Mountain gorillas in the rainforest. Uganda. Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park.

Higher Maximum Temperature Increases the Frequency of Water Drinking in Mountain Gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei)

Another study in the science genre of: The Bleedin’ Obvious

A real study in frontiers in Conservation Science, determines that gorillas drink more water when it’s hot.

ORIGINAL RESEARCH article

Front. Conserv. Sci., 10 March 2022 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fcosc.2022.738820

Introduction

Water has numerous essential roles for animals, such as being a medium for chemical reactions to occur, a transporter of metabolic and waste products, a lubricant and shock absorber (Robbins, 1983Jéquier and Constant, 2010). In addition, water plays a vital role in thermoregulation (National Research Council, 2003Mitchell et al., 2009Jéquier and Constant, 2010Withers et al., 2016). Maintaining water balance is a major homeostatic objective and critical for growth, reproduction and survival (Karasov and del Rio, 2020). Water requirements are influenced by several factors, such as climatic conditions, diet and metabolic rates (Robbins, 1983Jéquier and Constant, 2010Karasov and del Rio, 2020).

Terrestrial animals gain water from food (preformed water), metabolic water resulting from the oxidation of macronutrients and through drinking water (Robbins, 1983Jéquier and Constant, 2010). Most animals rely on free-standing water sources, but some are able to obtain most of their water needs from metabolic and preformed water (Withers et al., 2016). Understanding how animals obtain and use water is particularly important in the face of climate change, as increasing global temperatures and more extreme weather events are predicted to influence water availability and can have a negative impact on animals’ ability to maintain homeostasis (Hetem et al., 2014Fuller et al., 2016Zhang et al., 2019).

Increasing temperature leads to the increased need for evaporative cooling, particularly in endotherms, which requires water (National Research Council, 2003Withers et al., 2016Mitchell et al., 2018Karasov and del Rio, 2020). To compensate for increased water loss when temperatures are high, animals often increase the amount of water consumption (Adams and Hayes, 2008Dias et al., 2014Harris et al., 2015Mella et al., 2019Chaves et al., 2021). Animals may also increase water drinking during dry periods, which coincide with the times of highest temperature in some areas (Harris et al., 2015Mella et al., 2019). In addition, the water content of foods may be lower during times of low rainfall and so animals may need to supplement water intake with drinking (Fuller et al., 2016). Animals may also prioritize water rich foods to supplement preformed water intake during periods of low rainfall (Ciani et al., 2001Sato et al., 2014).

Decreased water availability has been shown to drive increased mortality rates in several species (Cayton and Haddad, 2018Riddell et al., 2019Young et al., 2019Campos et al., 2020). In contrast, rainforest dwelling species may obtain most or all of their water requirements from their diet (Karasov and del Rio, 2020). However, increasing temperatures may lead to increased water drinking as a means to thermoregulate and avoid dehydration (Dias et al., 2014Chaves et al., 2021). Monitoring changes in water drinking behavior can serve as an early warning indicator of the impacts of climate change as the duration of dry spells and temperatures increase.

A considerable proportion of primate species (22%; 134 of 604) are predicted to be vulnerable to the impacts of drought (Zhang et al., 2019). Moreover, primate habitats are predicted to experience 10% more warming than the global mean increase in temperature, with 86% of primate species likely to experience increases of over 3°C in maximum temperatures by 2050 (Graham et al., 2016Carvalho et al., 2019). Higher elevation regions are also experiencing faster increases in temperature than lower elevation ones (Wang et al., 2016). Given the vulnerability of primates to dry spells, it is vital to look for indicators of physiological stress in endangered species, such as changes in the occurrence of water drinking caused by climate change (Chapman et al., 2006Bernard and Marshall, 2020).

Understanding how endangered mountain gorillas obtain and use water is particularly warranted as they are vulnerable to the risk of extinction for a number of reasons. Only around 1,000 individuals remain in two small isolated mountaintop islands of Uganda, Rwanda, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo over an area of approximately 784 km2 (Eckardt et al., 2019Granjon et al., 2020). The slow life history of mountain gorillas limits their ability to evolve beneficial adaptions that are better suited to new climatic conditions sufficiently quickly to mitigate the detrimental effects of climate change (Robbins, 2011). Mountain gorillas are also geographically highly restricted due to intense human pressure surrounding their current habitat, such that they cannot disperse to other areas (Robbins, 2011).

