Texas to United Nations: Pound Sand

A rather direct Tweet from Texas Governor Greg Abbott

Texas to United Nations: Pound Sand

The world is reeling from spiraling fuel costs caused by premature over-reliance on renewable energy.

High fuel costs punish middle class families & stoke the supply chain crisis.

Texas oil & gas is needed right now.

https://www.kvue.com/article/tech/science/climate-change/united-nations-to-texas-curb-reliance-on-oil-and-gas-to-remain-prosperous-in-era-of-climate-change/287-a7622d6e-e4cc-43c6-9936-30835e6c23ca

Originally tweeted by Greg Abbott (@GregAbbott_TX) on October 25, 2021.

The article to which he responded includes this:

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres says Texas is well-positioned to lead the way in the production of renewables.

“If Texas wants to remain prosperous in 2050 or 2070, Texas will have to diversify its economy and Texas will have to be less dependent on oil and gas,” Guterres said. “It has all the conditions to be – because of the weather in Texas – a leading state in renewable energy in the US,” he added.

Texas is the nation’s largest producer of crude oil and natural gas and the largest emitter of carbon dioxide. While it is deeply entrenched in a carbon-based economy, the state is also the largest producer of wind energy in the United States.

“Texas is prosperous today because Texas is based on what was the main factor of what was wealth and power in the last century. Oil and gas. What we are seeing is, with things changing, the green economy will tend to be preponderant in the future,” Guterres said.

https://www.kvue.com/article/tech/science/climate-change/united-nations-to-texas-curb-reliance-on-oil-and-gas-to-remain-prosperous-in-era-of-climate-change/287-a7622d6e-e4cc-43c6-9936-30835e6c23ca
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MarkW
October 25, 2021 6:05 pm

caused by premature over-reliance on renewable energy.

So over-reliance on renewable energy is ok, so long as it’s not premature?

Allan MacRae
Reply to  MarkW
October 25, 2021 9:03 pm

 
Watch this powerful video – European Parliament politicians actually standing up for human rights and condemning the criminal Covid-19 vaccine mandates and passports.
 
The Covid-19 lockdowns, distancing, masking were never scientifically necessary. The Covid-19 “vaccines” were neither safe nor effective. It was all a global-scale scam.
 
My latest paper explains it all:
“SCIENTIFIC COMPETENCE – THE ABILITY TO CORRECTLY PREDICT”
by Allan MacRae, B.A.Sc., M.Eng., October 2021
http://correctpredictions.ca/
(excerpt)
 
The ability to correctly predict is the best objective measure of scientific and technical competence.
 
Following are the correct predictions of Allan MacRae and colleagues on two important subjects:
– GLOBAL WARMING ALARMISM
– COVID-19 LOCKDOWNS AND ”VACCINES”
 
Our scientific predictions on both these subjects are infinitely more accurate than the mainstream narratives, which have been false and baselessly alarmist to date.
__________________________________
 
Members of EU Parliament Reject Vaccine Mandates For Human Rights And Freedoms
by brianpeckford
Video is found here: https://rumble.com/vo4cud-didnt-see-this-coming-eu-parliament-reject-orwellian-vaccine-mandates-in-fa.html
brian peckford | October 26, 2021

Rumble — European Union Members of Parliament are coming out strongly against the Human Rights abuses that have come about as a result of the NWO’s “Green-Pass” vaccine mandates. They are saying that governments across Europe (and the world) are violating the fundamental freedoms of its citizens, which are enshrined in law.
The MPs are making it clear that the “Covid-Agenda” has nothing to do with science, nor public health, but rather is intended to bring about a Totalitarian system that eliminates even the most basic of human rights in order to enslave the population.

Enginer01
Reply to  Allan MacRae
October 26, 2021 6:50 am

Off-topic, of course,,,
As a non-vaxed user of ivermectin, I am horrified by humanities’ inability to see that managed economies never work.
We elect those people who cannot get a good job, and give them the reins, and complain they are driving us in the wrong directions.
It was probably a good idea to grant Railroad barons free land, but I’m not so sure about the subsidies for electrical windmills and solar panels. ZPE is on the horizon or you can wait 20-50 yeasrs for fusion, If I did not believe the innovators behind technologies like BrialiantLightPower.com were on to something, I would favor small, modular Molten Salt reactors where the major components are fabricated and renewed in factories and trucked to the use point.
It all works.

griff
Reply to  Enginer01
October 26, 2021 8:51 am

I’m going to take advice on energy policy from someone who ignores public health advice and vaccination known to work in favour of taking a drug with no provable medical impact on covid?

Richard Page
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 9:19 am

What on earth have those points got in common, apart from Enginer01? Taking or not taking Ivermectin has sod all to do with whether they are knowledgeable about energy systems. Typical moronic behaviour that we have had to endure, yet come to expect – you conflate one or more issues as if that actually means something then sit back with a smug look. If you have sod all to contribute then why don’t you keep it to yourself rather than parading your ignorance and incompetence for everyone to see?

Last edited 1 month ago by Richard Page
Truth Be Told
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 10:39 am

False statement.

Richard Page
Reply to  Truth Be Told
October 26, 2021 12:16 pm

False correlation.

John
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 6:07 pm

you are so ignorant you cant see beyond the Fauxi lies

Joao Martins
Reply to  griff
October 27, 2021 4:18 am

I’m going to take advice on energy policy from someone who ignores…

Don’t take the advice! Stand up and keep to your faith!

Perhaps you will not benefit from it in this world but certainly you will get plenty of compensation in the hereafter.

… OR …

… or should I have written “Certainly you will not benefit from it in this world but perhaps you will get plenty of compensation in the hereafter”?

Barnes Moore
Reply to  Allan MacRae
October 26, 2021 7:07 am

Well, since you opened the o/t door, some additional info.

Some interesting stats re: safety of Ivermectin vs vaccines and the FDA approved Remdesivir.

VAERS data (from VAERS analysisi) show the number of adverse effects from the vaccines at 818,044 from December 2020 through October 15, 2021. Of those, there were 18,924 life threatening events, 83,412 hospitalizations, 17,128 deaths (compared to 9,183 for all other vaccines combined since 1990), 26,199 permanent disabilities, 91,961 emergency room visits and 575 birth defects after vaccinations.

Per the WHO database VigiAccess, which collects adverse effects data on medications used around the world, there have been 7,491 adverse drug reactions for Remdesivir since the drug was introduced in 2020, more than ivermectin has registered over the last 30 years. What’s more, serious adverse reactions from remdesivir are reported in high numbers. For example, in less than two years, those who have used remdesivir have reported over 560 deaths, 550 serious cardiac disorders (such as bradycardia and cardiac arrest), and 475 acute kidney injuries.

