Norway: Record Oil & Gas Export Revenue in 2021! How Else Could They Have Funded Massive EV Subsidies?

Guest “Irony can be so ironic” by David Middleton

Norway Announces Record Oil & Gas Revenues in 2021

January 14, 2022 by David NikelHome » News from Norway » Norway Announces Record Oil & Gas Revenues in 2021

In spite of the climate crisis, Norway’s love affair with petroleum seems to be continuing. Never before has the country enjoyed such high revenue from its oil and gas industry.

The Norwegian Petroleum Directorate said 2021 had been a “great year” for oil and gas in Norway. Oil and gas production has remained high as both demand and prices have increased.

The news was announced by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate’s Ingrid Sølvberg at the presentation of their annual resorts. As pointed out by our friends at the Barents Observer, “she did not mention the word ‘climate’ even once.”

It’s the latest chapter in Norway’s very visible conflict between its desire to be a leader in the green shift while remaining one of the world’s biggest producers of oil and gas.

Norway’s oil and gas industry in numbers

In the final quarter of 2021, Norway’s oil and gas exports reached more than NOK 100 billion (USD $11.5 billion) per month. That’s almost three times more than in the same period the previous year.

Production of oil in 2021 increased to 102 million standard cubic meters and natural gas to 113 billion cubic meters. Norway has now extracted approximately half of all oil and gas resources available on the Norwegian continental shelf.

[…]

Life in Norway

Irony #1

Despite racking up $11.5 billion/month in oil & gas export revenue, Norwegians pay more for gasoline than almost every other nation on Earth.

Cheap ↑ to Expensive ↓

Irony #2

In part, due to exorbitant gasoline prices, EV sales are booming in Norway, particularly Tesla vehicles manufactured in Red China.

January 03, 2022 09:53 AM

EV sales rose 48% in Norway last year, led by Tesla

Electric cars made up nearly two thirds of overall registrations

Reuters

OSLO — Sales of electric cars in Norway rose by 48 percent last year, ensuring that almost two out of every three new vehicles were battery powered and making Tesla the top selling brand.

Seeking to become the first nation to end the sale of gasoline and diesel cars by 2025, oil-producing Norway exempts full-electric vehicles from taxes imposed on models using internal combustion engines.

Tesla took an 11.5 percent share of the overall car market, making it the number one brand for the first time on a full-year basis ahead of Volkswagen with 9.4 percent.

The U.S. automaker on Sunday reported record quarterly deliveries that far exceeded Wall Street estimates, riding out global chip shortages as it ramped up China production.

[…]

Automotive News Europe

Norway compensates for the exorbitant gasoline prices by massively subsidizing EV purchases.

The Norwegian EV incentives:

* No purchase/import taxes (1990-)

* Exemption from 25% VAT on purchase (2001-)

* No annual road tax (1996-2021). Reduced tax from 2021. Full tax from 2022..

* No charges on toll roads or ferries (1997- 2017).

* Maximum 50% of the total amount on ferry fares for electric vehicles (2018-)

* Maximum 50% of the total amount on toll roads (2019)

* Free municipal parking (1999- 2017)

* Parking fee for EVs was introduced locally with an upper limit of a maximum 50% of the full price (2018-)

* Access to bus lanes (2005-).

* New rules allow local authorities to limit the access to only include EVs that carry one or more passengers (2016)

* 50 % reduced company car tax (2000-2018). Company car tax reduction reduced to 40% (2018-) and 20 percent from 2022.

* Exemption from 25% VAT on leasing (2015)

* Fiscal compensation for the scrapping of fossil vans when converting to a zero-emission van (2018)

[…]

The progressive tax system makes most EV models cheaper to buy compared to a similar petrol model, even if the import price for EVs are much higher. This is the main reason why the Norwegian EV market is so successful compared to any other country.

Norwegian EV policy

Irony #3

Norway’s EV subsidies are funded by oil & gas export revenue and are not even close to “carbon neutral.”

Norway an EV role model? Their pathway is expensive and paid for with oil & gas exports

June 4, 2021 by Schalk Cloete

Norway is an EV leader thanks to a generous pot of tax incentives. Today, battery-electric cars make up more than half of all new car sales in Norway. Schalk Cloete takes a detailed look at what those incentives cost, and how many tonnes of CO2 they avoid. In short, Norway – a major oil and gas exporter – needs to sell over 100 barrels of oil (which emits 40 tonnes of CO2) to pay for the tax breaks it gives EVs to avoid one tonne of CO2. And Norway’s electricity is almost completely clean thanks to hydro power, so the CO2 avoidance costs will be higher in other countries. In other words, most countries cannot take this pathway to achieve EV dominance. It’s very expensive, and paying for it – certainly in Norway’s case – emits large amounts of carbon. Cloete is therefore very critical of some of the hype around EV targets. He wants to see the emphasis shift to behaviour change that reduces car use. And instead of being an EV leader, Norway should consider being a leader in turning oil and gas into low-carbon fuels.

I love living in Norway. It’s a beautiful country with nothing other than the weather to complain about. But this Nordic dream comes with a sizable oil stain; a foundation built on 50 years of lucrative hydrocarbon exports.

From official data, I estimate that Norway has sold fossil fuels amounting to roughly 44 billion barrels of oil equivalent – a CO2 legacy in the vicinity of 15 gigatons. Norwegian production costs are attractively low, so we can reasonably assume a profit of $23/barrel to reach a cool $1 trillion in historical cumulative hydrocarbon profit (resource rent, to be more precise).