Mountain gorillas generally obtain sufficient quantities of water from the vegetation they consume and they rarely drink water (Schaller, 1963). The water content of mountain gorilla foods is high, with most foods comprising between 60 and 90% water (Rothman et al., 2006Grueter et al., 2016), with little seasonal variation (within-species) in the Virunga Volcanoes (Watts, 1998). Mountain gorilla habitat is characterized by bimodal rainfall distribution (heavier rains in March-May and lighter rains in September-November), with temperature mostly being a function of elevation and showing little seasonal variation (Polansky and Robbins, 2013Seimon and Phillips, 2015Diem et al., 2019Eckardt et al., 2019). Both Uganda and Rwanda are already experiencing the impact of climate change with increasing temperatures and frequencies of extreme weather events (Safari, 2012McGahey et al., 2013Tenge et al., 2013Nsubuga et al., 2014Nsubuga and Rautenbach, 2018). Mean annual temperature increases of approximately 2.1°C have been recorded over the last 5 decades (McGahey et al., 2013Nsubuga and Rautenbach, 2018). Future projections indicate that this trend is likely to continue, with increases of 1 to 2.5°C between 2000 and 2050 (Tenge et al., 2013Nsubuga and Rautenbach, 2018). Furthermore, rainfall has become less seasonal, with both an increase in rainfall over time and increases in the duration of dry spells, trends that are likely to continue in the future (Kizza et al., 2009McGahey et al., 2013Diem et al., 2019Salerno et al., 2019Ojara et al., 2020).

To investigate if changes in climatic conditions could impact water drinking patterns of mountain gorillas, we examined water drinking behavior between 2010 and 2020 in the two remaining populations of mountain gorillas and correlated this to local maximum temperature and rainfall. We tested the prediction that mountain gorillas drink more often during hotter and drier periods. After observing notable differences in the frequency of water drinking between the two populations, we compared the water content of key foods between the two mountain gorilla populations to see if this could explain differences in their behavior.

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fcosc.2022.738820/full

Of course to get funding this frame was needed.

Undoubtedly, the direct impact of climate change is likely to be a bigger problem for species living in more arid environments that face reduced access to sufficient quantities of either free-standing sources of water or preformed water (Fuller et al., 2016Cayton and Haddad, 2018Mitchell et al., 2018Wessling et al., 2018Riddell et al., 2019Young et al., 2019Campos et al., 2020). Many avenues of future research into this topic remain to better determine how much of a risk increased temperature poses for the mountain gorillas. However, this study emphasizes that climate change may have negative consequences even for rainforest dwelling mammals that routinely obtain nearly all of their water from dietary items. This may be especially true for endangered species in small isolated populations which are vulnerable to drought and the risk of extinction.

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fcosc.2022.738820/full

Read the full article here.

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Tom Halla
March 11, 2022 6:05 am

Duuh!

Gabriel Oxenstierna
March 11, 2022 6:13 am

Je suis gorilla.

commieBob
Reply to  Gabriel Oxenstierna
March 11, 2022 7:37 am

Mais oui mon ami. link

Jordan Peterson would also point out that you are lobster as well.

Doug Huffman
Reply to  commieBob
March 12, 2022 4:11 am

Jordan Peterson following a blind link to Nonsensical American. Tsk tsk tsk.

Falsifiability is the boundary demarcation of science from nonsense.

fretslider
March 11, 2022 6:20 am

It’s hot and I’m thirsty….

Is my Nobel in the post?

Spetzer86
Reply to  fretslider
March 11, 2022 7:38 am

And you’re landlocked into a limited geographical area by humans, so climate change is reducing your access to water and new foraging areas…

Last edited 8 months ago by spetzer86
ozspeaksup
Reply to  Spetzer86
March 12, 2022 2:36 am

im pretty sure gorillas would be more than capable of finding water provided BY human habitats. in west Aus the greentards took over farmland ripped out water points and troughs to allow nature to restore itself
well it did the reliant on mankind water roos and others died nasty deaths

Last edited 8 months ago by ozspeaksup
Barry James
March 11, 2022 6:21 am

They can’t be serious, surely. They can’t be that desperate to find alarming “what if” scenarios.