For Ivermectin, per VigiAccess there have been 5,674 adverse drug reactions since 1992 with what is now over 4 billion doses administered. Those reactions have been mild and transient. The largest reported categories for ivermectin include skin issues, headaches, dizziness, and gastrointestinal disturbances such as diarrhea and nausea. The NIH confirms that ivermectin’s primary adverse side effects “include dizziness, pruritis [itchy skin], nausea, or diarrhea. And a recent review of ivermectin similarly describes the common side effects as “itching, rash, swollen lymph nodes, joint pain[], fever, and headache.

See https://ago.nebraska.gov/sites/ago.nebraska.gov/files/docs/opinions/21-017_0.pdf for an excellent examination of the controversy surrounding Ivermectin.

Yet it is Ivermectin that is being smeared and demonized as dangerous. Pharmacies are refusing to fill legitimate prescriptions from doctors and hospitals are refusing treatments using IVM in favor of using Remdesivir at a cost in excess of $3000 per 5 day treatment as part of the standard of care. Ivermectin costs maybe a dollar per 3mg pill. A five day treatment using Ivermectin might cost $100, probably less.

There is truly something very sinister and evil going on and I hope there will be a price to pay. Had the re-purposing of IVM and HcQ been embraced early on when doctors were finding that both were effective when used early in treatment, this pandemic would be well under control – just as the state of Uttar Pradesh has found.

For those not aware, Uttar Pradesh is the largest state in India with a population of over 200 million – roughly 2/3 the size of the US. They launched an aggressive campaign to distribute covid kits in an attempt to stem the growth in cases due to the delta variant. Among other things, the kits included Ivermectin. April 26 appears to be the peak at over 35,000 cases. By July , the case count had dropped to 156 – that is not a typo. Their vaccination rate at the time was under 5%. As of October 22, the number of active cases stands at 112, with 10 new cases, and the vaccination rate stands at 12% for fully vaccinated individuals. UP is not the only state that experienced similar results after wide distribution of Ivermectin – Delhi, Goa, Karnataka, and Uttarakhand also saw dramatic reductions in cases, hospitalizations, and mortality. But, you will not see this reported in the MSM, and in fact, the WHO pressured the Indian Government to remove Ivermectin from it’s treatment protocol. Fortunately, individual states are free to develop and administer their own protocols. Unlike UP, Kerala restricted the use of Ivermectin in April and abandoned it altogether in August in favor of vaccines. It is a tiny state compared to UP, yet as of Oct. 22, have over 8,733 new cases and over 83,333 active cases. Using this link, it is clear to see what states use Ivermectin, and which do not. Above the main chart is a drop down labled “ALL INDIA” where you can pull up the stats of each state in India. It is quite revealing. https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/coronavirus

John
Reply to  Barnes Moore
October 26, 2021 6:14 pm

This is Fauxi
He forced Indonesia to stop using Ivermectin so he could get is patent fees from Pizer
this guy was called out in an interview and again showed he is nothing but a snake oil salesman

Kay Davis
Reply to  John
October 29, 2021 3:33 pm

There is no need to insult snake oil salesmen.

griff
Reply to  Allan MacRae
October 26, 2021 8:50 am

This relates how to climate change? The avowed object of discussion of this site?

MarkW
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 10:34 am

How many times can one troll be wrong regarding the same question?

Truth Be Told
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 10:41 am

W.H.O. Director Tedros thinks so. See Gateway Pundit Oct. 12th.

Truth Be Told
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 10:58 am

Pope Francis thinks it does. GatewayPundit April 8, 2020
Greta Thunberg GatewayPundit April 20, 2021
There must be a few more proponents you can find.

ATheoK
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 5:19 pm

The avowed object of discussion of this site?”

Absurdly wrong, again silly trollop.
Like so many other absurdities invoked by haters of CO₂, you start with a grossly false presumption.

If you weren’t so lazy to check WUWT’s “About” page you would see this:

About Watts Up With That? News and commentary on puzzling things in life, nature, science, weather, climate change, technology, and recent news by Anthony Watts”

Unlike the talking points you are assigned, WUWT covers far more than: “climate change”, “The avowed object of discussion of this site” according to pretentious ignorant trollops.

TonyG
Reply to  ATheoK
October 27, 2021 6:44 am

“If you weren’t so lazy to check WUWT’s “About” page you would see this:”

Maybe I’m misremembering, but hasn’t griff been around since before the masthead change?

MarkW
Reply to  TonyG
October 27, 2021 9:49 am

This site has always been about more than just weather.

John
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 6:15 pm

go to the naughty corner

Pat from Kerbob
Reply to  MarkW
October 25, 2021 9:47 pm

Sure, why not.
So it has to be mature, with affordable storage, and then we can over-rely on it.

Or, never.

Same same

Duane
Reply to  MarkW
October 26, 2021 7:48 am

There is zero reason to blame renewables on the current spike in oil and gas prices, which is 100% due to a temporary imbalance between supply and demand of oil and gas. It’s ridiculous to blame having a larger supply of energy causing a spike in energy pricing – complete ignorance of the economic law of supply and demand.

Only a moron believes that increasing supplies of anything causes the price to spike.

We have had a humongous increase in demand for oil and gas in 2021 after suffering a humongous cut in demand for oil and gas in 2020. Oil and gas producers cannot simply step on an accelerator pedal to instantly match supply with demand.

The world oil and gas industry has ALWAYS been extremely cyclical – the most cyclical of all worldwide industries. Always subject to temporary shocks on both the supply side and the demand side.

There are lots of reasons to believe that renewables are not the answer to our ongoing energy needs. But blaming them for something that has been going on the oil and gas business for more than a century is dumb.

griff
Reply to  Duane
October 26, 2021 8:52 am

Absolutely! Renewables are nothing to do with price hikes!

MarkW
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 10:37 am

It really is amazing how many subjects griff is utterly ignorant in.
The failure of renewables means more fossil fuel power is needed. Which means the demand for coal and gas goes up.
When demand goes up, so does price.
It’s really simple so even griff should be able to understand it.

Beyond that, he and his fellow travelers have been doing everything in their power to prevent the mining of coal and drilling for gas.

ATheoK
Reply to  MarkW
October 26, 2021 5:25 pm

There are limits to genius.

Stupidity, arrogance, narcissism, egocentrism, greed have no limits.