[…]

CO2 avoidance costs

The best thing about BEVs in Norway is that electricity comes almost completely from clean hydropower. This means that BEV emissions relative to conventional cars come only from battery manufacturing.

…paid for by selling barrels of oil

[See graph below]

From the above graph, a BEV like the ID4 with an 80 kWh battery will avoid about 15 tons of CO2 relative to an HEV when electricity emits no CO2 (zero well-to-tank fuel cycle emissions for the BEV). Relative to a PHEV, the saving is about 6 tons of CO2.

Hence, in total, the CO2 avoidance cost of incentivising people to buy the ID4 in Norway is $36,500/15 = $2,400/ton relative to the RAV4 and $23,300/6 = $3,900/ton relative to the RAV4 Prime.

For perspective, each barrel of oil that Norway sells to help finance these large tax breaks emits about 0.43 tons of CO2 upon use. Making the $2,400 required to avoid one ton of CO2 with the ID4 at the previously assumed resource rent of $23/barrel requires the sale of 104 barrels (45 tons of CO2). Relative to the RAV4 Prime, it comes to 73 tons of oil CO2 per ton of CO2 avoided. These numbers reveal the Norwegian BEV revolution to be little more than a band-aid on a 50-year oil legacy.

[…]

EnergyPostEU

Schalk Cloete is a fan of EV’s, he’s a “research scientist dedicated to sustainable development” and he supports decarbonizing Norway’s oil & gas exports. I haven’t checked his numbers (nor do I have time to do so); but they don’t seem unreasonable. If he is correct, Norway’s EV subsidies result in the export of 45 to 73 tons of CO2 emissions for every 1 ton of avoided domestic emissions.

This works for Norway. They have abundant cheap ($0.14/kWh) electricity due to their world class hydroelectric resources and infrastructure. They have world class oil oil & gas resources; which they efficiently exploit. They have a relatively small population. They can probably afford to do this for many more years to come.

Actual and projected sale of petroleum 1971‐2022.” (Norwegian Petroleum Directorate)

Is natural gas petroleum? Generally no, although it is usually associated with petroleum.

Petroleum is defined as:

A broadly defined class of liquid hydrocarbon mixtures. Included are crude oil, lease condensate, unfinished oils, refined products obtained from the processing of crude oil, and natural gas plant liquids. Note: Volumes of finished petroleum products include non hydrocarbon compounds, such as additives and detergents, after they have been blended into the products.

EIA

I would have captioned the graph as “Actual and projected sale of oil & gas 1971‐2022.”

Is it hypocritical for Norway to export 45 to 73 tons of CO2 emissions for every 1 ton of avoided domestic emissions? No. It’s just good business – for Norway. This model won’t work very well for the rest of the European EV bandwagon.

Is it ironic? Fracking A it is!

Irony can be so ironic!

Is it hilarious that climate alarmists and social justice warriors are stupid enough to think that Norway is saving the planet? Frack yeah!

Addendum: Norway 2019 Export Revenue

 Billions %
Crude Oil $     29.643%
Natural Gas $     23.034%
Refined Petroleum Products  $        6.19%86%
Fresh Fish $        6.810%
Raw Aluminum $        2.94%
Total $     68.5100%
OEC
OEC

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John Bell
January 18, 2022 6:04 am

EXACTLY my point! All of this renewable stuff, from wind and solar to hybrid vehicles, it all is done on the shoulders of fossil fuels. None of it can be done without fossil fuels. Only fossil fuels can make it happen. In fact, it takes more fossil fuels than would be used than without renewables.

Joseph Zorzin
January 18, 2022 6:06 am

so, are the natives complaining about EVs in a cold climate?

Spetzer86
Reply to  Joseph Zorzin
January 18, 2022 6:53 am

Not when they’re locked in their houses…

lgl
Reply to  Joseph Zorzin
January 18, 2022 9:42 am

No problem

MarkW
Reply to  lgl
January 19, 2022 7:54 am

That they can still work when it was cold was never the point.
The fact remains that the amount of energy you can get out of a battery drops rapidly as it gets cold, which results in an equivalent drop in range.
In addition, batteries can’t be charged when they get below freezing.

Trebla
Reply to  MarkW
January 26, 2022 5:03 am

I drive a Ford PHEV and it’s true that the range drops as much as 50% when it gets cold. But that’s due mainly to the heater drawing huge amounts of electricity from the battery. The new Nissan Leaf will be equipped with a heat pump and one European manufacturer is working on accessing the battery heat to warm the car’s interior. We’re making progress.

Tom Halla
January 18, 2022 6:09 am

Virtue signaling on steroids

ResourceGuy
Reply to  Tom Halla
January 18, 2022 12:27 pm

Petrodollar sugar high….with a plug

bonbon
January 18, 2022 6:12 am

Sep 2021 : Norwegian Yara International, the world’s largest fertilizer company which with Cargill, controls the world fertilizer made from natural gas, announced cuts in production of ammonia by 40%.
Something does not add up…

bonbon
Reply to  David Middleton
January 18, 2022 7:31 am

Yara needs Norwegian gas, right? Why the crazy exposure to EU or international prices? They are not EU, just like Switzerland EEA. Is this the reason for the disaster?

bonbon
Reply to  David Middleton
January 18, 2022 9:09 am

Got it!. Seems the ‘local’ gas prices are indeed global…
I wonder where Yara and Cargill pay tax, if at all…

Graeme#4
Reply to  David Middleton
January 18, 2022 4:50 pm

One here in Western Australia in the Pilbara, close to the natural gas supply.

