“Extreme Weather” Page

Tropical Cyclones

Global Tropical Cyclone Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) – 1971 to Present

Ryan N. Maue PhD – PoliClimate.com – Click the pic to view at source

Global Tropical Cyclone Frequency- 1971 to Present

Ryan N. Maue PhD – PoliClimate.com – Click the pic to view at source

Global Hurricane Frequency – 1978 to Present

Ryan N. Maue PhD – PoliClimate.com – Click the pic to view at source

Number of Atlantic Hurricanes

Ryan N. Maue PhD – WeatherStreet.com – Click the pic to view at source

Number of Named Atlantic Storms

Ryan N. Maue PhD – WeatherStreet.com – Click the pic to view at source

US Extremes in Landfalling Tropical Systems – 1910 to Present – Annual

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) – Click the pic to view at source

US Hurricanes 1851 – 2010

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory – (AOML) – Click the pic to view at source

Australian Region Tropical Cyclones 1970–2011 (Severe tropical cyclones are those which show a minimum central pressure less than 970 hPa)

Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) – Click the pic to view at source

Tornadoes

Note: The US represents about 75 percent of the world’s recorded tornadoes:

US Inflation Adjusted Annual Tornado Trend and Percentile Ranks

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Storm Prediction Center- Click the pic to view at source

Preliminary U.S. Daily Count and Running Annual Tornado Trend From National Weather Services Local Storm Reports

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Storm Prediction Center – Click the pic to view at source

US Strong to Violent Tornadoes (EF3-EF5*) – 1950 to Present

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) – Click the pic to view at source

U.S. Tornadoes (EF1-EF5) – Annual Count 1954 – 2012

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) – Click the pic to view at source

Precipitation/Drought

Global Precipitation 1901 – 2009

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) – Click the pic to view at source

Note: The United States (US) represents less than 2% of Earth’s surface area and the contiguous U.S. “is just “1.58% of the total surface area of the Earth” .

US Average Streamflow Index – 1999 to Present

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) – WaterWatch – Click the pic to view at source

Contiguous US – Precipitation 1901 – 2009

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) – Click the pic to view at source

US Extremes in 1-Day Precipitation – 1910 to Present – Year to Date

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) – Click the pic to view at source

Contiguous US – Extreme One-Day Precipitation Events 1901 – 2009

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) – Click the pic to view at source

Contiguous US – Abnormally High Annual Precipitation 1895 – 2008

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) – Click the pic to view at source

Extremes in Days with/without Precipitation – 1910 to Present – Year to Date

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) – Click the pic to view at source

Global Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) – 1950 – 2010

Justin Sheffield, Eric F. Wood & Michael L. Roderick – Little change in global drought over the past 60 years – Nature – Click the pic to view at source

Extremes in Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) – 1910 to Present – Year to Date

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) – Click the pic to viewat source

Contiguous US – Palmer Z Index – 1998 – 2011

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) – Click the pic to viewat source

US Lands Under Drought Conditions 2000 – 2009

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) – Click the pic to view at source

Percent of US in Moderate to Extreme Drought 1900 – 2006

Karl, T., NOAA. 2006. – Click the pic to view at source

US and North American Drought Comparison

Roger Pielke, Jr. – University of Colorado at Boulder. – Click the pic to view at source

Prairie Provinces (Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba Canada) Drought Frequency and Severity – 1402 to 2002

SaskAdapt – the Prairie Adaptation Research Collaborative at the University of Regina – Click the pic to view at source

Temperature

US Annual Heat Wave Index 1895 – 2008

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) – Click the pic to view at source

Contiguous US – Hot Daily High Temperatures 1910 – 2008

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) – Click the pic to view at source

Contiguous US – Hot Daily Low Temperatures  1920 – 2008

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) – Click the pic to view at source

Extremes in Minimum Temperature – 1910 to Present

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) – Click the pic to view at source

Extremes in Maximum Temperature – 1910 to Present

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) – Click the pic to view at source

Central Europe Pressure – Temperature – Precipitation

Reinhard Böhm – Austrian Central Administration For Meteorology (ZAMG) – Click the pic to view at source

Snowfall

Northern Hemisphere Winter Snow Cover – 1967 to Present

Rutgers University – Global Snow Lab (GSL) – Click the pic to view at source

Eurasian Winter Snow Cover – 1967 to Present

Rutgers University – Global Snow Lab (GSL) – Click the pic to view at source

Northern Hemisphere Snowcover with 1995 – 2009 Climatology

Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science – Florida State University – Click the pic to view at source

5 Year Northern Hemisphere Snowcover with 1995 – 2009 Climatology

Florida State University – Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science – Click the pic to view at source