John
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 6:19 pm

you are the moron

Richard Page
Reply to  Duane
October 26, 2021 9:30 am

If it was just a simple cyclical process, then the prices would never have shot up so far or so sharply until demand and supply coincided, fixing new price levels. No – something else happened to make it far more critical; renewables failed massively across Europe and much of the world. A ‘global stilling’ event, coupled with unseasonably colder weather combined to reduce renewable energy to virtually nil for an extended period and drive demand for reliable fossil fuel energy through the roof. Without the global stilling, this wouldn’t have happened, neither would it with the colder weather or the seasonal fuel cycle alone – but all together, it became quite the event. A warning for the future not to put all your eggs into an unreliable basket!

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Duane
October 26, 2021 9:59 am

Only a moron believes force-feeding unpredictable, unreliable Junk Energy (aka wind and solar) into electric grids with government mandates, subsidies and tax credits that can be “sold” or “used” before the first watt of energy is produced, will result in anything but a reduction in the supply of the REAL energy (aka fossil fuels, nuclear, and hydro when/where available) that everything, including the Junk Energy, is actually reliant upon.

This significantly increases the supply shortage and causes The Problem.

Only a moron can’t see that reliance upon weather dependent energy “sources,” i.e., Junk Energy, is a recipe for disaster – beyond the fact that Junk Energy is simply incapable of producing what is needed when it is needed and where it is needed.

DonM
Reply to  AGW is Not Science
October 26, 2021 11:29 am

Is he a moron or a shill?

Either way, he should just be ignored (or laughed at … like the other one).

MarkW
Reply to  Duane
October 26, 2021 10:39 am

First off, if the renewables had worked as sold, there would be no mismatch between supply and demand, so your belief that renewables had no role in this problem fails the test of reality.
Secondly, the same people who have been demanding more renewables are also demanding the end of mining and drilling. So there is a second connection between the two issues.

DonM
Reply to  Duane
October 26, 2021 11:27 am

shill for who?

Reply to  Duane
October 26, 2021 2:22 pm

Duane,
Shipping, too, is pretty cyclical – in most trades.
It’s a low entry-cost business.

Auto

John
Reply to  Duane
October 26, 2021 6:18 pm

It has everthing to do with politics
investing in Oil and Gas is not happening
Shell, BP Exxon, Statoil ….the list goes on are not
the Banks are not funding the Juniors – so this end of town is not
If you are that naive then you are the moron

George
October 25, 2021 6:06 pm

I live in Dallas and I approve this message.

Reply to  George
October 25, 2021 6:19 pm

Me too from Florida.

Reply to  George
October 25, 2021 6:31 pm

I live in two places, err, I like to commute every few weeks.

  • Tucson Arizona because I hate the winter cold.
  • central Texas, about 15 miles north of the geographic center of Texas.

Texas is a great country. Let’s Go Brandon!

Scissor
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
October 25, 2021 7:14 pm

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Scissor
October 25, 2021 8:16 pm

It’s supposedly the number one hit on iTunes. It’s been banned on Youtube, naturally.

ResourceGuy
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
October 26, 2021 5:27 am

I live in two places also, including Tucson.

Texas is great and provides asylum for Californians and New Yorkers.

Two San Francisco prosecutors leave DA Chesa Boudin to join recall effort (yahoo.com)

David S
Reply to  George
October 25, 2021 8:14 pm

I live in Michigan and I approve it too!

MarkW
Reply to  George
October 25, 2021 8:39 pm

Next step

US to United Nations. Pound Sand.

Zig Zag Wanderer
October 25, 2021 6:10 pm

What we are seeing is, with things changing, the green economy will tend to be preponderant in the future

Should’ve gone to Specsavers, mate.

What I’m seeing is the complete inability of unreliables to deliver reliable electricity.

Last edited 1 month ago by Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
October 25, 2021 6:43 pm

The irony that is that Texas leads the nation on Wind power penetration into its grid.
Texas has over 25 GW nameplate of installed wind turbine farms, next closest is Iowa with 8.5 GW nameplate, followed closely by Oklahoma.
https://www.power-technology.com/features/us-wind-energy-by-state/

The February grid crisis fiasco was direct result of those dumb unreliable wind energy policies and not enough investment in reliable electricity from natural gas and nuclear.

observa
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
October 25, 2021 7:37 pm

What you need is lots of Syncons and they spin it like this-
Wind and solar limits relaxed after four big spinning machines installed | RenewEconomy
When it’s like this with the Age of Syncons-
The age of the syncons | Energy Networks Australia
So we were paying $34 mill a year because of unreliables and their asynchronous power problem alone were we?

62% renewable power in the last 12M they say so- The state government has a target of reaching “net 100 per cent renewables” by 2030, but most experts say this will likely be achieved well before then.

Now the NEM interconnected grid consists of Qld, NSW, ACT Vic, Tas and SA so whaddya reckon the ‘net 100% renewables’ means? Can all those States and Territory do the accounting that SA is doing here by imitating their lead? Or would there be a fallacy of composition problem with that? Net has become the climate changers’ favourite weasel word nowadays.

Reply to  observa
October 25, 2021 9:51 pm

I would enjoy a barbie chat with you here in Texas observa. Any travel plans? Texas has no quarantine rules.

Old planning engineer
Reply to  observa
October 25, 2021 10:16 pm

Yes. System strength is a by product of lots of rotating machinery driving synchronous generators. Inverters (PV and wind farms) are currently a sink for system strength rather than a source due to how they react following a system fault. Replace thermal generation with inverters and you lose strength. Weak systems fail as the U.K. found out last year and SA found out a few years ago.

You forgot to mention how much the sync condensers cost the public rather than the people who caused the problem. Don’t remember the exact figure but around $100 M AUD I think. Another free ride for the unreliables.

griff
Reply to  Old planning engineer
October 26, 2021 8:53 am

The UK found no such thing at any point last year.

Richard Page
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 9:41 am

August 09, 2019 severe blackouts. September, October 2020, capacity falls to dangerously low level due to multiple system failures. December -January 2020/21, electricity demand exceeds supply – some areas are shut down to preserve grid integrity. Anything else you wanted to know, Griffy? We all know how incapable you are when it comes to searching the internet.

MarkW
Reply to  Richard Page
October 26, 2021 10:41 am

In griff’s world, the fact that the system hasn’t collapsed, is proof that it never will, regardless of how much harder the system is stressed in the future.

Last edited 1 month ago by MarkW
Lawrence
Reply to  observa
October 25, 2021 10:30 pm

Another expensive add on that could have been avoided if the Port Augusta power station had been left in operation. Wouldn’t need the battery either. I am continually dismayed at the absolute ignorance of our politicians and how gullible they are. One follows the other.

