More than half of all new UK cars to be electric by 2028 in bid to ditch petrol and diesel

From NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE KNOW THAT

By Paul Homewood

Sheer madness!

MORE than half of all UK cars should be electric by 2028, according to the Government, as it looks to solidify plans for a Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) mandate.

Grant Shapps is looking to set legally binding targets to speed up the shift away from petrol and diesel, and towards the mass adoption of electric vehicles. In its new report, the Department for Transport proposed legally binding annual targets that car manufacturers will be forced to meet before 2035.

In less than eight years, the Government will ban the sales of new petrol and diesel vehicles in the UK.

Just five years later, a similar ban will be introduced to restrict sales of hybrid vehicles.

The proposed scheme would start in 2024, when manufacturers would have to sell all-electric cars, which account for 22 percent of their total sales.

The Government document added: “There is a level of uncertainty based on the form of wider policy measures and future demand, but this modelling assumes that by 2030 a minimum of 80 percent of all new UK car sales are zero emission.

“It assumes a 22 percent mandate in 2024 and 52 percent in 2028.

“Alongside ZEV uptake, it also assumes further efficiency improvements to non ZEVs.”

In 2030, the European Union expects approximately 46 percent of all new car sales to be ZEV across the EU.

The document stated that the UK is a leading ZEV market in Europe, so would expect to be above this average value.

The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders said that new rules “must encourage consumers to purchase, not just compel manufacturers to produce”.

SMMT chief executive Mike Hawes said: “The danger is that consumers will lack the incentive to purchase these new vehicles in the quantities needed, keeping their older, more polluting vehicles for even longer thereby undermining the carbon savings this regulation seeks to deliver.”

https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/cars/1593104/electric-car-sales-uk-zero-emission-vehicle-mandate-consultation-dft

If this is not an admission that for most drivers EVs are absolutely useless, I don’t know what is!

It also raises the question of how these quotas will be enforced. After all, car manufacturers cannot force people to buy EVs. And we already know that huge discounts don’t make any difference, because the government has already tried them.

I have read rumours that manufacturers will be fined if they don’t hit the targets, which simply means that these will be added to the price of conventional cars, to the detriment of drivers. If that is the case, people will simply tend to buy imported cars instead, who presumably won’t be affected by the quota.

This whole business is an example of how we are all gradually losing our freedom of choice.

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Iain Russell
April 9, 2022 6:07 am

No subsidies! EVs are hideously expensive and inherently dangerously, so make the rich who can afford to frolic in them pay full freight!

Vuk
Reply to  Iain Russell
April 9, 2022 7:17 am

In the UK there is also problem with charging stations. If you can find a fast charge one at a motorway junction there are long ques, while if there is a slow charge available it takes for ever. Good luck with it, but i’ll stick with my 1992 Volvo 940 that will be only 36 years old by then.

Speed
Reply to  Vuk
April 9, 2022 9:30 am

Driving one car for 36 years rather than buying ten or twelve new ones has certainly reduced the automobile industry’s emissions. Thanks for your good work.

Editor
Reply to  Speed
April 9, 2022 9:38 am

I understand Lithium has increased 500% in recent weeks so presumably that will give a sharp twist to prices as will availability.

Gary Pearse
Reply to  tonyb
April 9, 2022 1:09 pm

You know that Li production reached an all time high in 2021 of …wait for it …100,000 tonnes!

Nicholas McGinley
Reply to  Gary Pearse
April 9, 2022 1:42 pm

Tesla is about to go into th lithium mining biz, because they are now only able to meet growth projections if they have enough of each raw material to do so, and the whole world is now trying to build cars with huge lithium based batteries as fast as humanly possible.
But there is no news about any concerted effort to find and produce more lithium as fast as humanly possible.
Here in the US, the same people demanding an end to fossil fuel and things that use them, are actively preventing any new mines from be able to get approved.

Right now they are “studying” the impact of producing lithium from the Salton Sea brines.
That sounds great, until one realizes they have already mandated production of huge numbers of the devices that need lithium, and there is nowhere near enough of it on the world market to meet those mandates.
Quantifying California’s Lithium Valley: Can It Power Our EV Revolution? (lbl.gov)

Ricz Bacz
Reply to  Gary Pearse
April 11, 2022 9:57 pm

I don’t know what percentage of lithium is in every battery, but since one battery can weight 500 kg, there is not enough Lithium to make half a million EV a year for the whole world! I think in UK alone sells of new cars are much greater than million a year.

Nicholas McGinley
Reply to  tonyb
April 9, 2022 1:30 pm

What this stat says is, there is a limit to how many of these things we can make, because they are raw material limited.
Lithium only comes from a few places these days, and demand is way ahead of supply.
Besides for that issue, the only way half of buyers will buy an electric is if it makes economic sense to do so.
If they cannot make electric cars cheaper, they will have to make the alternatives expensive.

The big problem with these mandates is, they are invented by people who take no account of what will be required to make it so.
Making a law to be “carbon neutral” by such and such a date will not make it possible to do it.
Lawmakers are now under the impression they can ignore practicalities, that they can alter reality by decree.
Silly ideas become very dangerous when the subject at hand is the supply of the exact materials that allow us to live.

Last edited 2 months ago by Nicholas McGinley
Jeff Alberts
Reply to  Nicholas McGinley
April 9, 2022 4:36 pm

Nicholas. Haven’t you figured out that they don’t want people in cars? And this is one way of achieving that goal.

Reply to  Jeff Alberts
April 9, 2022 11:42 pm

Ecoserfdom

patrick healy
Reply to  Jeff Alberts
April 11, 2022 7:58 am

Good point Jeff.
The real hilarious issue is what about the billions (American billions) our betters will loose in The Road Fund License to give it its intended name of fixing potholes.
Somall those numpties who buy these Skalectric cars will be hit with road milage charges to make up the difference.
My 12 year old diesel Astra with 73,000 miles on the clock is good for another 50K

yarpos
Reply to  Jeff Alberts
April 12, 2022 1:37 am

back to your villages peons!

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Nicholas McGinley
April 10, 2022 3:28 am

“The big problem with these mandates is, they are invented by people who take no account of what will be required to make it so.”

That’s the problem. The politicians don’t understand what they are trying to get us into. They are forging ahead with no clue.

Gerald Hanner
Reply to  Speed
April 9, 2022 11:25 am

I drove a BMW 538e for over thirty years. It was a manual transmission. Fun to drive.

Reply to  Speed
April 9, 2022 11:41 pm

In 20 years time Britain will be the new Cuba – a museum of old cars.

yarpos
Reply to  Phil Salmon
April 12, 2022 1:40 am

they have mandated everything else, why not the confiscation and crushing of old cars?

duane
Reply to  Iain Russell
April 9, 2022 7:40 am

Uhhh, no. EVs are no more expensive than equivalent internal combustion vehicles. The ones you’re thinking of, the Teslas, are expensive because they are high end high performance luxury vehicles, equivalent to high end luxury vehicles from luxury brands like BMW, Mercedes Benz, Audi, etc. that cost the same or more than the Tesla.

You can buy a brand new 2022 EV for under, or very near, $30,000 which is about the average price of a new economy car like Toyota Corolla.

https://www.edmunds.com/electric-car/articles/cheapest-electric-cars/

Nothing inherently dangerous, or at least more dangerous, about EVs than a gasoline fired car. Despite all the yakking about battery fires, I suppose you’ve never heard of or actually seen gas cars catching fire or exploding? (I have seen that multiple times). Do you know anything at all about the fire and explosive potential of gasoline? Oh, and by the way, did you never notice that your gas or diesel powered vehicle also has a battery in it?

It is a valid argument that the governments of free peoples should not be compelling them to buy this vehicle or that vehicle, or any other product. It is entirely a different matter of debating the relative merits of different vehicles. Though it always helps a lot to get your FACTS straight, and not rely on fallacies and myths instead of FACTS.

Peta of Newark
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 8:03 am

When ‘gas’ cars catch fire, 99 times out of 100, it was an electrical fault that caused the blaze.
Whether they were involved in a single/multiple vehicle wreck or not.

Oldseadog
Reply to  Peta of Newark
April 9, 2022 12:01 pm

The real point is that when a gasoline car goes on fire it is easy to put the fire out.

Willem post
Reply to  Oldseadog
April 9, 2022 12:39 pm

Who in hades would be daft enough to exchange batteries at about $12000, including labor, etc., in an 8-y-old medium crossover car?

OF THE CHARTS IDIOCY

Last edited 2 months ago by Willem post
Mike Lowe
Reply to  Willem post
April 9, 2022 1:21 pm

Perhaps those who prefer not to see their “old” car’s value drop to nil? Undoubtedly the biggest problem we old car owners will face is the legislation which will surely be introduced forcing us off the road – legislation concocted by high-income politicians well-fed by generous taxpayer salaries.

Ricz Bacz
Reply to  Mike Lowe
April 11, 2022 10:07 pm

I don’t think this kind of legislation is possible. It would deprive millions of elderly and disabled people of mobility. Who is going to buy them food or take them to the doctor?

Dennis
Reply to  Willem post
April 9, 2022 8:19 pm

Also consider trade-in valuations for EV, dealers would obviously require a battery condition report and offer a trade-in price based on remaining acceptable working life retained.

Dennis
Reply to  Oldseadog
April 9, 2022 8:17 pm

Australian States require all EV and Hybrids to display a blue sticker on the front and rear registration plates to alert road traffic authorities in the event of an accident.

ICEV do not have a warning sticker requirement unless equipped with LPG dedicated system or dual fuel system, and the sticker is red.

