CO2 Page

1 Year of CO2 Daily and Weekly Means - Mauna Loa:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

5 Year Global Monthly Mean CO2:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

5 Year Mauna Loa  Monthly Mean CO2:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

7 Year Alert, Canada Daily CO2

ClimateGrog – Greg Goodman – Scripts Institute – Click the pic to view at source

1996 to Present, Mauna Loa CO2 and Period Of Pause In Each Temperature Record:

Wood For Trees – Werner Brozek – Hadley Center – CRU – NOAA ESRL – NASS GISS – UAH – RSS – Click the pic to view at source

1985 to 2009 Alert, Canada CO2 Concentrations:

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

1979 to Present  Global Average CO2 and Growth Rate:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

1975 – Present Mauna Loa CO2:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

1973 to Present Monthly Mean Carbon Dioxide

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

1960 to Present Mauna Loa CO2 Growth Rate

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

1959 to Present Mauna Loa CO2

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

1957 to Present Mauna Loa Monthly Mean Carbon Dioxide

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) – Click the pic to view at source

1900 to 2011 Cumulative CO2 Concentration, Anthropogenic CO2 Emissions and Temperature

Ferdinand Engelbeen – Mauna Loa – Law Dome – Siple Dome – US Department of Energy (DOE) – Hadley Center – Click the pic to view at source

1850 to Present Observed Total CO2 Concentration:

European Environment Agency – Click the pic to view at source

1830 to Present, Law Dome, Antarctica CO2 Mixing Ratio

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

1750 To Present Observed Total CO2 Concentration:

European Environment Agency – Click the pic to view at source

1740 to Present CO2

University of Washington – Department of Atmospheric Sciences – Dennis L. Hartmann – Click the pic to view at source

1000 to Present Law Dome, Antarctica, CO2 Mixing Ratio

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

1000 to Present  Law Dome, Antarctica, CO2 Mixing Ratio

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

10,700 years – GISP2 – Teperature with CO2 from EPICA DomeC

climate4you.com – Ole Humlum – Professor, University of Oslo Department of Geosciences – Click the pic to view at source

160,000 to 1996 CO2 Concentration

University of Washington – Department of Atmospheric Sciences – Dennis L. Hartmann – Click the pic to view at source

400,000 to Present Vostok, Antarctica, CO2 Cocentration

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

Anthropogenic CO2 Emissions By Source 

1990 – 2013 Global Fossil Fuel and Cement Emissions

Geovisualist – Le Quere et al 2013, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center – Click the pic to view at source

1750 – 2010 Global CO2 Emissions from Fossil-Fuels:

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

1750 – 2010  Global CO2 Emissions from Fossil-Fuels By Contributors:

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

1850 – 2010 Global CO2 Emissions from Fossil-Fuels By Contribution To Total:

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

1950 – 2010 Global Per Capita CO2 Emissions from Fossil-Fuels:

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

1950 – 2010 Global Per Capita CO2 Emissions from Fossil-Fuels:

EPA – Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy – Click the pic to view at source

Cumulative Anthropogenic CO2 Emissions from Fossil-Fuels:

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center – Click the pic to view at source

1950 – 2010 Global Per Capita CO2 Contributions By Source:

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center – Click the pic to view at source

Note: All historical Land Use based estimates of CO2 contribution should be viewed with a high degree of skepticism. Further information on Land Use based CO2 estimates can be found Land Use Change section below.

Anthropogenic CO2 Emissions By Geography/Country 

1965 – 2013 CO2 Emissions Developed World vs. Developing World:

Ed Hoskins – British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy 2014 – Click the pic to view at source

1980 – 2013 CO2 Emissions and Emission Per Capita/Head Developed World vs. Developing World:

Ed Hoskins – British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy 2014 – Click the pic to view at source

1965 – 2013 Cumulative CO2 Emissions Developed World vs. Developing World:

Ed Hoskins – British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy 2014 – Click the pic to view at source

1965 – 2013 CO2 Emissions For Selected Countries:

Ed Hoskins – British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy 2014 – Click the pic to view at source

1965 – 2013 CO2 Emissions Per Capita/Head For Selected Countries:

Ed Hoskins – British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy 2014 – Click the pic to view at source

1965 – 2013 CO2 Emissions Per Capita/Head For Selected Countries:

Ed Hoskins – British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy 2014 – Click the pic to view at source

1965 – 2013 Annual CO2 Emissions Growth vs. Total For Selected Countries:

Ed Hoskins – British Petroleum Statistical Review of World Energy 2014 – Click the pic to view at source

Land Use Change Based CO2 Estimates:

There have been claims made that Land Use Changes measured as Annual Net Flux of Carbon to the Atmosphere were a significant source of Anthropogenic CO2, however the following graphs are based upon highly suspect Houghton data, i.e. from IPCC AR4: “Although the two recent satellite-based estimates point to a smaller source than that of Houghton (2003a), it is premature to say that Houghton’s numbers are overestimated.” Houghton’s method of reconstructing Land-Use Based Net Flux of Carbon appears arbitrary and susceptible to bias; i.e. “Rates of land-use change, including clearing for agriculture and harvest of wood, were reconstructed from statistical and historic documents for 9 world regions and used, along with the per ha [hectare] changes in vegetation and soil that result from land management, to calculate the annual flux of carbon between land and atmosphere.” Furthermore Houghton’s findings have varied significantly over time, i.e. in Houghton & Hackler, 2001 they found that, “The estimated global total net flux of carbon from changes in land use increased from 397 Tg of carbon in 1850 to 2187 Tg or 2.2 Pg of carbon in 1989 and then decreased slightly to 2103 Tg or 2.1 Pg of carbon in 1990″. However, by Houghton, R.A. 2008 he found, “The estimated global total net flux of carbon from changes in land use increased from 500.6 Tg C in 1850 to a maximum of 1712.5 Tg C in 1991″.

Annual Net Flux to the Atmosphere from Land Use Changes: 1850-2005 (Houghton)

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center – Click the pic to view at source

Net Flux of Carbon to the Atmosphere from Land-Use Changes from 1850 to 1990;

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center – Click the pic to view at source

Source Guide

British Petroleum (BP)
Home Page – http://www.bp.com/
Statistical Review of World Energy 2014 Page – http://www.bp.com/en/global/corporate/about-bp/energy-economics/statistical-review-of-world-energy.html

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) – U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) – Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) –
Home Page – http://cdiac.ornl.gov/
Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Page – http://cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/emis/meth_reg.html
Trace Gas Emissions: http://cdiac.ornl.gov/trace_gas_emissions.html
Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species – http://cdiac.ornl.gov/tracegases.html

ClimateGrog – Greg Goodman
Home Page – http://climategrog.wordpress.com/

European Environment Agency (EEA):
Home Page – http://www.eea.europa.eu/
Data and Maps Page – http://www.eea.europa.eu/data-and-maps
Graphs/Figures Page – http://wwws3.eea.europa.eu/data-and-maps/figures/
Indicators Page – http://www.eea.europa.eu/data-and-maps/indicators/#c5=&c7=all&c0=10&b_start=0
observed-trends-in-the-kyoto-gases-1/image_xlarge”> – Click the pic to view at source[/caption]

Ferdinand Engelbeen
Home Page – http://www.ferdinand-engelbeen.be/
Climate Page – http://www.ferdinand-engelbeen.be/klimaat/climate.html

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL)
Home Page – http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/
CO2 Page – http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/ccgg/trends/
Physical Sciences Division (PSD) Products Page – http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/products/
Physical Sciences Division (PSD) Data Data Page – http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/data/
Physical Sciences Division (PSD) Data Maps Page – http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/map/

University of Washington – Department of Atmospheric Sciences – Dennis L. Hartmann
Department Of Atmospheric Sciences Home Page – http://www.atmos.washington.edu/
Dennis L. Hartman’s Page – http://www.atmos.washington.edu/~dennis/

About these ads

16 thoughts on “CO2 Page

  1. Dear

    How many percent of the annual co2 is caused by humans?

    In many studies i have seen that the rise in temperature proceeds the rise in co2 concentrations, and that there is a timelag of approx 200-800 years

    But in the last 100 years we see that co2 levels rise in approx the speed as worlds temperature ( except for the last 15-17 years)

    Where is the timelag gone?

    Do you have an explanation?

    Many thanks

  2. Broadly speaking, and we can address the specific changes due to man’s net release of CO2 into the atmosphere a bit later, the following true:

    When CO2 levels were steady, global average temperatures rose.
    .(But at the same rate they were rising between 1975 – 1996.)
    When CO2 levels were steady, temperatures were steady.
    When CO2 levels were steady, temperatures fell.
    .(Again, at the same rate that they fell between 1945 and 1975.)

    When CO2 levels rose, temperatures fell.
    When CO2 levels rose, temperatures were steady.
    When CO2 levels rose, temperatures rose at the same rate that they rose when CO2 levels were steady.