Galvinator
Reply to  Lawrence
October 26, 2021 7:07 am

Totally agree. Destruction of formerly functioning infrastructure to supply electricity to the frontier regions of South Australia was government vandalism. Now repeated in Victoria and possibly soon in NSW.

Allan MacRae
Reply to  observa
October 26, 2021 5:32 am

Syncons may help to solve the frequency problem of Wind and Solar Power Generation but NOT the intermittency problem, which is the real giant-killer.

You’ve still got the fatal flaw – NO power when the wind doesn’t blow and the Sun doesn’t shine. Most five-year-olds could tell you that, but it’s apparently too complicated for our idiot politicians.

Lrp
Reply to  observa
October 27, 2021 9:05 am

SA has hardly any economy

Kenji
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
October 25, 2021 10:41 pm

As a 4th generation Californian … I envision the UN’s promised future as the entire length of CA’s coastline covered in Giant windmill factories. 1,000 miles of windmills. Won’t that be a beautiful “sustainable” future? We’re gonna need all these AND the wind factories covering the Sierra Nevada to power all our shiny new Teslas. Right?

Not to be … premature

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Kenji
October 26, 2021 10:05 am

They’ll likely also be a suspicious drop in the number of raptors and bats, but the Eco-Nazis will insist it has “nothing to do” with the wind mills aka bird choppers.

Allan MacRae
Reply to  Kenji
October 26, 2021 12:09 pm

And the wind power still won’t work, because of intermittency.

You’ll be Californicated! Like, I mean, y’know, Totally!

griff
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
October 26, 2021 8:53 am

The February fiasco was ENTIRELY down to ignoring advice – repeated advice – on winterization and a subsequent fail of natural gas to provide power.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 10:14 am

Only in your alternate reality.

In reality, it was the domino effect of wind face-planting a third of electric production which (due to “green” stupidity AS WELL) INCLUDED the compression of gas in the natural gas pipelines. No fuel = gas plant go “off line.” Stagnation of what’s “in the pipes” means any moisture content becomes more likely to freeze, amplifying supply issues. If the gas plants stayed on line (which they would have in a Texas without wind farms), little would have been freezing to begin with, and there would be enough operating to keep things functional.

Texas in February 2021 was the “canary in the coal mine” for any significant reliance upon wind and solar for energy. Only a moron or the willfully ignorant can’t see that.

MarkW
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 10:42 am

It really doesn’t matter how many times griff is corrected, he will stick with his old lies until he is given new ones.

John
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 6:22 pm

it was down to a much more simple problem
you had to have electrically driven pipeline gas compressors
so the chicken and the egg no power no gas no power

bigoilbob
Reply to  John
October 27, 2021 9:34 pm

“…you had to have electrically driven pipeline gas compressors”

Electrification of natural gas facilities, whether in the field or at conditioning plants is a wonderful thing. And it has been gaining ground for almost 50 years. The simple fix for the shut offs would have been to give them priority when unloading. California has been doing this for 25 years that I know of.

Bigger pic, griff is spot on when he blames the natural gas to electric infrastructure for the catastrophe. It could have been relatively easy to harde it between the 2011 warning and 2/21. And that is what the Texas regulators should be doing now, instead of bounty hunting fetal heart flutters. Cost should be borne for that and for interconnection, by Ercot, via rate payers. I have NO problem with the natural gas to electric infrastructure being rewarded for doing so.

Nobody should have realistically expected that wind would stay on in those parts per ten thousand (so far) events. When all of the currently communized external costs for hydrocarbon electricity production are considered, it is still the low cost source. Even factoring in the relatively tiny start up helps it has received.

And to whine about how gas should have been kept on to base load is just silly. It is a bridge fuel. Would you run your emergency generator 24/7/365?

HotScot
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
October 26, 2021 3:06 am

Renewables – ~2% of global energy, after 40 years of hot air.

These nutters aint too bright.

Reply to  HotScot
October 26, 2021 7:58 am

What on earth made you think that generating energy was the purpose of ‘renewable energy’?

griff
Reply to  HotScot
October 26, 2021 8:54 am

But in many countries, 40% and better of electricity generation – and rising.

Paul Penrose
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 9:21 am

Liar.

Richard Page
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 9:44 am

Stop lying Griffy. 40% nameplate capacity – 4% actual electricity generation on average (quite often it’s 0%).

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 10:16 am

“Generation” means little when it is not “generated” when and where it is needed, which is why the ignorant cheerleaders for Junk Energy always like to talk about “generation” and equally irrelevant “capacity.”

MarkW
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 10:43 am

There is no country that comes anywhere close to 40%, hitting those levels for a few minutes once or twice a year is a completely different thing.

DonM
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 11:35 am

No grff you are wrong. It has never been higher than 3% in any country in the world at any one time.

(this is easy … just make shit up)

Lrp
Reply to  griff
October 27, 2021 9:09 am

Rubbish!

ChrisB
October 25, 2021 6:15 pm

The boss of a firm that needs handouts from others for existence gives advice on how to become self sufficient.

Clearly he has never had a real job.

Reply to  ChrisB
October 25, 2021 6:36 pm

You’ve the mind of an authoritarian. You see everything through government control. You must love living in whatever socialist hell hole utopia you call home.

HotScot
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
October 26, 2021 3:09 am

Calling for freedom of choice is authoritarian in you’r mind?

Now we know where you’re going wrong.

DonM
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
October 26, 2021 11:38 am

appears Chris was referring to the UN guy, not the Gov.

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  ChrisB
October 25, 2021 7:01 pm

The boss of a firm that needs handouts from others for existence gives advice on how to become self sufficient.

Clearly he has never had a real job.

Exactly. Those that do nothing and produce nothing are giving orders to those that do things and produce things. The UN needs to be defunded immediately.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
October 25, 2021 9:19 pm

It’s just that the UN began to have pretensions of power beyond their usefulness. Each new generation of bureaucrats running the place increasingly regarded the UN as the world’s unofficial world government. They’re now so for out of their depth it’s pathetic.

Mason
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
October 26, 2021 5:36 am

And Atlas Shrugged!

October 25, 2021 6:18 pm

Abbott needs to walk the walk, most land in Texas is private; time to tell the feds to take a hike.

gringojay
October 25, 2021 6:19 pm

Texas might be willing to try something new, like this:

39F8C99F-FBCA-48F7-A8D9-45A2E26D68AB.jpeg
Derg
Reply to  gringojay
October 26, 2021 3:36 am

That is funny

griff
Reply to  gringojay
October 26, 2021 8:54 am

civilised countries have given up the death penalty.

gringojay
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 9:33 am

@griff – You say that like it’s a good thing.