Hubert Gans
Reply to  bonbon
January 18, 2022 6:36 am

For fertilizer production as for e.g. AddBlue, rocketing gas prices in the EU have caused production cuts, as it seems higher costs can’t be transferred to the customers; guess this is the same for a Norwegian producer

Peta of Newark
Reply to  bonbon
January 18, 2022 7:38 am

Quote:”controls the world fertilizer made from natural gas, announced cuts in production of ammonia by 40%.

That’s absolutely No Problem.
Hopefully you can see the rather low quality image I’ve put up showing UK farm prices for Ammonium Nitrate (AN) have gone up 182% since this time last year

So will it still be no problemo when farmers reduce their usage of AN by over 50% and thus grow 50% less food, sugar basically.

Will things still be “Better Than Ever” and ‘on the up‘ “?

They might actually be because peeps will then be forced to eat something other than, and healthier than, sugar – such as cardboard, paper, sand & rocks – there nothing more unhealthy than sugar

And the reduced AN usage will cause a decrease in the rise of atmospheric CO2 – a *real* decrease that might (if the whole world followed suit) actually register on the Keeling Curve

funny ol’ world innit

edit to “Oh God, the picture’s crap”
Go here instead:
https://ahdb.org.uk/GB-fertiliser-prices

UK Fert Prices.JPG
Last edited 4 months ago by Peta of Newark
bonbon
Reply to  Peta of Newark
January 18, 2022 7:47 am

…then be forced to eat something…

Who does anyone think they are to force-feed voters?

Instead feed these Afghan’s now on the verge of starvation, 10 million youth.

Facing Economic Collapse, Afghanistan Is Gripped by Starvation
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/04/world/asia/afghanistan-starvation-crisis.html

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  bonbon
January 18, 2022 12:19 pm

…then be forced to eat something…

Who does anyone think they are to force-feed voters?

Nobody is force feeding anyone. They are “forced” to eat or die of starvation.

Afghanistan is completely irrelevant. Ask Brandon, he caused the problem.

bonbon
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
January 18, 2022 12:38 pm

Eh, I thought Bush invaded Afghanistan, and it festered for 20 years, and the US lost the war?
Biden opposed the ‘surge’. Trump ended the debacle.
Now genocide by starvation is the game in town, for the entire world to see! The US better save itself, fast!

Duker
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
January 18, 2022 5:42 pm

Ask Trump, he caused the withdrawal to happen starting 12 months before Brandon came into WH and agreed non belligerent status with the Taleban in his Doha peace treaty. Supposed to be a reconciliation with Kabul puppet government but Trump never made that happen as Kabul wouldnt play along.
Trump even publicly said for Biden to hurry up his delayed withdrawal

MarkW
Reply to  Duker
January 18, 2022 8:05 pm

This lie certainly is persistent.
Trump did sign a document that specified that the US was going to pull out.
However that document was full of timetable and goals that the both the US and the Afghan government had to meet before each step of the pullout.

It was Biden, and Biden alone who decided to dump all of that in the rubbish and just pull everyone out as fast as he could. It was Biden that decided we had to abandon the air base and all of the equipment.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  MarkW
January 19, 2022 2:04 am

“It was Biden, and Biden alone who decided to dump all of that in the rubbish and just pull everyone out as fast as he could. It was Biden that decided we had to abandon the air base and all of the equipment.”

Yes, it’s all on Biden. Trump’s plan would not have turned Afghanistan over to the Taliban. Biden didn’t have a plan, all he did was order the military to withdraw as soon as possible and damn the consequences. This is what appeasers do.

And now we have new reporting saying the Inspector General of the military warned Biden of the collapse of the Afghan military if the U.S. withdrew abruptly.

So Biden knew the consequences of his order, and he didn’t give a damn. He had no problem sentencing 25 million Afghans to starvation and slavery and death.

Biden, over the years of his being in political office, has literally ruined the lives of tens of millions of people with his stupid, delusional decisions, from Vietnam to Iraq to Afghanistan. Biden is getting right up there with Stalin, and Mao, and Pol Pot, on the scale of human misery caused.

Last edited 4 months ago by Tom Abbott
Joseph Zorzin
Reply to  bonbon
January 18, 2022 12:32 pm

Let the Taliban feed the people of Afghanistan. If they can’t, the natives will wipe them out.

D. J. Hawkins
Reply to  Joseph Zorzin
January 18, 2022 2:16 pm

Hmmm, I doubt it. More like another Cambodia.

Joseph Zorzin
Reply to  D. J. Hawkins
January 18, 2022 5:00 pm

I thought the saying was that nobody could conquer Afghanistan? That should include a fanatic group of their own people. The Cambodian peasants were not so well armed.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Joseph Zorzin
January 19, 2022 2:16 am

“I thought the saying was that nobody could conquer Afghanistan?”

That’s the usual lie put out by those who don’t want to fight in Afghanistan in an effort to discourage such things.

Afghanistan can be conquered if the right approach is taken. Start off by not allowing the Taliban to have a safe haven in Pakistan to turn to when things get too hot for them in Afganistan.

You won’t win the battle if you allow your enemies to run away to fight another day. Because ruthless leaders, sitting in their safe haven, just recruit more cannon fodder from the ranks and sends them back into the battle. This kind of activity can go on for years and years depending on how many military-age recruits you have. It was claimed that the North Vietnamese military had been so depleted by the war that they were putting 15-year-old boys into the fighting line at the end of the war.

