EU to Restrict Coffee Imports to Combat Climate Change

Guest essay by Eric Worrall

Has the European Union finally crossed a line? Coffee importers who cannot pinpoint the exact geographical source of their product, and prove their product is “deforestation free”, are set to be locked out of the common market, potentially starving European coffee lovers of their morning fix.

E.U. seeks to block import of commodities that drive deforestation

By Bryan PietschToday at 5:04 p.m. EST

The European Union on Wednesday proposed a measure that would seek to restrict imports to “deforestation-free” goods and materials for countries in the bloc, in an effort to fight consumer trends that drive deforestation around the world.

Importers of commodities including coffee, cocoa, soy, beef, palm oil and wood — as well as products made from those materials, such as furniture and chocolate — would be required to identify the geographic coordinates of the land where the materials were produced. To qualify as “deforestation-free,” the land cannot have been deforested or degraded since Dec. 31, 2020.

The proposal — which would need to be approved by the European Parliament and E.U. member states before coming into force — was hailed as “groundbreaking” action to combat the climate crisis by European Commission officials. “We can’t ask for ambitious climate policies from partners on the one hand and export pollution and support deforestation on the other,” said, Virginijus Sinkevicius, a Lithuanian European commissioner for environment, oceans and fisheries.

Copa-Cogeca, which represents the European agricultural industry, said the tiered system — which the proposal called a “key feature” — was “incompatible” with World Trade Organization rules. The system could have “serious consequences on the future trading relationships and distort the competition on both the EU and global market,” the group said in a statement. As a WTO member, Copa-Cogeca said, the E.U. must “fully respect” WTO rules. Representatives for the European Commission did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2021/11/17/eu-commodity-imports-deforestation/

I can’t help thinking the volume of paperwork generated by importers applying for approval for their product will cause more deforestation than any coffee growing operation.

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fretslider
November 18, 2021 2:06 pm

The inner party will have Victory coffee

Naturally

Bryan A
Reply to  fretslider
November 18, 2021 6:10 pm

Imagine that, banning products that “drive deforestation”…
No more wood for DRAX
No more products that use Palm Oil or Coconut Oil sourced from Brazil
No Biofuel
No Wind Power requiring clearing ANY forested areas
No Solar Power requiring clearing ANY forested areas

Drake
Reply to  Bryan A
November 18, 2021 6:41 pm

DRAX is in the UK, aren’t they out of the EU?

Leo Smith
Reply to  Drake
November 18, 2021 6:52 pm

yup.

Bryan A
Reply to  Drake
November 18, 2021 10:06 pm

BoJo the Clown could remedy that

Alan the Brit
Reply to  Drake
November 19, 2021 12:51 am

I suspect in name only!!!

Old Goat(@khazi22)
Reply to  Drake
November 19, 2021 1:37 am

Not really. Smoke and mirrors.

Bob boder
Reply to  Bryan A
November 19, 2021 3:49 am

Lmao, +100

ATheoK
Reply to  Bryan A
November 19, 2021 3:22 pm

One does wonder why they singled out coffee…?

Perhaps some EU executive is building a porch or boat using mahogany swietenia?

Bryan A
Reply to  ATheoK
November 19, 2021 10:32 pm

Mahogany and Teak are excellent for dressing out MEGA-Yachts

ATheoK
Reply to  Bryan A
November 22, 2021 5:57 pm

Teak is farmed in a number of places worldwide.

Mahogany swietenia has not responded very well, as concentrated stands attract concentrated life forms that consume mahogany swietenia.

The same goes for many of the rosewoods and especially Brazilian Rosewood.

Their best growth plots are where the trees are widely interspersed. Teak grows happily in regular stands.

Mahogany swietenia is CITES 1 right now, at the request of a number of nations who found their trees disappearing. Yet a small nation seemed to have immense superabundance. That is as long as it’s neighbors had abundant of mahogany swietenia.

Mahogany swietenia is not forbidden from sale as existing stockpiles are utilized. However, the price per square foot has climbed and matches rarer woods.

Gerry, England
Reply to  fretslider
November 19, 2021 6:28 am

The Elite will have coffee flown in by private jets under diplomatic immunity so there is no inspection.

Eric Vieira
Reply to  Gerry, England
November 19, 2021 8:10 am

The rest of us get soylent green …

November 18, 2021 2:09 pm

Eco-Loons may be biting off more than they can chew by attempting to deny any Europeans their daily fix of Coffee.

Spetzer86
Reply to  nicholas tesdorf
November 18, 2021 2:41 pm

I can only imagine how the Italians are going to take that. They like their expresso so the little spoon stands up in the super tiny cup they use.

Rah
Reply to  Spetzer86
November 18, 2021 6:31 pm

The Italians and their expresso got nothing on the Middle East and their “Turkish” coffee. However their cappuccino is hard to beat.

Ed Zuiderwijk
Reply to  Rah
November 19, 2021 5:33 am

Cappuccino is an Austrian invention. It goes back to the siege of Vienna by the Turks in 1683. After the besiegers had been routed by troops of the Polish king Jan Sobieski, the Viennese collected the spoils from the supplies left by the Turks, including large quantities of coffee, then rarely known in the rest of Europe. They knew how to brew the stuff however, but sugar was in short supply. So the brew was rather bitter. Then a Capuchin monk had the idea of adding milk to soften is impact.

Redge
Reply to  Spetzer86
November 18, 2021 11:06 pm

Espresso

(Sorry for being pedantic)

Disputin
Reply to  Redge
November 19, 2021 1:54 am

Why? Pedantry is accuracy.

Alan the Brit
Reply to  nicholas tesdorf
November 19, 2021 12:52 am

Our French cousins drink it by the bucket load!!!

ATheoK
Reply to  nicholas tesdorf
November 19, 2021 5:09 am

Such bans on in-demand products always initiate smuggling and black markets, which invite organized crime.