MarkW
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 10:44 am

Amazing how griff actually believes that his opinions are the standard by which civilization is to be measured.

Trying to Play Nice
Reply to  griff
October 27, 2021 4:16 am

No, Griff. Wimp countries have given up the death penalty.

Lrp
Reply to  griff
October 27, 2021 9:15 am

Ignorant and judgemental! What a surprise

Lrp
Reply to  gringojay
October 27, 2021 9:12 am

They’ll both die of boredom

David Kamakaris
October 25, 2021 6:21 pm

“Texas to United Nations: Pound Sand”

Love it Love it Love it!

Cam_S
October 25, 2021 6:22 pm

Hooray, Greg Abbott!

hiskorr
Reply to  Cam_S
October 25, 2021 6:29 pm

Now if he would only close the border…

Duker
Reply to  hiskorr
October 25, 2021 7:14 pm

Where would they get their cheap labour from.

Texas would be like Iowa, stagnant without the massive Hispanic migration over the last 40 years

2019 ‘Texas gained almost nine Hispanic residents for every additional white resident last year’

By 2040 its politics will be more like California when ‘people of colour’ are 65%

n.n
Reply to  Duker
October 25, 2021 7:45 pm

“people of color” is a diversity bloc is a racist judgment and label.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Duker
October 25, 2021 8:25 pm

Hispanics are fairly conservative. Many of them vote Republican, especially in the last election where they went for Trump in a big way.

They may have another chance to go for Trump in a big way in the near future.

What I’m waiting for is some of those Texas House Democrats from the border counties switching political parties over Biden’s failure to prevent the invasion of the U.S. by hundreds of thousands of illegal aliens.

Article of Impeachment are being prepared in the House of Representatives for Biden and maybe Harris, too.

We have to wait until the Republicans take control in 2022 before this impeachment can be pressed. Unless some Democrat legislators decide to change parties and give the conservatives enough votes to proceed.

Biden is not endearing himself to the people of south Texas including Democrat Hispanics, with his open border policy.

Larry in Texas
Reply to  Tom Abbott
October 26, 2021 1:15 am

If we are talking impeachment in the event the GOP takes control of the House after 2022, you had better be including Kamala Harris being impeached as well in those discussions – it is no “maybe,” it must also happen. She is, after all, Vice-President at the moment and would take over if Biden actually resigned or was somehow removed from office by the Senate. She would be, in many ways, far worse than Biden if she became President.

P.S. For all you folks out there, Greg Abbott’s response to the UN is as idiotic as Figueres’s original statement – “premature” reliance on renewable energy, my foot. Reliance on renewable energy is dangerous and is never going to solve anything. It is a compete disaster, as last February should have proven to all who are concerned about cheap, plentiful energy as well as a reliable electric grid.

Editor
Reply to  Larry in Texas
October 26, 2021 5:50 am

Actually, the reliance on renewable energy clearly has been premature. It would have been much more sensible to use other energy sources, such as coal, oil, gas, hydro, biomass, nuclear fission and nuclear fusion[*] in the meantime. ie, while working on getting renewables to be viable.

[*]- yes I know that nuclear fusion isn’t working yet, but surely it can be got working long before renewables are viable.

OweninGA
Reply to  Mike Jonas
October 26, 2021 7:35 am

glad you added that asterisk…I was wondering if you had lost it there for a bit.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Mike Jonas
October 26, 2021 10:26 am

You can say it IS premature, but the fact is it ALWAYS WILL BE.

Or, one might just say that it is dangerous BECAUSE “renewables” will never supply the energy we need, and relying on it to do what it is clearly incapable of doing on its face is guaranteed to be disastrous.

Junk Energy will never supply our energy needs unless we resign ourselves to cave man living.

TonyG
Reply to  Tom Abbott
October 26, 2021 10:51 am

Hispanics are fairly conservative

Rep. Soto doesn’t like that: https://twitter.com/RepDarrenSoto/status/1451645686664073222

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Duker
October 25, 2021 9:25 pm

Although I loath the label “people of colour”, you’ll probably find they’re not nearly what you expect them to be. They have proven to be among Trump’s strongest supporters. They’re not nearly as clueless as liberals and other progressives believe they are.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Rory Forbes
October 26, 2021 10:27 am

Or hope that they’ll be.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  AGW is Not Science
October 26, 2021 11:00 am

I was thinking about those who already live in the US and CAN vote. They’re the ones who realize they are the ones who will likely lose their jobs to the illegals.

Kenji
Reply to  Duker
October 25, 2021 10:49 pm

And when this crop of cheap laborers demand living wages … you know … “white people wages” … then where will BIG Republican RINOS and The Communist Democrat Party go for their cheap labor?

Hint: our current runaway inflation $$$ windfall isn’t landing in the pockets of cheap labor. Nope. Another class altogether is getting filthy rich off the backs of the Proles.

October 25, 2021 6:26 pm

Pound Sand UNFCCC….

and Let’s Go Brandon!

Dave Fair
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
October 25, 2021 10:18 pm

Send the UN a copy of the upcoming movie “Weekend at Brandon’s.”

October 25, 2021 6:30 pm

Is Mr. Antonio Guterres Greta’s uncle?

When you hire all these clowns, you’ll get a circus.

ghalfrunt
October 25, 2021 6:40 pm

At one time you say that renewables produce no useful energy
At another time you say that low output of renewables causes the gas prices to rise

So Strange.

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  ghalfrunt
October 25, 2021 7:03 pm

Half Runt, the problem is that all of that electricity produced that is useless, still must be paid for by someone. Typically that is by producers of reliable electricity, whether as a direct or indirect cost.

And if you put your faith in unreliables, and they don’t produce, while at the same time preventing production of reliable energy sources because Climate Change ™, then yes, prices will necessarily sky-rocket, just as Barack promised and Joe is delivering. There was an intermediate period when Donald actually managed to obtain energy independence for the USA for the first time, but that is now over.

Last edited 1 month ago by Zig Zag Wanderer
MarkW
Reply to  ghalfrunt
October 25, 2021 7:21 pm

There’s an old saying, “There are none so blind as those who refuse to see”. This fits ghoulfund perfectly.

n.n
Reply to  ghalfrunt
October 25, 2021 7:47 pm

The price of reliables are progressive when they are shackled by intermittents.

philincalifornia
Reply to  ghalfrunt
October 25, 2021 7:48 pm

How are those renewables doing in stabilizing the climate? The dog ate yer homework again?