Gordon A. Dressler
Reply to  Barry James
March 11, 2022 6:35 am

Hey, look, in just the text quoted in the above article they managed to squeeze in the phrase “climate change” a total of seven—yes, seven!—times.

And, I have absolutely no interest in going to the full article to find out how many more times they use that obvious-but-unquantified, red herring phrase.

fretslider
Reply to  Gordon A. Dressler
March 11, 2022 7:08 am

they managed to squeeze in the phrase “climate change” a total of seven—yes, seven!—times.” And none of them cut the mustard

“how animals obtain and use water is particularly important in the face of climate change”

That is a complete word salad. How about “climate change forces dogs and cats to adapt by drinking from domestic toilets”?

“Monitoring changes in water drinking behavior can serve as an early warning indicator of the impacts of climate change”

It can also highlight the differences in drinking behaviour between winter and summer months.

Was this garbage peer reviewd?

Reply to  fretslider
March 11, 2022 7:29 am

Green nonsense like this is never peer reviewed and usually just pall reviewed to insure that it hits all the talking points needed to support confirmation bias.

Rocketscientist
Reply to  fretslider
March 11, 2022 9:21 am

I not sure it was even pee reviewed.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  fretslider
March 11, 2022 9:24 am

“climate change forces dogs and cats to adapt by drinking from domestic toilets”

Oh, the horrors!

ozspeaksup
Reply to  Clyde Spencer
March 12, 2022 2:41 am

and they do this because??
A;the water bowl elsewhere is empty
B; the water IN the loo bowl is clean(if you dont use chemical muck in it) and its COOL!
friends dog not only preferred the loo he learnt to lift the lid to get to it she had to change the door handles as well to round not lever, to prevent it

Steve Case
Reply to  Gordon A. Dressler
March 11, 2022 7:16 am

8 Authors
4300 Words
70 references
25 hits [Ctrl-F] “climate change”
Funding: Grand Duchy of Luxembourg

ResourceGuy
Reply to  Steve Case
March 11, 2022 8:20 am

That equates to 8 academic promotions and the opportunities for more travel funding.

Editor
Reply to  Steve Case
March 11, 2022 1:23 pm

Steve ==> Yes

Funding

This project was funded by the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg under the United Nations Environment Programme Vanishing Treasures Programme, Max Planck Society and Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund.

ozspeaksup
Reply to  Kip Hansen
March 12, 2022 2:42 am

vanishing grant money more like

Krishna Gans
Reply to  Kip Hansen
March 12, 2022 4:38 am

Look at the sale statistics what breweries sell in summer and what in winter.
And try to find out what the differences are standing for.

ResourceGuy
Reply to  Barry James
March 11, 2022 9:21 am

It was a fun trip though.

asiaseen
Reply to  ResourceGuy
March 11, 2022 6:36 pm

Mountain gorillas in the rainforest. Uganda. Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park. Photo caption

A real fun trip but how did they get in to an Impenetrable Forest?

THOMAS ENGLERT
Reply to  Barry James
March 13, 2022 1:13 pm

Not mentioned was how these gorillas survived the Medieval Warm Period.

Ron Long
March 11, 2022 6:22 am

What’s next to study with tax funds? What percent of the time does the Sun rise in the east? If that study goes up for bid I’m in.

Gordon A. Dressler
March 11, 2022 6:26 am

The entirety of the above article could be reduced to this single sentence:
“Send us more funding and don’t worry how your money is being spent.”

Thomas Gasloli
Reply to  Gordon A. Dressler
March 11, 2022 8:09 am

The majority of government funded university research can be reduced to that sentence.

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Gordon A. Dressler
March 11, 2022 9:26 am

And, “Send the money quickly! I’m up for consideration of tenure in six months.”

