponsor, Rep. Rosa DeLauro, has sought to forestall opposition to her bill by falsely claiming that that “the Constitution’s commerce clause prevents the federal government from regulating commerce that doesn’t cross state lines.”)

    But lawyers familiar with our capricious legal system know better. The Supreme Court ruled in Wickard v. Filburn (1942) that even home gardens (in that case, a farmer’s growing wheat for his own consumption) are subject to federal laws that regulate interstate commerce. Economists and scholars have criticized this decision, but it continues to be cited and followed in Supreme Court rulings, such as those applying federal anti-drug laws to consumption of even home-grown medical marijuana. Indeed, many court decisions allow Congress to define as “interstate commerce” even non-commercial conduct that doesn’t cross state lines….. http://www.examiner.com/scotus-in-washington-dc/trojan-horse-law-the-food-safety-modernization-act-of-2009

    And just to make you feel all warm and fuzzy, especially if you were aware of the Premises ID/National Animal ID battle and the sneaky way the government signed up your property WITHOUT permission and placed you in a data base they refused to remove you from.

    …The Utah Department of Agriculture and Food is promoting the Utah Garden Challenge in order to collect information about independent food production for the USDA.

    The Utah Garden Challenge is a voluntary contest to register 10,000 gardens. The data mining project has a broad interest in any “resource” who is growing food…
    http://www.morphcity.com/home/117-utah-garden-challenge-for-suckers

    USDA: Join the People’s Garden Movement Register Your Garden

    Is your garden benefiting the community, incorporating sustainable practices and a collaborative effort? If yes to all three criteria, congratulations on growing a People’s Garden!

    Regardless of type – vegetable, beautification, wildlife, or other – new and existing gardens can receive the designation of a People’s Garden….

    Collaboration is a joint effort of multiple individuals so your family could be considered a collaboration. If you give away food to your neighbors, family or friends it is collaboration, and who hasn’t received Zucchini: the vegetable from hell from a neighbor.

    I wonder how many will ‘register’ their gardens….

  96. Txomin says:

    @Outrageous Ampersand

    Nonsense. “America” is not that important. Sure, upheavals of power murk the waters and create opportunity for disaster. But also for renewal and growth. In short, the world will go on.

  97. Gail Combs says:

    DirkH says:
    August 16, 2013 at 9:41 am

    Outrageous Ampersand says:
    August 16, 2013 at 9:38 am
    “@DirkH
    Ah, but remember the recent Supreme Court ruling: citizens have no standing to sue the government over policy. ”

    Then who has?
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    The States. But they are also getting told by the US Courts to SHUT …. UP! So we are now in a neat little box. Citizens can not sue and states can not sue on their behalf so where does that leave us? Our second Amendment rights….

    Oh I forgot those have been done away with too or at least some of them, “Anti-Occupy” law ends American’s right to protest. Obama is busy working on the last one. Kerry says US [Obama] will sign UN treaty on [small] arms regulation despite lawmaker opposition From the point of view of international Law that binds the US to the treaty.

    “U.S. law distinguishes what it calls treaties, which are derived from the Treaty Clause of the United States Constitution, from congressional-executive agreements and executive agreements. All three classes are considered treaties under international law; they are distinct only from the perspective of internal United States law…..”

    This [Supreme] Court has regularly and uniformly recognized the supremacy of the Constitution over a treaty.” ~ Reid v. Covert, October 1956, 354 U.S. 1, at pg 17 <a

    Can the states sue the federal government for exceeding its constitutional authority?

    According to the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, the answer is no. Last year, that court dismissed Virginia’s lawsuit challenging Obamacare, on the grounds that the state had no interest in the lawsuit above and beyond the interests of its citizens, and states aren’t allowed to sue just on behalf of their citizens. States can only sue if they have some unique interest as states.

    In the latest issue of the University of Florida Journal of Law & Public Policy, I argue otherwise. I contend that states should have the right to sue the federal government for exceeding its constitutional boundaries if in doing so, it conflicts with a state law, such as the Health Care Freedom Act. After all, states already have the right to challenge federal laws that contradict state laws on a variety of other subjects. If the federal government says that states can’t regulate hunting or fishing within their boundaries, for example, the states can sue because the federal government is interfering with the state’s constitutionally reserved sovereignty. The Fourth Circuit acknowledged that, but said that that rule didn’t apply because the Health Care Freedom Act didn’t regulate individual action or run a state program. But as I contend in my article, states aren’t just limited to regulating individual action or running state programs. They also have the authority (reserved by the Tenth Amendment) to articulate and enforce individual rights, which is what the Health Care Freedom Act did. And that means that they should have the power to intervene to defend their own interest as states to protect their citizens.

    After all, that’s basically what happened in McCulloch v. Maryland, one of the central decisions in American constitutional law…which the Fourth Circuit completely ignored….

  98. I see a parallel between what happened with Chavez in Venezuela and what seems to have started here in the USA.
    To make his takeover work, Hugo bought the people. This will not work here, surely?
    I admire the Constitution and the Bill of Rights and the will of the people to defend them.

  99. Jon says:

    “Many companies will need to purchase new computers to run Windows 8.”

    No, as a couple of other people have already pointed out, they merely need to download and install one of the many free versions of Linux optimised for older PCs. Personally I recommend Mint XFCE.

  100. Gail Combs says:

    1 Faith Morgan says:
    August 16, 2013 at 9:47 am

    Green energy is the only way forward,
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    You are of course correct Faith. It is the only way forward to economic and political chaos, third world status and occupation by either the UN or China. I would suggest you hurry up and start your training in Mandarin now.