And that’s what American military policy has been for many decades (Vietnam and Afghanistan). The U.S. military didn’t choose to do it this way, they were forced to allow safe havens by ignorant politicians. If left up to the U.S. miliary, the battle would be over very much sooner than when the politicians are running things because the military would attack and eliminate the safe havens and the leaders residing there.

Politicians don’t think about how best to carry out a military operation. Their focus in on the next election. So we get idiots like Joe Biden calling the military shots. A recipe for disaster.

Last edited 4 months ago by Tom Abbott
Weylan R McAnally
Reply to  Peta of Newark
January 18, 2022 1:55 pm

70% of all the calories consumed on Earth are sugars. They are cheap and filling. Protein is expensive and relies on sugars to grow (cows, pigs, pork). Want to see mass revolution? Let people start getting hungry on a large scale.

Duker
Reply to  Weylan R McAnally
January 18, 2022 5:45 pm

protein for most of the world comes from potatoes,cereals and grains. meat eating on a large scale is a western thing, indeed feeding animals grains is a very american thing

Last edited 4 months ago by Duker
Janice Moore
Reply to  Duker
January 19, 2022 1:33 pm

Meat eating on a large scale is a wealth thing. Everywhere.

Protein deficiency AND/OR morbid obesity is what comes from using potatoes and grains for the source of all or nearly all one’s protein.*

So, yeah, being healthy is, indeed, a very American (and all other free market/wealthy countries) thing.

And everywhere you find wealth, you will find that the fossil fuel industry is directly traceable as the controlling, ultimate, cause.

God, bless the fossil fuel industry!💖

****************************************************

*POTATOES

2/3 cup = ~2g protein (20.1 g carbs) (Source: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/foods/potatoes )

RDA for 180 lb. adult = ~ 2.3 ounces (Source: https://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-2018/protein-needs-fd.html )
= ~ 65 g per day/~2g = ~ 33 (servings @2/3 cup)

33 x 2/3 = 22 cups (@16 cups/gallon) = ~ 1.4 gallons (5.3 L) of potatoes PER DAY.

33 x 20.1 carbs = 660 g CARBS

RICE

 1 cup 1(28.7 g carbs) = 2.4 g protein = ~5% RDA (Source: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318699#nutrition )
~20 cups = RDA (about 1.25 (4.7 L) gallons of rice PER DAY)

57 g CARBS

(and no fruits, vegetables, or other carbs, else even MORE carbs with very little protein added)

WHEAT

~4.7 oz. of wheat/cup – 3.5 oz./~3/4 cup (72 g carbs) wheat flour = ~13 g protein (Source: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/foods/wheat#nutrition )
13 g x 5 = RDA, 5 servings @ ¾ c.

About 1 c. per loaf of bread, so, about ¾ of a loaf of bread per ¾ c. x 5 = 3.75 loaves of bread EVERY DAY

72 x 5 servings = 360 g CARBS

********************************************

1 can of Coke Classic ~ 40 g carbs
Atkins diet recommended carbs per day = 15-20 g

*********************************************
EGG

1 egg = 6 g protein
~11 eggs for RDA

BEEF, CHICKEN, TURKEY, LAMB

7g/oz. (Source: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/bariatrics/_documents/nutrition_protein_content_common_foods.pdf ) x 3 = 2.1 oz. , so, about 3.5 oz (~100g) of meat = 2.3oz/65g 

Ron Long
January 18, 2022 6:24 am

Looks like Norway has decided to lead the way into the future: I’m a radical environmentalist from Norway and I will save the planet from Capitalists. PS, my position is for sale, you know, like to Capitalists who make and distribute EV’s.

bonbon
Reply to  David Middleton
January 18, 2022 7:49 am

Could be the real reason Tesla’s Gigafactory, next to VW , Germany, got the market cross-hair.

griff
Reply to  David Middleton
January 18, 2022 8:28 am

See also: Saudi Arabia.

AndyHce
Reply to  David Middleton
January 18, 2022 10:58 am

Once they get enough people into EV, so that it is too late anyone to change his mind, new taxes on those EV vehicles will more than make up for the revenue lost to low gasoline sales.

ResourceGuy
Reply to  AndyHce
January 18, 2022 12:32 pm

Someone has to pay the road taxes to pay for all that petroleum-based pavement. Add time lags to the other thing forgotten in the modern era together with (climate) cycles.

Gerard O'Dowd
Reply to  David Middleton
January 18, 2022 8:38 pm

If my memory serves Norway has a slowly declining native population, like the rest of the Western Europe, due to below replacement reproduction birth rates, and low economic growth, so no need to build new hydroelectric facilities in the future to supply new power for consumer or commercial sectors.

North Sea Oil and Gas Is by far Norway’s biggest industry. The money from oil and gas exports goes into a sovereign wealth fund.

Note the $6.8 Billion per annum in Aquaculture off shore salmon culture and harvesting exports to supply protein to the world. Norway is one of the world leaders in this business. SALMAR ASA is a private corporation in salmon aquaculture.

H. D. Hoese
Reply to  David Middleton
January 18, 2022 10:17 am
Phillip Bratby
January 18, 2022 7:22 am

Who is mad enough to buy an EV in a country as cod as Norway? You would need a proper car as well for in the winter.

griff
Reply to  Phillip Bratby
January 18, 2022 8:27 am

Electric vehicles accounted for nearly two-thirds of all new car sales in Norway this past year, according to newly published data from the country’s Road Federation. In 2021, Norwegian dealerships sold 176,276 cars, 65 percent of which were EVs. That’s an 11 percentage point increase from the year prior when they accounted for 54 percent of all new car sales.’