10 Year Northern Hemisphere Snowcover with 1995 – 2009 Climatology

Florida State University – Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science – Click the pic to view at source

20 Year Northern Hemisphere Snowcover with 1995 – 2009 Climatology

Florida State University – Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science – Click the pic to view at source

Western Slope Sierra Snowfall Average – 1979 – Present

John Christy, Director of the Earth System Science Center at the University of Alabama in Huntsville – Click the pic to view at source

Central Sierra Donner Summit Snowfall and Snowpack 1879 – 2011

University of California, Berkeley – Central Sierra Snow Laboratory – Click the pic to view at source

Source Guide

Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BOM):
Home Page – http://www.bom.gov.au/
Climate Page – http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/
ENSO Page – http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/enso/

Florida State University – Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science – Moe – Robert Hart, PhD.
Home Page – http://moe.met.fsu.edu/
Products Page – http://moe.met.fsu.edu/~rhart/web.php

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
Home Page – http://epa.gov/
Indicators Page – http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/science/indicators/

IPCC’s Special Report Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change
Adaptation (SREX):
Home Page – http://www.ipcc-wg2.gov/SREX/
Summary For Policymakers – http://www.ipcc-wg2.gov/SREX/images/uploads/SREX-SPMbrochure_FINAL.pdf
Full Report – http://www.ipcc-wg2.gov/SREX/images/uploads/SREX-All_FINAL.pdf

John Christy, Director of the Earth System Science Center at the University of Alabama in Huntsville
Home Page – http://www.nsstc.uah.edu/atmos/christy2011/index.html
Press Release – http://nsstc.uah.edu/essnews/stories/02142012.html

Justin Sheffield, Eric F. Wood & Michael L. Roderick – Little change in global drought over the past 60 years – Nature
Paper – http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v491/n7424/full/nature11575.html

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – National Climatic Data Center (NCDC)
Home Page – http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/about/about.html?bandwidth=high
Products Page – http://www.ncdc.noaa.govgov/oa/ncdc.html?bandwidth=high
FTP Page – http://www1.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/cmb/?bandwidth=high
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Storm Prediction Center (SPC)
Home Page – http://www.spc.noaa.gov/
Tornado Page – http://www.spc.noaa.gov/climo/online/monthly/newm.html

Reinhard Böhm – Austrian Central Administration For Meteorology (ZAMG)
Paper – http://resources.metapress.com/pdf-preview.axd?code=l446053m40t06j43&size=largest

Rutgers University – Global Snow Lab (GSL)
Home Page – http://climate.rutgers.edu/snowcover/index.php?bandwidth=high
Products Page – http://climate.rutgers.edu/snowcover/chart_seasonal.php?ui_set=eurasia&ui_season=1?bandwidth=high

Roger Pielke, Jr. – University of Colorado at Boulder.
Home Page – http://rogerpielkejr.blogspot.ca/
Drought Article – http://rogerpielkejr.blogspot.ca/2012/09/drought-and-climate-change.html
Disaster Bullshit Button – http://rogerpielkejr.blogspot.ca/2012/03/handy-bullshit-button-on-disasters-and.html

Ryan N. Maue – PoliClimate.com
Home Page – http://policlimate.com/weather/

SaskAdapt – The Prairie Adaptation Research Collaborative at the University of Regina
Home Page – http://www.parc.ca/saskadapt/

Water & Drought – http://www.parc.ca/saskadapt/adaptation-options/theme-assessments/water-drought

WeatherStreet.com
Home Page – http://www.weatherstreet.com/

Steven Goddard – RealSecience.com
Home Page – http://stevengoddard.wordpress.com/
Bad Weather Page – http://stevengoddard.wordpress.com/bad-weather/
University of California, Berkeley – Central Sierra Snow Laboratory

Home Page – http://vcresearch.berkeley.edu/research-unit/central-sierra-snow-lab
Snowfall – http://www.thestormking.com/Weather/Sierra_Snowfall/sierra_snowfall.html

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) – WaterWatch
Home Page – http://waterwatch.usgs.gov/new/?bandwidth=high

Additional Research

Anthony Watts – WattsUpWithThat.com
“See also my compilation of extreme weather trends (not).”
Floods – no increase in frequency, less intense
Extreme weather events – no trend
Global precipitation – no trends
Rate of sea level rise – deceleration over 80 years
Weird weather – no trends
Forest fires – decreasing frequency
Tropical Pacific sea level rise – fell

Philippe Sorrel, Maxime Debret, Isabelle Billeaud, Samuel L. Jaccard, Jerry F. McManus & Bernadette Tessier – “Persistent non-solar forcing of Holocene storm dynamics in coastal sedimentary archives” – Nature:

Paper – http://www.nature.com/ngeo/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ngeo1619.html#ref1

“Here we present a reappraisal of high-energy estuarine and coastal sedimentary records from the southern coast of the English Channel, and report evidence for five distinct periods during the Holocene when storminess was enhanced during the past 6,500 years. We find that high storm activity occurred periodically with a frequency of about 1,500 years, closely related to cold and windy periods diagnosed earlier. We show that millennial-scale storm extremes in northern Europe are phase-locked with the period of internal ocean variability in the North Atlantic of about 1,500 years.”