Nicholas McGinley
Reply to  Peta of Newark
April 9, 2022 1:52 pm

Conventional vehicles do not burst into flames in the middle of the night while sitting in the garage.
And gas does not have much explosive potential when it is a tank of liquid.
Only clouds of vapor with the correct mix of oxygen can explode.
Toss a match into a bucket of gas and the match goes out.
Tossing a cigarette on a gas puddle will not cause it to ignite.
Electric cars are a small fraction of vehicles on the road, but they are responsible for a large number of the deaths by occupants by burning alive.
They burst into flames after even minor accidents.
They burn so fast and so hot occupants do not even have time to take off their seatbelts.
Once again Duane is completely full of shit and wrong on key details of factual information, while also being arrogantly smug and condescending while he announces and wallows in his ignorance.

Prize though for Most Strawmen In A Single Asinine Comment.

Sunderlandsteve
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 8:06 am

Making cost comparison with ev versus ice is always difficult as often the ev models are only ev.
However a direct comparison can still be made as there are a handful of cars available in the UK that come with a choice of ice or eV with the same trim levels.
For example the vauxhall corsa in gs trim. £19,490 ice against £27,000 ev.
Same car, same trim. Interestingly there is an even cheaper ice version that is not offered as ev.
As you say get your facts right.

Mr.
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 8:39 am

Duane, what if people don’t give a rats about the “attractions” of EVs, they just don’t want one, and look forward to continuing their traditional motoring habits?

You know, as is supposed to happen in free democracies.

Citizen Smith
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 8:48 am

Duane writes in large generalities, calls for facts then overlooks the obvious. What is the useful range of a $30k ev? Battery size matters. Besides, small batteries need more charges. Battery life is mainly dependent on the number of recharges. Battery replacement is a very expensive repair especially in relation to the value of a used low end vehicle. You get what you pay for unless, of course, it’s subsidized. Generally speaking.

Meab
Reply to  Citizen Smith
April 9, 2022 9:07 am

DuhWayne is flat-out lying. Comparable EVs, EVs with similar range to an ICE car and fast-charging cost $20,000+ more. Like most Dimocrats, DuhWayne thinks he can invent his own reality and other people who aren’t thinking-challenged will just buy into it.

Brad-DXT
Reply to  Meab
April 9, 2022 11:04 am

He is employing a typical leftist tactic. Lie in the hope that no one looks for themselves and ignore any contrary information.

Alan
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 8:58 am

How often have gas vehicles just blown up sitting in the driveway?

Alan Watt, Climate Denialist Level 7
Reply to  Alan
April 9, 2022 12:45 pm

Happens all the time in TV shows — so it must be real 🙂

Reply to  Alan Watt, Climate Denialist Level 7
April 10, 2022 8:35 pm

I believe that it is the county fire department in Los Angeles that has a special unit that only works with the movie studios – ensuring safety when they pack a car with C4 to shoot a scene. (Also to make sure the inventory is kept track of!)

MM from Canada
Reply to  Alan
April 9, 2022 1:56 pm

EVs are also incredibly difficult to put out and have a nasty tendency to reignite – for up to a week.

Dave Andrews
Reply to  MM from Canada
April 10, 2022 5:19 am

Yep. An advisory put out by the Bedfordshire Fire Service in the UK says

“EV fires are known to reignite hours, days or even weeks after the initial event. Recovery firms are increasingly concerned about dealing with electric vehicles

Old Man Winter
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 9:21 am

At least with ICE fires only 300 gals is needed to put them out.
With EV fires it takes 3000 gallons AND 24 hrs. It’s a hot torch
that can set everything on fire around it for a very long time.
Remember the lithium battery fires that sunk a ship carrying cars
across the Pond as the fire burned for many days & they couldn’t
put it out? You can’t even roast hot dogs or marshmallows cuz of
the very toxic fumes!

With inflation rising rapidly & lithium in high demand, how much will
the $10k battery cost in 10 yrs? $20k, 40k? With the lifetime of most
ICE cars ~250k miles, how much will that be in 20yrs?
What about the pollution from all the used batteries?

I have a “burning” question to ask you- when an EV catches fire, is it
still a zero emissions car? 😉

Last edited 2 months ago by Old Man Winter
Geo
Reply to  Old Man Winter
April 9, 2022 12:28 pm
Nicholas McGinley
Reply to  Old Man Winter
April 9, 2022 1:55 pm

People in some areas are buying a coal fueled car when they buy a EV.

Derg
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 9:43 am

You skipped your protocol today?

Mark BLR
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 10:27 am

EVs are no more expensive than equivalent internal combustion vehicles.

Copied from a Norwegian website in March of last year (2021), but I don’t think the numbers have changed by that much since then …

The OP’s call for “No subsidies !” remains valid in 2022, and for the foreseeable future.

Norway_VW-Golf-vs-eGolf.png
Scissor
Reply to  Mark BLR
April 9, 2022 11:39 am

Seems like the e-golf is getting a free pass. It’s heavier than the ICE Golf but pays no weight tax and what’s with not paying any VAT?

Old Man Winter
Reply to  Mark BLR
April 9, 2022 12:49 pm

Considering how vulnerable the grid is in Europe, a wise
person may want to get an EV extender- while the supply
lasts- with the cost split between several people which would
give them another solution to cloudy, rainy, foggy days when
the wind isn’t blowing either or if they ration electricity/energy.
They’d be prepared for it, as the West has gotten used to
everything being always available.

M B
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 10:46 am

Battery powered vehicles have spontaneously combusted in the recent past actually, just ask the German bus station that couldn’t put out a battery powered bus fire that spread to others and lasted 3 days. If I remember correctly, this prompted legislation to disallow the parking of battery powered vehicles in undergrounds. I know of no gasoline or diesel vehicle that shares such a risk or has such a history. As for affordability… from an online site : “With the price increases, the cheapest listed vehicle for sale by Tesla is now the Model 3 with rear-wheel-drive. The vehicle’s sale price starts at $46,990 before additional features”. That’s considered an entry vehicle? The cheapest EV was the Nissan Leaf at $27 400, 149mi range. Highest range – Volkswagen ID.4 at 289miles at a “cheap” price of $41 995. And when we think of economy, or affordable manufacturers, Kia usually produces a reasonably priced vehicle, just not for EV. The EV6 rolls in at $40 900, with a top range of 232mi. You must have a time machine, or been revived from a decades old coma because you’re not in 2022. For gasoline cars available now, The Chevy Spark, Mitsubishi Mirage, Hyundai Accent, Nissan Versa Note, all have price tags half or even a third of the EVs. I invite you to do a quick online search, review or dealer visit. Add to this the fact they will provide you with three or four or more times the driving range, and the ease and speed of fueling, you aren’t just from another time, but another planet. For the average person, a full on EV, (as opposed to hybrids – which a coworker found to be worthless once the batteries hit end of life – throw away money that gets him net zero $ ahead), purchase is motivated by something other than facts and economics as related to travel. My neighbors, one a teacher, the other working in a law office, boasted of their Model 3 Tesla purchase of last year. They joined online groups and gushed as others joined, all feel good emotions of “doing the right thing for the planet”. Funny, I’ve yet to actually hear the planet thank anyone, but I digress. They no longer have an EV which, in my neighbors words, “We paid more for than I thought I would pay for a car, and I won’t do it again!” Needless to say, they now drive two gas powered vehicles. EV gone. You can debate, point-counter-point, blah blah on, and obfuscate all you want, but eventually, the hard wall of reality is what the idyllic slam into when they’re daydreaming about unicorns. NON-FACTUAL statements that are easily demonstrated to be so, like yours, should be.

Last edited 2 months ago by M B
Mike Lowe
Reply to  M B
April 9, 2022 1:42 pm

As a result of that German bus station fire, I am just waiting to see which countries do the sensible thing and ban all EVs from underground car parks, as well as multi-storey ones, etc. Plus all buildings housing more than one occupant, etc. Seems only sensible to me, but would be an admission of total failure of EVs for many politicians. Are EVs permitted in the Channel Tunnel? Just asking for a friend!

leowaj
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 11:02 am

I wonder how much it will cost to create a vehicle that meets the current level of utility of my truck? I drive mid-sized truck. It provides two-wheel drive, four-wheel drive, and four-wheel drive low. It can tow reasonably for my needs. It has air conditioning for summer heat, heating for winter cold, remote start for convenience.

I’ve yet to see an EV– even upcoming ones– that cause me to say, “say, an EV truck looks like a good or better replacement for my current truck!” ICE is still the superior product on the whole. Any nation seeking to reduce its reliance on ICE right now is shooting its citizens and its economy to death.

Scissor
Reply to  leowaj
April 9, 2022 11:55 am

Some people like you and me actually demand performance of products to meet their needs. They evaluate products objectively weighing pros and cons.

The fundamental problem of EVs is the weight of the battery, which results from the chemical and physical challenges of electrical energy storage. Incremental improvements will make for better batteries but it’s unlikely that they get to where they need to be to compete on cost for relative performance.

Bill E
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 2:25 pm

I looked up the first 2 cars from Duane’s link:
Nissan Versa (ice) starting $15,180, as shown $18590
Nissan Leaf (EV) starting $27,400, as shown $37,400

MINI Cooper Hardtop 2 Door (ice) $22,900-$32,900
MINI Cooper Hardtop 2 Door Electric (EV) $29,900-$30,750

Bryan A
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 7:10 pm

You can buy a brand new 2022 EV for under, or very near, $30,000 which is about the average price of a new economy car like Toyota Corolla

Like the…
2022 Mazda MX-30 for $33,000 and a 100 mile range and 10+hour recharge time at 120v house current
2022 Mini Cooper SE for $29,900 and a 114 mile range and 11+ hour recharging time at 120v house current
2022 Nissan Leaf for $27,400 and a 149 mile range and 15 hour recharge time at 120v house current
While the 2022 Toyota Corolla is $20,000 and gets 30-38mpg and a range of 435 miles with a 6 minute refill time

Robert Austin
Reply to  duane
April 10, 2022 9:03 am

“Oh, and by the way, did you never notice that your gas or diesel powered vehicle also has a battery in it?”