Ed Zuiderwijk
March 11, 2022 6:27 am

Reading that made me thirsty. The Muenchener Gold is wonderful.

fretslider
Reply to  Ed Zuiderwijk
March 11, 2022 7:10 am

I’ll have to make do with a Stella Artois for now.

Disputin
Reply to  fretslider
March 11, 2022 7:57 am

Hobgoblin!

fretslider
Reply to  Disputin
March 11, 2022 8:12 am

Bishop’s Finger!

(Shepherd Neame)

Jtom
Reply to  Ed Zuiderwijk
March 11, 2022 7:28 pm

Had not considered this until now, but I am going to seek out Obolon Lager, a Ukrainian beer. I suspect it will go down easier than a Russian vodka (haven’t had any in a long time. I drink Tito’s, made in Texas).

Alan Watt, Climate Denialist Level 7
March 11, 2022 6:30 am

Moreover, primate habitats are predicted to experience 10% more warming than the global mean increase in temperature, with 86% of primate species likely to experience increases of over 3°C in maximum temperatures by 2050

What ever happened to “arctic regions are expected to experience the greatest warming?”

I tried to follow the links to the two references for the “over 3°C increases” claim, but they both just led back to this study.

Who is predicting (sorry, “projecting”) such a large rise and on what evidence?

Last edited 8 months ago by Alan Watt, Climate Denialist Level 7
Gordon A. Dressler
Reply to  Alan Watt, Climate Denialist Level 7
March 11, 2022 6:38 am

Alan, answers to your questions: IPCC, none.

But that was meant to be a rhetorical question, wasn’t it? 🙂

MarkW
Reply to  Alan Watt, Climate Denialist Level 7
March 11, 2022 6:56 am

First off, primates come from a wide variety of habitats.
Secondly the area where mountain gorillas come from is pretty humid and even the IPCC has been forced to admit that areas with lots of water in the air are not going to see much if any warming from CO2 due to the overlap between CO2 and H2O.

Mark BLR
Reply to  Alan Watt, Climate Denialist Level 7
March 11, 2022 7:45 am

I tried to follow the links to the two references for the “over 3°C increases” claim, but they both just led back to this study.

The direct links were indeed to the “References” section of this study.

Following the “CrossRef Full Text” options there, however, led me to the “Abstracts” of the papers in question (in both cases, the full papers are paywalled …) :
URL 1, Graham et al (2016) : https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10764-016-9890-4
URL 2, Carvalho et al (2019) : https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcb.14671

NB : The first Abstract includes the “We found that overall, nonhuman primates will experience 10% more warming than the global mean …” claim, it’s the second one we’re after.

From the Carvalho et al Abstract :

We employed an analytical approach to objectively select a subset of climate scenarios, for which we then calculated changes in climatic and LUC conditions for 2050 across primate ranges (N = 426 species) under a best-case scenario and a worst-case scenario.

With 86% of primate ranges likely to be exposed to maximum temperature increases >3°C, primate hotspots in the Neotropics are expected to be particularly vulnerable.

Again, the full paper is paywalled, but the “Supporting Information” file would indicate that their “best-case scenario” is actually RCP 4.5 (see Tables S2 and S4).

AR6 (the WG1 report from last September) basically designated their “worst-case scenario” (RCP 8.5, quelle surprise, which is bracketed by the newer SSP3-7.0 and SSP5-8.5 pathways …) as “counterfactual”, while the “future emission trends in the absence of additional climate policies” option was qualified as “approximately in line with the medium RCP4.5, RCP6.0 and SSP2-4.5 scenarios” (see page 1-110).

RCP 4.5 = the “consensus view’s” current worst-case scenario (/ pathway).

RCP 8.5 = science fiction / hysterical scaremongering / …

Last edited 8 months ago by Mark BLR
Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Alan Watt, Climate Denialist Level 7
March 11, 2022 9:44 am

Moreover, primate habitats are predicted to experience 10% more warming than the global mean increase in temperature, …

Therefore, instead of experiencing a year-to-year average increase of about 0.018 deg C, the poor gorillas will have to endure almost 0.020 deg C! Will they be able to find enough water to sate their thirst? Stay tuned for the next chapter of Modern Gorillas.