Trust the EU or UN to expand the reach and power of organized crime.

Eric Vieira
Reply to  ATheoK
November 19, 2021 8:12 am

The EU … is … organized crime …

Bryan A
Reply to  Eric Vieira
November 19, 2021 10:33 pm

Organ-ized? By which Organ??

Dave Fair
Reply to  ATheoK
November 19, 2021 10:42 am

Evidence the disaster of Prohibition in the U.S.

Ron Long
November 18, 2021 2:12 pm

I would like to amend my previous comments (I hope everyone that voted for the CAGW crowd and their socialism plans starves slowly in the cold and dark) to include “without coffee”.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Ron Long
November 18, 2021 8:57 pm

That’s my feeling exactly. The EU was never a good idea. Since when do bureaucrat employees get to dictate what people eat or drink?

Redge
Reply to  Rory Forbes
November 18, 2021 11:10 pm

Personally, I think the original idea of the EU was good.

Unfortunately, the monster didn’t stop growing.

Right-Handed Shark
Reply to  Redge
November 19, 2021 12:31 am

I’m pretty sure that the original “idea” for the EU was, from the outset, “The Fourth Reich”.. It was sold, initially, as a trading partnership but was always intended to take more and more political control. And now, here we are with Germany pretty much in charge of “One People, One Realm, One Leader!”.. Okay, about six unelected leaders, but it’s pretty close to their ideal..

Eric Vieira
Reply to  Right-Handed Shark
November 19, 2021 8:15 am

Rodney Atkinson (yes, Mr. Bean’s brother) has quite a lot to say on this subject (see http://freenations.net/).

Bryan A
Reply to  Right-Handed Shark
November 19, 2021 10:37 pm

It’s more like the United States of America Europe but without the Constitutional requirement for elections

Pamela Matlack-Klein
Reply to  Redge
November 19, 2021 12:57 am

About the nicest thing about living in the EU is being able to drive across international borders without having to go through Customs and Immigration. Actually, this is probably the only good thing about the EU!

Joao Martins
Reply to  Pamela Matlack-Klein
November 19, 2021 2:33 am

No more. You are forgetting C19 passports. They were created to be enforced forever. Different systems in different countries; last minute changes to the rules of allowed/not allowed to circulate dictated separately by each country. The demonstration that the UE never has been a “union”, as its name states.

Pamela Matlack-Klein
Reply to  Joao Martins
November 19, 2021 2:54 am

Sigh…I had forgotten that. We are going on an educational field trip to Gibraltar in a few weeks, this C19 nonsense could certainly affect that.

ozspeaksup
Reply to  Pamela Matlack-Klein
November 19, 2021 4:27 am

gibraltars locked down in spite of 118% vaxxed so xmas is cancelled apparently see SOTT webpage for the item on it

Pamela Matlack-Klein
Reply to  ozspeaksup
November 19, 2021 1:37 pm

No! A little boy is going to be heart-broken! Thanks for the tip.

Eric Vieira
Reply to  Pamela Matlack-Klein
November 19, 2021 8:18 am

The main problem with that: criminals and terrorists can also go from country to country, taking their “gear” with them without being caught. That’s the other side of the medal.

ATheoK
Reply to  Redge
November 19, 2021 5:36 am

Agreed, Redge.

I was loaned to the EU from the states to work on a couple of product standards.

Back then, it was a chore, sometimes impossible, to drive between countries in Europe, let alone bring/buy products easily across the borders.

Of course, back then, EU unelected bureaucrats were not obvious meddlers in government. They were simply the final incorporation level for standards.

EU bureaucracy is complex.
To change any one EU standard is an extremely difficult effort. It is easier to initiate a whole new standard work group than to directly modify an existing standard.

Causing standards to become regulatory red tape maze and obstacles to anything new.
Unless one happens to be well connected to EU upper echelons.

The concepts for EU commerce and common border policies were initially pleasant ideas.

EU’s growth into layered unelected tyrant and despotic bureaucrats is not pleasant or conducive to commerce and border controls.

MarkW
Reply to  Redge
November 19, 2021 5:49 am

If it had been left as merely an economic union, it would have been useful.

Redge
Reply to  MarkW
November 19, 2021 6:04 am

That was what the UK joined, an economic union, but as ATheoK points out it “evolved” into a monster – a bit like the UN

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Redge
November 19, 2021 9:53 am

I would like to believe they had the best of intentions in the beginning, but being of sound mind, I know better. It’s never a good idea to hand over so much power to largely Left leaning bureaucrats, whatever the original idea was intended to be. It cannot work because none of them understand how free market economies work.

The following, though intended to be humour, is quite possibly the single best description of the EU ever expressed.

Yes Minister explains the EEC (EU) – YouTube

Redge
Reply to  Rory Forbes
November 19, 2021 10:07 am

That’s brilliant it’s time to revisit “Yes, Minister” 🙂

I think I’m pro-EU and anti-Brussels lmao

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Redge
November 19, 2021 11:05 am

The problem is; in today’s woke world, revisiting satire like ‘Yes Minister’ is out of the question. What do you think the reaction would be now, if someone dared to say Germany’s reason for joining the EEC (in that skit)?

Hell, even the author of ‘Harry Potter’ has been cancelled and uninvited to the 20th anniversary banquet. Can you imagine anyone making ‘Monty Python‘ in today’s PC world? It might even be illegal now, in Britain.

Bob boder
Reply to  Rory Forbes
November 19, 2021 3:50 am

Since people willing gave up their rights and responsibilities.

ozspeaksup
Reply to  Rory Forbes
November 19, 2021 4:26 am

well maybe they need to throw OUT their stupid laws re the degree of bent ness a banana or cucumber can have? the size colour etc for apples etc etc
because due to their insane requirements more food is trashed than sold

Dave Andrews
Reply to  ozspeaksup
November 19, 2021 7:09 am

The bent banana meme was actually started by Boris Johnson in a newspaper article in 2016. It was part of his run up to the referendum on Brexit and was, as so often with him not based on anything true.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  ozspeaksup
November 19, 2021 10:03 am

Bureaucrats shouldn’t be making “laws” in the first place. They forgot or never learned how a ‘free market, is supposed to work. The market is the regulator, not some over fed, over educated and over paid, chinless wonder. All the EU ever managed to do was increase costs with complexity and reduce efficiency.