Derg
Reply to  ghalfrunt
October 26, 2021 3:38 am

Hey it’s the person who told us to drink bleach…shame on you

Tom Halla
October 25, 2021 6:40 pm

We in Texas already have too much wind and solar on the grid, as we learned with the February snowstorm. While there were other failures, having some thirty percent of the base load from wind drop off led to a cascade of other problems.
Guterres is not living in the real world if he thinks Texas should double down on failure.

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  Tom Halla
October 25, 2021 7:10 pm

Too much wind and solar generation capacity, but not enough wind and solar itself…

Last edited 1 month ago by Zig Zag Wanderer
Tom Halla
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
October 25, 2021 7:19 pm

Neither wind or solar work all that well in freezing rain.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Tom Halla
October 25, 2021 8:31 pm

“Guterres is not living in the real world if he thinks Texas should double down on failure.”

That’s what he is saying. He wants you to double-down on the windmills.

Obviously, he doesn’t understand the problem, or, he understands the problem, but doesn’t care if the Texas economy crashes after adding more windmills.

Texas doesn’t need any advice from the Charlatans at the UN IPCC.

Pamela Matlack-Klein
Reply to  Tom Abbott
October 26, 2021 2:11 am

Guterres is Portuguese and Portugal does not have a lot of windmills. We have so few here that when some pop up on the horizon during a road trip it is something to remark on. We also don’t have brown- and black outs….

CD in Wisconsin
October 25, 2021 7:05 pm

“”What we are seeing is, with things changing, the green economy will tend to be preponderant in the future,” Guterres said.”

************

As I recall, the children’s character Pinocchio had an issue where his nose would grow every time he told a lie. I submit that Secretary Guterres and a lot of other climate alarmists would have noses stretching half-way to the Moon by now if they had the same problem.

Saying that the climate is in a “code red” emergency was bad enough. Putting out misleading or outright false statements about wind and solar energy makes matters worse. With all the lies, the Secretary would have to go under the knife quite frequently to keep his nose at a length where he would not be embarrassed to show his face in public.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  CD in Wisconsin
October 25, 2021 8:35 pm

“Saying that the climate is in a “code red” emergency was bad enough.”

I think Guterres just made that up on his own. “Code Red” is not mentioned in the AR6.

Guterres just thought he needed to jump-start the scaremongering. And of course, he was quoted widely. Which was his aim.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Tom Abbott
October 28, 2021 9:18 am

I just heard Biden give a speech before he leaves for Scotland and Italy and he used “code red” in his speech. Presidential propaganda.

Duker
October 25, 2021 7:07 pm

I dont get his point at all. The UN isnt interested in Texas either.
Its the US government which sets the legal climate change policies.

Just because they can choose their text book suppliers they think they are all powerful.

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Duker
October 25, 2021 8:39 pm

Are you criticizing Texas or the UN? I thought you were dissing the UN until I got to the “text book suppliers” part. Please clarify.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Duker
October 25, 2021 9:34 pm

“Climate change” doesn’t require any specific government policies, because we know no way to alter such variations. Weather is an important factor for government but climate not so much. Your text book remark is a non sequitur.

Richard Page
Reply to  Duker
October 26, 2021 12:29 pm

Your remark could have been quite good and interesting except for one tiny flaw: the Twitter remarks made by the governor of Texas were in reply to remarks made specifically about Texas by the UN Secretary General. So tell me again how the UN isn’t interested in Texas when they obviously are?

n.n
October 25, 2021 7:38 pm

Premature evacuation. Premature abortion. Premature intermittents. The progressive trifecta.

The Great.. Green Leap

Rory Forbes
Reply to  n.n
October 25, 2021 9:37 pm

Premature evacuation

Were you referring to explosive diarrhea? In which case I understand the “Great Green Leap.”

Reply to  Rory Forbes
October 26, 2021 8:01 am

Who will rid me of these massive erections (windmills, I meant…)

Richard Page
Reply to  n.n
October 26, 2021 9:49 am

n.n – I understand if you have a problem with being….. premature. You do know that you can get help with that, right?

John
October 25, 2021 7:47 pm

Its quiet simple
the COP 26 should provide all delegates with hemp clothing, hot water bottles and bicycles

and they should only have Tofu

and if they came by plane they should have to walk home – that should keep Morrison and Biden out of the way for a good long time to allow us to restart our energy economises

Dennis
October 25, 2021 7:50 pm

Obviously the UK Government agrees and has been installing diesel fuelled generators to recharge the COP26 Electric Vehicle fleet.

Izaak Walton
October 25, 2021 8:10 pm

Well, according to the EIA, Guterres is correct. The EIA states that Texas has crude oil reserves of 18,622 million barrels and currently produces 4.810 million barrels of oil a day. Which means that Texas will run out in 10 years time. And also according to EIA it will run out of natural gas at about the same time. All of which means that if Texas wants to remain prosperous in 2050 or 2070 it won’t have a choice except to diversify its economy.

The data is at
https://www.eia.gov/state/print.php?sid=TX

Tom Abbott
Reply to  Izaak Walton
October 25, 2021 8:43 pm

I guess those poor, dumb Texans can’t see that. It’s a good thing they have you and Guterres to put them on the right path for the future.

Izaak Walton
Reply to  Tom Abbott
October 25, 2021 8:55 pm

Well clearly the governor of Texas doesn’t appear to understand what Guterres is saying. There is no contradiction between stating that the world needs Texas’ oil and natural gas in 2021 and stating that in 2050 Texas will have to find alternative sources of wealth.

Rory Forbes
Reply to  Izaak Walton
October 25, 2021 9:42 pm

You can be sure that the ‘Unreliables’ won’t be any part of the alternatives. You’ll find there’s a world of difference between proven reserves and what’s left in the ground.

Derg
Reply to  Izaak Walton
October 26, 2021 3:53 am

Citizens in the US did not elect Guterres. F him.

MarkW
Reply to  Izaak Walton
October 26, 2021 5:38 am

Since Texas still has hundreds of years worth of oil and gas, why do they need to diversify by 2050?

Zig Zag Wanderer
Reply to  Izaak Walton
October 25, 2021 9:15 pm

if Texas wants to remain prosperous in 2050 or 2070 it won’t have a choice except to diversify its economy

Or Texans could look for more oil and gas. Everyone who has predicted peak oil or gas had been wrong so far. I think we may have hit peak ‘peak oil’, in fact.

