NW passage not so busy after all

Guest post by Robert Phelan

One of our commenters last week was going on about how the Northwest Passage was opening up and ships were making the passage… there is a website which tracks world wide shipping…. So my question was, “gee, how many ships are using this nifty new passage?”

http://www.sailwx.info/shiptrack/shiplocations.phtml

West of Greenland, there appear to be only three manned vessels, the Russian tanker Volgoneft-131, which has been making it’s way south at about three or four miles per day for the last week ( http://www.sailwx.info/shiptrack/shipposition.phtml?call=UFTA ),  the French yacht Vagabond (call sign FLAO  http://www.damocles-eu.org/press/Images_from_the_polar_yacht_Vagabond_85.shtml  ) which has been anchored in Jones Sound off Ellesmere Island for the last week, and  the Royal Arctic Line container ship Irena Artica ( http://www.ral.gl/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=215&Itemid=192&lang=en  ) crawling up the west coast of Greenland in Baffin Bay.

The answer seems to be “none”.  Only those three north of 70N. WUWT?

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54 Responses to NW passage not so busy after all

  1. Gary Hladik says:

    Cosmology has “dark matter” and “dark energy”. Climate scientology has Trenberth’s “dark heat”, also known as “in the pipeline”. No doubt the abundant but undetectable vessels taking the northwest passage will be classified as “dark shipping”. :-)

  2. Frank Luxem says:

    Yet watch this get reported as “fact,” then re-reported and spread. Another card in the AGW house.

  3. jbird says:

    Does the truth really matter to these morons? A young TV news announcer at my local station introduced a comment about the weather this morning with, “Since it it heating up everywhere in the world,….”

    I don’t remember the rest of her statement. It’s discouraging; I don’t see how anyone can fight such stupidity.

  4. milodonharlani says:

    Maybe in August or September the vast armada will appear to cruise the balmy NW Passage in stately splendor.

  5. Mark T says:

    I think those “dark ships” are sometimes referred to as “nuclear submarines.”

    Mark

  6. Gunga Din says:

    Maybe the dark ships’ cargo is the missing heat? That’s why no one can find the heat. They can’t find the ships!

  7. jbird says:
    July 11, 2012 at 6:43 pm

    Does the truth really matter to these morons? A young TV news announcer at my local station introduced a comment about the weather this morning with, “Since it it heating up everywhere in the world,….”

    I don’t remember the rest of her statement. It’s discouraging; I don’t see how anyone can fight such stupidity.

    You can fight such stupidity, but don’t expect to win.

    The other day a good-looking but otherwise lacking commentator on the Global TV news hour opined on the rolling power blackouts we experienced in Alberta on Monday, caused by the highly improbable coincidence of six major power generating stations (four were coal-fired and two were natural-gas-fired) having to be shut down for various reasons. She observed that the problems had been compounded by, and I kid you not, “windy turbines” (because it so happened that along with the hot weather there was an absence of wind and therefore no wind-power generation, but she did not mention that, even though the lack of wind-power generation accounted only for an infinitesimally small fraction of the total power shortfall).

    What is the use of fighting? Stupidity is a gift by the gods and should not be punished.

  8. PhilMB says:

    Wasn’t able to connect to sailwx.info, but did get into http://www.marinetraffic.com/ais/ Zooming into the Bearing Sea is a China cargo carrier “XUE LONG” heading up and around to Iceland. Pull the map around and you will see the potential paths available.

  9. James Sexton says:

    Lol, Robert, I hope you gave them a heads up! Last year, I did a post using the ship tracker, and it was down for days. ……. oops.

  10. Peter GC says:

    Not used the site you mention but I believe that AIS positions available on the internet are dependant on land based receivers which are located only in major ports or population centres. The site I normally use is marinetraffic.com. When tracking a certain vessel it will generally dissapear for long periods when away from populated areas.

  11. Rob Z. says:

    I can’t resist throwing this little tidbit into the discussion. Apparently the huge ice melt isn’t cooperating according to Shell Oil. See the link here. http://www.worldoil.com/Ice_delays_Shell_Alaska_drilling.html Story was from July 9th. See bottom for date line.