Pamela Matlack-Klein
Reply to  Ron Long
November 19, 2021 12:51 am

And no chocolate either! Coffee may be high priority but chocolate is equally loved. All those Belgian chocolate makers will, hopefully, stop this foolishness in its tracks!

Joao Martins
Reply to  Pamela Matlack-Klein
November 19, 2021 2:43 am

Not sure of that.

Most professional organizations in the UE are VERY dependent (often FULLY dependent) on the governments of their countries or (when their scope is supranational) on the bureaucracy of the EU. So they will produce a “statement” of “discordance” with those silly rules but, in the end, they will let them pass (through lack of reaction and information/mobilization of their membres). And then, all the “stakeholders” will happily look to the other side when a black market starts supplying the forbiden goods. If, hypothetically, I would say that there are some such black markets operating NOW, I would eventually be committing a crime or breaking any of the millions of EU rules and directives.

Pamela Matlack-Klein
Reply to  Joao Martins
November 19, 2021 2:50 am

I do hope you are not correct about this but your experience with EU politics is greater than mine. But, hope springs eternal, I hope we are not reduced to buying our coffee and chocolates on the blackmarket!

J N
November 18, 2021 2:14 pm

Here in EU we will now only import coffee from Sweden and Iceland!!!

LdB
Reply to  J N
November 18, 2021 3:21 pm

Apparently supplies from greenland and the arctic could be on the cards as Griff keeps telling us it’s going to ice free.I hedge that with the EU doesn’t ban the import of ice-free causing coffee beans.

Last edited 2 months ago by LdB
Craig from Oz
Reply to  LdB
November 18, 2021 4:14 pm

But only by looking at what is happening now – what happened in the past it not important. Griff knows these things.

Charles Higley(@higley7)
Reply to  J N
November 18, 2021 4:51 pm

Grow the coffee in the Sahara. They did not mention anything about the high cost and CO2 emissions of irrigating all that land using water from desalination plants. As long as no forests are involved, it’s perfect. Also a much shorter transport distance to Europe.

Bryan A
Reply to  Charles Higley
November 18, 2021 6:14 pm

Consume in Europe only what is produced in Europe (grow their own coffee)
Eliminates most of the transportation costs and associated CO2 footprint

Bryan A
Reply to  J N
November 19, 2021 10:39 pm

Don’t worry, Greenland and Iceland will import Coffee from Columbia and Africa before reselling it to EU

Tom Halla
November 18, 2021 2:15 pm

I would assume someone works with a group offering certification of compliance with this rule.

bill Johnston
Reply to  Tom Halla
November 18, 2021 4:02 pm

For a small fee.

Fraizer
Reply to  bill Johnston
November 18, 2021 5:52 pm

For a small fee.

FIFY

MarkW
Reply to  bill Johnston
November 19, 2021 5:54 am

They always start small, but they never stay that way.

Pauleta
November 18, 2021 2:24 pm

Do these sycophants know the species name for coffee? Do they know where the species is from? How it was introduced in SA and other places? Who did that? When?

I am watching from afar Europe go down in flames (or in ice cubes), and to thing some years ago I almost moved there.

Joel O'Bryan(@joelobryan)
November 18, 2021 2:28 pm

This is why Brexit.

commieBob
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
November 18, 2021 3:22 pm

Yep. The arrogance of Brussels is now irking Poland. No Pexit yet but stay tuned.

Laertes
Reply to  commieBob
November 18, 2021 5:08 pm

Reading about this today, I’m 100% for Polexit tomorrow, being a Pole myself.

This crosses the line. They want this proposal to be widened to more products in the future. This will simply ban food from being sold on the EU market, even if deforestation or “forest degradation” is legal. They already want to widen this to “other ecosystems”, so soon, ALL FOOD WILL BE BANNED IN EU.

They’re completely, stark mad. They’re engineering a mass hunger event, just like during the communist times. I think at some point, civil disobedience will have to become civic duty.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Laertes
November 18, 2021 9:01 pm

Unelected officials should never be given such power. They will always abuse it. The EU was a bad idea from the start and the average citizen knew it.

Rah
Reply to  commieBob
November 18, 2021 5:37 pm

The Poles know the deal and their population has the pride and National identity to carry it out. Remember that is where the rot started for the last tyrants that dominated Eastern Europe for a time.

In the early 80s I was on a team targeted into Poland in the event WW III had started in Europe. I learned to admire them based on the country studies we did in preparing for that mission.

No one was coming to get us out IF we even made it in alive. But the way I figured it, our chances of survival 500 miles behind the FEBA were probably better than those on the front line had that nightmare come to pass.

bonbon
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
November 19, 2021 12:53 am

To deprive the Brits of the good ol’ cuppa tea, would be the red-line.
I wonder if Darjeeling or Assam would be on BoJo’s virtue list after FLOP26?

Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 2:30 pm

This appears to be a storm in a teacup (or coffee cup). It only applies to land cleared in 2021 or later. And since the EU has been well supplied with coffee for hundreds of years all of those importers will not be effected. And one suspects that already most growers know where their farm is so listing the co-ordinates of it on various forms is hardly onerous.

Krishna Gans
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 2:50 pm

You do not understand what regulation spleen is.

Tom in Florida
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 3:02 pm

The fact that it applies anywhere is the problem.

MarkW
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 3:13 pm

One constant with regulations, and regulatory agencies, is that they always grow.
For ow it only applies to land cleared in 2021 or later, but that’s just for now. The reach of these regulations will grow.