MarkW
March 11, 2022 6:52 am

free-standing sources of water or preformed water

What is preformed water?

fretslider
Reply to  MarkW
March 11, 2022 7:22 am

Dihydrogen monoxide – a very nasty chemical

Well, Mark, I was going to post a link to Penn & Teller’s petition to ban the aforementioned, but it’s been disappeared on Youtube etc

“This video isn’t available anymore”

I’ll let you draw your own conclusions on why that should be.

Last edited 8 months ago by strativarius
fretslider
Reply to  fretslider
March 11, 2022 7:44 am

Addendum

Go to 00:30 on….

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RF1nwuRFD3w&t=3s

One they missed.

commieBob
Reply to  fretslider
March 11, 2022 7:50 am

Dihydrogen monoxide is a deadly poison. link

Last edited 8 months ago by commieBob
David S
Reply to  commieBob
March 11, 2022 8:51 am

According to the CDC dihydrogen monoxide kills nearly 4000 people per year in the US alone.
https://www.cdc.gov/drowning/facts/index.html

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  commieBob
March 11, 2022 9:47 am

And, people have been known to suffocate breathing in the liquid phase! In fact, it is so common that there is a special word for it — drowning.

H.R.
Reply to  MarkW
March 11, 2022 8:00 am

Is it anything like packaged dehydrated water?

It comes in a container shaped like a 1-liter bottle. All you have to do is add water, shake, and pour.

Reply to  MarkW
March 11, 2022 8:02 am

“What is preformed water?”

Consecrated water? Perhaps using pixie dust?

ih_fan
Reply to  MarkW
March 11, 2022 11:21 am

What is preformed water?

Go to a website, click on the link to “Buy a Pond” and have it shipped to you (free shipping with Amazon RainForest Prime).

Once you open the box, lay it out flat, and enjoy your new pond.

H.R.
Reply to  ih_fan
March 11, 2022 6:38 pm

Yah, but… whudda ’bout da fish? Do I just toss my fish & chips leftovers in and check back in the morning?

Gordon A. Dressler
Reply to  MarkW
March 11, 2022 11:22 am

MarkW asked “What is preformed water?”

Most commonly known as “ice cubes”. Up until reading the above article, I had no idea gorillas had those in their diet.

Can gin-and-tonics be far behind?

Jtom
Reply to  MarkW
March 11, 2022 7:34 pm

“ Fluid can enter the body as preformed water, ingested food and drink, and, to a lesser extent, as metabolic water that is produced as a by-product of aerobic respiration and dehydration synthesis. A constant supply is needed to replenish the fluids lost through normal physiological activities, such as respiration, sweating, and urination.

Water generated from the biochemical metabolism of nutrients provides a significant proportion of the daily water requirements for some arthropods and desert animals, but it provides only a small fraction of a human’s necessary intake. In the normal resting state, the input of water through ingested fluids is approximately 2500 ml/day.”

Gordon A. Dressler
Reply to  Jtom
March 13, 2022 7:57 am

Which, in turn, invites the question, what the heck is “dehydration synthesis”?

How does it differ from normal dehydration and why does it need to be synthesized?

Danley Wolfe
March 11, 2022 6:53 am

Uh, … ok….

Danley Wolfe
March 11, 2022 6:56 am

I j ust found a way tro filter wuwt emails..

fretslider
Reply to  Danley Wolfe
March 11, 2022 7:37 am

Any chance you can put that in English?

ih_fan
Reply to  Danley Wolfe
March 11, 2022 11:27 am

Are you asking for grant money, too?