If you want to support the safety of EVs, don’t be flippant and say something completely stupid to score some imagined points. The lead acid batteries in internal combustion cars contain a minuscule quantity of energy compared to the lithium containing batteries in EVs and the contents of lead acid batteries do not fiercely burn seemingly spontaneously or in accidents.

Last edited 2 months ago by Robert Austin
Jim Gorman
Reply to  duane
April 10, 2022 10:51 am

Exactly what EV are you currently driving?

Ted
Reply to  duane
April 10, 2022 12:45 pm
Reply to  duane
April 10, 2022 8:31 pm

Watch a lot of movies, do you?

ICE cars don’t spontaneously combust in your garage.

yarpos
Reply to  duane
April 12, 2022 1:50 am

more fantasy and selective reality from Duane

outside of motorsport and TV how often have you seen a burning car? then there is Duane

doesnt seem to think spontaneous combustion of a parked car is a biggie

doesnt seem to understand the difference between a lead acid starting battery and sitting on a ton of Lion cells.

Last edited 2 months ago by yarpos
niceguy
Reply to  Iain Russell
April 9, 2022 9:30 am

In Paris there are Teslas but pretty much all are the 3, the only one bellow 40000 €, the only one eligible to the bonus!

Ken Irwin
April 9, 2022 6:08 am

UK does not have the electrical infrastructure to support that load.
Current wish list energy planning is doomed to abject failure.

duane
Reply to  Ken Irwin
April 9, 2022 7:43 am

Actually, the great majority of recharging of EVs takes place overnight wherever the vehicle is garaged. In all electric grids worldwide, power demand is at its least during the overnight hours – power always peaks during the day time when people are awake and working, shopping, recreating, etc. and businesses are open for business. That’s why the utilities encourage customers to use less power during the day and more during the night.

So no, the grid will not be overwhelmed at all with EVs.

duane
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 7:46 am

So in other words, EV use will cause electrical demands to be much more levelized throughout the 24 hour day than they are today. That is inherently a very good thing. Power plants and electrical grids function much more efficiently and reliably when they are operated continuously at near their capacity, with as little daily cyclical change as can be achieved.

Paul S
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 7:57 am

And those natural gas or wood fired plants that produce the electricity don’t expel CO2, do they?

Peta of Newark
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 8:06 am

Yeeeeeessss, right.
But if the electric is coming from solar panels, that become a con, not a pro.

Likewise and easily 80% of the time, the wind drops at night-time also

leowaj
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 11:13 am

Duane, you are correct in that when grid suppliers are producing near their capacity, they operating most efficiently. The problem is that consumers don’t operate as low-energy during the day and high energy at night (to recharge their cars). They operate on an as-needed basis. When they need fuel, they find the nearest, cheapest station and fill up. With EVs the equivalent to a fuel pump station is a fast-charge station. And there aren’t many of them around compared to fuel pumps and home outlets (long charging, which is the equivalent of using a dropper to put gasoline in your car one drop at a time). At present, in order to convert to a nation completely to EVs, it would require rationing fast-charge stations– which is already happening in effect because there are so few and lengthy lines form at them at all times of the day.

So, moving consumers from the (superior) demand-driven, supply-fulfilled market in place right now to an inferior demand-drive, supply-cannot-be-provided market will have a deleterious effect on the entire economy. This is not the direction any nation should move.

Last edited 2 months ago by leowaj
b.nice
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 12:09 pm

“when they are operated continuously at near their capacity”

So EV won’t be charged using wind and solar, because neither of them fit that description.

That means that EV’s won’t reduce CO2 emissions.

You can’t live in your little fantasy land all your life, you know !

And how many people have street parking as their only choice.

EV charging overnight.. its a nightmare, not a fluffy little dream.

Nicholas McGinley
Reply to  b.nice
April 9, 2022 2:06 pm

That is right.
Most of everyone who lives in a downtown has no way to charge an EV. Same for almost everyone who lives in an apartment.

Duane has obviously not done even a simple math exercise before commenting.
The question is not whether or not a single EV right now will overload the power grid…it is what happens when half or more of all cars are EVs, and everyone plugs it in when they get home, and the whole country is running on intermittents which produce very little power at night and are in any case not able to throttle up or down to match loads.

When the grid is mostly wind and demand exceeds supply, the power must be purchased on open spot markets, most commonly from some other nearby state or country, which is well known to be the very most expensive power there is in the whole world.

If there is a situation where the demand exceeds the load carrying capacity of the transmission lines bringing in this power, the result will be a rolling blackout, a brownout, or grid collapse.

ATheoK
Reply to  b.nice
April 9, 2022 8:42 pm

Agreed.

On top of their delusional charging assumptions, they’ve pushed vehicles into production that fail to provide transportation/usage to one person each day.

Instead of a spouse returning home from a long commute and then using the family car for evening, night and weekends, the car must be charged for between 10-15 hours as documented by Bryan A.

Meaning that every family needing a vehicle for various errands, lessons, classes, assemblies, meetings, second job, etc. will need their own vehicle.

The numbers of vehicles on our roads will increase substantially.

MM from Canada
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 2:11 pm

“So in other words, EV use will cause electrical demands to be much more levelized throughout the 24 hour day than they are today.”
Nice try, but EV use won’t change the demand for OTHER uses of electricity or when that electricity is needed. It will just increase the total demand overall. And since the sun doesn’t shine and the wind doesn’t blow 24/7, widespread EV adoption will exacerbate the problems the UK is already having with its grid.

ATheoK
Reply to  MM from Canada
April 9, 2022 8:57 pm

Duane’s notion of the electrical grid is similarly bizarre.
Instead, it assumes that EVs charging off schedule are perfectly all right. That things balance out…

Ignoring that vehicles will be charging day and night, depending on who is using them. The neighborhood grid, i.e. wires strung overhead or buried, are not sized for that levels of continuous voltage/amperage.

Nor are renewables capable of providing high quality consistent high quality electricity necessary for fast charging E-vehicles. That electricity must come from consistent generating facilities.

EV buses and other high person capacity commute vehicles must also increase their numbers substantially. Large batteries will reduce vehicle capacity; they will drain their batteries faster.

Since fast charging seriously cuts the life of the battery, commuter vehicles will be charging nonstop. As soon as one vehicle is returned to transporting people, another vehicle will be plugged in for charging.

All of those lithium ion batteries in urban centers are disasters waiting to happen..

Dave Andrews
Reply to  ATheoK
April 10, 2022 5:50 am

The UK has c 300,000 Low Voltage (LV) substations and around 1m feeders with about 450,000kms of buried cables. It is estimated that about 80% of this LV network is built for ‘lighting plus’ (c.1.2kW) and is not suitable for 7kW EVs and 9kW heat pumps.

A few years back the cost of upgrading this network was put at £60 billion and would involve digging up most of the non motorway roads in the country.

https://v2g.co.uk/2021/05/electric-vehicles-as-energy-smart-appliances

Last edited 2 months ago by Dave Andrews
Paul S
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 7:54 am

Solar works very well during the night

Dennis
Reply to  Paul S
April 9, 2022 8:25 pm

Of course it does, and according to a blogger a couple of years ago in a Sydney Australia newspaper on line blog who posted that she would recharge her EV, when she gets one, overnight from solar electricity.

Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 7:56 am

EVs require more power than houses which means the nightime slack cannot handle 100% EVs.

Last edited 2 months ago by ferdberple
In The Real World
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 8:24 am

Anybody who could actually count would realise that the UK grid cannot charge more than about 10% of the private cars at any time without the grid going down .
Although actually , their ” Smart Meters ” [ which are compulsory for a car charger ],
would just shut down the ones who are charging to try to keep the grid going .So most of them will not get charged up .

It would need a massive increase in generation capacity for the country to be able to run anywhere near the amount of EVs the Green Loonies want the country to take up .

Matt Kiro
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 8:40 am

There are no charging stations, no parking for all the charging stations, no batteries to store all the electricity needed. That is the infrastructure he is talking about. There isn’t even the necessary materials available to construct everything, unless the UK uses everything the world produces. It is impossible to do in the time frame they are pushing.

Mike Lowe
Reply to  Matt Kiro
April 9, 2022 1:45 pm

Isn’t that a comforting thought! The Greens will eventually be forced to face facts!

Meab
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 9:39 am

Your’re lying AGAIN, DuhWayne. The average household electricity usage in the US is 10.7 kW-hrs per day. That’s only enough electricity for the average EV to travel about 30 real-world miles. Since the average amount of driving in the US is 39 miles (all driving), should everyone switch to EVs it would more than double residential electricity usage, doubling the amount of electricity needing to be generated. You cannot double usage without seeing an increase in peak power demand.

In addition, less than half the people in the US own a single-family home. Even fewer own a place to charge an EV (think of all the people who park on the street). There would be a mad scramble to find public chargers – many would need to charge after work during the peak electricity usage time thus further increasing peak demand.

It never ceases to amaze me that the people who shout the loudest are often the least knowledgeable.

b.nice
Reply to  Meab
April 9, 2022 12:11 pm

The supply grids themselves will also need massive upgrades in most places.

This will be a truly expensive exercise.. for absolutely no gain of any sort.

H.R.
Reply to  b.nice
April 10, 2022 4:16 am

Now, now, b nice. The little birdies will have a lot more power lines to perch on if we have to double or treble the amount of transmission lines. That’s a plus.

Too bad the increase in bird choppers needed to run power through all those new lines will leave far fewer birdies to perch on those lines. That’s a minus.

It’s always something…

Dave Andrews
Reply to  b.nice
April 10, 2022 5:57 am

Yep. A cost of £60 billion has been put on upgrading the UK network but this was a few years ago and it will inevitably be greater now. It would also involve digging up most of the non motorway roads in the country!

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 10:48 am

In all electric grids worldwide, power demand is at its least during the overnight hours …

That is the situation at the moment. That will be turned on its head if everyone owns an EV.

Russell
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 4:37 pm

Actually, the great majority of recharging of EVs takes place overnight wherever the vehicle is garaged.