MarkW
Reply to  griff
January 18, 2022 8:57 am

Just goes to show that if you subsidize something enough, people will buy it.
How many other countries can afford the huge subsidies that Norway is using?

Pat from Kerbob
Reply to  griff
January 18, 2022 10:54 am

Griff the entire point of the article above is not denying Norway is buying a lot of EVs, its pointing out they are doing so because its massively subsidized and that the money for the subsidies comes from oil and gas revenues.
Otherwise they absolutely could not afford this.

Oil and gas can do everything.

LdB
Reply to  griff
January 18, 2022 6:14 pm

Reading comprehension not your strong point hey Griff … EV sales on the back of Fossil Fuel money 🙂

January 18, 2022 7:24 am

You need fossil fuels to make the iron in irony. How great is that?

guest
January 18, 2022 7:34 am

Apologize for an off topic remark, but this is the response I received from a NASA Facebook page Administrator regarding the ability for the average of a series of measurements to have more precision than the individual measurement instruments. Apparently, you can use a meter stick to measure the width of a human hair.

“…repeating measurements adds accuracy. The more observations that are used, the greater the accuracy as the larger number of observations reduces the error due to the averaging process.
For example, suppose you have a single thermometer or temperature-reading device with an accuracy of 0.1°C. Then for that measurement the best accuracy we can have is 0.1°C. However, if we want to determine the average measurement of 10 different measurements, each using the same device, the error becomes the error of the average, i.e., the square root of the additive sums of each error measurement, divided by the number of measurements. For 10 observations, that turns out to be again 0.1°C. If we increase the number of measurements to 100, the error margin drops to 0.0316 ( = ((0.1*100)^0.5)/100). With a thousand measurements, it drops to 0.01. With 10 thousand measurements it drops to 0.00316, and so on. 
The Global Historical Climatology Network integrates daily climate measurements from over 100,000 locations around the world. Ocean surface floats like the Global Drifter Program employ over 1,400 devices across the world’s oceans to take similar climate measurements. Additionally, the 3,800 ARGO free-drifting floats profile climate measurements of the world’s oceans from the surface down to 2,000+ meters depths. Lastly, an array of satellites measure sea surface temperatures and other climate measurements from orbit, providing global swath coverage around the clock. Ships are still used to obtain temperature measurements throughout their voyages, augmenting the data provided from the other sources.
For the purposes of comparing annual anomalies from specific years, NASA’s GISS ranks those comparisons based on the 2nd decimal place (hence 2018 being tied with 2021 for the 6th-warmest year since 1880).”

bonbon
Reply to  guest
January 18, 2022 7:56 am

So if I average millions of measurements with an Optical microscope, I will eventually reach the accuracy or precision of an Electron microscope?

Considering the sheer precision of the NASA JWST telescope mirror actuators (7 per segment), it sure looks like something just does not add up!

Alexy Scherbakoff
Reply to  bonbon
January 18, 2022 5:10 pm

I’ve been thinking about buying a micrometer, I don’t need to now because my vernier will do the same.

DD More
Reply to  guest
January 18, 2022 8:26 am

Except the “Error of the Average” only works when you repeat the measurement of some quantity X #times. In words, the error in the estimated mean is equal to the error in each individual measurement X divided by the square root of the number of times the measurement was repeated.
Doesn’t work when measuring different somethings.

AndyHce
Reply to  DD More
January 18, 2022 11:03 am

or using different instruments or measuring something that keeps changing

Jim Gorman
Reply to  guest
January 18, 2022 11:58 am

“…repeating measurements adds accuracy. The more observations that are used, the greater the accuracy as the larger number of observations reduces the error due to the averaging process.”

Only if you are measuring the same thing multiple times with the same device and only if the measurements form a Gaussian distribution. Temperature measurements are never the same thing. Measurements from different ships are never the same device.

However, if we want to determine the average measurement of 10 different measurements, each using the same device, the error becomes the error of the average, i.e., the square root of the additive sums of each error measurement, divided by the number of measurements. “

Again, only if you are measuring the same thing. It depends “random errors” forming a a Gaussian distribution around the “true value” of the “same thing”. 10 measurements scattered at different times can’s possibly be construed as the same things.

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  guest
January 18, 2022 12:23 pm

If we increase the number of measurements to 100, the error margin drops to 0.0316 ( = ((0.1*100)^0.5)/100). With a thousand measurements, it drops to 0.01. With 10 thousand measurements it drops to 0.00316, and so on.

“Math is hard”
Barbie

TonyG
Reply to  guest
January 18, 2022 12:51 pm

“this is the response I received from a NASA Facebook page Administrator regarding the ability for the average of a series of measurements to have more precision than the individual measurement instruments”

That looks a lot like arguments I’ve seen being made around here.

D. J. Hawkins
Reply to  TonyG
January 18, 2022 2:29 pm

Zeke Hausfather is (in)famous for promoting this particular stupidity. He is the very definition of invincible ignorance on this topic.

Dave Fair
Reply to  guest
January 18, 2022 3:29 pm

Please note that any improvement in accuracy is derived by using only one device at only one location for all measurements used in the averaging. This is just NASA smoke and mirrors.

fretslider
January 18, 2022 7:38 am

Norway has stashed it’s North Sea gains in a sovereign wealth fund.

The UK didn’t…

“Nicola Sturgeon has ended months of speculation by announcing that the Cambo oilfield should not go ahead. “

Norway 2 : 0 UK

Last edited 4 months ago by fretslider
bonbon
Reply to  fretslider
January 18, 2022 7:59 am

I wonder if that is an anti-London thing? Apparently England reaps the North Sea benefit, not Scotland. Something reeks of crude here….

fretslider
Reply to  bonbon
January 18, 2022 8:09 am

The dash for gas etc got rid of the coal mines.