Gordon A. Dressler
Reply to  Danley Wolfe
March 11, 2022 12:55 pm

OK, but have you come up with a way to do that for comments being posted?

alastair gray
March 11, 2022 6:58 am

Gorillas will drink when they are thirsty implying that gorillas have more sense than the authors of this self evident tripe who publish when they want attention from their gormless nitwit peers and of course more dosh to study more of the bleeding obvious.
I counted 40 references which seemed to be there to legitimises the most banal of obvious facts and observations. I suppose this childish crap passes as scholarship these days

H. D. Hoese
Reply to  alastair gray
March 11, 2022 7:21 am

While the paper shows many indirect claims of necessity of more study, it may be mainly a “wheel rediscovery” as the title suggests. “Under these conditions, drinking water may be an effective way of reducing body temperature and reestablishing homeostasis. This result is similar to findings in several other species (Adams and Hayes, 2008; Dias et al., 2014; Harris et al., 2015; Mella et al., 2019; Chaves et al., 2021).”

I read reasonable papers that often end up with an indirect form of begging. Pressure to publish, measured by numerically based “impact factors” helps make university, and even some governmental labs, research incredibly busy. As noted here before from Sigma Xi, National Honor Research Society, part of the climate crisis pusher crowd. “We are thrilled to invite you to join our monthly virtual mental health workshop, hosted by our wellness partner, Happy. We are dedicated to de-stigmatizing and improving mental health in the research community.” While they don’t understand the cause, it may be a wonder that it is not worse.

H. D. Hoese
Reply to  H. D. Hoese
March 11, 2022 7:59 am

It’s not just publication pressure, but also in many other areas leading to producing students as lab assistants and obtaining great titles for their faculty members, departments, institutes, correspondence and advancement. Like some generals in some countries?

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  H. D. Hoese
March 11, 2022 9:53 am

Only humans drink water when they aren’t thirsty. These over-educated word-smiths find it difficult to understand that animals show more common sense and only drink when they are thirsty.

jeffery p
Reply to  alastair gray
March 11, 2022 7:42 am

Wouldn’t it be a better study to see if the guerillas’ habit is actually getting drier and if the guerillas have plenty of sources of water? A real study with physical measurements?

Andy Pattullo
March 11, 2022 7:07 am

So many words wasted. Why do Gorilla’s drink water in warm weather? – no access to cold beer. Why do idiots write pseudoscientific papers about it – too much access to Russian vodka and unearned grant money.

DMacKenzie
March 11, 2022 7:13 am

But the authors got the got the trip of a lifetime at conservation concerned contributors’ expense.

Thomas Gasloli
Reply to  DMacKenzie
March 11, 2022 8:13 am

And lovely photos to put on their Facebook page.

Mike Smith
March 11, 2022 7:15 am

So, gorillas have no problem adapting to slightly higher temperatures. Great news for gorillas everywhere.

Perhaps we need a study to examine whether humans consume more water in hot conditions?

fretslider
Reply to  Mike Smith
March 11, 2022 7:31 am

Humans consume more alcohol under lockdown.

jeffery p
March 11, 2022 7:38 am

How would we know otherwise? I guess we could have polled the gorillas and see what the survey says.

It sounds silly (ok, you got me, this study is silly) but there are plenty of “facts” in science that are really just assumptions. Climate “science” is full of unproven assumptions, too many to list here.

On the other hand, what have we really learned and how can the fact gorillas drink more when it’s hot and dry be applied? I can think of better use of time and money.

Curious George
March 11, 2022 7:41 am

No comment. I can’t be more generous.

stinkerp
March 11, 2022 7:47 am

The commenters don’t credit the authors enough for their ingenious play on climate change global warming hysteria to fund their dream trip to see charismatic megafauna in the wild; an expensive trip that generally only relatively wealthy Westerners get to make. I’m thinking about getting funding to study the effects of sea level rise on the surf swell in Tahiti.

Jeff Alberts
Reply to  stinkerp
March 11, 2022 8:35 am

I am more than willing, for only the price of a plane ticket and hotel stay, to vigorously study the effects of climate change at topless beaches in the south of France.

Jtom
Reply to  Jeff Alberts
March 11, 2022 7:42 pm

No, you really don’t want to do that. Been there, done that. I’ve seen dozens of beautiful topless females since that trip, but the sight of the obese ninety year old topless person (pretty sure it was a female) I saw there is still seared in my brain.

Be careful what you wish for.

March 11, 2022 7:47 am

The comments here as sooo negative!

Just imagine if this valuable study had found the opposite and what that would have meant to the dangerous acceleration of sea level rise?