Most streets of London are now littered with parked cars (not garaged). Long extension cords will present electrical and physical safety hazards to every road user. Just an unintended consequence?

Only a drongo who has no idea of the infrastructural engineering involved would make such a comment. Or maybe just another leftist-idealist with a “super-simplified” view and vision of the world.

H.R.
Reply to  Russell
April 10, 2022 4:23 am

I predict a sharp increase in copper thievery under those circumstances, Russell.

Not only will your EV not get charged, but you’ll be buying a replacement cable every few days.

The good news is that replacement cable prices should go down as all the cables will be made from recycled copper. You know… the copper that was charging your car last week?

Bryan A
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 9:26 pm

The peak will change to peak charging time as EVs are forced into every garage and mandated to replace ICE vehicles. The new Peak Time will be at night when No Solar is available. So … YES … forced EV acceptance WILL alter Peak Usage Time and over tax existing electric infrastructure. Every 50 AMP charger (1 per EV) places an additional 12kVA of load on your residential service. 1 EV charger added to your home service will more than double your average daily usage (unless you use a lot anyway) and if you have 2 cars, your daily usage will triple. The average 25 KVA OH Transformer is good for about 35kVA of load before it’s overtaxed and needs to be upsized. With every car being EV, and people having 2 cars charging overnight you will need 100 KVA Transformers on every other pole feeding no more than 4 houses each. Yes, infrastructure will be overtaxed and need upsizing.

Last edited 2 months ago by Bryan A
Ted
Reply to  duane
April 10, 2022 4:02 pm

“In all electric grids worldwide, power demand is at its least during the overnight hours ” – except in winter, when people use electricity for heat. This will be even worse if fossil fuels get limited by the government, moving more people to use grid power to stay warm.

Reply to  duane
April 10, 2022 8:48 pm

The power is coming from where? Not that hundred acre solar farm, that’s for sure. Good chance not from those windmills down the road, either (that might be a good thing, you’ll actually get a decent night’s sleep!)

How many houses in the UK actually have garages?

Robert Watt
Reply to  Ken Irwin
April 9, 2022 3:17 pm

Absolutely, you are correct. 50% of the existing cars on the DVLA register would be 16M vehicles. These would be connected to the UK grid for recharging mostly between 18.00 and 07.00 hrs. Obviously, not every vehicle will need a full recharge but for a period 16M cars requiring 7kw of power for, say 2 hours overnight, would require an additional 112 GW of generating capacity and a massive increase in the national grid network to deliver this additional power load to users homes. As the existing installed electricity generation capacity in the UK is currently around 65 GW, how are these 16M electric cars going to be recharged. It would take many years to upgrade the UK’s electricity supply system to meet the demand of 16M EVs. What I can’t understand is why electrical engineers within the UK are not making public statements that the ambitions for EVs by 2028 are complete ‘pie in the sky’.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Robert Watt
April 10, 2022 4:07 am

“What I can’t understand is why electrical engineers within the UK are not making public statements that the ambitions for EVs by 2028 are complete ‘pie in the sky’.”

Good question.

H.R.
Reply to  Robert Watt
April 10, 2022 4:29 am

Robert Watt: “What I can’t understand is why electrical engineers within the UK are not making public statements that the ambitions for EVs by 2028 are complete ‘pie in the sky’.”


Because those electrical engineers plan on an early retirement from all the extra money they will make at night as copper thieves.
😉

April 9, 2022 6:09 am

More wishful thinking at the UK. Fortunately, Canada has the answer … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KlHEbfHjZPQ

Old Man Winter
Reply to  John Shewchuk
April 9, 2022 7:04 am

Every Yank needs to see that yesterday. Brandon has some ‘splainin’ to do!

Spetzer86
April 9, 2022 6:10 am

I want to see the electric farm tractors and combines we’re going to be using to grow and harvest food. I don’t think the average farmer has the money to purchase these items, nor the time to wait the multiple times a day to recharge the suckers while trying to beat the rain or snow. Seems like if you significantly reduce the gas customer base, the decreased production will lead to increased overhead costs and increased final costs of goods. That means your food is going to cost more, along with everything else.

Old Man Winter
Reply to  Spetzer86
April 9, 2022 6:54 am

Since farmers work very long days during busy times- planting & harvesting-
there’s little time left to recharge batteries. Now that they don’t need
drivers anymore & can run equipment 24/7, that leaves 0 time for charging.

Vuk
Reply to  Old Man Winter
April 9, 2022 7:26 am

Simples, turn your fields into solar farm, get your grain from Ukraine.
comment image
(image by courtesy of the UK’s Minister for Defence Procurement)

Old Man Winter
Reply to  Vuk
April 9, 2022 8:29 am

“get your grain from Ukraine”- you’re a poet & didn’t know it! 😉

If they don’t, they’ll need very long & thick extension cords
500hp-1000hp = ~500kw-~1MW power (allowing for
transmission losses) If only Tesla had been right
about transmitting electricity through the air!

Last edited 2 months ago by Old Man Winter
Spetzer86
Reply to  Old Man Winter
April 9, 2022 8:35 am

Yeah. Your average farm field is so close to major power lines.

Derg
Reply to  Vuk
April 9, 2022 9:45 am

This is such a sad sight 😔

Nicholas McGinley
Reply to  Derg
April 9, 2022 4:44 pm

Especially when you realize all those panels are probably enough for a single large farm, but they still need a huge number of very expensive batteries or they will have zero power for more than half of the hours in a year.

Reply to  Spetzer86
April 9, 2022 7:22 am

The only upside is that demand for gasoline will drop and so will it’s price for those of us who were not suckered into the big climate lie.

Gregory Woods
Reply to  co2isnotevil
April 9, 2022 7:27 am

I don’t think so – the price will only go up…

Peta of Newark
Reply to  Gregory Woods
April 9, 2022 8:08 am

Strictly: the tax on the fossil fuel will go up

Old Man Winter
Reply to  co2isnotevil
April 9, 2022 7:30 am

Actually it may not. The oil will be refined into diesel they’ll use
for all the towed chargers needed to maintain normal range.

EVtrailr.jpg
Richard Page
Reply to  Spetzer86
April 9, 2022 7:30 am

I think we’ve seen, with the US oil industry, how the UK government will react to farmers unable to grow or harvest enough food – “they’re just sitting on thousands of unused acres of land, they need to increase production, pronto!”

Reply to  Richard Page
April 10, 2022 9:04 pm

A highly educated Cambodian even gave us the model for doing just that.

People named “Duane,” “Griff,” “Nick,” “Bob,” etc. are going to be very surprised when they are among the first to be offered the not to be turned down opportunity for fresh air, sunshine, and lots of exercise.

Joe Crawford
Reply to  Spetzer86
April 9, 2022 8:03 am

Those tractors are going to look awfully funny hauling around 5 to 10 tons of battery while working the fields. Of course the government could provide each farmer with two or three battery banks for each tractor so he can change ’em out at lunch and dinner time while charging the others.

Scissor
Reply to  Joe Crawford
April 9, 2022 10:23 am

Wouldn’t the extra weight give them more traction in mud and soil?

Brad-DXT
Reply to  Scissor
April 9, 2022 11:16 am

It will certainly make them sink faster.
When I had my woods logged, the rain got the heavy equipment stuck for weeks. It was good for the morels though.

Scissor
Reply to  Brad-DXT
April 9, 2022 4:27 pm

Sorry, I was being sarcastic.

Brad-DXT
Reply to  Scissor
April 9, 2022 10:11 pm

I knew that. I was just letting you know that I know where to find morels. You find any yet?

Scissor
Reply to  Brad-DXT
April 10, 2022 7:02 am

Thanks. Sorry.

No luck so far on the morels. We have some rain coming in, then I’ll look again after that.

Old Man Winter
Reply to  Scissor
April 9, 2022 1:26 pm

Depends on what you’re doing, soil type & how wet it is as
too much rain can cause problems, as Brad-DXT said.

The batteries could give it too much weight to start with which
you can’t get rid of. The weight also has to be distributed
properly front-to-back. So design may also be critical.

Old Man Winter
Reply to  Joe Crawford
April 9, 2022 1:14 pm

I’d hate to have a battery catch fire on a combine as normal
combine fires can require fire departments to extinguish. With a lot
of ripe grain that can burn, that could get quite spendy in a hurry!
More than likely, the $600k combine will be totaled with the lithium
blow torch. The good news is tractors are cheaper.

500 hp = ~400kw => ~360A @ 110V or ~90A @ 440V.
Halve it for 250hp, double that for 1000hp!

0000 Cu wire (0.46″)- 195A @ 140F, 260A @ 190F
I wouldn’t want all of that heat nearby. What could go wrong!

April 9, 2022 6:18 am

The world will be watching the UK Great Green Experiment….even though it is all for nothing….CO2 is not a problem but a benefit. Are those outside charging ports on those vehicles waterproof?

Redge
Reply to  Anti_griff
April 9, 2022 6:45 am

The world will be watching the UK Great Green Experiment…

And laughing at our folly

Bill
Reply to  Redge
April 10, 2022 12:13 am

Only if they can avoid the folly themselves. 😮

Richard Page
Reply to  Anti_griff
April 9, 2022 7:33 am

The charging ports are waterproof – that’s one of the few areas on the EV’s that was developed for other uses and that will actually work!

Graham
Reply to  Anti_griff
April 9, 2022 12:42 pm

We are being pushed by our quasi communist government to buy EVs in New Zealand.
A large tax has just been imposed on utility vehicles to subsidize EVs .
This government wants to electrify our transport system including heavy trucks .
It takes a very large battery to drive a fully loaded 60 tonne truck and trailer and the batteries have to be changed with using a crane every 200 kilometers .
This government does not have a clue as our elecrticity generation would have to double if all transport was electrified .
Our government has recently reduced the road tax that is added to all petrol sales as the rapid price increases was severely impacting every one .
Our government stopped oil and gas exploration off our shores so that our large Huntly power station was forced to import coal from Indonesia to keep the lights on in New Zealand instead of using gas from offshore Taranaki .
With their blind rush to electrify our transport system Huntly will burn millions of dollars worth of imported coal even though there are vast reserves of coal near by .

