Estimating Cloud Feedback Using CERES Data

.Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach As usual, Dr. Judith Curry’s Week In Review – Science Edition contains interesting studies. I took a look at one entitled “Cloud feedback mechanisms and their representation in global climate models“, by Ceppi et al., hereinafter Ceppi2017. The paper looks at the changes in the radiative effects of clouds. From…

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Feedback on Feedbacks

Guest essay by Rud Istvan In recent weeks, there have been a number of WUWT guest posts on climate sensitivity related matters. Sensitivity is determined by feedbacks to increased CO2. The delta T to doubled CO2 in the absence of feedbacks is 1.1-1.2C. Monckton calculated 1.166C in his new (and unfinished) ‘Feet of Clay’ series…

Emergent Climate Phenomena

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach In a recent post, I described how the El Nino/La Nina alteration operates as a giant pump. Whenever the Pacific Ocean gets too warm across its surface, the Nino/Nina pump kicks in and removes the warm water from the Pacific, pumping it first west and thence poleward. I also wrote…

It's Not About Feedback

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach The current climate paradigm believed by most scientists in the field can be likened to the movement of balls on a pool table. Figure 1. Pool balls on a level table. Response is directly proportional to applied force (double the force, double the distance). There are no “preferred” positions—every position…

What’s the worst case? Climate sensitivity

Posted on April 1, 2019 by curryja | Reposted from Climate Etc. by Judith Curry Are values of equilibrium climate sensitivity > 4.5 C plausible? For background, see these previous posts on climate sensitivity [link] Here are some possibilistic arguments related to climate sensitivity.  I don’t think the ECS example is the best one to…

CAGW: a ‘snarl’ word?

Reposted From Judith Curry’s Climate Etc. By Andy West The term ‘CAGW’  has both appropriate and inappropriate usage. Introduction Rational Wiki says: ‘“CAGW”, for “catastrophic anthropogenic global warming”, is a snarl word (or snarl acronym) that global warming denialists use for the established science of climate change. A Google Scholar search indicates that the term…

The Picasso Problem

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach [See update at the end.] Let me start explaining the link from Picasso to climate science by looking at what Dr. Nir Shaviv called “the most boring graph I have ever plotted in my life”. This is the graph of the changes in the best estimate of the range of…

Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #309

Brought to You by SEPP (www.SEPP.org) The Science and Environmental Policy Project By Ken Haapala, President   California Litigation, General: The public nuisance lawsuits by San Francisco and Oakland against oil companies continue to attract attention by those interested in carbon dioxide (CO2)-caused global warming. Global warming is now generalized into climate change, as promoted…

Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #300

Brought to You by SEPP (www.SEPP.org) The Science and Environmental Policy Project   THIS WEEK: By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP) Fears of Global Warming: Last week’s TWTW brought up the well tested fact that all gases absorb radiant energy in certain bands of the electromagnet spectrum, including nitrogen, N2, which…

A New Index to Willis’s Posts

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach Well, my old index to my posts was out of date, and I finally got tired of not being able to find things that I’ve written. This is me trying to figure it out. So I wrote a program in the computer language “R”. It takes as input a list…