Joao Martins
Reply to  MarkW
November 19, 2021 2:53 am

Yes. Just see the evolution of the “ambitions” to reduce “temperature”, “carbon”, etc.: they start with wide or distant goals, then each year those goals are changed: reducing the increase of “global warming” temperature, shortening the period to achieve x% “emissions” or increasing the “x” in the percent reduction of emissions.

This is the way of EU: start something quietly, then changing it step by step.

LdB
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 3:27 pm

The reason it won’t have effect is nothing to do with that junk. It’s Brazil what will happen is they will clear a forest area and use the co-ordinates for a different farm the same as the do for cattle. How does the EU think they are going to get compliance or audits?

What you are seeing is typical EU arrogance and stupidity.

commieBob
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 3:33 pm

Most growers do not export directly. The paperwork burden will fall on the middle men. The required certifications will mostly be fraudulent. Palms will have to be greased and there will be less money available to pay the actual producers.

So, given that real people will actually suffer, I would not call it a tempest in a teapot.

Izaak Walton
Reply to  commieBob
November 18, 2021 4:20 pm

Why would the required certifications be mostly fraudulent? All coffee grown on farms that existed before 2020 would not be affected by this proposal. Globally coffee production is growing at about 0.5% per annum so at most only 0.5% of producers will need a fraudulent certificate.

Laertes
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 5:16 pm

Also soy and, in the proposal by the NGOs, maize.Soon rice, wheat, every single source of protein for humans…

I mean, what can go wrong with trying to legislate away the need for food?

The Soviet famine of 1932–1933 was a famine in the major grain-producing areas of the Soviet Union, including UkraineNorthern CaucasusVolga RegionKazakhstan,[5] the South Urals, and West Siberia.[6][7] About 5.7 to 7 million people are estimated to have lost their lives.

Izaak Walton
Reply to  Laertes
November 18, 2021 6:34 pm

Who is trying to legislate away the need for food? What they are trying to do is stop deforestation. Given that currently the world produces more than enough food to make everybody obese and also that yields are increasing thanks to added CO2 in the atmosphere where is the need for additional deforestation?

Drake
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 6:53 pm

You are such an a$$. If I own “forest” and wish to use it for “agriculture” for other than forest materials, I have a right, in most countries to do so. But little Hitlers, or Stalins, or Maduros, or Castros like YOU feel YOU should be able to make MY production “unacceptable”.

There are vast areas of “forest” in the southeastern US that 100 years ago were farmland and are now forest. Are you saying that land should never be used for agriculture again?

Again, you are an a$$! No doubt about that.

ozspeaksup
Reply to  Drake
November 19, 2021 4:34 am

err a word to the wise in aus managing to clear anything with trees over 50mm at the base!!! requires approvals and consents from councils and theyre being insane over land WE own and pay taxes on limiting ability to just farm. locals wanted a bathroom extension on an OLD home new greenlaws said it “might” be on a flyover path of black cockatoos and they had to PAY to get it approved for THAT reason on top of usual council building appr fees
insanity
its growing globally

Izaak Walton
Reply to  Drake
November 19, 2021 8:23 am

If you own a forest in country A that does not give you the right to sell goods in country B. Countries are free to set their own rules on imports and can impose tariffs on goods like steel for example.

Laertes
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 7:06 pm

Given that currently the world produces more than enough food to make everybody obese

I have a friend (60 year old) who earns around $200 per month selling vegetables on the market. She’s also disabled. How lovely that the elites want to restrict and limit food for her by hiking up the food prices.

And about obesity – it is the richest elites who are not obese, because they can afford more expensive and more healthy food. In countries like mine (Poland), food expenses are already high enough compared to Western countries. For the poorest people, most of their earnings monthly are spent on food. EU will fix that – reduce their demand by making food unaffordable.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 9:12 pm

What gives them the idea they have the right to interfere with what takes place in other sovereign nations? The people who hand down such authoritarian edicts will never be satisfied with coffee only. They’re entitled parasites which only one goal in sight … absolute control.

Last edited 2 months ago by Rory Forbes
Redge
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 11:16 pm

Izaak,

Do you think there are more brain cells in your head, more trees on earth, or more stars in the universe?

I’ll give you a clue: the answer is trees

Disputin
Reply to  Redge
November 19, 2021 2:04 am

Sorry, Redge, it’s stars. By quite a margin.

Redge
Reply to  Disputin
November 19, 2021 2:15 am

That’s because I’m an idiot!

I meant stars in the galaxy

Brain cells: 86 billion

Stars in the galaxy: 100 billion

Trees on earth: over 3 trillion

Joao Martins
Reply to  Disputin
November 19, 2021 3:01 am

I tend to agree. And am rather certain about the relative position of “cells”…

Joseph Zorzin
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 19, 2021 2:16 am

“What they are trying to do is stop deforestation.”

The best way to ENCOURAGE forest protection is to encourage market for forest products- without them, forest owners will convert the land to agriculture or develop it for industry or urban sprawl.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 9:08 pm

What gives you the idea that it’s any of the EU’s business?

commieBob
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 9:36 pm

‘Fair Trade’ and ‘Organic’ certifications are mostly fraudulent. Try a web search for fair trade organic fraudulent. It’s rampant.

Joao Martins
Reply to  commieBob
November 19, 2021 3:02 am

Be careful, you are touching a very sensible point…

Krishna Gans
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 19, 2021 12:49 am

Only if the trees don’t freeze down 😀

Joao Martins
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 19, 2021 2:56 am

Why would the required certifications be mostly fraudulent?

Are you sure that the CURRENT certification of many foodstufs and industrial raw materials (both produced in EU and imported) is not?