    I am not going to repeat myself. So here is my comment about why Green energy doesn’t work and how the EU is finally waking up. Click HERE

    And the results of “….Lower the CO2 emissions to 83% of the 2008 level over the next seven years….” Click HERE

  101. _Jim says:

    Txomin says August 16, 2013 at 3:37 pm

    Nonsense. “America” is not that important. Sure, upheavals of power murk the waters and create opportunity for disaster. But also for renewal and growth. In short, the world will go on.

    It’s not like the US is (or was) a beacon of hope, a ‘fount of liberty’, or acted as the ‘arsenal for democracy’ for other countries being attacked by an aggressive ‘oppressor’ in the world … what was the pilot’s name who flew a Mig over to Japan with nothing left but vapors in the fuel tank on account of the fact their military was afraid of just such defections? Why was he ‘dying to get here’?

    http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?43294-Interview-with-Lieutenant-Viktor-Ivanovich-Belenko

    .

  102. Gail Combs says:

    I did not realize ‘Faith’ is in the UK (You would think she might have notice all the people freezing to death by now.)
    So Faith, for you I suggest learning Russian.

  103. James at 48 says:

    Meanwhile, back up at the ice pack …

    Temperature continues to drop.

    Looks like the vortex is fanning out. Looking at the 6 day, the Arctic Front will have its first major hemispheric break out of the season. There will literally be a single boundary ringing the globe up around 60 N. Meanwhile it appears the rainy season is already knocking on the door down here in the high 30s North, in NorCal.

  104. DirkH says:

    Gail Combs says:
    August 16, 2013 at 4:11 pm
    “I did not realize ‘Faith’ is in the UK (You would think she might have notice all the people freezing to death by now.)
    So Faith, for you I suggest learning Russian.”

    That’s so 1970ies. We are busy reading the Quran here in Europe.

  105. DirkH says:

    Txomin says:
    August 16, 2013 at 3:37 pm
    “@Outrageous Ampersand
    Nonsense. “America” is not that important. Sure, upheavals of power murk the waters and create opportunity for disaster. But also for renewal and growth. In short, the world will go on.”

    …but maybe as a shithole.

  106. clipe says:

    Anyone read Faith’s “poetry”? I did so you don’t have to.

    Makes William McGonagall sound like Yeats.

    Beautiful Railway Bridge of the Silv’ry Tay!
    Alas! I am very sorry to say
    That ninety lives have been taken away
    On the last Sabbath day of 1879,
    Which will be remember’d for a very long time.

    ’Twas about seven o’clock at night,
    And the wind it blew with all its might,
    And the rain came pouring down,
    And the dark clouds seem’d to frown,
    And the Demon of the air seem’d to say—
    “I’ll blow down the Bridge of Tay.”

    When the train left Edinburgh
    The passengers’ hearts were light and felt no sorrow,
    But Boreas blew a terrific gale,
    Which made their hearts for to quail,
    And many of the passengers with fear did say—
    “I hope God will send us safe across the Bridge of Tay.”

    But when the train came near to Wormit Bay,
    Boreas he did loud and angry bray,
    And shook the central girders of the Bridge of Tay
    On the last Sabbath day of 1879,
    Which will be remember’d for a very long time.

    So the train sped on with all its might,
    And Bonnie Dundee soon hove in sight,
    And the passengers’ hearts felt light,
    Thinking they would enjoy themselves on the New Year,
    With their friends at home they lov’d most dear,
    And wish them all a happy New Year.

    So the train mov’d slowly along the Bridge of Tay,
    Until it was about midway,
    Then the central girders with a crash gave way,
    And down went the train and passengers into the Tay!
    The Storm Fiend did loudly bray,
    Because ninety lives had been taken away,
    On the last Sabbath day of 1879,
    Which will be remember’d for a very long time.

    As soon as the catastrophe came to be known
    The alarm from mouth to mouth was blown,
    And the cry rang out all o’er the town,
    Good Heavens! the Tay Bridge is blown down,
    And a passenger train from Edinburgh,
    Which fill’d all the people’ hearts with sorrow,
    And made them for to turn pale,
    Because none of the passengers were sav’d to tell the tale
    How the disaster happen’d on the last Sabbath day of 1879,
    Which will be remember’d for a very long time.

    It must have been an awful sight,
    To witness in the dusky moonlight,
    While the Storm Fiend did laugh, and angry did bray,
    Along the Railway Bridge of the Silv’ry Tay,
    Oh! ill-fated Bridge of the Silv’ry Tay,
    I must now conclude my lay
    By telling the world fearlessly without the least dismay,
    That your central girders would not have given way,
    At least many sensible men do say,
    Had they been supported on each side with buttresses,
    At least many sensible men confesses,
    For the stronger we our houses do build,
    The less chance we have of being killed.

  107. Outrageous Ampersand says:

    @ Chad Wozniak,

    Most troops are southern boys. They grew up listening to the lessons of 1865. They won’t fire on civilians, regardless of how loud the brass screeches.

    To everyone else: if America goes, everything else goes with us. Have you forgotten what happened in 476? Sure, hummanity will survive, it will just be set back 1,000 years.

    America is the last remnant of the glory of Athens, Rome, and Jerusalem. A poor shadow, to be sure. But the only ghost left of the mighty heritage of western civilization.

  108. Outrageous Ampersand says:

    There are two old southern sayings that I think apply:

    1. Outnumbered and outgunned is just the way we like it.

    2. It’s too late to fix it, but too soon to start shooting.

    Do as you will. Just remember the lessons of 1789 and 1865. The knowledge will serve you well.