Fortunately the gorillas drink more so we’re safe from the rising seas – for now.

But wait – they now have to study the effect of warming on the drinking habits of chimps.

(Not to mention the effect of warming on my drinking habits)

oebele bruinsma
March 11, 2022 8:14 am

I just added the thirsty gorilla: https://www.numberwatch.co.uk/warmlist.htm

ResourceGuy
March 11, 2022 8:18 am

Next thing you know they will be labeled climate refugees and get an earmark in the budget along with monthly childcare payments.

Jeff Alberts
Reply to  ResourceGuy
March 11, 2022 8:36 am

John Kerry says we’ve already seen millions of climate refugees.

ResourceGuy
March 11, 2022 8:22 am

This kind of “research” is what prompted Putin to invade and annex without fear. Look up quotes from him to get the connection.

fretslider
Reply to  ResourceGuy
March 11, 2022 8:37 am

Putin sees a West that has corroded from within with PC, Wokery and identity politics. Know your pronouns.

How will the West defend what it so abhors – itself? To make it easier on Putin there’s a brainless bimbo and a bumbling, illucid old fool in the White House, a busted UK PM, a weak new German Chancellor and Macron at the end of his term.

What better time could there be?

Clyde Spencer
Reply to  fretslider
March 11, 2022 9:58 am

I’m not sure I would go so far as to elevate her to the status of a “bimbo.”

p0indexterous
March 11, 2022 8:31 am

In a related subject: Water is wet.

David S
March 11, 2022 8:34 am

Oh No!! Hot weather causes gorillas to drink more water. This never happened before! It’s climate change! We’re all gonna die! … Oh yeah and it’s Trumps fault. /sarc.

March 11, 2022 8:35 am

Once again they conflate higher maximum temperatures with rising average temperatures.

Opus
March 11, 2022 9:13 am

I’ve always wondered why girls in Hawaii wear bikini’s on the beach. You think they’d give me some grant money to go conduct a study?

Joao Martins
Reply to  Opus
March 11, 2022 10:39 am

Call me if you need a colaborer!

ih_fan
Reply to  Opus
March 11, 2022 11:25 am

Do you need a coauthor for that paper? I’m available.

MarkW
Reply to  Opus
March 11, 2022 2:37 pm

Will it be hands on?

ResourceGuy
March 11, 2022 9:14 am

Do they know they are just props in a larger scheme?

Clyde Spencer
March 11, 2022 9:21 am

I do hope that the gorillas are properly recycling all their empty plastic water bottles!

James Allen
March 11, 2022 9:43 am

The monkeys inhabiting the cities and countryside of the world, and also those writing studies apparently, also drink more water when it’s hot. Occasionally beer too. I didn’t know this was a shocking idea to comprehend.

ResourceGuy
March 11, 2022 9:45 am

Gorillas in the Propaganda Mist

Go Home
March 11, 2022 10:03 am

These pretzels are making me thirsty.

Joao Martins
March 11, 2022 10:18 am

Higher Maximum Temperature Increases the Frequency of Water Drinking in Mountain Gorillas
In humans too!…

And I suppose that also in dogs and other dry land animals. Got to design a research project to get money to confirm if that is true.

Shoki Kaneda
March 11, 2022 10:38 am

I just completed my own study that shows increasing government research funds produces more demand for funding among “scientists” that cannot make it in the free market.

Peter Fraser
March 11, 2022 10:55 am

And it got a 2.4 rating.

markl
March 11, 2022 10:55 am

This is going beyond ridiculous. People are taking their little piece of the world and associating any changes with AGW. Is it because they want to feel “in” or is it because they know they’ll get noticed?

Kerry Eubanks
March 11, 2022 11:25 am

This is amazing. Gorillas are the first species ever known to drink more often in hotter and drier periods.

Unbelievable.

Bob
March 11, 2022 11:59 am

Please tell me these money grubbing devils didn’t get paid for this. This kind of nonsense needs to stop.

n.n
March 11, 2022 12:24 pm

Is that fur? So politically incongruent. Evolve.