Izaak Walton
Reply to  Zig Zag Wanderer
October 25, 2021 9:18 pm

Texas has a finite size and thus finite fossil fuel reserves. At some point it will run out of fossil fuels and will need to diversify.

Dave Fair
Reply to  Izaak Walton
October 25, 2021 10:25 pm

Diversify into what, oh Nostradamus?

ResourceGuy
Reply to  Dave Fair
October 26, 2021 8:26 am

Economic development as defined by and personally invested by Democrats is craft breweries and marijuana growers and dispensaries and labor law. All other sectors are greedy capitalists that must be heavily taxed or further regulated. The current bad list is fossil fuels, real estate, and pipelines. Stay tuned.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  ResourceGuy
October 26, 2021 10:35 am

The irony being that you can’t brew beer, grow pot in any substantial quantity or provide “labor” with any gainful employment absent fossil fuels, aside from less-than-subsistence back-breaking manual labor.

Larry in Texas
Reply to  Izaak Walton
October 26, 2021 1:25 am

What makes you think that the people of Texas get their oil and gas ONLY from the State of Texas itself? As oil and gas markets are both national and international, as well as highly fungible, your statements are disingenous to say the least. As well as missing the basic point that it is the idiots in the Biden administration who are angling to ruin the country with their bogus climate policies, thus ruining availability of oil and gas everywhere in the United States.

ResourceGuy
Reply to  Izaak Walton
October 26, 2021 5:11 am

Texas has finite land area also. Why don’t all investments go into land speculation and why isn’t land at the top of your investment portfolio? It is readily apparent that the troll instruction booklet has not been updated since the first claims of peak oil in the 1970s. It must be effective though with the average illiterates to keep coming back. Just don’t pull the crustal abundance nonsense from the troll list–that one really sets me off with my specialty and terminal degree in resource scarcity.

MarkW
Reply to  Izaak Walton
October 26, 2021 5:37 am

They won’t be running out in 2050 or 2070.

BTW, Texas is already quite diversified.
Something you could have found out for yourself had you not been convinced you already know everything.

Mason
Reply to  Izaak Walton
October 26, 2021 5:47 am

Izaak, that peak oil argument is the same as it was in the 70’s. It is put out there by anti-oil lobbies. That is why we will soon see rigs back in service. Drill baby, drill! Let’s go Brandon

Marc
Reply to  Izaak Walton
October 25, 2021 9:27 pm

Anyone who pays attention knows that the EIA is only slightly more reliable than the UN. In the early 2000s they had the US running desperately short of natural gas by the end of the decade and needing massive imports from Canada and LNG re-gas terminals to survive. Fast forward a few years and the US had shale gas running out its ears. There’s a reason no one at the EIA has ever discovered or produced a barrel of oil or an MCF of gas. They are mostly mindless beaurocrats

Pat from Kerbob
Reply to  Izaak Walton
October 25, 2021 9:53 pm

Izaak, remember how no matter what reserves are listed and how much they are extracted, the next year world reserves are always higher.
Year after year
Because exploration
Because changing tech
Because there is always more so far.
Eventually that will change but not yet.
Alberta has 400 years of oil sands supply “based on current tech”.
Meaning my remote descendents can still be extracting it to pave roads for EV’s, right?

If renewables are ever ready, meaning affordable realistic grid level storage, then have at it. Until then the lights have to stay on.

Keep working on it, report back in 20 years on the progress because the last 20 don’t cut it

MarkW
Reply to  Pat from Kerbob
October 26, 2021 5:39 am

One of these days, Izaak will know as much as he thinks he knows.
Sadly, that day will not be coming any time soon.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  MarkW
October 26, 2021 10:57 am

Translation – “any time soon” = “ever.”

John_C
Reply to  MarkW
October 26, 2021 3:20 pm

How I long for the days when I was 17 and knew everything. Izaak might soon be 17 too.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Pat from Kerbob
October 26, 2021 10:57 am

“If renewables are ever ready, meaning affordable realistic grid level storage, then have at it. Until then the lights have to stay on.”

= meaning NEVER

Reply to  Izaak Walton
October 25, 2021 10:02 pm

Well EIA estimates are a bit off and political in nature.

The USGS is a bit more on the energy realism side however:

“WASHINGTON – Today, the U.S. Department of the Interior announced the Wolfcamp Shale and overlying Bone Spring Formation in the Delaware Basin portion of Texas and New Mexico’s Permian Basin province contain an estimated mean of 46.3 billion barrels of oil, 281 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, and 20 billion barrels of natural gas liquids, according to an assessment by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). This estimate is for continuous (unconventional) oil, and consists of undiscoveredtechnically recoverable resources.”

ref: https://www.usgs.gov/news/usgs-announces-largest-continuous-oil-assessment-texas-and-new-mexico

And there is still more to come.

USGS is the only provider of publicly available estimates of undiscovered technically recoverable oil and gas resources of onshore lands and offshore state waters. The USGS Delaware Basin Wolfcamp shale and Bone Spring Formation assessment was undertaken as part of a nationwide project assessing domestic petroleum basins using standardized methodology and protocols.”

Last edited 1 month ago by joelobryan
Izaak Walton
Reply to  Joel O'Bryan
October 25, 2021 11:11 pm

Joel,
Even taking that estimate gives Texas another 26 years before it runs out of oil rather than 10 which is still going to occur before 2050. Plus some of that oil belongs to New Mexico and so Texas’ share will run out sooner.

MarkW
Reply to  Izaak Walton
October 26, 2021 5:41 am

Poor, poor Izaak.
Another clueless socialist who doesn’t bother trying to understand the concepts on which he pontificates.

Please spend a couple of minutes researching the concept of proven reserves, then you can apologize to the class for wasting everyone’s time.

Kenji
Reply to  Izaak Walton
October 25, 2021 10:57 pm

Those future dollars won’t be worth much at the rate Jao Bi Dinh is printing them. Best to earn them all in the next 10 years.

Is that when we are supposed to reach “Peak Oil” … again? Again?

Derg
Reply to  Kenji
October 26, 2021 3:54 am

Kenji you forgot we only have 10 years…I mean 9 years left.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  Derg
October 26, 2021 11:01 am

LOL. Reminds me of a joke. A doctor tells his patient “You only have 6 months to live,” and hands his patient the bill for his services. The patient says “I don’t have the money to pay for this,” to which the doctor replies “I’ll give you another six months.”

ResourceGuy
Reply to  Izaak Walton
October 26, 2021 5:00 am

You obviously don’t have an education in resource econ/finance. But you have provided a good classroom demo for how not to use data. Did you stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night?