  109. Mac the Knife says:

    _Jim says:
    August 16, 2013 at 11:20 am
    One wonders if you are familiar with the facts surrounding the passage of a particular piece of legislation titled the Affordable Care Act …

    _Jim,
    Thank You!
    Those facts very much needed to be clearly stated yet again. I’m glad I read all of the comments, before I responded. You corrected the false statements with greater clarity than I would have.
    MtK

  110. Gail Combs says:

    Outrageous Ampersand says: @ August 16, 2013 at 10:28 am

    ….Let me know when you figure out how to do it, because I’m plumb out of ideas. Regrettably I’m young enough that I’ll live to see the end of everything.
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    At the rate they are going I am afraid I am too. I am beginning to think those in power are completely mad. (Or planing to join Maurice Strong in China)

  111. Outrageous Ampersand says:

    I hate to preach, I really do. But right now I feel I must.

    There is a very old story. It’s 10,000 years in the telling. It has many branches and many twists. It tells the tale of an animal that chose to stand on two legs and face the universe. This animal had no claws, no fangs, nothing but reason and naked courage.

    When famine came, he grew special plants to sustain him. When the sky roared and the earth shook, he made the stones themselves shelter him. When mighty creatures chose to dine on him, he fought them off with fire.

    As he progressed, he built roads to encircle the new of the earth, arts to bring the gods down to earth, and laws to ensure that all could walk unafraid.

    And he failed. He failed.

    The glorious story of Man faltered for many years, with only a single divine spark left alight, a single seed.

    This seed found root on a new continent, and blossomed into the greatest force for good the world has ever known. A story 10,000 years long reached its climax under the dawn of a new world.

    Now the world grows dim. The light is fading. The darkness closes in, last as it was first.

    America is a feeble old man, but we are all that is left. If we go, the light leaves the world, maybe this time forever.

    That is what we fight for. Not an economy or a country, but the course of seven billion souls.

  112. Gail Combs says:

    milodonharlani says: @ August 16, 2013 at 11:03 am
    …IMO however the greater threat to liberty is the metastasized growth & militarization of federal, state & even local law enforcement, combined with the unsupervised abuses of the national “security” surveillance state….
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    That scares the ERRR … out of me. Poorly trained local law enforcement with military weapons.(Shudder) Does anyone else remember the Kent State Riots? My old boy friend was at ground zero.

  113. Chad Wozniak says:

    @Andres Valencia –
    Regrettably, Krauthammer still endorses limiting CO2 emissions, which, if he had stopped to think about it, is exactly what will drive the economic suicide he otherwise recognizes. You can’t oppose economic suicide without opposing its cause.. Too many Republicans, including others like Christine Todd Whitman and William Ruckelshaus, still buy into AGW. These people need to get the message THAT CO2 HAS NO DISCERNIBLE EFFECT ON CLIMATE, be right up front with it to the American people, and fight tooth and nail for real science.

    On a related point – now we have new Interior Secretary saying there had better not be any “climate deniers” in the Department of the Interior. Hypocrite! She and her fellow gusanos are the deniers, of actual science.

  114. Gail Combs says:

    dbstealey says: @ August 16, 2013 at 11:52 am

    ….The Petraeus affair proved that: Gen. Petraeus was made an example for only one reason: to cow the generals and admirals…..
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    I am sorry but you are incorrect. Gen. Petraeus COULD shed light on what happened to Seal Team 6 and COULD shed light on Benghazi. He did not. Gen. Petraeus said that he didn’t like the talking points: he thought they didn’t do enough to connect the attacks to demonstrations in Cairo that were triggered by an anti-Islam video. This has since proved to be a diversion.

    So he carried water for the Admin. and has been rewarded.

    Retired Gen. David Petraeus to join investment firm

    Petraeus will become the chairman of the newly created KKR Global Institute, an initiative of the Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Company investment firm.

    According to a release issued by the firm, the KKR Global Institute will ”further build on the firm’s efforts to help KKR’s portfolio companies expand globally, and it will periodically serve as an outlet for publishing the firm’s thought leadership products, including views from portfolio managers and industry experts.”…

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-politics/wp/2013/05/30/retired-gen-david-petraueus-to-join-investment-firm/

  115. Have to throw in my 2 Cents from Lincoln:

    “…that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

  116. Gail Combs says:

    Pete says: @ August 16, 2013 at 12:39 pm

    Relevant to the “We don’t need no stinkin’ Congress” idea and all it entails, Charles Krauthammer has an outstanding column in today’s Washington Post.

    Check it out: http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/charles-krauthammer-can-obama-write-his-own-laws/2013/08/15/81920842-05df-11e3-9259-e2aafe5a5f84_story.html
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    Thanks Pete, Well over 3000 comments on that article in a day WOW! I do not think I have ever seen that many comments on one article before.

  117. shras789 says:

    I certainly hope so, but he better move fast

  118. A.D. Everard says:

    chemman says:
    August 16, 2013 at 10:59 am

    “1 Faith Morgan says August 16, 2013 at 9:47 am”

    Do you actually live on so called green energy. No not the stuff they say you get for a few extra pennies per kilowatt hour on your electric bill. You have no idea if that really is coming from a renewable source. What I am asking is have you cut yourself off from the grid and actually live a “sustainable life?”

    I actually do live off grid and it isn’t for the faint of heart. You must forgo things that are large energy hogs. You know things like air conditioners and fancy dish washers. So why don’t you get out of that fantasy world of yours and try to practice what you preach.

    *

    I also have lived off grid – for almost five years. The worst was having no fridge. The worst job was washing the laundry because I had to do that by hand.