Mike Lowe
Reply to  Graham
April 9, 2022 1:53 pm

Correct, thereby proving how technically-ignorant Cindy and her communist mates are! It would be great if they could be persuaded to read these comments, but they are far too busy with important matters such as bribing the MSM and encouraging the use of a near-dead language!

Jeff Alberts
Reply to  Anti_griff
April 9, 2022 6:05 pm

Are those outside charging ports on those vehicles waterproof?”

Pretty silly question.

pochas94
April 9, 2022 6:19 am

He who makes the rules gets rich really fast.

2hotel9
April 9, 2022 6:21 am

Where will all the electricity for these toys come from? Oh, yea, coal, gas, hydro and nuclear.

Ray Swadling
Reply to  2hotel9
April 9, 2022 6:46 am

Well, even if you could generate the power, unless the entire UK local distribution network is upgraded for increased demand then good luck geeting it to the thousands of domestic charging points needed.. .

2hotel9
Reply to  Ray Swadling
April 9, 2022 6:55 am

Same here in States. Greentards got no clue and you cannot explain it to them, they simply want things to magically happen and get angry when it doesn’t.

Ray Swadling
Reply to  2hotel9
April 9, 2022 1:10 pm

Yep…the local distribution grid is still based on historical demand.
Predating even all the electric gadgets we have currently.
Add in UK Gov want us all to switch to electric for heating and cooking instead of gas, and the local transformers will be glowing cherry red 🙂

Russ Wood
Reply to  Ray Swadling
April 9, 2022 9:07 am

Well, there was that street in an Australian city where about a third of the householders bought electric. Simultaneous charging of more than three cars blew the street’s power – for everybody!

Mike Lowe
Reply to  Russ Wood
April 9, 2022 1:55 pm

Where was that? We need to know, because a good practical experiment is all it should need to convince the few sensible technically-knowledgeable politicians.

H.R.
Reply to  Mike Lowe
April 10, 2022 4:46 am

Wait, what?!? You’re saying there actually is a technically knowledgeable politician?

Who knew?

Old Man Winter
Reply to  2hotel9
April 9, 2022 7:32 am

Do you mean like this?

EVcoal.jpg
2hotel9
Reply to  Old Man Winter
April 10, 2022 11:54 am

Just like that!

Peta of Newark
Reply to  2hotel9
April 9, 2022 8:17 am

My BoE calculation, check it, went like this:

30 million UK cars
As per what insurance companies say, each does 10,000 miles per year
No matter what EV makers and Gov’t say, in UK conditions of weather, traffic stop/starts, hills, roundabouts, corners etc etc, those cars will go for 2 miles on one kWh of electricity

Lets say 10,000 hours in a year means they are all moving at one mile per hour. Thus burning 500Watts as they go

Straight up that’s a continuous 15GW demand = about a third of current UK peak demand and half of average ordinary demand

Obviously double that if they only all charge up at night – while the sun ain’t shining and the wind has dropped. sigh

Philip
Reply to  Peta of Newark
April 9, 2022 9:11 am

You assumed 100% charging/storage/conversion efficiency.
I doubt that you would get better than 70%, if that. so not 15GW, more like 20GW

Philo
April 9, 2022 6:27 am

It’s pretty obvious that the politicos trying to run the country do not have enough engineering knowledge to develop a program that might have a chance of working.

The proposed limits will simply bankrupt average citizens. The wealthy could afford to add a couple extra vehicles and continue to have transportation at hand. The less wealthy would struggle to get a vehicle charged overnight and not make it to work the next day.

I can almost guarantee that average workers who can’t afford long commutes and extensive overnight charging will be jobless in less that a year. This continuing, senseless jumbling of the power systems will simply crash them.

Let’s cheer on the clueless politicos and get the trauma over.

Brad-DXT
Reply to  Philo
April 9, 2022 11:22 am

Engineering dyslexia is rampant in the political class. They rely on emotional appeal to get re-elected and not on solving problems.

Eric, here’s another. 🍸

Coeur de Lion
April 9, 2022 6:30 am

Aviation, shipping, forestry and agriculture are not susceptible to Net Zero which will fail. Everyone (who can count above say ten) says so.

Old Man Winter
April 9, 2022 6:34 am

I bet Griffo will still claim that it’s a zero emissions car!

EV0pollu.jpg
CD in Wisconsin
Reply to  Old Man Winter
April 9, 2022 11:14 am

Who are you going to believe, your own two eyes or Griffypoo?

observa
April 9, 2022 6:42 am

They’re off with the fairies as it can’t happen-
Tesla Shocks German Consumers With A €7,000 Price Hike For Base Model 3 | Carscoops

Tesla and the premiums will eventually satisfy the wealthy car buyer market and then the EV sales will flatline at the same time as their price soars. In the meantime Toyota et al will make a killing with hybrids for the bulk of the urban market and it will become obvious to future Govts that ICE bans will see them thrown out on their ear.

Even in Oz with fuel prices spiking over Ukraine there was two party support for quickly halving the fuel excise with an election in the offing. Australian Labor have gone real quiet on changing the climate now.

Old Man Winter
April 9, 2022 6:44 am

I also wonder if Griffo is still waiting for the Easter Unicorn’s gift of
the Pot o’ Gold it found at the end of the rainbow?

h/t Oldseadog

unicorn.jpg
Oldseadog
Reply to  Old Man Winter
April 9, 2022 7:29 am

Worth noting that the Mercedes-Benz B class automatic diesel at the end of the rainbow in the picture is 15 years old, does 55 miles to the GB gallon, uses no oil between services, has 148,000 miles on the clock, has the original battery and exhaust pipe and came with a 30 year free collection guarantee if it breaks down. I don’t plan on changing it any time soon.

Old Man Winter
Reply to  Oldseadog
April 9, 2022 7:44 am

When in Frankfurt, I got to ride in a Mercedes taxi. The sound of the
door closing was a lot better than any car us Yanks ever built.

One guy in the squadron drove a Mercedes so he’d
always pick up parts when he went to Europe.

BTW, I was always impressed that the color of the car matched
that of its hubcaps! 😉 😉 😉

Last edited 2 months ago by Old Man Winter
Old Man Winter
Reply to  Oldseadog
April 9, 2022 8:04 am

Did you ever get a call from the Babylon Bee? You seem to have the knack of making life become reality.
I was absolutely stunned when I saw your picture.
ROTFLMAOHATM!!! 🙂

Last edited 2 months ago by Old Man Winter
Richard Page
Reply to  Old Man Winter
April 9, 2022 7:36 am

Easter Unicorn? Pot o’ gold? Just how many different fantastical memes are you trying to squeeze in there?

Old Man Winter
Reply to  Richard Page
April 9, 2022 7:57 am

Unfortunately with Griffo, I probably missed a few like Santa Claus,
the Tooth Fairy, The Green Nude Eel, Whirled Peas, etc. Griffo’s list
is probably endless! 😉 😉 😉

I’m working on a PhD in memeology, but since I’m not a
biologist I can’t tell you what a woman is! 😉

Last edited 2 months ago by Old Man Winter
Jo Ho
April 9, 2022 6:47 am

Iain Dale wrote an article in the Daily Mail about a horrific 11 hour journey in his EV which should have taken a couple or three hours. Boris is, unfortunately, pushing ahead with this EV nonsense long before the required technology is available or indeed the Green energy to power them. Wait twenty years and then take another look at EVs, but for now put ‘Rip van Winkle’ to bed.

IAIN DALE: My 11-hour journey from hell proves Britain is hopelessly unprepared for electric cars | Daily Mail Online

Steve Richards
Reply to  Jo Ho
April 9, 2022 10:58 am

Main stream media is mentioning more pitfalls of EVs now. It would have been unheard of a12 months ago.

Mike Lowe
Reply to  Jo Ho
April 9, 2022 2:02 pm

Unfortunately, Boris is no longer ruled by his brain – if he ever was. Having a Greenie in his bed may be the biggest problem the UK has to overcome.

Mr.
Reply to  Jo Ho
April 9, 2022 4:18 pm

Iain Dale could have headlined his article –

“MUGGED BY REALITY”

Redge
April 9, 2022 6:51 am

This UK subject won’t be driving an EV. I’ve nothing against them but I prefer a good old-fashioned car with a proper engine, and besides, I have nowhere to charge an EV, even if I could afford one.

Alex Emodi
April 9, 2022 6:55 am

It’s pie in the sky.The electricity capacity doesn’t exist, and can’t be produced in that timescale.Delusion of the highest order.

James Snook
April 9, 2022 7:04 am

The virtue signalling targets as credible as unicorn farming in Parliament Square.

Apart from anything else EV’s will be increasingly unaffordable for private motorists as battery raw material prices explode, e.g. Lithium prices currently 6.5 times higher than five years ago.

The majority of current purchases in the U.K. are Management company cars, where the tax on benefits in kind has been reduced to zero for the first year and very little in subsequent years. This, coupled with no Road Tax, is fiscally unsustainable but makes EV’s a no brainer for the time being in this sector.

ihfan
Reply to  James Snook
April 9, 2022 7:43 am

If people think EVs are expensive now, wait until that is the only type of vehicle you can buy.

You know, that whole supply and demand thing.

April 9, 2022 7:04 am

Uk guv mint gone full GreatThingBerg
“Why arent you doing something about this?”
“We will makes some virtue signalling laws, and charge you double. Now P*** off and STFU”.

Olen
April 9, 2022 7:14 am

Who will profit from this in currency?

Carlo, Monte
April 9, 2022 7:23 am

—How To Commit National Suicide—

Unfortunately Brandon & B*ttpl*g are heading into the same concrete wall.