  12. PhilMB says: July 11, 2012 at 7:47 pm
    James Sexton says: July 11, 2012 at 7:58 pm

    Grumble, Grumble. The sailwx.info map is loading a lot slower than it was this afternoon. If their server crashes and they come looking for someone to blame, I’ll tell them it was that Phelan guy at Trinity wot done it. Cryosphere Today seems to be showing 60% concentration through most of the Canadian Archipelago and that poor tanker seems to be slogging its way south through 80%. Xue Long is still down near the Aleutians. Clear sailing there.

  13. Mark and two Cats says:

    jbird said:
    July 11, 2012 at 6:43 pm
    Does the truth really matter to these morons? A young TV news announcer at my local station introduced a comment about the weather this morning with, “Since it it heating up everywhere in the world,….”
    I don’t remember the rest of her statement. It’s discouraging; I don’t see how anyone can fight such stupidity.
    ———————-
    Against stupidity, even the gods contend in vain.
    -Friedrich Schiller

  14. @ Walter H. Schneider :
    July 11, 2012 at 7:35 pm

    I’m quite sure that the news report that I read about the Alberta power problems ended with the note that wind power had made up part of the “missing” power. I’ll check in the mornng. Now is bedtime

    IanM

  15. Taphonomic says:

    Mark and two Cats says:
    ” Against stupidity, even the gods contend in vain.
    -Friedrich Schiller”

    Stupid is as stupid does.
    -Forrest Gump

    You can cure ignorance, you can’t cure stupid.
    -Some smart guy.

  16. GeoLurking says:

    Taphonomic says:
    July 11, 2012 at 9:28 pm

    From Ron White: “You can’t fix stupid”

  17. Bill Tuttle says:

    “Ignorance is curable, stupid is forever.” –Robert A. Heinlein

  18. Richard111 says:

    @ PhilMB
    Nice link, thank you. Map doesn’t seem to show where the ice is.
    But sure are lots of potential paths. :-)

  19. Mac the Knife says:

    “You can lead a person to knowledge…. but you can’t make them think.”
    MtK

  20. Günther says:

    One of our commenters last week was going on about how the Northwest Passage was opening up and ships were making the passage…

    Link? Perhaps he was referring to the Northern Sea Route? Shipping might well again double there this year.

  21. Lew Skannen says:

    It is a modern day Marie Celeste – not only are all the passengers missing but ships are missing as well!
    (It is worse than we thought!!)

  22. Günther says: July 11, 2012 at 10:22 pm

    Günther: If I’d known Anthony was going to turn my e-mail into a post I would have taken a bit more time and care. The commenter was Jesse Fell in a number of comments in the thread about The Folly of Blaming the Eastern U.S. Heat Wave on Global Warming. Jesse seemed unaware of a number of things about the Northwest Passage, including that it was navigated by a wooden-hulled RCMP schooner, the St. Roch, in 1942. And here we are, half-way through the melt season, and the traffic is sparse.

  23. Michael Tremblay says:

    This nonsense about the Northwest Passage is just that – nonsense. Even if the Northwest Passage were completely free of ice year round it could not compete with the Northeast Passage for two important reasons – one, the distance to the Far Eastern markets from Europe through the NE Passage is shorter: two, the NW passage is uncharted – that is, the risk of running aground is greater. The NE passage has been regularly traversed since the 1920’s with the aid of Soviet (and later Russian) icebreakers and is extensively charted. The NW passage has had no commercial traffic pass through it on a regular basis and has several incidents of vessels grounding because of the poor charts.

    Encyclopedia Britannica
    “In the 1920s the newly established Soviet Union began developing the Northern Sea Route as a shipping lane, and domestic cargo ships started using portions of it during the summer months in the 1930s; the first successful one-season through-transit of the passage was by a Soviet icebreaker in 1934. Portions of the route were used between 1942 and 1945 during World War II by ships carrying Allied supplies from cities on the U.S. West Coast to ports in northern Siberia, notably Tiksi at the eastern edge of the Lena River delta. Domestic regional shipping grew after the war, made easier by improved navigational aids, a growing fleet of icebreakers to allow passage through the sea ice, and a lengthening shipping season—the latter having become year-round in the western section by 1980.