    You are spot on in your observations. I believe a lot of these let’s-go-live-in-the-wild types don’t think beyond frolicking amongst the trees and staring at the stars at night. They have no idea how hard life can be without power.

  119. Gail Combs says:

    rw says:
    August 16, 2013 at 1:37 pm

    During his (almost obsessive) lying about Benghazi, I realized that Obama was beginning to go off the rails. This isn’t going to be pretty, but I don’t think these wine-and-cheese types are really cut out to be dictators. Instead, they expect that we’ll all submit and everything will be OK.

    Plus, they’ve bet the farm on AGW of all things! So what happens when their fantasies fail to materialize?…..
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Urban Wars that will make the Rodney King riots look like a walk in the park.

    Why do you think the local police and the Department of Homeland security are gearing up for war?

    Obama has been repeatedly playing the race card, Zimmerman, the rodeo clown and every other chance he gets. Now picture what will happen when the electric grid goes completely unstable – permanently because we have shut down too many Coal plants. Now picture what happens when farmers like me take one look at the cost of implementing the Food Safety laws and say LET THEM EAT GRASS!

    THEY thought the laws would mean farmers would sell out but I won’t I will be G… D… if I will let the Sons of Syphilitic Camels have my land. And I am not the only one. The average age for an American farmer is ~56. Many are Vietnam Vets. Most farm because they love it not because thats how they make money. So they grow corn for ethanol or plant trees to sell to the UK as fuel but they flip the finger at the ADMIN and the rest of America and they don’t grow food.

  120. _Jim says:

    Gail Combs says August 16, 2013 at 5:50 pm

    I am sorry but you are incorrect. Gen. Petraeus COULD shed light on what happened to Seal Team 6 and COULD shed light on Benghazi. He did not.

    Sensing a non-sequitur here as well as significant potential after-the-fact ‘creative rationalization’ and event-to-person linking where there may be no solid justification for asserting such linking …

    .

  121. u.k.(us) says:

    “Essentially, he said that it is time to act,” she said. “And he said he wasn’t going to wait for Congress, but that he had administrative authorities and that it was time to start utilizing those more effectively and in a more concerted way.”
    ==============
    Just how might one implement such a strategy, while leading from behind ?

  122. Pamela Gray says:

    Well Glory Be! I stand corrected! Indeed no Republican voted for Obamacare.

  123. Ric Werme says:

    Gail Combs says:
    August 16, 2013 at 5:12 pm

    milodonharlani says: @ August 16, 2013 at 11:03 am
    …IMO however the greater threat to liberty is the metastasized growth & militarization of federal, state & even local law enforcement, combined with the unsupervised abuses of the national “security” surveillance state….
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    That scares the ERRR … out of me. Poorly trained local law enforcement with military weapons.(Shudder) Does anyone else remember the Kent State Riots? My old boy friend was at ground zero.

    I was at part of an event Tuesday – the mayor and City Council of Concord NH had a discussion item about accepting a federal grant (i.e. our money) in the form of a BEARCAT (Ballistic Engineered Armored Response Counter Attack Truck).

    In the application, the police chief claimed “[On] the domestic front, the threat is real and here. Groups such as the Sovereign Citizens, Free Staters and Occupy New Hampshire are active and present daily challenges.” Only us Free Staters (I was here before the FSP got created) are active, and we took notice. The hearing room was full, some 150 people, and about that many didn’t make it in.

    On person to testify against accepting the grant was not a FSP member but, as reported in the Huffington Post:

    A man identifying himself as a retired United States Marines Corps Colonel and Iraq War veteran testified last week against a New Hampshire city’s proposed acceptance of a grant for a police armored vehicle, and the video footage has gone viral.

    “What’s happening here is that we’re building a domestic military, because it’s unlawful and unconstitutional to use American troops on American soil,” he says in the video. “We’re building a domestic army, and we’re shrinking the military, because the government is afraid of its own citizens… We’re building an army over here, and I can’t believe that people aren’t seeing it. Is everybody blind?”

    Well worth reading and watching.

    I was at CMU during the Kent State “incident”. The school closed and all the students went home to an early summer break – and wound up at hometown schools, like CMU. He riled up the crowd and started a march on CMU’s ROTC offices, which got well trashed but did not get set on fire. Almost, but the guy with the lighter got booed down.

  124. Ric Werme says:

    One thing I like about New Hampshire is that we not only have the right to revolt, but the duty. From the Bill of Rights of the NH State Constitution:

    [Art.] 10. [Right of Revolution.]
    Government being instituted for the common benefit, protection, and security, of the whole community, and not for the private interest or emolument of any one man, family, or class of men; therefore, whenever the ends of government are perverted, and public liberty manifestly endangered, and all other means of redress are ineffectual, the people may, and of right ought to reform the old, or establish a new government. The doctrine of nonresistance against arbitrary power, and oppression, is absurd, slavish, and destructive of the good and happiness of mankind.

    June 2, 1784

    I don’t know who wrote the last sentence, but it adds a good exclamation mark.

  125. Gail Combs says:

    Outrageous Ampersand says: @ August 16, 2013 at 5:04 pm

    I hate to preach, I really do. But right now I feel I must….
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Ampersand, thank you for putting my feelings into words. I am old, I have no children. I fight with words because like you I look into the future and I see the coming of a Dark Age that makes the last one look benevolent.

  126. u.k.(us) says:

    The scary part is, the Republicans are only wolves in sheeps clothing.
    So, now what ?

  127. Gail Combs says:

    Ric Werme,
    Thanks I was aware of Concord asking for the military equipment but not of the hearing. I used to live in NH while working in MA. I just could not force myself to live in the People’s Republic until I married a native.

