Northern Regional Sea Ice Page

Map of the ArcticThanks to REP

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – The Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection – click to view at source

Arctic BasinCentral ArcticBaffin Bay/Gulf of St. Lawrence/Newfoundland BayBaltic SeaBarents SeaBeaufort SeaBering SeaCanadian ArchipelagoChukchi SeaCook InletGulf of St. LawrenceEast Siberian SeaGreenland SeaHudson BayKara SeaLaptev SeaSea of OkhotskYellow Sea

Arctic Basin:

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Central Arctic:

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – click to view at source

Baffin Bay/Gulf of St. Lawrence/Newfoundland Bay:

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – click to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Baltic Sea: :

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – click to view at source

Barents Sea: :

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – click to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Beaufort Sea: :

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – click to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Bering Sea: :

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – click to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Canadian Archipelago::

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – click to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Chukchi Sea::

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – click to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Cook Inlet::

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – click to view at source

East Siberian Sea::

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – click to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Greenland Sea::

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – click to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Hudson Bay::

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – click to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Kara Sea::

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – click to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Laptev Sea::

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – click to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Sea of Okhotsk::

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – click to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Cryosphere Today – University of Illinois – Polar Research Group – Click the pic to view at source

Yellow Sea::

National Snow & Ice Data Center (NSIDC) – click to view at source

Source Guide:

Cryosphere Today – Arctic Climate Research at the University of Illinois:

Home Page – http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/

Products Page – http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/

Images Indexed By Date – http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/IMAGES/

National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC):

Home Page – http://nsidc.org/

FTP Page – http://nsidc.org/data/seaice_index/images/

Regional FTP Page – ftp://sidads.colorado.edu/DATASETS/NOAA/G02186/plots/

Data Search Page – http://nsidc.org/searchlight/

Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center (NERSC) – Arctic Regional Ocean Observing System (ROOS):

Home Page – http://arctic-roos.org/

Sea Ice Charts – http://arctic-roos.org/observations/satellite-data/sea-ice/ice-area-and-extent-in-arctic

Regional Page – http://arctic-roos.org/observations/satellite-data/sea-ice/sea-ice-variability-in-regions

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Jim Cripwell

Is there any data on the ice in the Northwest Passage? I have a bet, and Environment Canada has stopped giving the data.

Chris @NJSnowFan

Anthony you have to add all the links Neven has listed here..
https://sites.google.com/site/arcticseaicegraphs/
He did not have very nice things to say about you in is past the other day.

@njsnowfan

Jim Cripwell says:
August 25, 2013 at 2:31 pm
Is there any data on the ice in the Northwest Passage? I have a bet, and Environment Canada has stopped giving the data.
Here is Environment Canada web site for daily and weekly ice updates..
http://www.ec.gc.ca/glaces-ice/default.asp
They do have new notice up,
Please note the Canadian Ice Service (CIS) is modifying several of its web pages to meet the international Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG). We apologize for the inconvenience this may cause

@njsnowfan

New Data Picture of the Arctic Ice coverage from E. Canada.
https://twitter.com/NJSnowFan/status/372338435815518209/photo/1

rogerknights

I suggest that, in the Reference Page drop-down list, this page be listed adjacent to the Sea Ice page.

Bloke down the pub

There seems to be a lot of broken links on the main sea ice page at the moment. Is it just a coincidence or am I getting paranoid?

Greg Goodman

re. JAXA moving the goal posts :
Their attempt at rewriting the data record seems to be totally unfounded, being based on applying techniques for newer, more precise satellites to data from older instruments. This leads to a sizeable changes that increase past decadal averages. Yet another dataset falls victim to non science motivated “corrections”.
I go into this in more detail at Lucia’s:
http://rankexploits.com/musings/2013/september-nsidc-prediction/#comment-119346

Greg Goodman

Here’s a more objective way to compare successive years. I use a low-pass filter to remove short term ‘weather’ noise. This result uses ALL the daily data.
Here I looked at all years since 2005 on a spaghetti plot and retained the two nearest to this years trace. 2013 so far is bounded by the data of 2008 and 2009.
http://climategrog.wordpress.com/?attachment_id=439
So far since 2005 , 05,06,09 had more ice than 2013, 08,11,12 had less.