    In the late 1960s the Soviet Union made some overtures toward allowing foreign ships to use the Northern Sea Route, but they did not officially open it to foreign shipping until 1991. However, with the dissolution of the Soviet Union late that year, Russia subsequently experienced years of economic slowdowns and political instability, which negatively affected the operation of the passage. Shipping through it thus declined into the early years of the 21st century, after which domestic use of it began to increase again. Interest by foreign shippers in using the passage also grew at that time as the Russians introduced more sophisticated icebreakers and made improvements to port facilities along the route—aided also by a general trend toward longer ice-free periods each year. The first full traverse of the route by foreign merchant ships occurred in 2009. In 2010 a passenger ferry and a tanker ship (both Russian) each became the first of its kind to successfully navigate the passage’s entire length.”

    Interestingly, from a historical perspective, the German Commerce Raider ‘Komet’ sailed through the NE Passage into the Pacific with the aid of Soviet icebreakers in 1940 and Soviet warships frequently used this passage to travel from Murmansk to Vladivostok. Domestic Russian commercial traffic is quite extensive and international traffic is modest but growing.

  24. dp says:

    It’s very interesting how the east coast of Africa is barren of shipping. What ever could be causing that? Pirates? (use Church Lady voice)

  25. pat says:

    LOL. Everyone who does not have to transit the NW passage seems to know an awful lot about it.

  26. kadaka (KD Knoebel) says:

    From Günther on July 11, 2012 at 10:22 pm:

    Link? Perhaps he was referring to the Northern Sea Route? Shipping might well again double there this year.

    http://barentsobserver.com/en/arctic/northern-sea-route-without-murmansk-06-07

    Northern Sea Route without Murmansk
    The new Law on the Northern Sea Route, adopted by Russian legislators this week, does not include Murmansk and the Barents Sea.
    By Atle Staalesen
    July 06, 2012

    The law, which lays down regulations on shipping along the increasingly popular Arctic route, states that the route in the west officially stretches from the eastern coast of the Novaya Zemlya, the Kara Gate and the straits between the mainland and the island of Vaigach. In the east, the route includes the areas from the Russian-U.S. sea border and the latitude of the Cape Dezhnev, the easternmost point on Russian territory, RIA Novosti reports.

    The regulations, consequently, do not include the Barents Sea and the Pechora Sea, both of them waters, which are expected a hike in shipping and industrial activities over the next years. Both Murmansk and Arkhangelsk, Russia’s two main Arctic cities, are located outside the new definition of the Northern Sea Route territory.

    The new law, which was adopted by the State Duma in a third reading Tuesday, will come into force in 2013.

    Included in the law is also the establishment of a new Northern Sea Route administration, which is to manage icebreaker and sailing master services, as well as provide radio communication and hydrographic information, organize search and rescue operations and prepare preparedness meaures on emergency situations. According to Bellona.ru, the Russian Finance Ministry is allocating 27 million RUB (€660.000) for the new administration.

    Starting next year, you’ll have to specify if you’re making comparisons to the old or the new Northern Sea Route.

    And the Russians are assuming greater control of the area? Yeah, that’ll make the route much more popular. Or not.

  27. Steve R says:

    Does anyone know if the gps constellation is reliable in the arctic ocean?

  28. Jon says:

    My take on this is to change the titles of the elements that conspire to forward UNFCCC conform claims only.
    Social climate scientist, social journalist, social science magazine, social news media, etc etc

    ?

  29. Petrossa says:

    Here in France they just keep prattling on in the daily weather forecast at every weather event about ‘le rechauffement climatique’ It’s like nothing ever happened the last decade. In France it’s real and no MSM ever questions it.

    No wonder there are a lot of ‘stupid’ reporters around. If you don’t look for it yourself you won’t find anything saying otherwise. And since most Frenchies consider English the language of the devil they have precious little alternate sources.

  30. kadaka (KD Knoebel) says:

    http://barentsobserver.com/en/arctic/best-bidder-gets-nuclear-icebreaker-deal-03-07

    Best bidder gets nuclear icebreaker deal
    Russia’s nuclear power corporation Rosatom announces a tender on the construction of a new class of icebreakers.
    By Atle Staalesen
    July 03, 2012

    The 173 meter long and 33 thousand ton deadweight vessel will have a keel depth of 10,5 meters and be able to operate both in the Barents, Pechora and Kara Seas, as well as on the Yenisey River and in the Ob Bay. It will have two reactors of the type Ritm-200. The number of crew members will be 75.