  128. Gail Combs says:

    u.k.(us) says:
    August 16, 2013 at 7:13 pm

    The scary part is, the Republicans are only wolves in sheeps clothing.
    So, now what ?
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Time for a third party or better yet time to kick the RINOs out and return the Republicans to Classic Liberals.

  129. “THEY thought the laws would mean farmers would sell out but I won’t I will be G… D… if I will let the Sons of Syphilitic Camels have my land.”
    WOW, Gail you’re really wound up. – Good for you…

  130. Chad Wozniak says:

    @Gail Combs –
    Loved the part about the “sons of syphilitic camels’ – right on! Just the sort of resolve and determination we need to beat back the AGW fanatics.
    @rw –
    I would caution anyone not to think these people have the will to act out their intentions and destroy science, freedom and the economy. We should be prepared for them to cling to AGW and to their claims of authority outside of the Constitution to the bitter end, and they can do tremendous damage before they are finally stopped. . They will do that until physically compelled to stop.

  131. Jeff L. says:

    2 thoughts:

    1) How appropriate that the new EPA bosses quote was at the Univ of Colo Boulder – also know as the Peoples Republic of Boulder by most in Colorado – ‘nuf said there.

    2) The chill goes deep – it has snowed at least 3 times (that I am aware of ) the Colorado mountains this month. A occasional late August snow isn’t uncommon but 3 snows in the first half of August – pretty uncommon , at least based on my years of observation.

  132. u.k.(us) says:

    I’ve been subjected often in my reading lately to “syphilitic camels’ “.
    Is this like a metaphor, or something more serious ?

  133. MattS says:

    u.k.(us),

    A quick Google search shows that “syphilitic camels” gets thrown around a lot in politics. I would call it a playground level insult in most cases, however it can be more serious.

    http://joelsgulch.com/insert-blessing-that-involves-the-fleas-of-a-thousand-camels/

  134. David Ball says:

    “This Is Why” – The Decemberists

    Come the war
    Come the avarice
    Come the war
    Come hell

    Come attrition
    Come the reek of bones
    Come attrition
    Come hell

    This is why
    Why we fight
    Why we lie awake
    And this is why
    This is why we fight

    When we die
    We will die
    With our arms unbound

    And this is why
    This is why
    Why we fight
    Come hell

    Bride of quiet
    Bride of all unquiet things
    Bride of quiet
    Bride of hell

    Come the archers
    Come the infantry
    Come the archers
    Of hell

    This is why
    Why we fight
    Why we lie awake
    This is why
    This is why we fight

    And when we die
    We will die
    With our arms unbound
    And this is why
    This is why we fight
    Come hell
    Come hell

    This is why
    Why we fight
    Why we lie awake
    This is why
    This is why we fight

    When we die
    We will die with our arms unbound
    And this is why
    This is why we fight

    So come to me
    Come to me now
    Lay your arms around me
    And this is why
    This is why
    We fight
    Come hell
    Come hell
    Come hell
    Come hell

  135. Tsk Tsk says:

    richardscourtney says:
    August 16, 2013 at 12:35 pm

    The device proposed in the above article is not some green dream like windfarms. It is a proposal for increasing the output of thermal power stations by utilising their low grade heat instead of dumping that heat from cooling towers.

    At this stage it cannot be known if the proposal is technically, financially and economically feasible. But, at present, power stations dump more energy as low grade heat than the energy they provide as electricity. The proposal certainly seems worthy of investigation.

    Richard
    =========================================================================
    Actually it can be known. I don’t care if we use artificial tornadoes, Stirling engines, or unicorn merry-go-rounds, Carnot thermal efficiency still applies. It is uneconomical to extract more mechanical work from the waste heat from power plants now because the inlet and rejection temperatures are simply too close to one another. I find it hard to believe that this scheme will achieve a 40% increase in total electrical power for the same thermal input. Even assuming they’re talking coal or nuclear baseload which are in the neighborhood of 30-35% efficient, we’re supposed to believe that we’re going to improve this to somewhere near 50%. I’m not buying it til someone shows me some real data or sound calculations.

  136. SAMURAI says:

    Gail Combs says:
    August 16, 2013 at 7:20 pm
    u.k.(us) says:
    August 16, 2013 at 7:13 pm

    The scary part is, the Republicans are only wolves in sheeps clothing.
    So, now what ?
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Time for a third party or better yet time to kick the RINOs out and return the Republicans to Classic Liberals.

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>
    I whole heartedly agree!

    The Republican Party has simply become the armature Democrat-lite party, that believes in gigantic government, huge deficits, crony crapitalism, massive entitlement programs, the Constitution is a hurdle to be circumvented rather than the law of the land, massive rules and regulations, weak monetary policies, etc.

    Why would anyone vote for a rank armature piker when you can get the real deal with a professional Democrat? Why indeed…

    Americans are now fed up with both parties, (Congressional approval rating is at an hilarious 12%) and are open to an alternative. Unfortunately, the Constitution established a two party system, so third-parties are not possible to maintain. Somehow, the Republican Party must be reformed to a Libertarian ideology, but there are now only 3 Senators in Washington able to pull it off: Rand Paul, Ted Cruz and Mike Lee…

    The other problem is that 49% of Americans don’t pay any income taxes, 48 million are on food stamps, 47 million are on Social Security, 314 million soon to be on Obamacare and 24 million work for state or federal governments…

    With such a vast majority of Americans now willing to just vote themselves more money without regard to the socio-economic consequences, it’s really difficult to effect change.

