Aurora in Michigan last night – great time lapse video

As I mentioned on my post yesterday, low latitude aurora could be possible thanks to the CME that impacted Earth yesterday. Here’s a wonderful time lapse video from Michigan last night showing the Aurora Borealis in stunning color and clarity.

 

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16 Responses to Aurora in Michigan last night – great time lapse video

  1. Max Hugoson says:

    Wow, red, blues, almost whites? Never seen that in the Continental USA, only Canada and Alaska.

    That was an EXTREME event!

  2. DR says:

    Yep, I was out last night and saw it here in Michigan. Quite a rare treat with the colors.

  3. Paul Westhaver says:

    Thanks for forecasting the aurora yesterday. The news warns us about snow and cold etc, but rarely do they warn us about eye candy! Too cloudy in Nova Scotia last night so thanks for the great video.

  4. cjames says:

    Check out these pictures from Marquette, Michigan:

  5. Andy Wehrle says:

    There are reports of an aurora event on the night of Dec 13 1862 in the Fredericksburg, VA area. I wonder what the climate implications are of that event, if any?

  6. PRD says:

    I noticed the odd red hue last night in NW Louisiana. I figured it was the lights of the gas drillers reflecting off of more wildfires.

  7. michael says:

    West Central Arkansas: I set up last night for some time lapse. Got plenty of stars and some flickering red glow, but didn’t get the aurora. I think the camera turned off too early or I might have had some great aurora images. A guy 60 miles west of here got a great time lapse of the aurora – mostly reds.

  8. Dr. Dave says:

    I’ve seen the Aurora Borealis twice in Michigan. The most vivid display was on a warm summer night in the mid-70s. We were camping on a beautiful private beach and had a big bonfire going. Sometime after midnight one of us noticed them when he walked away from the fire and down the (very dark) beach. We watched for hours! The event was all over the newspapers the next day. They were visible as far south as southern Indiana.

    The last time was just a few years later in northern Michigan (south of Traverse City). This time you had to look north to seem them. They weren’t “all around you” like they were the first time.

  9. Crispin in Waterloo says:

    @Dr Dave
    I was on top of Rochdale Collegiate watching the cartoon Animal Farm that night. It was so spectacular, visible in spite of the Toronto lights, that we spent as much time look up as at the screen.

  10. George E. Smith; says:

    Well time lapse auroral displays bug the hell out of me. People get to think they are watching something real, and movie makers even put them in movies at that speed. So I would like to see a real time auroral video to see what it actually looks like.

  11. Ed Mertin says:

    Michael, that glow up north of you was me. Went swimming in Lake Dardanelle near Nuclear 1 and I was really glowing in the dark! Big wave to you from the mountain above Boxley Valley!

  12. Garry says:

    @George E. Smith “I would like to see a real time auroral video to see what it actually looks like.”

    There are some on youtube, here:

    I saw some in Alaska (Denali) some years ago and recall they moved somewhat like a curtain blowing in a very light breeze, in slow motion. In other words the movement was slow but visible from one minute to the next, and left us saying “Just wow, that’s amazing.” It went on for more than an hour, at about 2:30 AM.

  13. Anna says:

    Just wondering if there are any conditions in which an aurora would be seen in south eastern Australia?
    PS Thank you to everyone here, I am learning such a lot about a subject that now has me fascinated.

  14. I saw the Northern Lights in North Wales, I would guess late 50s, early 60s. Was at prep school there, and our headmaster woke up the older boys and told us to put our slippers and dressing gowns on; he then took us outside and we were treated to what is a truly extraordinary sight. Never seen them since, tho’ I will do before I pop it, that I have promised myself, and this time much further North. Oh and I go to see the total solar eclipse in Oz in 2002, so count myself very luck as a witness of cosmic phenomena man. Both are more than worth travelling for, and for sure, I can understand how people become eclipse junkies

  15. JohnB says:

    http://www.mlive.com/news/index.ssf/2011/10/see_northern_lights_over_michi.html

    Link includes satellite images of the aurora as well as video from a satellite flyby.

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