Dave
April 9, 2022 7:24 am

Better build a lot of nukes really quickly.

Andy Pattullo
April 9, 2022 7:26 am

Obviously this is infantile fantasy thinking. There is nothing zero emission about EV’s when one takes into account all the mining, manufacturing, rare earth metals, steel, plastics and of course, the mainly fossil fuel source of the electricity. Then there is the unaccounted costs in dollars and carbon emissions in whatever process are to be developed to decommission the batteries and cars once no longer functional.

H.R.
Reply to  Andy Pattullo
April 10, 2022 4:59 am

From the pictures I’ve seen, the EVs decommission themselves… while fire departments watch.

So that’s one less problem to worry about.

duane
April 9, 2022 7:30 am

Well, last I heard the UK is a representative democracy with a Parliament that is accountable to the voters, that enacts the laws in accordance with a Constitution, so ministers are always proposing this or that, but until it’s the law, it’s not the law. We’ll see whether this ever becomes law or not.

It’s like the old saying in the US – “The President proposes, but Congress disposes”.

Oldseadog
Reply to  duane
April 9, 2022 10:45 am

My understanding is that net zero by 2050 is the law, it went through Parliamernt pretty much on the nod.
Who said “You get the Parliament you deserve.” ?

Alan Watt, Climate Denialist Level 7
Reply to  Oldseadog
April 9, 2022 1:55 pm

I don’t know, but Will Rogers said “We have the best Congress than money can buy.”

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Alan Watt, Climate Denialist Level 7
April 10, 2022 4:33 am

Will also said, Congress doesn’t do much, but that’s what we want them to do.

Alan Watt, Climate Denialist Level 7
Reply to  Tom Abbott
April 10, 2022 5:42 am

I don’t remember that wording, but he did say “Thank goodness we don’t get all the government we pay for,” which is the same idea.

ResourceGuy
April 9, 2022 7:53 am

KGB agents take note of the vulnerabilities there and add them to the briefing file.

Richard Page
Reply to  ResourceGuy
April 9, 2022 2:48 pm

The FSB, do try to keep up!

ResourceGuy
Reply to  Richard Page
April 9, 2022 3:55 pm

KGB in heart and spirit

TonyL
April 9, 2022 7:54 am

Put a stop to the mandates. Take the politicians who propose these things and give them such a working over that they never try it again.

But How??

We all, around here, know how damaging EVs, (and BEVs, ZEVs) really are. USE It.
We know that Cobalt, needed for EVs is produced in “artisanal” mines in Africa, often by children, often under conditions resembling slavery.
Use It.
Politicians promoting EVs are cheering on slavery in Africa. They are all for child slavery. The children are black. Therefor, the politician is a RACIST Slaver. Do not let up.

We know that the Rare Earth elements needed for the motors are produced in China under appalling environmental conditions.
Use It.
Politicians promoting EVs are cheering on environmental destruction in China. They are all for some of the most polluting mining practices on the planet. Therefor, the politician is an Environmental Criminal. Keep at it.

We know that EV batteries do not recycle. At the end of the line, there is no choice but to dump old batteries in landfills.
Use It.
Politicians promoting EVs are cheering on environmental destruction in our own country. EV batteries have toxic compounds which can seep into groundwater aquifers. These politicians are promoting the poisoning of our own children.

Politicians carefully craft and protect their public image. They live or die on public perception.
Give them a whole new public image.
Done right, they will never know what hit them.

ResourceGuy
April 9, 2022 7:57 am

How many trees in North American clearcut forests does it take to power a charging lot of 10 EVs and the queue backed up there? I bet Drax Group knows alongside the subsidy meter.

Chris Nisbet
April 9, 2022 8:18 am

“people will simply tend to buy imported cars instead”
Here in NZ, they’ve just plonked a $4.5K fee on imported cars.
Used imports attract a $2.5k fee as well.
It’s all good though – it’s not like people are suffering financially right now. Oh, wait.

I wonder how much pain the public will let their leaders inflict on them. NZers seem to be gluttons for it.

https://www.nzta.govt.nz/vehicles/clean-car-programme/clean-car-programme-questions-and-answers/

Mr.
Reply to  Chris Nisbet
April 9, 2022 8:53 am

Isn’t EVERY car imported into NZ?

Chris Nisbet
Reply to  Mr.
April 9, 2022 9:07 am

Yes.

Mike Lowe
Reply to  Chris Nisbet
April 9, 2022 2:08 pm

I’ll just stick with my 2008 Nissan X-Trail despite over 110,000 km on the clock. If Cindy ever considers passing laws which outlaw older ICE vehicles, she will start a revolution. Fortunately we have an election due in just over one year – maybe more of us engineers need to stand for election.

Walter Sobchak
April 9, 2022 8:22 am

The interesting question is how the Brits are going to stop the manufacturers, almost all of which are foreign owned, from simply folding their tents and stealing away in the middle of the night?

As for the poor (and I mean that literally) British consumer, they will need to study up on how Cubans have kept American cars from the 1950s running.

Russ Wood
Reply to  Walter Sobchak
April 9, 2022 9:11 am

Cuba? Lots of backyard mechanics! Got the same in South Africa!

Oldseadog
Reply to  Russ Wood
April 9, 2022 10:47 am

Also no cold weather requiring salt on the frozen roads which gets onto the cars making them rusty.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Walter Sobchak
April 10, 2022 3:15 pm

Points, plus, condensers are a lot easier to after-market manufacture compared with computer modules.

Peta of Newark
April 9, 2022 8:32 am

Electric cars are all about control and taxation.
little else

= things desperately needed by spendthrift Gov’ts made up of paranoid (chemically depressed and thus prone to panic##) people – people that make Mr Putin look like The Angel Gabriel

end. of. story.

## The Gov’t response to Wuhan Flu demonstrated that perfectly – the only response all that Western Gov’ts had was to throw money at an exaggerated and misunderstood problem/mechanism.
The exaggeration coming out of computer models =The Ultimate Contemporary Authority – in turn those computers been programmed by paranoid people.

sound familiar?
Positive feedback systems never end happily

griff
April 9, 2022 8:36 am

Seems likely…

UK electric car sales hit record month | The Independent

“The number of electric vehicles registered in the UK in March was the highest on record for a single month.

Nearly 40,000 new electric vehicles were registered in the UK last month, an increase of nearly 80 per cent compared to March last year, according to the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders.

The number of registrations was higher last month than during the entirety of 2019, according to the group.”

tomsa
Reply to  griff
April 9, 2022 10:29 am

I wonder how those new owners will feel when they start lining up for hours at charge points like poor Mr. Dale on his eleven hour journey from hell.

Oldseadog
Reply to  tomsa
April 9, 2022 10:50 am

Even more interesting will be if the business car-owners, in 3 years time, will replace the electric car with another one, or will they go back to IC.

b.nice
Reply to  Oldseadog
April 9, 2022 12:26 pm

And what will they do with the old EV with the clapped out battery.. ?

Mike Lowe
Reply to  b.nice
April 9, 2022 2:12 pm

Correct. With ICE cars, it was sensible practice to purchase an almost new ex-company car even with higher mileage. Someone doing that with a 3-year old EV will later realise that few years remain before the battery expense makes his purchase unsaleable. What then?

JohnC
Reply to  Mike Lowe
April 10, 2022 5:55 am

I believe someone has already experienced this in the U.K. he bought a second hand Mercedes and the battery needed replacing. The cost of the new battery was more than the car was worth.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Oldseadog
April 10, 2022 4:55 pm

Leasing is the only sensible way to have one, after the lease runs out, the battery becomes someone else’s problem.

Bryan A
Reply to  tomsa
April 10, 2022 2:23 pm

I wonder how they’ll feel when they try to leave for work in the morning and their “Plugged In” EV has a drained battery because the “Grid” needed the energy to cover a shortfall in generation overnight

Andy Pattullo
Reply to  griff
April 9, 2022 10:32 am

A very concerning statistic given the huge detrimental effects through the lifecycle of fully electric vehicles and the fact they do nothing to diminish the superstitiously vilified, life-giving CO@ concentration in the atmosphere (or perhaps increase them modestly given their materials and energy intensity in manufacture). I share your concern Griff for this growing idiocy. When will we return to fact based decision-making?

Mike Lowe
Reply to  griff
April 9, 2022 2:10 pm

Things are almost always “a record” when you start from a minimal base!

Mr.
Reply to  griff
April 9, 2022 2:28 pm

What you left out of The Independent’s puff piece Griff was this –

The boost in electric vehicle registrations stands in stark contrast to the broader picture of the car market last month. New car registrations declined by around 14 per cent to some 240,000 vehicles, the weakest March in 24 years, due to supply chain shortages, particularly a lack of semiconductors.

and this –

More electric vehicles on Britain’s roads will mean higher demand for charge points. Last month, the government said it will help businesses to roll out 300,000 public charge points by 2030, the equivalent of almost five times the number of fuel pumps on our roads today.

Motorist groups and those involved in the transition to electric vehicles welcomed the government’s commitment but said they were concerned about the speed and scale of the rollout.

Dave Andrews
Reply to  griff
April 10, 2022 6:22 am

Petrol and diesel cars, and mild hybrid EVs which are mainly oil powered, registrations in the UK for 2021 were almost 1.2m. BEV,PHEV, HEV under 0.5m

Last edited 2 months ago by Dave Andrews
Bryan A
Reply to  griff
April 10, 2022 2:20 pm

So with 243,000 new registrations in March, “Nearly 40,000” EV registrations is nearly 16% instead of 8%

Jo Ho
April 9, 2022 8:41 am

Interesting : “The AMS — a society of meteorologists, atmospheric chemists and physicists, oceanographers and other scientists — is among a number of professional science groups that have increased efforts in recent years to strengthen their ethics codes, foster a more welcoming culture for underrepresented groups and develop and enforce sanctions when members are accused of harassment or discrimination. They are also wrestling with how much to disclose publicly about such incidents.”