    The only way to overcome these depressing numbers is to somehow convince a large number of people that such an economic and social construct is unsustainable and that eventually US’ $20 trillion federal and state debt and $100~200 trillion unfunded liabilities (depends on computation assumptions) will eventually lead most of them to poverty….

    A tall order, with very little time to accomplish it. Moreover, the changes that are required to fix the problems will initially be very painful with millions of public sector employees fired, entitlements severely cut, interest rates increased, default on a large portion of US debt, a spike in unemployment, a drop in GDP, a banking/financial crisis will ensue, etc… I.e. vote for me and I’ll make your life miserable for a couple for a few years…. Oh, goody….

    Anyway, that’s what we’re up against… Short-term pain for long-term gain.

  137. Chad Wozniak says:

    @Tsk Tsk – Combined heat and power (cogeneration) facilities feed the steam from generation into industrial processes to capture its energy to do useful work. Also, combined cycle gas generation uses the steam heat as well as the combustion heat, to generate added power.

  138. Ric Werme says:

    SAMURAI says:
    August 16, 2013 at 9:44 pm

    The Republican Party has simply become the armature Democrat-lite party,

    armature? Do you mean amateur?

    Americans are now fed up with both parties, (Congressional approval rating is at an hilarious 12%) and are open to an alternative. Unfortunately, the Constitution established a two party system, so third-parties are not possible to maintain.

    I don’t think the US Constitution established a two party system, or any parties, for that matter.

    It may have facilitated the formation of two dominant parties allowing a situtation where the work together to prevent other parties from becoming a threat.

    In New Hampshire, the Libertarian party gained major party status, then the legislature changed the qualification, and we lost major party status in the next election and never regained it. This wasn’t the only reason we lost major party status, but it is the most important.

  139. nzrobin says:

    And when Gina was head of air quality at EPA she was asked if she knew the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere. She had to admit that she did not. How can someone with such ignorance rise to a position such as this? Shocking.

  140. Janice Moore says:

    “I don’t think the US Constitution established a two party system, or any parties, for that matter.” [Ric Werme]

    You are correct.

  141. Mr Green Genes says:

    nzrobin says:
    August 16, 2013 at 11:13 pm

    And when Gina was head of air quality at EPA she was asked if she knew the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere. She had to admit that she did not. How can someone with such ignorance rise to a position such as this? Shocking.
    =====================================================================
    Hmm. It looks as though the US is very similar to the UK in this regard. Here it almost seems like an act of faith to appoint to top jobs, not least as government ministers, people with absolutely no knowledge of the subject on which they’re supposed to lead. Either that, or we pick people with such a vested interest that they will only pursue their own agenda without any regard for facts or evidence.

    It’s working SO well …

  142. dbstealey says:

    Gail Combs says…

    Regarding Gen Petraeus:

    “So he carried water for the Admin. and has been rewarded.”

    I would use a more credible source than Media Matters to make that argument. They always put the Administration’s spin on their ‘news’ reporting.

    The fact is that Gen Petraeus has been completely co-opted, which was the point I made. His groveling resignation letter kissing up to Obama was disgusting: ["...This afternoon, the President graciously accepted my resignation... you (Obama) did extraordinary work on a host of critical missions during my time as director, and I am deeply grateful to you for that... Thank you for your extraordinary service to our country, and best wishes for continued success in the important endeavors that lie ahead for our country... With admiration and appreciation... David Petraeus"]. <— [that letter was written to the guy who publicly stuck it to Petraeus. Now Obama owns him.]

    I argued that the U.S. military has been co-opted along with the courts. Who will protect American citizens now from the American government? Petraeus was publicly humiliated for a specific reason. The fact that they threw him a bone afterward means nothing; it just keeps him in line, with something else he can lose. Every general officer in the military saw and understood exactly what had happened. None of them want to be in Petraeus’ shoes. They will be putty in Obama’s hands now.

    I was surprised at how easy it was to cow the military by making an example of Petraeus [and he was certainly made an example; there was no reason to go pubic with his sins. He could have simply been forced to retire for ‘personal/family reasons’, like many before him. But that would not have had the intended effect: publicly making a high ranking general officer into a chump, and thus herding the rest into line.

  143. richardscourtney says:

    Tsk Tsk:

    At August 16, 2013 at 9:32 pm
    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2013/08/16/the-wuwt-hot-sheet-for-august-16th-2013/#comment-1392825
    you write to me

    I don’t care if we use artificial tornadoes, Stirling engines, or unicorn merry-go-rounds, Carnot thermal efficiency still applies. It is uneconomical to extract more mechanical work from the waste heat from power plants now because the inlet and rejection temperatures are simply too close to one another. I find it hard to believe that this scheme will achieve a 40% increase in total electrical power for the same thermal input. Even assuming they’re talking coal or nuclear baseload which are in the neighborhood of 30-35% efficient, we’re supposed to believe that we’re going to improve this to somewhere near 50%. I’m not buying it til someone shows me some real data or sound calculations.

    But nobody is suggesting defying Carnot Cycle limits.

    As you say, conventional coal-fired PF and nuclear plant operate at ~35% thermal efficiency using single cycle steam turbines.

    Operation at over 50% thermal efficiency is obtained using combined cycle plants; e.g. combined cycle gas turbines (CCGT) burning gas, or pressurised fluidised bed combustion (PFBC) burning coal. They use gas and steam turbines where the exhaust heat of the gas turbine provides the heat for the steam turbine. The gas and steam turbines each operate at less than maximum efficiency but their combination provides higher efficiency than either can alone.

    Conventional PF and nuclear plant operating combined heat and power (CHP or ‘cogeneration’) operate at over 80% thermal efficiency. They utilise the low-grade waste heat for heating buildings.