    As previously reported, Russia is now also building four diesel-engined icebreakers. One of them is under construction at the Baltic Yard.

    Russia’s six nuclear icebreakers are all operated by the Rosatomflot, and are based at the Atomflot base in Murmansk.

    Didn’t they get the memo about the soon-to-be “ice free” Arctic? Why do they want these newer and better icebreakers that will soon become irrelevant, except perhaps in winter?

    Looks like Russia is planning for much more ship traffic by planning on reducing much more thick solid ice into broken-up slush.

  31. garymount says:

    The vessel St Roch that Robert E. Phelan mentions is housed in the Vancouver Maritime Museum:
    http://vancouvermaritimemuseum.com/main.jsp?page=216

  32. Rhys Jaggar says:

    The London Times had a full page advert for a luxury cruise through the NW passage in August this year. That’d probably be one.

    Commercially, I’d have thought that the NE passage is simpler. Far fewer narrow channels to navigate.

    Anyone asked the Russian naval services how many commercial vessels plan on going through this September???

  33. MFKBoulder says:

    Robert E. Phelan says: July 11, 2012 at 10:43 pm

    … Jesse seemed unaware of a number of things about the Northwest Passage, including that it was navigated by a wooden-hulled RCMP schooner, the St. Roch, in 1942. And here we are, half-way through the melt season, and the traffic is sparse.
    ######## ######

    That’s only half of the truth:
    The schooner St.Roch made the passage travelling from 1940 until 1942: thus they needed three melting seasons. This gives an different impression than than Robert’s statement.

  34. garymount says:

    Anybody remember the Australian couple attempting the Northwest Passage from last year ?
    http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674australian_explorers_attempting_to_sail_the_northwest_passage/

    It looks like they have just resumed their journey a few days ago:
    http://www.yachtteleport.com/

  35. Gary Hladik says:

    Mark T says (July 11, 2012 at 6:53 pm): ‘I think those “dark ships” are sometimes referred to as “nuclear submarines.”’

    That raises an interesting point. Is the northwest passage navigable by submerged submarines? If so, is it shorter than the polar route?

  36. garymount says:

    St Roch:
    “•First vessel to complete the Northwest Passage in one season (1944), also making it the first to use the more northerly, deeper route and to complete the Passage in both directions”

    http://www.vancouvermaritimemuseum.com/page216.htm

  37. EternalOptimist says:

    steve r asks
    Does anyone know if the gps constellation is reliable in the arctic ocean?

    it is pinpoint accurate at 70 degrees, and reliable too.

  38. cirby says:

    The Volgoneft-131 doesn’t seem to be traveling through the “northwest passage,” so much as “sitting in the middle of an icepack, hardly moving at all.”

    I have a feeling that it’s out there for some other reason – it’s a tanker (and a small one at that), so I’d be looking at it more like a support ship. What is it refueling?

  39. David says:

    Walter H Schneider and jbird – totally agree – but the problem is, these morons are on the TELLY so everyone (apart from us, of course) thinks they must be telling the truth..!

  40. Dyrewulf says:

    This reminds me of a saying in my world (Information Technology) ‘Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups.’

  41. MFKBoulder says: July 12, 2012 at 12:55 am
    As near as I can tell, you are correct. The first St. Roch voyage was 1940-1942, and though wooden-hulled she was built for arctic conditions. In 1944 the St. Roch made the return voyage in a single season. My point, however, is that this is not the first time such a voyage was possible – and just how possible is open to debate, apparently. The ship-location-tracking sites don’t seem to have a fix on everyone, everywhere, all the time, but there doesn’t seem to be any traffic now.

    cirby says: July 12, 2012 at 4:37 am
    I had the same thought: “Why is a small tanker moving south out of the pack ice?” As Robert Service put it: “There are strange things done in the midnight sun…”

  42. Phil. says:

    Robert E. Phelan says:
    July 12, 2012 at 7:52 am
    MFKBoulder says: July 12, 2012 at 12:55 am
    As near as I can tell, you are correct. The first St. Roch voyage was 1940-1942, and though wooden-hulled she was built for arctic conditions. In 1944 the St. Roch made the return voyage in a single season. My point, however, is that this is not the first time such a voyage was possible – and just how possible is open to debate, apparently. The ship-location-tracking sites don’t seem to have a fix on everyone, everywhere, all the time, but there doesn’t seem to be any traffic now.