Gunga Din
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 3:45 pm

Isn’t Bureaucratic rule wonderful!
My local church put up a building.
All the necessary permits were satisfied and obtained.
15 years later, to get the permits to remodel the basement, we had to prove what time of year some trees where cut down for the original, approved building, because back then, the original PERMITTED building might have interfered with the breeding season of an endangered bat 15 years before.
(Fortunately we found a dated receipt for when the trees were cleared.)

Enjoy your coffee (and tea?) while you can.
There are Irrational zealots out there that are moving the bureaucratic ladder of control.

Joseph Zorzin
Reply to  Gunga Din
November 19, 2021 2:24 am

Wow, where did this insanity take place? As for bureacratic rule- I live in Massachusetts- probably the most burreacratic state in America. I’m a forestry consultant managing private woodlots. Every single thing I do is overseen by state “service foresters” as if I’m a builder of nuclear reactors. I spend more time doing paper work now than I do in the forests. It wasn’t this way when I started when Nixon was in the White House. All the paper work looks impressive- but, the work in the forests, by and large, isn’t any better. It was pretty good then and it’s pretty good now- but now we have this layer of very expensive bureaucracy. I and a few other private sector foresters refer to our ruling state people as “burros”.

Gunga Din
Reply to  Joseph Zorzin
November 20, 2021 7:15 am

Central Ohio

Joseph Zorzin
Reply to  Gunga Din
November 20, 2021 7:26 am

yuh, right- the rust belt- where real industrial jobs are now scarce but plenty of “burro” jobs!

Craig from Oz
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 4:26 pm

Izaak? I assume you know where you live and where you work.

So… How quick can you give us the co-ordinates? You should know them already by your logic.

Also, you say the the EU has been well supplied with coffee for hundreds of years.

Ignoring the fact that the EU is not hundreds of years old, and assuming you are referring to the countries that currently make up the EU (and ignoring the fact that many of these countries are not – in their current form – hundreds of years old… 😀 ) we then have the question about the size of the long term coffee market. Has it remained the same size the entire period? Has it grown? Could it be considered to grow in the near or middle future?

Also, if your logic is correct and existing growers are not affected, then what happens with new growers trying to get into the market? Why is the burden going to be forced onto them? Is this some sort of market manipulation from Big Coffee?

Also, and this is the important bit, Studies Have Shown(tm) that the severity and frequency of Teacup Storms is likely to increase because of Global Warming(tm).

So It May Already Be Too Late(tm) and could be Worse Than We Thought(tm)

Rah
Reply to  Craig from Oz
November 18, 2021 5:41 pm

Hmm, during WW II most of Europe was drinking ersatz “coffee” if any at all.

Last edited 2 months ago by Rah
Izaak Walton
Reply to  Craig from Oz
November 18, 2021 5:48 pm

Craig,
I have a phone with an inbuilt GPS. I can provide you the precise co-ordinates of my location very easily. Failing that anyone with a mobile phone and reception can use triangulation to determine their location to within a 100 metres or so.

lee
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 6:37 pm

Now all yo have to do is get the GPS location of a specific coffee bean. 😉

Last edited 2 months ago by lee
AndyHce
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 6:47 pm

but can you prove that location has not been deforested recently?

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 9:19 pm

It’s a shame you can’t find your ass with both hands when it’s so easy to find your geographic coordinates.

K. McNeill
Reply to  Rory Forbes
November 19, 2021 7:57 am

You forgot the flashlight

Rory Forbes
Reply to  K. McNeill
November 19, 2021 10:05 am

Now there’s the problem …

observa
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 6:44 pm

It only applies to land cleared in 2021 or later. 

That’s very big of the sanctimonius gits isn’t it Izaak? Moi ancestors cleared the land for our pleasant needs including the Industrial Revolution but how dare you Les Miserables do that now to pull yourselves out of serfdom. Be off with you impertinent knaves and immerse yourselves in the bespoke hunter gatherer lifestyle. On second thoughts forget the hunter bit.

MarkW
Reply to  observa
November 19, 2021 6:00 am

Izaak is also convinced that the only reason why Venezuela is an economic basket case, is because the US refuses to trade with them.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 18, 2021 9:07 pm

Every journey strts witth the 1st step. “Two weeks to flatten the curve” turned into going on two years of economic and human disaster. Man-made global cooling turned into 40 years of climate based fraud malfeasance and government overreach.

Like all other forms of rot, socialism never sleeps.

Bob boder
Reply to  Izaak Walton
November 19, 2021 3:52 am

Vietnam and China are now 2 of the biggest producers of coffee, think the E.U. will ban imports from either? I doubt it very much.

RicDre
November 18, 2021 2:30 pm

Importers of commodities including coffee, cocoa, soy, beef, palm oil and wood

Its a good thing that the UK left the EU, otherwise they may have been forced to convert the Drax power plant back to coal.

Krishna Gans
November 18, 2021 2:32 pm

Not that I believed EU politicians aren’t crazy, but now they have crowned their crazyness.
Someone out there liking to drink mukkefukk in the morning ? (The one or the other substitute)

Last edited 2 months ago by Krishna Gans
Rud Istvan
November 18, 2021 2:41 pm

EU is both nuts and agriculturally ignorant. The best coffee comes from the arabica bean. (Bitter Robusta is used blended or in instant coffee, and is grown mainly in Vietnam.) Arabica originally grew only in Ethiopia in the tropical forest highlands understory. As Ethiopia deforested, production moved to central and South America highlands. Mainly Columbia and Brazil, but also some in Costa Rico and Guatemala. In those countries, coffee still needs some ‘forest shade’. Maybe not the original South/central American highlands wild forest, but still forest. Many fun details are in essay ‘Last Cup of Coffee’ in ebook Blowing Smoke.

As Ethiopia learned the hard way, arabica really doesn’t like deforestation.

Rud Istvan
Reply to  Rud Istvan
November 18, 2021 2:53 pm

Just went and reread Last Cup. The Arabica is also grown a lot on Java. And in both Java and south/Central America, about half is growth in those places with little or no ober story shade trees. The higher elevations need less, the lower elevations more, shade.