Last edited 8 months ago by n.n
ozspeaksup
Reply to  n.n
March 12, 2022 2:51 am

roflmao
++++++

Peta of Newark
March 11, 2022 1:11 pm

Simply incredible for a near infinite number of reasons..

Primary reason being = Wouldn’t their efforts have been better directed discovering why the Human Ape doesn’t do that?

iow: Why do humans float around in a constant state of dehydration when it is one of the main reasons for hypertension and thereafter death from Cardio Vascular Disease – circa 20 million souls per year
Also massively implicated in Obesity## & Diabetes = another 20 or so mill pa

## Basically/simply, almost everyone nowadays confuses the ‘thirsty signal‘ from their tummies as a ‘hungry signal

Thus they go eat something rather than drink water, and when that ‘something’ is typically ever more carbohydrate (sugar) what they’re doing is tantamount to suicide.
ho hum
Am sure the big apes in the picture are thinking – Too Many Humans anyway

Last edited 8 months ago by Peta of Newark
Clyde Spencer
Reply to  Peta of Newark
March 11, 2022 2:08 pm

Why do humans float around in a constant state of dehydration when it is one of the main reasons for hypertension …

I would hazard a guess that it is because the Naked Ape evolved to run down, or continuously track a wounded animal, sometimes for days in a dry savanna, with little or no opportunity to even search for scarce water, and when ‘canteens’ had not yet been invented. Those that didn’t have the ability to survive dehydration starved to death instead of dying from cardiovascular complications.

The ‘thirsty signal’ can be satisfied by eating food with a high water content, such as most fruits, but especially citrus fruits. It is also probably better than water alone because some electrolytes are replaced.

Kevin McNeill
March 11, 2022 1:12 pm

This was cribbed from a 5th grade science project right?

Doonman
March 11, 2022 1:42 pm

Future projections indicate that this trend is likely to continue

There’s the clairvoyancy clause again.

Wasn’t it just last week when the warmunists declared here that trend predictions were never used in climate science?

Nik
March 11, 2022 3:32 pm

It’s three more weeks to April 1st, right?

ATheoK
March 11, 2022 3:59 pm

1) Start the Confirmation Bias with a debunked fallacy.

A considerable proportion of primate species (22%; 134 of 604) are predicted to be vulnerable to the impacts of drought (Zhang et al., 2019). Moreover, primate habitats are predicted to experience 10% more warming than the global mean increase in temperature, with 86% of primate species likely to experience increases of over 3°C in maximum temperatures by 2050 (Graham et al., 2016Carvalho et al., 2019).”

Worthless predictions.

2) pretend to perform science.

“To investigate if changes in climatic conditions could impact water drinking patterns of mountain gorillas, we examined water drinking behavior between 2010 and 2020 in the two remaining populations of mountain gorillas and correlated this to local maximum temperature and rainfall. We tested the prediction that mountain gorillas drink more often during hotter and drier periods.”

Pure bias.
a) measure nothing.
b) presume everything.
c) alleged comparisons are purely subjective assumptions.
d) Allege that perfectly normal behavior is proof of their absurd assumptions.

Reminds me of the common leftist canard that all pictures of polar bear proves they are starving. When they actually find a sick polar bear they make front page news blaming climate change.

Geoff Sherrington
March 11, 2022 4:03 pm

Here is where the paper is logically wrong. The authors claim “ more extreme weather events are predicted to influence water availability and can have a negative impact on animals’ ability to maintain homeostasis”
Wrong. The purpose of homeostasis is to control excursions and allow ongoing life. If homeostasis for a particular animal group failed in design, the animals would die and the species would go extinct. The abundance of species right now indicates that homeostasis works fine. Geoff S

ozspeaksup
March 12, 2022 2:34 am

next study Do bears sh*t in the woods?
I find this above ,so called study, abysmally stupid

very old white guy
March 12, 2022 7:39 am

The Bee ????

Nicholas McGinley
March 12, 2022 2:10 pm

In other shocking news, people eat more when they are hungry.

March 13, 2022 4:53 am

A good paper marred by a regrettable and frankly silly link to the climate hysteria.

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