A.D. Erlykina, B.A. Lakenb and A.W. Wolfendalea – Fluctuations in some climate parameters – Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics:

Paper – http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682611000319

“There is argument as to the extent to which there has been an increase over the past few decades in the frequency of the extremes of climatic parameters, such as temperature, storminess, precipitation, etc, an obvious point being that Global Warming might be responsible. Here we report results on those parameters of which we have had experience during the last few years: Global surface temperature, Cloud Cover and the MODIS Liquid Cloud Fraction. In no case we have found indications that fluctuations of these parameters have increased with time.”

About these ads

13 Responses to “Extreme Weather” Page

  1. Very good! Thanks Anthony et al.

  2. Mike says:

    A question, Anthony. Were any of the surface air temp graphs corrected for bad sitings of surface stations?

    Mike

  3. Mark Ro says:

    Fantastic job JTF!!

  4. Robert Doyle says:

    Just great!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Thank you all so much.

  5. Mario Lento says:

    Thank you Anthony!

  6. Extreme Weather Events
    (Response to an article in The Australian 10-12-12)

    It all started out with Anthropogenic Global Warming (AGW). When that was found to be too limiting it morphed into Anthropogenic Climate Change (ACC), so it didn’t matter if it got hotter or colder it was man’s fault and penance had to be paid. Unfortunately that didn’t grab the headlines or the purse strings so a new label came to the fore about a year ago; Extreme Weather Events (EWEs), which always grab the headlines. At least EWEs is an appropriate name for a mob of bleating sheep. And now at Doha a few nations, including Australia, but not countries such as NZ, USA, Canada Japan, China and Russia have agreed that compensation should be paid for natural EWEs such as floods in the Amazon, blizzards in Tibet or droughts in the Sahara. Now if only we could turn our Aussie politicians who agreed to this into wethers.
    (For city folk who don’t know what ewes and wethers are look up your dictionary)

  7. Policy Guy says:

    Great display Anthony.

    Looks like you need to find a new source for drought info 1900 to present. The page you cite has been suspended. Must be very recent since you saw it.

  8. Policy Guy says: December 9, 2012 at 5:58 pm

    Looks like you need to find a new source for drought info 1900 to present. The page you cite has been suspended. Must be very recent since you saw it.

    Updated with the same graph from a different location. Thank you.

  9. Hell_Is_Like_Newark says:

    From a cursory scan of all those graphs, the only thing that seems to be trending up (from 1990 to today) is heavy rain events in the lower 48. Anyone here have some thoughts as to why that is happening?

  10. Susan S. says:

    How about a mention of “Flash Freezes” being mentioned on the extreme weather page. We are currently experiencing it where I live, absolutely incredible when you are exposed to the cold winds coming down from the Arctic with no buildings blocking those winds. (I was out for 5 minutes and my toes were numb!)

  11. evanmjones says:

    A question, Anthony. Were any of the surface air temp graphs corrected for bad sitings of surface stations?

    A Rhetorical question, I’m sure. But since it’s NOAA data, it is clear that station siting HAS been accounted for. The well sited station trends have been carefully adjusted upwards to match the trends of the poorly sited stations. Sic.

  12. andrew kerber says:

    I am curious if the information for Heavy Rain events has been normalized for a (possible) increasing number of sites taking the measurements? Rainfall can be very spotty, so if it has not been normalized for more sites taking measurements, the increase could be an artifact of the measuring methodology.

  13. Double D says:

    Ever notice when the data doesn’t fit the warming model, the graphs stop years ago. When is it acceptable for a government agency to be putting out information that is five years old as the last measurement mark. Examples being ; Annual Heat Wave Index, Severe Drought, US Hurricanes until 2010.

    The doomsday forecast was more frequent hurricanes, wetter everywhere as ice melted and put more water vapor in the air inducing more rain clouds and runaway heat boiling us like frogs at 100C. Oooops the data says opposite so its is left out.

    How convenient is that

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s