Richard Page
Reply to  Rud Istvan
November 18, 2021 4:29 pm

There is also a correlation with altitude – the better the quality of Arabica beans, the higher the altitude. Good coffee comes from mountainsides or tall hilltops. As far as I’m aware the majority of the areas being deforested are flat, lowland areas ideal for growing palm oil or other e-fuel crops?

ResourceGuy
November 18, 2021 2:43 pm

Have you hugged your solar panel made in slave labor camps lately? The EU has no comment on that one except for subsidies for the purchase.

Dave Fair
Reply to  ResourceGuy
November 19, 2021 11:36 am

Climate Envoy John Kerry said that ChiCom slave labor was not in his lane when negotiating CliSciFi rules. FJB says we have to keep these issues separate in dealing with the ChiComs. Lets Go Brandon!

markl
November 18, 2021 2:45 pm

The AGW crowd is a never ending confederacy of dunces.

Wim Röst
November 18, 2021 2:45 pm

EU could better stop subsidizing biofuel. On how many millions of acres of biofuel producing products are grown, how many acres of forests have been burned to grow them? Who is doing wrong?

Joseph Zorzin
Reply to  Wim Röst
November 19, 2021 2:31 am

Nobody burns forests. The forests are thinned and that wood which has no other use goes to chips- if it doesn’t go to pulp or firewood. So, why do some of you keep saying that the forests are being burned? That’s as ignorant as any climate alarmist. Just because biofuel made from agricultural products is stupid doesn’t make biofuel from wood stupid. Managing forests is not highly profitable. Without all possible markets for all the wood- ranging from the best veneer quality timber down to the poorest quality trees only useful for chips- the land would probably be converted (truly deforested) for agriculture or urban sprawl. So, all you wood chip haters out there stop sounding as ignorant as climate alarmists.

Wim Röst
Reply to  Joseph Zorzin
November 19, 2021 11:25 am

Joseph Zorzin: “Nobody burns forests”.

WR: “Indonesia haze: Why do forests keep burning?The burning usually peaks from July to October during Indonesia’s dry season. Many farmers take advantage of the conditions to clear vegetation for palm oil, pulp and paper plantations using the slash-and-burn method.”
Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-34265922

ResourceGuy
November 18, 2021 2:46 pm

Violators will be forced to shovel imported wood pellets for the cause.

Donald Boughton
November 18, 2021 2:46 pm

There is always Ersatz coffee, made from acorns. Ask the Germans.

ResourceGuy
November 18, 2021 2:48 pm

At least you can get FDA and AMA approved opioids.

Ben Vorlich
November 18, 2021 3:14 pm

There is at least one precedent

Ersatz coffee, made of non-specific organic material (often acorns) to replace real coffee, which was not available by the end of the First World War due to the Allied blockade of German ports.

Rud Istvan
Reply to  Ben Vorlich
November 18, 2021 4:24 pm

During the Civil War, the southern troops made ersatz coffee from roasted Chickory. As a Boy Scout, we tried it. Not bad, but lacked caffeine punch.

Joao Martins
Reply to  Rud Istvan
November 19, 2021 3:16 am

It is still used in many European places. But it definitively is not the same s the real thing.

Jim Gorman
November 18, 2021 3:21 pm

Switch to Postum!

PaulH
Reply to  Jim Gorman
November 18, 2021 4:29 pm

Or chicory “coffee”. 🙂

Reply to  PaulH
November 18, 2021 5:18 pm
Richard Page
Reply to  saveenergy
November 19, 2021 4:01 pm

100% milk is, err, milk? If you add camp coffee it’s no longer 100% milk.

richard
November 18, 2021 3:29 pm

The people might go without coffee but rest assured the stone faced bureaucrats from Brussels will never , ever, miss their daily cuppas. The rarer it becomes the more they will be bathed in the coffee of their choice and coffee presents aplenty. Thankfully the totalitarianism of the EU will never last as it always ends up destroying itself.

Last edited 2 months ago by richard
AndyHce
Reply to  richard
November 18, 2021 6:51 pm

after half a thousand years!

Joel
November 18, 2021 3:46 pm

European is getting less important every year. It is dependent on imports for most necessities.
What does the world really need that Europe exports these days?

Joseph Zorzin
Reply to  Joel
November 19, 2021 2:32 am

porn

Gregory Woods
November 18, 2021 4:02 pm

I don’t see cocaine in the list. Few products are more destructive of the environment.

Jon R
Reply to  Gregory Woods
November 19, 2021 9:08 am

I hope you keep your opinions in your own house and enjoy your uncocained lifestyle in its confines, cause if I hear your righteousness on my street expect trouble.

Most squares need a good bit of Ketamine and Cocaine to be bearable.

Last edited 2 months ago by Jon R
Thomas Gasloli
November 18, 2021 4:05 pm

I’m sure the “deforestation free” certification will be as fraudulent as “certified organic”. Useless paperwork to make woke upperclass twits feel good about themselves.

observa
November 18, 2021 4:17 pm

You mean to tell me these caffeine concerns are only coming to the fore now?
Life cycle assessment of spray dried soluble coffee and comparison with alternatives (drip filter and capsule espresso) – ScienceDirect
I’m shocked! Shocked to the core I tell you!

observa
Reply to  observa
November 18, 2021 4:32 pm

It’s enough to drive a concerned chap to weak colour absent tea upon woking in the morning.

Jeff Reppun
November 18, 2021 4:37 pm

I have a question about CO2 absorption in a stable ancient forest. I would think that such a forest would be in CO2 balance. Plants that are growing are absorbing CO2 while decay from dying trees and plants would release CO2. Of course, in a forest fire, the fire releases the CO2 in a significant burst, but the resulting new growth, no longer shaded by tall trees, would stimulate CO2 absorption until a balance is reestablished.
 