All those benefits etc cost a lot of money. The T shirts worn by policemen declared Arthur Scargill is paying my mortgage.

Last edited 4 months ago by fretslider
bonbon
Reply to  fretslider
January 18, 2022 9:02 am

Looks like Thatcher’s work…

Reply to  fretslider
January 18, 2022 4:55 pm

ASPOM
Arthur Scargill Pays Our Mortgages
also –
Avon & Somerset Police Operation Miners.
The latter might have been for the Press, then only considerably anti-Law and Order,

Auto

Charlie
January 18, 2022 8:03 am

The only number that matters to AGW lunatics is the national CO2 emissions number. All other numbers don’t have to add up.

Pat from Kerbob
Reply to  Charlie
January 18, 2022 10:57 am

Same here in canada. We could dramatically accelerate LNG production and ramp down world CO2 numbers (the only thing that supposedly matters) and yet they fight LNG tooth and nail as it will increase our minuscule emissions here in canada.

All wrong
All stupid
all the time.

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  Charlie
January 18, 2022 12:26 pm

The only number that matters to AGW lunatics is the national CO2 emissions number. All other numbers don’t have to add up.

And yet, when it suits them, they don’t. In Oz we get slammed because we export coal to places like India and China. They get a completely free pass when they burn that coal. Go figure.

Håkon
Reply to  Charlie
January 18, 2022 1:36 pm

Hello from Norway! I can assure you, our AGW lunatics are just as bad as everywhere else. But the hypocrisy takes a different shape here because of the special situation we are in (plenty of hydropower, oil and gas, etc.) It is still important to save the world.

mikee
Reply to  Håkon
January 18, 2022 6:00 pm

Norway’s hypocrisy has reached new heights!

Pat from kerbob
Reply to  mikee
January 18, 2022 7:43 pm

If their govt was calling for shutting down the oil and gas industry then they are hypocrites
But they are not, they are drilling and pumping and using some of the proceeds to buy EVs as they have lots of cheap electricity to charge them.
I agree with Dave it’s smart policy

It’s not replicable in most of the world but that’s not their problem

Frank the Norwegian
Reply to  Pat from kerbob
January 19, 2022 1:53 am

Well, two obvious wrongs.. They ARE calling for shutting down the oil and gas industry

And cheap electricity prices are a thing of the past. We now export and are stuck with German prices.

Garboard
January 18, 2022 8:19 am

Norway is the Saudi Arabia of Europe . Every Norwegian is a millionaire effectively due to the trillions of dollars in their sovereign wealth fund . Norway is a shining example of what a good socialist government looks like . Not only do they have no reservations about being one of the worlds top oil producers , drilling higher into the arctic than anyone , but they even have a government subsidized whaling industry . They could care less what anyone else thinks . He who makes the gold rules . Its good to be Norwegian

Mr.
Reply to  Garboard
January 18, 2022 9:46 am

Sounds like Norway adopts a “Trumpian” approach to managing their country for the benefit of their citizens rather than a socialist model.

“Make Norway Great Still”?

Garboard
Reply to  Mr.
January 18, 2022 1:07 pm

Like trump , Norway goes its own way . No regard for the EU . Doesn’t accept poor immigrants , but makes big contributions to refugee camps . Protective of its culture . With a population less than NYC they can afford to share theIr wealth among all Norwegians . It’s good to be Norwegian

Frank the Norwegian
Reply to  Garboard
January 19, 2022 1:55 am

Bollocks – No regards for the EU??? We (Norway) are the most EU compliant country in the world. (Yes, that seems like utter madness as we are not a member, but here we are)

Håkon
Reply to  Garboard
January 18, 2022 1:17 pm

Goverment subsidized whaling industy? BS

garboard
Reply to  Håkon
January 19, 2022 3:31 am

super easy to fact check with google . not hard to find info about norwegian whaling industry .

griff
January 18, 2022 8:22 am

 Norwegians pay more for gasoline than almost every other nation on Earth.

Yes, but as so many of them drive EVs…

MarkW
Reply to  griff
January 18, 2022 8:59 am

Like most socialists, griff is willing to do anything to force people to behave as he wants.

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  griff
January 18, 2022 12:28 pm

Griff, that ‘whooshing’ is the sound of this entire article going over your head. Given the usual relevance of your links to your arguments, I’m not surprised at your reading comprehension levels, though.

Last edited 4 months ago by Zig Zag Wanderer
Garboard
Reply to  griff
January 18, 2022 1:00 pm

They can afford to with all the money selling gas to the world has put in their pockets

ResourceGuy
Reply to  griff
January 18, 2022 1:44 pm

They are actually driving petrodollars with a plug on the side of it.

Michael in Dublin
January 18, 2022 8:30 am

Hypocrisy

Anders Valland
January 18, 2022 8:37 am

I will not defens our national policies on EVs. But this piece, and most of the comments, show you don’t know Norway.

Yes, our oil and gas revenues cover a lot of costs in our society. We actually take care of everyone. Yes, we could do netter but we don’t take criticism from the US on this.

The reason for EV subsidier is that they would be way too expensive without. The price of a new car in Norway is 50% taxes. By removing taxes on EVs they become relatively cheap.

The cost of fuel is 70-80% taxes. Right now, part of Norway has electricity cost of around 15-25 cents per kWh, as opposed to the more normal 2-3 cents. Our society is electrified like very few other on this planet, ameaning most can charge cars at Home. That gives very low cost of operation.