Greg Goodman

justthefactswuwt , if you want to add that graph to this page, I can provide scripts to reproduce it.
I also have a fully interactive SVG version will all years since 2005. That format can be zoomed in and each year toggled on/off in the browser. I’ve had to arrange for this to be hosted outside my usual WordPress site since I can’t seem to upload svg format.
http://piments.com/svg/arctic_ice_annual_smoothed.svg
If that is possible on WUWT’s new ‘executive’ hosting options it would be a neat addition.
contact me if you want to know how to reproduce that. 😉

Susie

I have a book at home called “Wilkie’s Weather” which was written in 1976 by a then famous Australian meteorologist called Alan Wilkie. It contains the following paragraph:
“In a previous chapter we saw that a very useful tool came into our possession in 1960 and that was the weather satellite. The picture of the earth taken by these satellites show ice and snow areas (as distinct from cloud) and after an examination of tens of thousands of pictures taken between 1960 and 1970 it has been established that the north polar ice cap has spread over an additional area of some 4 million square kilometres, which is thought-provoking to say the least, as it is an increase of 12% in ten years!”
I’m wondering if you know (or can find out) how the current amount of snow and ice compares to what it was in 1960.

I have 95% a confidence level that there will be a record refreeze in the arctic this year…

a 95% confidence level – Duh…

Henry Clark

Susie says:
September 30, 2013 at 3:51 am
“I have a book at home called “Wilkie’s Weather” which was written in 1976 by a then famous Australian meteorologist called Alan Wilkie. It contains the following paragraph:
“In a previous chapter we saw that a very useful tool came into our possession in 1960 and that was the weather satellite. The picture of the earth taken by these satellites show ice and snow areas (as distinct from cloud) and after an examination of tens of thousands of pictures taken between 1960 and 1970 it has been established that the north polar ice cap has spread over an additional area of some 4 million square kilometres, which is thought-provoking to say the least, as it is an increase of 12% in ten years!”
I’m wondering if you know (or can find out) how the current amount of snow and ice compares to what it was in 1960.”

The secret of knowing actual climate history back then is indeed to look at what was published before the political era.
A huge 1960s rise in arctic ice is seen in a plot from a Russian-source archive in the second link in my subsequent post, while the first link is an example of how that history has been rewritten and deleted from the version published by the Cryosphere Today plot source on this page.

Henry Clark

Cryosphere Today, the source of most of these plots, also publishes a hockey stick version of sea ice history extending further back, with magical flatness pre-1950, as if such actually occurs in the messy real world of nature outside the CAGW narrative of climate not changing before modern world economic development. That can be seen at http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/IMAGES/seasonal.extent.1900-2007.jpg
When compared to actual archival history then in utter contrast (as in both the graphs and references about 3/4ths of the way down within http://img250.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=45311_expanded_overview2_122_15lo.jpg ), such implies that funded source of sleek plots, the Cryosphere Today public education/outreach (propaganda) site, has been compromised by enviro-activists acting at a frequent level of honesty for their particular subgroup of the population. Such is not shocking for a UIUC website which links to other CAGW movement websites while never linking to inconvenient ones.
I deliberately use the word compromised. It is a word sometimes used by military intelligence professionals having the right non-naive attitude in other context: If a source is known to have sent deliberately false data and done so with cunning and subtlety (as all the best liars know the most effective lie has mixed in some partial truth — or partial real data but a moderate percentage adjustment in trends etc), you shouldn’t auto-trust them on other claims without very explicit disclaimers.
A saying goes: “Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me.”
I don’t know a saying for “fool me XY times in a row because it never occurs to me that known past lies should make me skeptical about other claims.”
Pointing this out is not an implausible “conspiracy theory” strawman as claimed in a typical argumentative response of defenders of enviro-activist groups: Outright conspiracies are rare in the real world when taking formal organization, when on something which would collapse with any or a few dissenting “whistleblowers,” and when against the inclinations of the majority in the group. None of those imply here. In contrast, activists acting on their natural inclinations and copying their heroes like Ehrlich & Mann & Hansen is just natural (not appropriate to call a conspiracy unless “used car salesmen” or “lawyers” or “politicians” would be called a conspiracy just because not always honest when counterproductive to their desires), while the CAGW movement has quite survived thousands of dissenting scientists.
The only magnitude to which they may be trusted (with heavy disclaimers foremost) is to the degree they are constrained by too blatant other observations, although such as cross-comparison to aerial photos is more complicated than it might seem when ice area isn’t just continuous. (For instance, generally the CAGW movement BSes even far more about sea ice volume than sea ice area, since the former is less cross-checkable, much like they go hogwild on unverifiable deep ocean average temperature trends while rewriting surface temperature plots too but more subtly).

FanOfWUWT

Was looking at the .ijis.iarc site and though I can see 2014 and 2012, it seems that 2013 was removed from the graph. Flipped over to the NSIDC site and 2013 is conveniently omitted from that site also.
The Government wouldn’t be attempting to filter the data to tell the story that they want.
/sarc

Read about jet streams being accelerated by mid-latitude oxygen/ozone conversion which extends Rossby wave meander loops. Study the new theory on your desktop at this dedicated website:
https://www.harrytodd.org