    Please think about CHP.
    Low grade heat from a power station is dumped by the condenser cycle. This heat is often dumped using cooling towers that evapourate water. CHP does it by heating buildings that would otherwise use electricity from the power station to heat them.

    A power station’s condenser cycle need not evaporate water: it could accelerate air. The potential device suggested in the above article does this and uses wind turbibes to convert the energy of the moving air to electricity. In principle this is no different from CHP.

    Combined cycles and CHP reduce the thermal efficiencies of their turbines to obtain maximum thermal efficiency of their total systems. CHP more than doubles the thermal efficiency of a nuclear or a coal-fired conventional PF power station.

    As I said,

    At this stage it cannot be known if the proposal is technically, financially and economically feasible. But, at present, power stations dump more energy as low grade heat than the energy they provide as electricity. The proposal certainly seems worthy of investigation.

    Richard

  144. richardscourtney says:

    DirkH:

    I am replying to your post addressed to me at August 16, 2013 at 3:02 pm
    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2013/08/16/the-wuwt-hot-sheet-for-august-16th-2013/#comment-1392638

    It says

    There are two kinds of improvements to power plant cycles: The ones that work and are implemented all the time, like this one
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combined_cycle
    and the pie in the sky pipedreams whose main purpose it is to attract subsidies and give these people
    http://www.globeinternational.org/
    ideas for new taxes.
    The artificial tornado falls straight into category 2.

    Your opinion is noted, but not understood. It seems to reflect your ‘gut reaction’ to the press release claiming the potential device is ‘green’. That claim is clearly a big ‘nod’ to the existing need to claim any power generation research is for ‘green’ technology if the research is to obtain funds.

    Please read my reply to Tsk Tsk at August 17, 2013 at 1:28 am
    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2013/08/16/the-wuwt-hot-sheet-for-august-16th-2013/#comment-1392946

    If the device were – like CHP – to double the thermal efficiency of a power station then it would have the same effect as building a new (i.e. additional) power station but would have LESS capital cost than a new power station.

    And I fail to see where “subsidies” and “taxes” come into this.

    As I said in my first post about this above at August 16, 2013 at 10:42 am
    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2013/08/16/the-wuwt-hot-sheet-for-august-16th-2013/#comment-1392344

    This is an infant technology which needs to be proved technically and economically at demonstration scale. However, it would be a ‘game changer’ if successful because it would reduce the need for power stations by about a quarter and could be retro-fitted to existing power stations.

    Richard

  145. richardscourtney says:

    DirKH:

    As a point of information concerning my answer to you at August 17, 2013 at 2:25 am (which inexplicably is in moderation) I add the following.

    Pointing me to a wicki article on combined cycles was not needed. For decades I worked on development of pressurised fluidised combustion (PFBC) and air blown gasification combined cycle (ABGC) systems.

    Richard

  146. Ed Mertin says:

    Why is it that no country on this planet ever tried to be true Libertarian if it’s so plausible?
    Minimal government, free trade, open borders, decriminalized drugs, no welfare state and no public education system.

  147. kadaka (KD Knoebel) says:

    Dear Richard S. Courtney,

    In the “Tornado Turbine” designs, there is an external heat exchanger somewhere producing the warm air from the plant’s warm water.

    Thus you’ll already be building something about as grand as a cooling tower as just one component, to dump the heat to air.

    So why not just use a cooling tower? Take a bog-standard hyperboloid natural draft cooling tower, except at the bottom you rework the air intake so the incoming air passes through a turbine first. You don’t want evaporative cooling, you want to use air, so size it for dry cooling.

    All the energy in the warm water is available there as would be for a Tornado Turbine. Anything more fancy invites additional efficiency losses. You can get the swirling by offsetting the turbine outflow into the central “tube”, which is more efficient than aimed at center anyway, take it in tangential, even have it in the right direction for a Coriolis force assist.

    Will it work? You know much more than I about such, you tell me. Any removal of energy will slow the air stream. There are more air flow restrictions than a standard tower, sapping more available energy. How much can be removed before natural draft stops working?

    Which is interesting as a theoretical max, as there is a more important consideration, the rate the heat from the plant is shed. As you remove more energy and slow the air stream, you slow the cooling rate. But the plant MUST dump heat at a certain rate. How much energy is recoverable before the cooling systems aren’t cooling fast enough?

    I don’t see the Tornado Turbine being of any benefit over my redone cooling tower. Except where one involves known proven technology whose pros and cons presumably can be rather readily evaluated, the other is screaming for a giant federal research grant to build a giant structure to test the concept. Without being anywhere near as sexy as hot fusion or subatomic particle collisions.

  148. Gail Combs says:

    Ed Mertin says:
    August 17, 2013 at 2:50 am

    Why is it that no country on this planet ever tried to be true Libertarian if it’s so plausible?
    Minimal government, free trade, open borders, decriminalized drugs, no welfare state and no public education system.
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    That was the USA up until 1913 when a bunch of bankers, with a European banker, Paul Warburg to, lead, them came up with the Federal Reserve Act 0f 1913. In that same year two amendments to the Constitution were passed. One gave the USA an Income Tax to repay the fiat money the bankers created and then loaned to the US government with the wealth of the citizens, the other made the election of senators by popular vote instead of selected by the legislature of the state..

    These two amendments and the Federal Reserve Act were what was needed to take the power of the states away from them and to grow the Federal government to the size it is today. Originally the Senate was supposed to represent the will of the STATES and act as a check on the power of the federal government, while the House was supposed to represent the will of the people. This was done to keep the USA from becoming a Democracy.