That’s nice of them!

Atmospheric scientist loses honor, membership over ethics violation (msn.com)

Robert of Texas
April 9, 2022 9:13 am

This whole business is an example of how we are all gradually losing our freedom of choice.”

Or maybe worse, losing our collective minds.

My next car will be a gas guzzling truck and I’ll keep it for 20 years or until I die.

Even if a miracle occurred and U.K. managed to go entirely green energy (using nuclear power mainly) and 100% electric cars – besides improvising their own people with more expensive energy what have they accomplished? They account for less and less of the total emissions every year due to China, India, and soon Africa. Those areas are not going to throw away fossil fuels as they realize the huge advantage it gives them. By 2050, U.K. emissions are such a tiny part as to be immaterial to the imagined problem. Meanwhile, U.K.’s activists will have moved on to a new imaginary problem.

Speed
April 9, 2022 9:28 am

“When the EPA devised MPGe in the early 2000s, the government agency calculated that 33.7 kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity is comparable to a gallon of fuel in terms of its energy content.”
https://bit.ly/3LTxw6k
(msn.com)

As the government “looks to solidify plans for a zero emissions vehicle mandate … ” the government needs to solidify plans for supplying the zero emissions electrical power that those zero emissions vehicles will require. It will take more than the stroke of a pen to do so.

David S
April 9, 2022 9:35 am

My projected timeline:

2024, manufacturers legally required to sell all-electric cars.

2025 British people throw out all the politicians who foisted the Green New Deal on them.

2026 Unemployed politicians unable to find real jobs all go on welfare.

Oldseadog
Reply to  David S
April 9, 2022 10:51 am

If only.

April 9, 2022 10:14 am

I don’t care a fig about CO2 and I am quite against mandating EV adoption by legal constraints like those proposed here in the UK.

HOWEVER EV’s will sell themselves. I’ve driven electric for 9 years and I’ll never go back to ICE. it’s just that ICE cars are horrid little gadgets.

  • They have a stupid narrow usable rev range with little torque at low r.p.m. just where you need it in traffic,
  • They “stall” because the engine just won’r run below a certain speed so you need extra hardware like variable gear ratios and clutches (dog clutch won’t do).
  • They are rough, noisy,
  • The brakes wear out quickly because there is no regen braking,
  • The engine needs frequent oil changes and other replacement parts like plugs and filters
  • You have to keep putting large quantities of an expensive and highly dangerous fluid into them.
  • Like for like they are S-L-O-W

Yes ICE cars are currently cheaper to buy (but look at the whole life costs) and that will in any case change: the first four-function calculators were expensive.

Last edited 2 months ago by John Hardy
Slowroll
Reply to  John Hardy
April 9, 2022 11:01 am

All the usual maintenance on an ICE vehicle probably doesn’t equal the cost of replacing the battery on an EV. And the real irony of EVs is that the only people who can use them efficiently (city dwellers) have no place to charge them.

twobob
Reply to  John Hardy
April 9, 2022 12:10 pm

So for the last 9 years the tax payer has been subsidising you.

Reply to  twobob
April 9, 2022 12:19 pm

Twobob – actually I think it has been the ICE drivers subsidising me through fuel tax and vehicle excise duty that maintain the road system.

I think in the long run EVs will have to step up to the plate on that, but in the grand scheme of things it won’t be big numbers

Richard Page
Reply to  John Hardy
April 9, 2022 2:56 pm

Given the scarcity of lithium and the huge increases in price over just the last 6 months, how long will it be before you can no longer afford to replace the battery? 2 years? 4 maybe? Sooner rather than later there won’t be any lithium for the batteries, at any price.

Reply to  Richard Page
April 12, 2022 8:39 am

Richard – go away and do your homework before posting stuff like this

Dave Andrews
Reply to  John Hardy
April 10, 2022 6:31 am

Revenues from Fuel Duty and Vehicle Excise Duty in the UK amounted to £37 billion in 2019 -20. EVs are currently exempt from these charges so other road users are paying for your benefit. Why should they have to subsidise you and your ilk?

Reply to  Dave Andrews
April 12, 2022 8:39 am

Dave – if you look at my response to Twobon, you’ll see that I am not talking about subsidy

Galileo9
April 9, 2022 10:21 am

I used to drive a milk float in my youth, I didn’t like them then and from what I’ve seen in the intervening years nothing has happened to change my mind. There boring to drive, and runout of charge far too quickly. The only practical use is in towns and cities (as long as it’s equipped with a good horn!).

Mark BLR
April 9, 2022 10:35 am

Headline : “More than half of all new UK cars to be electric by 2028 …”
Main article : “More than half of all UK cars should be electric by 2028, according to the Government, as it looks to solidify plans for …”
Don’t believe everything that headline writers write.

Reply to  Mark BLR
April 9, 2022 12:21 pm

Mark – fair point but you might like to note that the two best selling cars in the UK in March 2022 were the Tesla Model 3 and the Tesla Model Y

Mr.
Reply to  John Hardy
April 9, 2022 2:39 pm

Yes John, and I also noted this –

New car registrations declined by around 14 per cent to some 240,000 vehicles, the weakest March in 24 years.

I suggest that apparently strong sales last month of Teslas was more a statistical aberration of a weak overall market performance than “business as usual” conditions.

Dave Andrews
Reply to  Mr.
April 10, 2022 6:43 am

There are over 31m cars in UK of which 1.2m are BEVs/PHEVs. BEVs, ie fully electric, number less than half of this figure at 420,000.

James H
April 9, 2022 10:58 am

After all, car manufacturers cannot force people to buy EVs.”

It appears that the government may be happy to take on this role, though. I would be surprised if after poor EV sales, the government didn’t decide to stop allowing people to register their older gasoline or diesel vehicles.

In almost every country, we can see that the politicians would rather the people suffer than admit a policy failure. This case will be no different, and in fact the more suffering and complaining from the people, the harder the policy will be pushed as sort of a punishment for not going along nicely.

Brad-DXT
Reply to  James H
April 9, 2022 11:37 am

That’s why most countries make self protection unlawful.

Richard Page
Reply to  Brad-DXT
April 9, 2022 2:59 pm

Self protection is perfectly lawful, it’s the pre-emptive self protection that doesn’t go down well.

Marcus
April 9, 2022 11:25 am

Charles
“A wind energy company has pleaded guilty after killing at least 150 eagles”
https://www.npr.org/2022/04/06/1091250692/esi-energy-bald-eagles?fbclid=IwAR0pwOjS-Yhe-qEsoNTKu2-jN-LF80ifkfA0MC8ZcNQawY0VYBqUDFD8n9E

Finally !

April 9, 2022 11:41 am

The UK Government makes no mention that their efforts to cease the use of crude oil may be the greatest threat to civilization. Attempting to attain a decarbonized world like the one that existed in the 1800’s and before, could result in Billions of fatalities for the 8 billion on earth from disease, malnutrition, and weather-related deaths, versus the projections of millions of fatalities from changes in climate.
 
Of the 3 fossil fuels of coal, natural gas, and crude oil, crude oil is the only one primarily used to manufacture products for society that are the basis of the economy.
 
Crude oil is virtually useless, unless it’s manufactured (refineries) into oil derivatives that are the basis of more than 6,000 products in our daily lives that did not exist before the 1900’s, and the fuels to move the heavy-weight and long-range needs of more than 50,000 jets and more than 50,000 merchant ships, and the military and space program.
 
Wind turbines and solar panels may be able to generate intermittent electricity, but they cannot manufacture anything. BTW, all the products needed to make the parts for vehicles, wind turbines, solar panels, planes, ships, medical supplies, tires, asphalt, and fertilizer are made with the oil derivatives manufactured from crude oil.
 
Of the 3 fossil fuels of coal, natural gas, and crude oil, where’s the UK Government’s replacement or clone for crude oil, to keep today’s societies and economies running?

Chris Nisbet
Reply to  Ronald Stein
April 9, 2022 3:21 pm

I’m unconvinced that politicians actually want to keep our economies running. Look at what they’ve done to us over the last few years. Aside from the lockdown idiocy, a number of countries are wrecking their electricity grids by getting rid of reliable sources before a decent replacement is put in place.
I’m also unconvinced they want us to _replace_ ICE vehicles with EVs. I suspect they just want rid of ICE vehicles, and we’ll just have far few people driving. They’re quite open about telling us all to make more use of public transport and bicycles. Here in NZ there is a blatant drive (forgive the pun) to disincentive driving cars – lowering speed limits, replacing car lanes with (mostly empty) cycle lanes, doing away with off-street parking, imposing import fees on vehicles that have no EV equivalent, narrowing roads in suburban areas etc.
As for weather-related deaths (e.g. due to making it unaffordable to stay warm), well that’ll be blamed on ‘Climate Change’, not their idiotic drive to rid of us the best/cheapest source of energy known to man. The clowns are already telling us the shortages arising from the Russia/Ukraine conflict are evidence we need more ruinable energy, not less.
I’d be interested to know, is there _any_ western country that has said ‘enough’ to this ‘green energy’ insanity? Has any one of them pointed out that CO2 isn’t actually pollution?

These people are not our friends.
/rant.

April 9, 2022 12:09 pm

My wife drives a 2005 Toyota. I drive a 2115 Ford. Bet they will still be running in 20 years.

Burgher King
Reply to  Jim B
April 9, 2022 2:38 pm

“My wife drives a 2005 Toyota. I drive a 2115 Ford. Bet they will still be running in 20 years.

Years ago, before I got my first decently paying job, I dreamed of the new truck I might someday be able to afford. Hearing this, my father gave me a piece of advice: “Live in present. Don’t live in the future.”

I have a 2009 made-in-America Mazda 6, the most reliable car I’ve ever owned. It refuses to wear out. My thirty-year old F-250 also refuses to wear out. If I’m still alive twenty years from now, I’ll still be driving these vehicles.