Our total energy consumption is 70% renewable, since we have abundant hydropower. But in the eyes of the greens, the politicians and capitalists of the EU we should not have the benefit of our own resources. And our politicians tjink it is very clever to fins the most expensive solutions without asking the benefit.

MarkW
Reply to  Anders Valland
January 18, 2022 9:03 am

Typical socialist, has absolutely no knowledge of economics, and approves of what ever the government decides to do.

Taxes make up 50% of the price of a new car. Therefore removing that tax from EV’s to make them cheap is a good thing.
Cost of fuel is 70 to 80% taxes, therefore using electricity that isn’t taxed as much is a good thing.

Rhys Jaggar
Reply to  MarkW
January 18, 2022 11:36 pm

Whatever kind of society Norway happens to be:

https://www.oecdbetterlifeindex.org/countries/norway/

suggests that they as Norwegians are pretty happy with it.

As a result, it’s not for you to comment on it, until such a time as they either come begging to the IMF for money.

If the USA could focus far more on its own crass domestic problems, the world would be a much better, much safer and much happier place.

Save all that money on the military bases the world doesn’t want but the USA demands to have for a start.

Remove the right of politicians to receive campaign contributions from US arms manufacturers second-off.

And explain how hyper-wealth of billionaires ‘trickles down’ to all the homeless, how human dignity comes from being banned from taking comfort breaks at work due to edicts of US billionaires etc etc.

Economics is theoretical alchemy.

Real world evidence is real world evidence.

You saying that low taxes brings ‘prosperity’ needs to be tested in the crucible of the 40% least well off…..it certainly creates obscene wealth for the fortunate…..

lgl
Reply to  David Middleton
January 18, 2022 1:35 pm

Your post is mostly BS. Only 14 % of Norways GDP is from oil and gas (2019), so, 86% of the EV funding is non-oil&gas.
The gas exports is >1100 TWh/yr. Each KWh cuts around 0.5 kg CO2 emissions in EU and elsewhere because it replaces coal. That’s 0.55 Gt/yr CO2 reduction. In addition, this makes the EU not totally dependant on mr. Putin.

lgl
Reply to  David Middleton
January 18, 2022 3:25 pm

No, your and Cloetes 45 to 73 tons is a red Herring. There is no link to the 1 ton. You are trying to make the impression there are tens of tons emitted to avert one ton of emissions. How many tons of fish or aluminium do we have to export? Those productions also have CO2 emissions.

lgl
Reply to  David Middleton
January 19, 2022 2:29 am

86% of the top 5 exports. Read what you link.
It’s 54% of total exports, but that too is a red herring.
In 2019 total revenue to the state of Norway was 1430 bill NOK, 313 of that from oil and gas, that’s 22%.
And again, the gas exports reduces the global emissions.

gringojay
Reply to  Anders Valland
January 18, 2022 11:04 am

Even a television detective can’t solve every mystery.

64FA8E60-84F8-40FE-8EC3-CFD6E88E8AD2.jpeg
Pat from Kerbob
Reply to  Anders Valland
January 18, 2022 12:03 pm

Having abundant hydropower is all about luck of the draw with geology and geography, and good for you.
Here in Canada Quebec has the same geographic advantage but they endlessly preen about virtue instead of making money while the sun shines, like in 2021 they unilaterally cancelled the idea of LNG, because there will be no market for natural gas in Europe (a Griff-like level understanding of economics and energy supply).

Canada = Stupid.
I wish we had politicians with even 1/10th the brain power of Norway. Instead we have mr Socks for Prime minister.

Garboard
Reply to  Anders Valland
January 18, 2022 1:15 pm

With trillions in profit and huge gov surpluses why does Norway need to tax its citizens so heavily ? Doesn’t make sense ? Norway is one of The most expensive countries in the world to live in so maybe everybody is so highly paid they are alright with high taxes . But again I dont understand why the gov needs it ?

lgl
Reply to  Garboard
January 18, 2022 3:52 pm

So that the gov can take care of the basics like school, health, communications, and the people can focus on more interesting things. Much like the US army, just less socialist 🙂

MarkW
Reply to  lgl
January 18, 2022 8:09 pm

The rest of the world is able to provide those same things without taxing the people to death.

lgl
Reply to  MarkW
January 19, 2022 2:40 am

But ‘those same things’ are still being paid for by the people, and they are often not provided to the poor.

garboard
Reply to  lgl
January 19, 2022 3:34 am

still don’t understand why , with trillions of dollars in fossil fuel profits in a country with very small population they can’t use that money for gov projects instead of using very high taxes .

lgl
Reply to  garboard
January 19, 2022 5:19 am

If it’s spent on gov projects the inflation rises and the value of the money evaporates, and most norwegians agree the 100 mill yr old resources do not belong only to the present population, rather several future generations too.

MarkW
Reply to  lgl
January 19, 2022 8:02 am

Ah yes, the old everything belongs to government school of communism.

MarkW
Reply to  lgl
January 19, 2022 8:01 am

Your knowledge of reality is severely lacking. No wonder you think government actually does a better job of providing things.
If you think schooling is not provided by government, you have never studied anything deeper than your navel.
I don’t know of any 1st or 2nd world country that doesn’t provide health care to the poor.
If you think there is no difference between buying something for yourself and having government buy it for you, then there is no hope left for you.