If a forest is cut down and much of the wood is used to build a houses (essentially
sequestering the carbon since roofing and paint helps prevent CO2 generating
decay) and the forest is replanted or planted with coffee plants, that that will
stimulate CO2 absorption.

Not a biologist, so I am really wondering why an ancient forest is the ultimate in CO2 absoption.

AndyHce
Reply to  Jeff Reppun
November 18, 2021 6:53 pm

It’s not the CO2, it is where the holy spirits live

Last edited 2 months ago by AndyHce
Jeff Reppun
Reply to  AndyHce
November 18, 2021 10:30 pm

I feel ashamed at my ignorance 😔

Joseph Zorzin
Reply to  AndyHce
November 19, 2021 2:38 am

Modern day, large and powerful logging equipment does a great job chasing out those spirits. :-}

MarkW
Reply to  Joseph Zorzin
November 19, 2021 6:02 am

I learned that in “Fern Gully”.

Joseph Zorzin
Reply to  MarkW
November 19, 2021 6:09 am
Joseph Zorzin
Reply to  Jeff Reppun
November 19, 2021 2:36 am

You are absolutely right! Ancient forests can only hold so much carbon- it can’t continue to add carbon forever. Forest scientists have studied how forests grow for centuries. For each type of forest and for each location, it’s well understood and charts have been created to show the grow over time. In some old forests, death of trees can often exceed young growth before a new balance is achieved. It’s complicated- which is why all the hatred of the wood chip business I see here is dead wrong and I speak from experience, almost half a century as a professional forester.

Jeff Reppun
Reply to  Joseph Zorzin
November 19, 2021 8:00 am

Thank you Joseph. My engineering mind tends to assess scientific issues from a laws of thermodynamics perspective, so this makes sense.

Ack
November 18, 2021 4:39 pm

Restrict…so only the elite will get as much as they need

Ed Fox
November 18, 2021 4:43 pm

The EC not EU role Europe. Even to break wind you must meet the regulations. Noise, odor, duration. All must be controlled or the planet will reach a tipping point. Fall over and spin out of orbit and burn up in the sun.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Ed Fox
November 18, 2021 9:28 pm

I gotta wonder if Biden met all the regulations during his recent time in Europe … or are visiting heads of state exempt?

AWG
November 18, 2021 4:56 pm

Will be looking forward to getting more variety of coffee since the EU is taking steps to price themselves out of the market.

c b
November 18, 2021 5:12 pm

Well, if EU stops drinking coffee… more for me ~~[_]3 : )

Rah
November 18, 2021 5:15 pm

Mark my word. There will be violence and even possibly murders over this. Don’t even think about screwing with my coffee. I may now wear glasses but I can still shoot a 3 shot group you can cover with a Nickel at 300 meters and nail the bull at 800 using the iron sight more often than not.

For me coffee is as essential as diesel fuel for doing my job and I am NOT a person to be trifled with before I get some of that nectar of the Gods down my neck in the morning or whenever I am awakened.

Joe
Reply to  Rah
November 19, 2021 6:09 am

Truer words were never spoken. 50 or 60 million people forced to go through caffeine withdrawal all at once will be ugly.

Geoffrey Williams
November 18, 2021 5:26 pm

Restricting coffee !!
Thin end of the wedge . .

THOMAS ENGLERT
November 18, 2021 5:39 pm

“Renewables” cause major deforestation.

Joseph Zorzin
Reply to  THOMAS ENGLERT
November 19, 2021 2:39 am

Exactly – the wind and solar farms, NOT good forest mgt. including the production of wood chips.

Rah
November 18, 2021 6:23 pm

We buy whole beans and grind our own just before brewing generally. We do not buy Starbucks products but buy various brands. At home and in the truck I have Tim Hortons regular ground also.

Pat from Kerbob
Reply to  Rah
November 18, 2021 6:56 pm

Tim Hortons isn’t coffee

Dave Fair
Reply to  Rah
November 19, 2021 11:44 am

The best bet is the Black Rifle coffee “Beyond Black.”

lee
November 18, 2021 6:28 pm

The rest of the world will have to endure cheap coffee until coffee producers cut back on production.

Pat from Kerbob
November 18, 2021 6:56 pm

While europe proceeds with plans to pelletize forests for “zero carbon fuel”.

So sad

Joseph Zorzin
Reply to  Pat from Kerbob
November 19, 2021 2:41 am

not it isn’t sad- it’s awesome as it helps American forest owners keep their land as forest rather than converting it to cotton farming or urban sprawl

the forests ARE NOT PELLETIZED- only a small percent of the harvested wood goes into pellets- the rest goes into high quality timber for construction, furniture, paper products

when are you forest mgt. haters gonna believe me?

Quilter 52
November 18, 2021 7:38 pm

Should work a treat. Smuggling appears to be a very effective thing in the EU. This will just add more to the gravy train. Meanwhile, I am sure the elites will still get their morning coffee. May be getting close to really p155ing the rest of the community though.

H.R.
November 18, 2021 7:50 pm

Only the elites will still be able to afford and enjoy their Kopi Luwak (civet poop coffee) after all other coffees are banned from the marketplace.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  H.R.
November 18, 2021 9:34 pm

“No shit!” …
“No, I shit you not!”
… and they both laughed until they cried!

Rory Forbes
November 18, 2021 8:53 pm

It’s only a matter of time before the EU becomes a completely authoritarian nightmare. Any administration composed of unelected, socialist bureaucrats is doomed to failure.

Joseph Zorzin
Reply to  Rory Forbes
November 19, 2021 2:42 am

Kafkaesque

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Joseph Zorzin
November 19, 2021 9:57 am

Exactly … an utter nightmare of meaningless complexity.

Walter Sobchak
November 18, 2021 8:58 pm

More for me.

Jim G.
November 18, 2021 10:03 pm

-> “the EU finally crossed a line?”