    It’s happening every year now, multiple yachts etc. in both directions, although being smart they don’t usually try until the time when the Passage actually opens (the last part to clear is usually north of Gjoa Havn around early August). Last year a yacht completed the circumnavigation of the Arctic in one season leaving Norway and sailing the NE passage along the Russian coast, crossing the Bering Strait and then sailing through the NW passage.

  43. Bloke down the pub says:

    You can lead a whore to culture, but you can’t make her think.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~
    By the way, I think those ship tracker web sites, of which there are a number, are connected to the companies which provide the equipment on the vessels. As such, no site is likely to show all the vessels in any area.

  44. kim2ooo says:

    Be Nice!

    They were taking about the OTHER Northwest Passage :)

  45. Russell C says:

    Such was just like the other ‘FAIL’ narratives I wrote about last month at my American Thinker article (which linked to a WUWT blog piece as one bit of my evidence): “Global Warming’s Killer: Critical Thinking” http://www.americanthinker.com/2012/06/global_warmings_killer_critical_thinking.html

  46. Billy Liar says:

    PhilMB says:
    July 11, 2012 at 7:47 pm

    Zooming into the Bearing Sea is a China cargo carrier “XUE LONG” heading up and around to Iceland.

    Where did you get the idea it’s a cargo vessel?

    Ship Type: Research/survey vessel
    Year Built: 1993
    Length x Breadth: 167 m X 25 m
    Gross Tonnage: 14997, DeadWeight: 8759 t
    Speed recorded (Max / Average): 12.4 / 10.8 knots
    Flag: China [CN]
    Call Sign: BNSK
    IMO: 8877899, MMSI: 412863000

    It’s not due in Iceland until 15 August 2012 at 10am so its got plenty of time and an ice breaking capability to get there so it can go via the North Pole if they want it to.

    http://www.marinetraffic.com/ais/showallphotos.aspx?imo=8877899#top_photo

    When I looked it was heading NW at 2.7kts – not really likely to be taking cargo anywhere, is it?

    Are you in the misinformation business?

  47. Billy Liar says:

    Steve R says:
    July 11, 2012 at 11:58 pm

    Does anyone know if the gps constellation is reliable in the arctic ocean?

    Too late late to ask now, you should have thought of that before planning your expedition:

    http://www.arcticrow.com/

    :)

    Seriously, it is the Global Positioning System and the satellite orbits are designed to allow a minimum of 4 simultaneously in view with adequate geometry for accurate fixing anywhere on the surface of the earth.

    Short answer = yes it is reliable anywhere on earth.

  48. See - owe to Rich says:

    I don’t understand the point of this posting. There is no point in considering the busyness of the NWP until it gets close to opening, just as you don’t look for people in the vicinity of a pub an hour before opening time. Keep an eye on the Sea Ice Reference page and you can judge when it’s getting close. It probably will open this year, but it’s not a done deal. I would guess that adverse winds would have the ability to keep the western end blocked. Perhaps someone knows more about that consideration than a guess :-)

    Rich.

  49. DanW says:

    Ship tracking websites in general display only ships that have their AIS transponder on, and have an AIS recieving station within range (up to 50 nm) to pick up the signal. Coverage along the NW passage is poor to nonexistent.

    Shipping through the NW passage is nonetheless very, very sparse. I did not find fresh stats but abt. 30 ships a year is a good guess. I live by the Northern Baltic Sea myself and we have more ships going by every afternoon.

  50. PhilMB says:

    Billy Liar says:
    July 12, 2012 at 12:54 pm

    “Are you in the misinformation business?”

    My apologies All – I misinterpreted what I saw on the map, ’twas not my intent to mislead.

  51. Billy Liar says:

    PhilMB says:
    July 12, 2012 at 6:10 pm

    Apologies for biting your head off!

    The site is a good find. I have used sailwx before but was not aware of marinetraffic. So thanks.