Gary Pearse
January 18, 2022 9:39 am

Norway’s relatively cheap electric power is indeed the key to successful EV rollout. It’s rather a clever strategy. First, because greens/lefties don’t do the kind of analysis re CO2 done in this article. They are moved by ‘feelings’ and spinnable optics.

The China example shows us this – despite being the worlds largest emitter of fossil fuel CO2, they enjoy the admiration of the rest of the world greenies, who even extol their totalitarian model as the way to go politically. China has already achieved the political nirvana sought by EU, UK/Commonwealth, and US ‘Democrats’.

Norway, like China, can even chide the European climate laggards with impunity with their EV plan. There is no question that UK and other European countries have, somewhere on their minds, the Norwegian/China model, and ultimately they will produce frack gas and oil and increasingly coal. How can we be confident of this? Because it’s there!

Peta of Newark
January 18, 2022 9:48 am

Remind me, what are they paying for their Teslas?

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1005003397325417.html

Alexander Vissers
January 18, 2022 11:16 am

For city centres and urban areas clean vehicles are a blessing. Both EV and clean diesel qualify. And as for the remaining oil and gas reserves,once advanced fracking is put to the test they may prove substantially higher.

ResourceGuy
January 18, 2022 12:25 pm

Does anyone know the total registered vehicle count in Norway over time? Adding EVs as opposed to replacing other types of vehicles only increases the vehicle count and demand for more garage space. This amounts to channeling the oil wealth in a particular direction alongside other uses of that wealth.

Gary
January 18, 2022 1:24 pm

Still 85% of vehicles on the road in Norway are ICE so EVs have not reached critical mass yet when the whole strategy implodes

Gordon A. Dressler
January 18, 2022 1:54 pm

In the debate over national climate policy desires versus hard cash income from sales of petroleum and natural gas, the old adage is as true as it ever was: Follow the money!

Alexander Vissers
January 18, 2022 2:10 pm

Norwegian state oil and gas profits are invested abroad and are not used to cover the state budget. This to avoid economic distortion. So Norwegians pay substantial taxes despite the oil profits. For Oslo and surroundings clean air is a blessing for more remote areas EV is not a logical choice.

marlene
January 18, 2022 2:22 pm

I’m concerned about the thought processes of those who continue to cling to their climate change rhetoric in the face of evidentiary proof against them. Obviously, their mission is not about the climate, but about the money.

Dave Fair
Reply to  David Middleton
January 18, 2022 3:43 pm

All three are interrelated: Got one, you’ve got the other two. Fungible is the word.

Dave Fair
Reply to  David Middleton
January 18, 2022 4:19 pm

Actually, the concept of fungibility is not restricted to money or commodities; most dictionaries provide for many variations. It can be pretty much anything that can be swapped around in relation to other things. In my example, if you have any one of the three (money, power or control) you can leverage that one thing into possession of the other two.

Dave Fair
Reply to  David Middleton
January 18, 2022 7:00 pm

David, I’m sorry I started this thing with a flippant comment. Anyway, I’m pretty sure Russian natural gas can be substituted for U.S. LNG in the EU natural gas market.

Dennis
January 18, 2022 4:51 pm

What happened to free enterprise and free markets, the left call capitalism?

Even Russia and China have adopted “capitalism” after realising that the USA became a wealthy nation based on free enterprise, of course controlled and managed, notably for comrades in China and other citizens need not apply to participate.

Without the government subsidies of taxpayer’s monies and other incentives how many EV would have been sold there? Given the number sold and government interference the golden rule of free enterprise, let the markets decide and choose winners and losers, has been abandoned, a recipe for economic instability in the longer term.

Dennis
January 18, 2022 5:03 pm

I own a Diesel engine SUV 4WD 2017 model purchased new, serviced in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions on time every 10,000 Km, it complies to Euro 5 emissions standard and I use two additives to reduce particulate building up in the exhaust system and another to clean injectors and fuel lines, I have a secondary diesel fuel filter installed to protect against poor quality fuel in remote areas.

The vehicle does not exhaust dark emissions and the exhaust pipe has no significant coating of carbon deposits or oil.

My point is that correctly maintained modern technology engines produce acceptably low emissions.

Now due for 110,000 Km service.

Last edited 4 months ago by Dennis
Thommo
January 18, 2022 5:31 pm

Australia sells coal to other countries and gets a caning, Norway sells gas and oil across the world and what do we hear?, Crickets.

Pat from kerbob
Reply to  Thommo
January 18, 2022 7:33 pm

Socialist CO2 is different, causes no problem.
It’s why Venezuela’s heavy oil is blessed but the alberta stuff is pure evil

Dennis
January 18, 2022 7:14 pm

USAF not about to stop using jet fuel, new storage facility under construction near Darwin NT Australia;

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-01-19/work-begins-on-us-jet-fuel-facility-outside-darwin/100764194

Vincent Causey
January 19, 2022 12:16 am

Norway is playing us for fools, talking up decarbonisation while profiteering off the global shortages. We should tackle them head on, with massive investments in developing new energy fields.

lgl
January 19, 2022 5:32 am

That “Addendum: Norway 2019 Export Revenue” is a lie.

glenn holdcroft
January 19, 2022 7:22 am

Fossil fuels expands EV take up . Why ?
Because they can afford it and other countries need what they can sell .
Hypocrisy runs riot .

January 20, 2022 7:16 pm

New rules allow local authorities to limit the access to only include EVs that carry one or more passengers (2016)”

Basically, all but the empty EVs…

Ken
January 21, 2022 4:15 pm

Maybe they know CO2 is an irrelevant GHG contrary to the constant media propaganda bombarding us on a daily basis.

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