I believe that is referred to as “Jumping the shark”.

griff
November 19, 2021 1:02 am

Is deforestation a good thing?

No.

so this is of itself a good measure.

Joseph Zorzin
Reply to  griff
November 19, 2021 2:43 am

millions of acres have been deforested for wind and solar farms- no forests have been deforested for chips

MarkW
Reply to  griff
November 19, 2021 6:04 am

Typical of griff to make a blanket statement.
I’m willing to bet that where your mom’s house is, was a forest at one time.

Dave Andrews
Reply to  griff
November 19, 2021 7:18 am

13 million trees cut down in Scotland to make way for unreliable wind turbines. Is that not deforestation?

ozspeaksup
November 19, 2021 4:23 am

the fine prints; SINCE dec 2020 seeing as almost everything BUT very new plantations need be some years if not decades old prior to harvest
its not going to affect older producers at all BUT will stop new ones finding an EU market
sounds good to those who dont read it though

Duane
November 19, 2021 4:54 am

That’s dumb. Most coffee is produced in higher elevations, in mountainous or hilly country with good “air drainage”. The places that the EuroGreenies are hyperventilating about are in the flatlands of the lower parts of the Amazon, where little coffee is grown.

ozspeaksup
November 19, 2021 5:00 am

hey all;-) Id say the EU may have a whole LOT more to worry about than where the coffee is from
ireland gibraltar now austria and germany upcoming shutdowns
https://www.zerohedge.com/covid-19/austria-imposes-full-lockdown-vow-penalties-those-who-resist-germany-may-follow

Andy H
November 19, 2021 5:05 am

This is great for UK and other countries outside the EU fence. Reduce the demand for products from the EU and their prices drop. Cheaper coffee all around (except in EU).

Richard Page
Reply to  Andy H
November 19, 2021 4:07 pm

Hmm but think how much you could get for a couple of jars smuggled across the NI border?

Timo, not that one
November 19, 2021 6:00 am

245 years ago a tax on tea caused the American Revolution.
Could history repeat itself?
No.
I doubt the sheep in Europe will do anything other than switch over to chicory.

Barry James
November 19, 2021 6:42 am

The president of Brazil is an enemy of the Left. Coffee is one of Brazil’s main sources of export income. Of course the Climate Mafia will use their propaganda machine to do as much damage to Brazil’s economy as they can.

norman blanton
November 19, 2021 6:58 am

Maybe they Europeans can do like the German Army of the 30 and 40s and brew meth in a cup to stay awake.

Olen
November 19, 2021 7:10 am

And the people have no say but those that do know better.

Peta of Newark
November 19, 2021 8:18 am

Puritanical Zeal through and through and through

Tell you what, howzabout banning anything/everything grown on land that was forest everywhere..

That should get the Required Result:- World Popoulation of less than 200 Million

Or what is telling, I notice so, is the ‘drug’ aspect
Coffee is a drug. Caffeine basically and not dissimilar to Nicotine

These being notable as ‘stimulant’ drugs – they wake you up
Other stimulants being, by example, MDMA Ecstasy and Cocaine etc

Notice that they are horribly ‘frowned upon’
Tobacco only gets away with what its continued use via a very long history and the tax revenue it generates.

Where-as the depressant drugs, are not frowned upon.
Stuff like alcohol and cannabis
But also sugar, especially when in the form of cooked starch. That is all it is, carbohydrate food = glucose. period. end of story.

We’re told that we ‘have’ to eat carbs because we need energy, alcohol is good ‘in moderation’ and cannabis is now given free rein
While stuff we evolved eating, saturated fat and animal protein which have no, zero, nil, zilch mind-bending properties what-so-ever are increasingly demonised in favour of the mind (and body destroying sugar.
You know it does that. People of the US, you spend $3.7 Trillion every year trying to fix the damage that shit does. Is that nothing to you – are you really THAT rich?

See the pattern.
‘Someone’ wants us all to be sleepy, chemically depressed and docile.
To have slow reactions, to be unquestioning dull thinkers with poor memories, generally ‘stupid’ and compliant.

¿Stepford Wives?

wonder why
what is really going on here

Matt
November 19, 2021 10:55 am

Good. Maybe the price will come down for the rest of the world that remains sane.

Shoki Kaneda
November 19, 2021 11:20 am

Pitchforks and torches time. Gas and heating oil are one thing: don’t mess with their coffee!

ResourceGuy
November 19, 2021 11:50 am

That’s mighty big of them.

Creeps….

How much of this wood ended up in boilers in the EU?

WSJ

SÃO PAULO—Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon rainforest has reached a 15-year high, newly released data shows. The surge is prompting environmentalists and scientists to question the government’s willingness to meet the pledge it made at the COP26 climate summit earlier this month to end illegal woodlands destruction by 2028.
About 5,100 square miles of Brazil’s Amazon—bigger than the size of Connecticut—was denuded in the 12 months between August 2020 and the end of July, a rise of 22% from the previous year and the most deforestation in one year since 2006, according to Brazil’s space research agency, INPE.
The data release incensed environmentalists, who questioned the timing of the announcement. INPE uploaded its findings on deforestation onto a federal government database on Oct. 27—four days before the United Nations climate change conference began, an official at the agency said. The government only publicly released the data late Thursday.
Brazil’s Environment Ministry denied that it delayed the release of the INPE’s data, which are estimates based on satellite images. “We only had access to the data yesterday,” said a spokesman for the ministry.

ex-KaliforniaKook
November 20, 2021 5:46 pm

Doesn’t seem that hard to beat. Check a map for an area that is not deforested, and claim that as the place where the coffee is grown. You really think someone is going to check? If they do, make a slight fix to the longitude, say sorry, and resubmit. Maybe just use your neighbor’s lat/long. Pay him a couple bucks for the privilege.

JohnB
November 22, 2021 7:25 am

It must really grind the gears of the European Kommissars that the little black people won’t do as their told. Screw Europe.

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