Richard Page
Reply to  Jim B
April 9, 2022 3:01 pm

Do you have your own oil well and fuel processing facility? The way things are going you may need them to keep the cars running.

griff
Reply to  Jim B
April 10, 2022 8:17 am

so that’s kind of a ‘back to the future’ deal there with the Ford?

Kevin McNeill
April 9, 2022 12:10 pm

Anybody figured out where all this electricity is supposed to come from other than the outlet in the wall?

Mr.
Reply to  Kevin McNeill
April 9, 2022 2:47 pm

Short answer – NO.

(but sadly, activists, politicians and bureaucrats, having absolutely no answers, are choosing to just respond like this –

comment image

Reply to  Kevin McNeill
April 10, 2022 9:30 pm

Why would they? Isn’t that where electricity comes from?

(I wonder how many of the “activists” live where their utilities are included in the rent. If you don’t see the bill, you don’t think about the cost. That’s the reason that government bond elections target advertising to apartment dwellers that don’t know how much of their rent is actually property taxes on the their landlord.)

Gary Pearse
April 9, 2022 12:45 pm

“Transport proposed legally binding annual targets that car manufacturers will be forced to meet before 2035.”

This is what is wrong with communist economics. Ordering what must be produced is guaranteeing economic bankruptcy, of first the companies, and ultimately the nation. Even China learned that free enterprise was the E=Mc² of economics. Of course, if you also order half your citizenry to buy electric on pain of prison or execution, you could square the policy circle, guess.

April 9, 2022 1:04 pm

LOL … wishful thinking by Russian funded greens.

ScienceABC123
April 9, 2022 1:21 pm

Stupid. Gasoline is a product of cracking crude oil. In the late 1800s there was no use for gasoline, so it was just burned off.

Moving to electric cars cuts down the demand for gasoline, but it will increase the demand for fuel oil used for power plants to charge those electric cars. The gasoline will be produced in larger quantities and will end up just being burned off. In short, this will result in more consumption of crude oil, not less.

charles zilich
April 9, 2022 1:59 pm

very rough estimates but gives a clue about what electricity is needed for an all EV United States
 
according to statista for 2020 there were 276 billion registered vehicles in the US.
according to statista 2020 electricity used in the US was 3,802 billion kilowatt hours [KWH]
policyadvice claims the average car is on the road for 13,474 miles per year.
motorbiscuit claims an average an electric vehicle gets 100 miles per 30 KWH
 
an average EV would need 134.74 x 30kwh = 4042.2 kwh to travel 13,747 miles.
so 276 billion vehicles x 4042.2 kwh/vehicle/year = 1,115,647,200,000,000 kwh per year to operate.
1,115,647,200,000,000 kwh / one billion = 1,115,647.2 billion KWH
electricity usage for US year 2020 was 3,802 billion KWH
electricity needed for all electric vehicles for one year is 1,115,647.2 billion KWH
1,115,647.2 billion KWH / 3,802 billion KWH = 293.43
basically to run all vehicles on electricity we would need to generate roughly 293 times the electricty more than we currently generate
now factor in electric heating…

dk_
April 9, 2022 2:22 pm

In less than eight years, the Government will ban the sales of new petrol and diesel vehicles in the UK.

Just five years later, a similar ban will be introduced to restrict sales of hybrid vehicles.

The body of the article seems a little different from the headline — all not half new vehicles will be electric, and not hybrid.

This must be followed by denying license to operate for all but essential fuel-powered vehicles. Fuel burning vehicles will be eliminated.

Power production is already limited to a closed list of licensed suppliers.

Step 2 will be nationalization of fossil fuels, with the main dedicated to electrical power generation and a small amount rationed to essential permits.

None of this will have any effect on the climate, or the weather.

The new world order will certainly be built around a planned economy, but will it be Marxist or Fascist?

Last edited 2 months ago by dk_
michael hart
April 9, 2022 2:44 pm

There’ll certainly be some weird shit going down in the car market as witching hour approaches.

warreni
April 9, 2022 2:50 pm

I really couldn’t give two poos what the current generation wants. They haven’t done any thing to warrant anything special yet. Please explain how you are going to produce enough electricity to charge all these cars when you can hardly produce enough for the current infrastructure.

pochas94
April 9, 2022 3:35 pm

When you have power no foolishness is too extreme.

John R. Doner
April 9, 2022 3:49 pm

Perhaps the UK will become like Cuba, with the great majority of cars being decades old, but kept in service somehow.Great time to buy an auto junk yard.

Andre Thomas Lewis
April 9, 2022 5:33 pm

Last time I looked many houses in the UK are terrace houses with no off-street parking and most apartments do not have individual electrical outlets in their parking bays. How are the EVs going to be charged up? Are owners supposed to find a nearby charging station (good luck with that) and walk home from there and then back to pick it up later?

griff
Reply to  Andre Thomas Lewis
April 10, 2022 8:16 am

Lamp posts. Lamp posts with EV chargers.

Uber just paid for 700 on street chargers to be rolled out across 3 London boroghs.

Besides given the average weekly mileage of UK cars, most people will only need to charge a couple of times a week. and if there are chargers at commuter rail stations, supermarkets, gyms and some places of work, then that’s covered.

Richard Page
Reply to  griff
April 10, 2022 11:50 am

That is probably the most stupid and ridiculous post that I have ever seen on this site. I wonder about your ability to live independently without carers, quite frankly. Consider how many of the Boris bikes were lost or stolen since they were introduced and you’ll see that anything like that will get stripped down and vandalised in short order. Given how quickly cars batteries lose the total amount of power – any EV with a battery over a few months in age doing more than a quick 2 min trip to the shops will have to recharge a damn sight more often than twice a week. As to the first idea – are you mad. I live in a small side street of maybe 30 terraced houses with 30+ cars on it – we have exactly 3, count ’em 3, lamp posts for the entire street – your idea is absolutely bonkers; insanity of the worst kind.

Carlo, Monte
Reply to  Richard Page
April 10, 2022 4:58 pm

griffffffff has a special talent for stupid and ridiculous.

Dennis
April 9, 2022 8:14 pm

A year ago I read that an electrical engineering association in the UK had sent a report to the Government pointing out that based on wind turbines to provide the electricity to recharge a fleet of half EV all of Scotland would need to be covered with wind turbines, with back up of course.

Dennis
April 9, 2022 8:23 pm

One of the obviously diversionary comments often posted by EV enthusiasts is how fast they accelerate from zero to whatever.

In Australia the Highway Patrol and other Police would not be impressed if an EV performed like that from traffic lights.

And how much energy does that performance drain from the batteries?

I recently read a US report about a new EV released there to rival Tesla S and offers a better range. The author was honest and advised that EVs are not best suited to highway driving over long distances because of energy usage increases as the speed increases.

Dennis
April 9, 2022 8:30 pm

Ask a builder tradesman and the other carpenters on a building site about electric tools and their need for many batteries on charge and charged to work a ten hour shift, each carpenter on site.

My builder son decided after testing on a project site to buy an internal combustion engine powered concrete saw after testing electric and how often battery changes were required.

And the fossil fuel engine model was much cheaper.

April 9, 2022 11:39 pm

I will never buy an electric car. They are dangerous and useless.

Welcome to a new Luddite age. The economy will be destroyed by the force-feeding of the population with a technology that is unwanted and unfit for purpose. Britain is heading toward a total fiasco, collectively driving over the cliff of net-zero.

April 9, 2022 11:55 pm

Even fully electric cars are not zero emission.

The vehicle emission most harmful to human health is vanadium dust from brakes:

https://viewpointvancouver.ca/2020/02/26/london-throat-why-brake-dust-is-bad-for-you/

E-cars are heavier than ICE cars due to the super-massive battery.

So in e-cars the most harmful vehicle emission, vanadium dust, increases due to the higher braking demands resulting from their heavy weight.

Phil.
Reply to  Phil Salmon
April 11, 2022 1:49 pm

Except e-cars can use regenerative braking lessening the demand for conventional brakes.

Mervyn
April 10, 2022 1:40 am

Someone is determined to destroy the western world which became supreme through cheap fossil fuel energy. Unlike the mass production of cheap Ford and Volkswagen vehicles for the people, electric vehicles are expensive and unaffordable to most citizens.

Tom Abbott
April 10, 2022 3:24 am

From the article: “In less than eight years, the Government will ban the sales of new petrol and diesel vehicles in the UK.

Just five years later, a similar ban will be introduced to restrict sales of hybrid vehicles.”

Doubling down on stupid!

This is going to work out about as well as their transition to windmills and solar. They can’t supply enough electricity now to power their economy and warm their homes and now they want to increase that electrical demand.

Idiocracy in action.

And all because they stupidly and wrongly think CO2 needs to be regulated.

Coach Springer
April 10, 2022 6:17 am

A less noted drawback: Making a nation’s existence dependent on one thing is always a bad idea.

observa
April 10, 2022 8:18 am

You gotta love EV optimism when the UK imports 38.9% of its electricity now-
UK’s energy production fell to lowest level in 50 years last year (msn.com)
Rustle up some more woodchips to replace Russian gas for the boilers I suppose. Perhaps griff has some contacts in the woodchip sustainability game?

Enlightened Archivist
April 10, 2022 10:36 am

Transport in the UK will look like Cuba in the 2040’s – all vintage vehicles.

Edward Katz
April 10, 2022 2:20 pm

It seems there’s some sort of collaboration going on between the government and manufacturers to the detriment of consumers. If people are forced to buy EVs, the producers will be able to keep their vehicles overpriced. In addition, if the government offers incentives, those are tax dollars supporting those incentives, so the consumer is being bribed with his own money.

Donald Whiteley
April 10, 2022 6:25 pm

We had this battle between EVs and gas autos 120 years ago. EVs lost. Now governments want to dictate what consumers never wanted.

Matthew Sykes
April 11, 2022 12:42 am

Time to stock up on good petrol and diesel cars, because they are going to double in price!