  3. I have been maintaining a database of all CO2 estimates through geologic time from all studies which make the data available and are not just cherrypicking one date or three dates but provide at least ten estimates over some period (there is a huge amount of cherrypicking in climate science and especially with respect to CO2 levels).

    There are a few methodologies which appear to be unreliable (producing unrealistically low estimates and unrealistically high ones that I have discarded – these are Paleosols/Pedogenic Carbonates, Boron and Tex-86 isotope calibrated estimates).

    So here is ALL of the 2,700 reliable estimates of CO2 over the last 750 million years and for higher resolution, last 270, 40 and 8 million years.

    The sources for these charts are all the estimates (excluding a few unreliable methods) from Berner GeoCarb III, Pagani 2005, Antarctic Ice Core Composite, Pagani 1999, Royer 2006 Composites, Pearson 2000, IPCC AR4 2007 – Royer 2008 Composites, Pearson 2009, Tripati 2009, Bao 2008, Hoenisch 2009, Beerling Royer 2011, Bartoli 2011, Seki 2010, Mcanena 2013

  4. Bernd Niessen – “How many percent of the annual co2 is caused by humans?”

    The following may answer your question:
    ” Man’s CO2 output per year is less than three percent of the totals released by the combination of all natural forces and man — about 803 billion tons.”

    “Man-made carbon dioxide emissions throughout human history constitute less than 0.00022 percent of the total naturally emitted from the mantle of the earth during geological history.”

    Man-made CO2 accounts for 0.12% to Green House Gas effect, with Mother Nature accounts for 3.50%. Water Vapor (both man and mother nature) accounts for 95.00%.

  5. “But in the last 100 years we see that co2 levels rise in approx the speed as worlds temperature ( except for the last 15-17 years).” “Where is the timelag gone?”

    Quite possibly time lag is still there.
    What we may be seeing now with some of the rise in CO2 levels is fallout of warming that occurred during MWP (about AD 950 to 1250).

    2014 AD – 18-years = 1996 AD
    “Warmer periods of the Earth’s history came around 800 years before rises in CO2 levels.”
    1996 AD – 800-years = 1196 AD.

    With the warming we experienced 17-years ago, we may see an increase in CO2 levels in 783 years.

  6. This is a very helpful page.
    I’d like to request one new plot please: Please show the total carbon at Mauna Lea, as a function of time just like NOAA but with the y-axis extending down to zero. This will help us visualize the increase in CO2 as a percentage of total CO2. Thanks.

  7. Various statements have been made here and there that human activity, such as power generation, transportation, and industrial process, add up to about 3% of new CO2 emissions per year. Supposedly there are half a dozens or so larger sources (e.g. volcanoes, insect life, ocean expiration). If there are any reasonable sources for this kind of information, charts or links would be quite interesting. A CO2 fact page that focuses solely on human activity contributions gives as biased a view as those claims that only human activity is responsible for climate changes.

  8. Thanks a lot for the answers

    Is there a way to measure the part of the man made co2 content in the present atmosphere?

  9. What exact forcing do you mean?

    Water vapor cant be because there is no increase in the lower tropisphere humidity as far as i know

    In the higher elevations the water vapor concentration is even going down for years

    Gr

  10. AndyH sez:

    “Various statements have been made here and there that human activity, such as power generation, transportation, and industrial process, add up to about 3% of new CO2 emissions per year. Supposedly there are half a dozens or so larger sources (e.g. volcanoes, insect life, ocean expiration). If there are any reasonable sources for this kind of information, charts or links would be quite interesting. A CO2 fact page that focuses solely on human activity contributions gives as biased a view as those claims that only human activity is responsible for climate changes.”

    AGREED!

  11. Bill Illis says:
    June 14, 2014 at 7:14 am

    So here is ALL of the 2,700 reliable estimates of CO2 over the last 750 million years and for higher resolution, last 270, 40 and 8 million years.

    Interesting graphs. Two notes:

    One for the last million years would help show the recent glaciation cycle.

    Typo on all graphs – “unrealiable” should be “unreliable”. Or maybe “unrealistic”. Lewis Carroll would like it though.

  12. In the chart labeled “160,000 to 1996 CO2 Concentration”, is it proper to display low resolution ice core info together with high resolution instrument readings in the same chart? As I understand it, a higher resolution source always will show much higher volatility of readings. Since we currently are in a CO2 upswing, this guarantees a hockey stick.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s