CO2 Page

1 Year of CO2 Daily and Weekly Means - Mauna Loa:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

5 Year Global Monthly Mean CO2:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

5 Year Mauna Loa  Monthly Mean CO2:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

1979 to Present  Global Average CO2 and Growth Rate:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

1975 – Present Mauna Loa CO2:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

1973 to Present Monthly Mean Carbon Dioxide

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

1960 to Present Mauna Loa CO2 Growth Rate

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

1959 to Present Mauna Loa CO2

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

1957 to Present Mauna Loa Monthly Mean Carbon Dioxide

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

1850 to Present Observed Total CO2 Concentration:

European Environment Agency – Click the pic to view at source

1830 to Present, Law Dome, Antarctica CO2 Mixing Ratio

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

1750 To Present Observed Total CO2 Concentration:

European Environment Agency – Click the pic to view at source

1740 to Present CO2

Dennis L. Hartmann – Click the pic to view at source

1000 to Present Law Dome, Antarctica, CO2 Mixing Ratio

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

1000 to Present  Law Dome, Antarctica, CO2 Mixing Ratio

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

10,700 years – GISP2 – Teperature with CO2 from EPICA DomeC

climate4you.com – Ole Humlum – Professor, University of Oslo Department of Geosciences – Click the pic to view at source

160,000 to 1996 CO2 Concentration

Dennis L. Hartmann – Click the pic to view at source

400,000 to Present Vostok, Antarctica, CO2 Cocentration

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

Anthropogenic Contributions to CO2

1750 – 2010 Global CO2 Emissions from Fossil-Fuels:

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

1750 – 2010  Global CO2 Emissions from Fossil-Fuels By Contributors:

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

1850 – 2010 Global CO2 Emissions from Fossil-Fuels By Contribution To Total:

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

1950 – 2010 Global Per Capita CO2 Emissions from Fossil-Fuels:

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

1950 – 2010 Global Per Capita CO2 Emissions from Fossil-Fuels:

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

Cumulative Anthropogenic CO2 Emissions from Fossil-Fuels,

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center – Click the pic to view at source

1950 – 2010 Global Per Capita CO2 Contributions By Source:

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center – Click the pic to view at source

Note: All historical Land Use based estimates of CO2 contribution should be viewed with a high degree of skepticism. Further information on Land Use based CO2 estimates can be found below.

Land Use Change Estimates:

There have also been claims made that Land Use Changes measured as Annual Net Flux of Carbon to the Atmosphere were a significant source of Anthropogenic CO2  i.e.:

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center – Click the pic to view at source

However, when you look at the Net Flux of Carbon to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes from 1850 to 1990;

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center – Click the pic to view at source

Houghton data these graphs are based upon is highly suspect, i.e. from IPCC AR4: “Although the two recent satellite-based estimates point to a smaller source than that of Houghton (2003a), it is premature to say that Houghton’s numbers are overestimated.” Houghton’s method of reconstructing Land-Use Based Net Flux of Carbon appears arbitrary and susceptible to bias; i.e. “Rates of land-use change, including clearing for agriculture and harvest of wood, were reconstructed from statistical and historic documents for 9 world regions and used, along with the per ha [hectare] changes in vegetation and soil that result from land management, to calculate the annual flux of carbon between land and atmosphere.” Furthermore Houghton’s findings have varied significantly over time, i.e. in Houghton & Hackler, 2001 they found that, “The estimated global total net flux of carbon from changes in land use increased from 397 Tg of carbon in 1850 to 2187 Tg or 2.2 Pg of carbon in 1989 and then decreased slightly to 2103 Tg or 2.1 Pg of carbon in 1990“. However, by Houghton, R.A. 2008 he found, “The estimated global total net flux of carbon from changes in land use increased from 500.6 Tg C in 1850 to a maximum of 1712.5 Tg C in 1991“.

Given Houghton’s overestimations, arbitrary reconstruction method and highly variable results, his Net Flux of Carbon to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Change data is not credible. However, even if it was, Net Flux of Carbon to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Change was inconsequential prior to 1950;

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center – Click the pic to view at source

and it appears that Land and Ocean Sinks would have absorbed any increace, along with much of the minimal pre-1950 Anthropogenic CO2 Emissions from Fossil-Fuels. This is supported by the findings of Canadell et al., 2007 that, “Of the average 9.1 PgC y −1 of total anthropogenic emissions (F Foss + F LUC) from 2000 to 2006, the AF was 0.45; almost half of the anthropogenic emissions remained in the atmosphere, and the rest were absorbed by land and ocean sinks.” Furthermore, they found “increasing evidence (P = 0.89) for a long-term (50-year) increase in the airborne fraction (AF) of CO2 emissions, implying a decline in the efficiency of CO2 sinks on land and oceans in absorbing anthropogenic emissions.” Thus absorption rates of Land and Ocean Sinks were likely significantly higher prior to 1950.

http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/ccgg/trends/

http://data.giss.nasa.gov/modelforce/ghgases/Fig1A.ext.txt

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4 Responses to CO2 Page

  1. Bernd Niessen says:

    Dear

    How many percent of the annual co2 is caused by humans?

    In many studies i have seen that the rise in temperature proceeds the rise in co2 concentrations, and that there is a timelag of approx 200-800 years

    But in the last 100 years we see that co2 levels rise in approx the speed as worlds temperature ( except for the last 15-17 years)

    Where is the timelag gone?

    Do you have an explanation?

    Many thanks

  2. RACookPE1978 says:

    Broadly speaking, and we can address the specific changes due to man’s net release of CO2 into the atmosphere a bit later, the following true:

    When CO2 levels were steady, global average temperatures rose.
    .(But at the same rate they were rising between 1975 – 1996.)
    When CO2 levels were steady, temperatures were steady.
    When CO2 levels were steady, temperatures fell.
    .(Again, at the same rate that they fell between 1945 and 1975.)

    When CO2 levels rose, temperatures fell.
    When CO2 levels rose, temperatures were steady.
    When CO2 levels rose, temperatures rose at the same rate that they rose when CO2 levels were steady.

  3. Bill Illis says:

    I have been maintaining a database of all CO2 estimates through geologic time from all studies which make the data available and are not just cherrypicking one date or three dates but provide at least ten estimates over some period (there is a huge amount of cherrypicking in climate science and especially with respect to CO2 levels).

    There are a few methodologies which appear to be unreliable (producing unrealistically low estimates and unrealistically high ones that I have discarded – these are Paleosols/Pedogenic Carbonates, Boron and Tex-86 isotope calibrated estimates).

    So here is ALL of the 2,700 reliable estimates of CO2 over the last 750 million years and for higher resolution, last 270, 40 and 8 million years.

    http://s12.postimg.org/kuw5mqdst/CO2_LAST_750_Mys.png

    http://s13.postimg.org/7jhm9tj9j/CO2_Last_270_Mya.png

    http://s10.postimg.org/5fz8g5a3d/CO2_Last_40_Mys.png

    http://s17.postimg.org/fwhaavhz3/CO2_Sea_Level_Last_8_Mya.png

    The sources for these charts are all the estimates (excluding a few unreliable methods) from Berner GeoCarb III, Pagani 2005, Antarctic Ice Core Composite, Pagani 1999, Royer 2006 Composites, Pearson 2000, IPCC AR4 2007 – Royer 2008 Composites, Pearson 2009, Tripati 2009, Bao 2008, Hoenisch 2009, Beerling Royer 2011, Bartoli 2011, Seki 2010, Mcanena 2013

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