  52. Michael Tremblay says:

    Billy Liar – The GPS tracking system becomes less reliable the further you are away from the equator because of the line of sight with the GPS satellites creates more interference with the atmosphere. In order to maintain an accurate position on earth you need to be in contact with at least three GPS satellites (triangulation). In order for the GPS satellites to maintain contact in the extremes of latitude (ie +90 or -90 degrees) they need to achieve a higher altitude to overcome the interference from the atmosphere due to the curvature of the earth. This is not to say that is cannot be done, the Russians created a GPS navigation system using satellites at higher altitudes precisely because of this problem (and the fact that they have a lot more of their country at northern latitudes) – the United States still does not have this capability because they position their satellites at a lower altitude.
    As a small aside, this means that cars built in the USA with built in GPS navigation become less reliable north of the 49th parallel (Canada and Alaska).

  53. Michael Tremblay says:

    i don’t want to rain on anybody’s parade here, but the idea that any passage through the Arctic (either the NWP or the NEP/Northern Route) will be used for Commercial Shipping is not based on whether or not there is any ice present, it is based on the economic and political viability of such an enterprise. The Soviets used the Northern Routs (NEP) despite the presence of vast amounts of ice – they used their very powerful ice breakers to continue opening passages through the ice in order to maintain a political presence in northeastern Siberia and to allow transit of their warships from Europe to the Pacific. The present Russian regime is doing the same thing but for economic reasons – they are still providing icebreakers to support transit of Foreign vessels and they are charging for the expense. As long as it is more profitable for the shippers to use this route while paying the Russian charges they will do so. Canada also has the capability of using their ice-breakers to provide year-round transit of the NWP and they have had for decades. The fact that Canada has not done so is because of the higher costs associated with providing safe passage at Western standards. That is to say the costs associated with providing extensive accurate charts of the NWP, as well as the setting up of rescue stations and refueling ports do not justify the expenditure of funds based on the Canadian Government’s expectations. That, coupled with the facts that the Northern Route (NEP) is shorter and maintained means that I doubt very much that significant use of the NWP for passage for commercial traffic will be realized in our lifetime regardless of whether or not the Arctic becomes ice free.

  54. Keith Sketchley says:

    GPS is usable in the Arctic, it does not suffer from low signal strength that the geo-stationary communication satellites do (due to aiming of their antenna pattern to more populous areas), Iridium SATCOM and HFDatalink are alternatives, HF voice if hungry (used by airliners for decades but a pita to use).
    I don’t know offhand if the WAAS version of GPS augmentation for greater accuracy is available in the Arctic, it comes from those GEOs, I believe it is not available in NW Alaska which is beyond the rounded corner of the beam pattern.

    The St. Roch’s hull was reinforced in some way that I forget, probably sheathed with steel sheet, though it still was a small wooden boat.

    My memory of feasibility of resupplying Cambridge Bay is that most years they could count on one month of access.
    (Cambridge Bay is the nearest sizeable support airport & seaport to where the cruise ship Clipper Adventurer ran aground on August 27, 2010. (In http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coronation_Gulf , which is a channel between the mainland and large Victoria Island, so about halfway across the northern mainland coast of Canada. (Grounding location 67-58.2N/122_40.3W, on an underwater ridge. See
    http://www.tsb.gc.ca/eng/rapports-reports/marine/2010/m10h0006/m10h0006.asp.

    Causal factors included slackness in acceptance of inoperative equipment (forward-looking sonar – they used an echo-sounder on the ship, but the ridge they hit has a steep side), not using a small boat precede the ship to echo-sound even though crews of that ship had done so previously, operating at full speed even though their schedule required only half of that, in a sparsely mapped area that had high risk of uncharted obstructions.

    While a large number of compartments were holed, most were double-bottomed. Fortunately _four_ tugs finally got the ship off the ridge, before the worst winds occurred.

    The shoal had been reported in 2007 by a CCG ship, notifications got buried later though databases were available, the chart selling service used by the Clipper Adventurer omitted the NOTSHIP information on that shoal and the crew were not aware of the NOTSHIP database.

    As on the open ocean, it may take a few hours for aircraft to reach the location to drop supplies, and at least several hours for other boats to arrive to help. The area is sparsely settled, I would expect the slow Twin Otter aircraft to be in the region such as at Cambridge Bay, but the big fast aircraft that can drop supplies, like C-130s and C-17s, are not stationed in the High Arctic, though they might be in and out of the area (resupplying Eureka weather station, for example.)

    Guidelines for the operation of passenger vessels in Canadian Arctic Waters are at http://www.tc.gc.ca/media/documents/marinesafety/tp13670e.pdf.

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