    The founding fathers were well aware of the problems inherent in a Democracy:
    A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the majority discovers it can vote itself largess out of the public treasury.

    Now the citizens of a state are taxed directly by the Federal Government and some of that money is then used to ‘bribe’ the States into doing the will of the Federal Government. Around 50% of tax revenue for a state comes from the Federal government. The threat to withhold funds is how the US government got the states to lower the speed limit to 55 MPH for example.

  149. richardscourtney says:

    kadaka (KD Knoebel):

    Thankyou for your post at August 17, 2013 at 3:58 am
    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2013/08/16/the-wuwt-hot-sheet-for-august-16th-2013/#comment-1393050

    Firstly, as you say, the proposed system requires a heat exchanger. However, this need not be a cooling tower.

    Large devices for forced-air water-to-air heat exchange are commercially available. Such a device would be much smaller and have lower capital cost than a cooling tower. It would heat the air (as is required). And it would accelerate the air for injection into the proposed ‘tornado’ device. Yes, a forced-air heat exchanger would reduce overall system efficiency because the fan would need to be powered to force the air, but I don’t see this as a significant thermodynamic or economic loss to the overall system.

    Secondly, as you also say, a cooling tower could be used as a chimney, then the kinetic energy of the air rising in the chimney could be extracted. If useful energy collection from a modified cooling tower were possible then it would be done. But the air speed achievable in such a chimney is too low for efficient energy collection from the air rising in it.

    Collection efficiency for the energy increases with the air speed. This is because the energy of ‘wind’ increases as the cube of the air speed. Indeed, no energy would be collected from low air speeds up the chimney (for the same reasons that windfarms provide no electricity unless the wind is strong enough).

    But very high energy collection is obtainable from high air speeds. The proposed device ‘spins-up’ the air for high energy collection efficiency. Indeed, that is the clear purpose of the device. And it says the spin would be initiated by the injection angle of the air into the device. (This is not dissimilar to the ‘spin speed’ of the fluid in a cyclone filter being higher than the speed of the fluid in the cyclone’s injection and extraction ports). The kinetic energy to accelerate the air would be obtained from the thermal energy of that air.

    Thus, the proposed device would have low capital cost and high energy collection efficiency.

    Would this work practically, financially and economically?
    I don’t know, but I can see no obvious reason why it would not.

    However, your proposed modified cooling tower cannot work because it provides air speeds which are too low for efficient energy extraction from the air.

    Hence, and in the light of the potential benefits, I would like investigation to determine the feasibility of the proposed ‘tornado’ device.

    Richard

  150. Mickey Reno says:

    Faith Morgan, wanting to do good, and even trying to do good, isn’t the same thing as actually doing good. You’ve heard the term “unintended consequences,” I’m sure. The story of Spain’s foray into large scale solar electrical generation is almost completely unintended, and has already failed as public policy. The sad thing is, Spain’s financial losses and generating failures could have easily been avoided, had Spanish power authorities listened to skeptical voices and power industry professionals, rather than Green utopians. Please check out these links, and then please, please do a little more open-minded digging on your own. Don’t add your voice to the irrational political force that pushes green, eco-delusions onto national governments and public utilities.

    http://rt.com/business/spain-solar-energy-bankruptcy-451/

    http://www.sott.net/article/264544-Spain-privatizes-the-sun-by-levying-consumption-tax-on-solar-power

  151. Ed Mertin says:

    oh, like back when we kinda used to resemble Zimbabwe, less government and more national insecurity, more crime, more illiteracy, more infant and maternal mortality and way lower life expectancy among other things.

  152. E.M.Smith says:

    Two years ago I bought an HP laptop with microsoft os on it. This year I bought an Android tablet. Most of the family uses Macs. My infrastructure is Linux. Next year the laptop gets an os upgrade to linux. Microsoft will be irrelevant to me then. Android, Mac and linux is all it takes.

  153. rw says:

    Chad Wozniak says:
    August 16, 2013 at 7:48 pm
    @rw –
    I would caution anyone not to think these people have the will to act out their intentions and destroy science, freedom and the economy. We should be prepared for them to cling to AGW and to their claims of authority outside of the Constitution to the bitter end, and they can do tremendous damage before they are finally stopped. . They will do that until physically compelled to stop.
    ===========================================================
    I’m not saying there aren’t some ominous trends (such as the militarization of the police, and the PC’ing of the military). But Lois Lerner and Doug Schulman aren’t Hermann Goering and Ernst Roehm. What happened in Germany involved tens of thousands of lower echelon officers who had battle experience in WWI and then learned to kill their political opponents in the 1918-23 period (see K. Heiden’s The Fuehrer). They weren’t like our contemporary wine-and-cheese types, and they had a very different ‘reinforcement history’ – and that makes a big difference.

    Another way of putting this is that we really do live in a world of cause and effect.

  154. u.k.(us) says:

    When standing on the shoulders of giants, it is best not to fall off.

  155. Myrrh says:

    Pamela Gray says:
    August 16, 2013 at 10:22 am
    I also have Windows 8. HORRIBLE product!!! My new hp extended keyboard notebook has a large mouse pad. Great idea for a mouse pad on a computer used for data analysis and report writing, but bad if you have windows 8. Windows 8 is actually made for a touch screen. Which I do not have. But when I rest my wrists below the keyboard as I am typing they connect with the mouse pad and the Windows 8 “finger sweep” functions start playing with my imagination, making me think my software has a poltergeist.

    Pamela, on an HP laptop with W8 there is a small indent on the mouse, top left, when pressed this shuts of the mouse for ease of typing – double tap to close and double tap to activate again, maybe it is the same for the notebook.

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