MarkW
Reply to  Izaak Walton
October 26, 2021 5:35 am

Yet another clueless idiot who doesn’t know what proven reserves are.
And to think, Izaak is convinced that he’s the smart guy in the room.

ResourceGuy
Reply to  Izaak Walton
October 26, 2021 8:16 am

How can we be producing copper today if we have been extracting it for thousands of years and they aren’t making more copper deposits? Think

David S
October 25, 2021 8:13 pm

I like the direct answer ! 🙂

STRICQ
October 25, 2021 9:27 pm

Sorry, but what was the Governor’s tweet? It’s not in the article from I see.

Reply to  STRICQ
October 25, 2021 10:05 pm

just a click away…

Screen Shot 2021-10-26 at 12.04.49 AM.png
Dave Fair
October 25, 2021 10:15 pm

Amazing! A Marxist UN politician lecturing a Texas governor on economic policy.

MarkW
Reply to  Dave Fair
October 26, 2021 5:42 am

Don’t you know that in the mind of socialists/marxists, they are always world class experts on every possible subject.
Just witness Izaak attempting to explain the concept of proven reserves above.

Sara
October 26, 2021 4:53 am

Okay, okay, I’ve read that as well as comments and here is my question, based on the simple fact that petroleum/carbon-based fuel resource is finite:

What is SO WRONG with building nuclear power plants NOW ??????

A coal-fired power plant across the state line north of me was dismantled once the nuke plant replacing it went online. I would rather see more nuke power plants built to replace coal/gas/petroleum – powered plants than any more of this nonsense about how wonderful wind turbines are when they are more destructive and unreliable than anything else. NOT IMPRESSED WITH WIND POWER, folks! Not a bit!

And I don’t give a flying frack in space if the greenbeaners and ecohippies have conniption fits over nukes.

Rud Istvan
Reply to  Sara
October 26, 2021 7:59 am

Sara, read essay Going Nuclear in evoke Blowing Smoke for a long footnoted answer. In short, CCGT for the next few decades while we figure out the best Gen4 nuclear approaches. Then go nuclear. Gen3 is too expensive, as Georgia and South Carolina have discovered to their great regret.

ResourceGuy
October 26, 2021 5:15 am

Better send in the Pope to bless the windmills.

bonbon
October 26, 2021 6:05 am

Sounds good. Anyone remember Enron, the Ranch at the crooked E, of Houston, TX infamy? It’s insane spot-pricing of US grid power caused an incredible debacle in 2001.
Unfortunately that impeccable economic free-market model (yeah model) was exported to CA, and to the Ranche at the Crooked EU. Has TX learnt anything? Blackrock is still holds popular sway and they, not Guterres call the shots.

It takes President Putin to accurately identify spot-pricing in the EU as the major culprit.

So mix Enron’s crooked caper with intermittent green insanity, and price fireworks were sure to follow. There is no gas shortage, and nuclear begins to look like the garden at Eden for those getting monthly bills.

meab
Reply to  bonbon
October 26, 2021 7:06 am

Bonobo,

Pure B.S. Enron’s collapse was a result of fraudulent accounting and dishonest business practices. Nothing to do with the spot market.

bonbon
Reply to  meab
October 26, 2021 8:39 am

Arthur Anderson did the fake accounting to keep the scam going, took the hit, and simply migrated to PWC, likely right now doing exactly the same thing.
Dereg, spot-price trading (Enron had even a fake trading floor) and futures blew out. That was after the GKO and LTCM blowout and money pumping. Today liquidity pumping is hundreds of times more after a derivative blowout in 2019.
Putin is spot-on !
Popcorn, anyone?

meab
Reply to  bonbon
October 26, 2021 10:08 am

Bonobo,

Enron’s fake trading floor has nothing to do with actual spot pricing, it was simply another example of their dishonest business practices.

Russia wants natural gas pricing to come down in the long term for only one reason, the currently high spot price will eventually destroy their desire to have a monopoly on reliable energy. At current prices, European countries will turn to coal and other energy sources. However, the best price for any commodity is the price that’s determined by supply and demand. You totally made up the fake connection between Enron and the EU. If you actually had a point (hint: you don’t) you wouldn’t need to make stuff up.

Olen
October 26, 2021 7:22 am

Why should any Western country belong to the money grabbing UN that seems to be dominated by third world countries? Sovereign nations can talk to other nations and make deals as they now do without the intervention or consultation of the UN. The UN is not a country and has no sovereignty nor is it accountable to anyone.

ResourceGuy
Reply to  Olen
October 26, 2021 8:28 am

You mean third world puppets who’s votes are routinely bought and paid for by Russia and China. The same goes for UN agencies and the World Bank.

markl
October 26, 2021 8:39 am

Thank you governor Abbott. It’s about time someone stood up to these bullies.

Bruce Cobb
October 26, 2021 8:44 am

Wait – let me check….Right, here it is in black and white on page 45 of the Climatists handbook “How To Talk To Climate Deniers” it says to “Appeal to their own economic self-interest, by showing how investing more on green energy now, and less on fossil fuels will pay off economically. Point out that green, or renewable energy is the future, and that they need to get on board, or they risk being left behind”.
Of course, like everything they spout, it is all complete lies.

Reply to  Bruce Cobb
October 26, 2021 9:56 am

We need to convince the greenies to give up all that they have that are in part available because of fossil fuels. Basically, that would leave them naked in the streets with no roof over head.

griff
October 26, 2021 8:49 am

The ‘spiralling’ fuel costs are NOTHING whatever to do with renewables.

It is natural gas etc which is the problem… price and inefficiencies in supply.

MarkW
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 10:48 am

Keep repeating that lie. One of these days even you might actually believe it.

AGW is Not Science
Reply to  griff
October 26, 2021 11:11 am

See my earlier comment above, willfully ignorant fool. Injection of Junk Energy (aka wind and solar) into the mix with the government’s boot on the scale in the form of mandates, subsidies and “tax credits” that can be sold or used before a watt of energy is produced means an artificial suppression of REAL energy producers (aka fossil fuels, nuke [and hydro when/where available]) which decreases supply beyond where “economic downturn” would ever have reduced it.

Thereby causing The Problem.

Andy Pattullo
Reply to  griff
October 27, 2021 5:27 pm

“Inefficiencies in supply”?? and you are defending wind and solar?? One of the main reasons for supply below demand is the excessive and continuous pressure to reduce investment in reliable fossil fuels along with all the activism to shut down pipelines and lock in resources. All of that is clearly directly related to the global warming scam, and the push for unreliables. Your analysis lacks any shred of credibility.

gringojay
October 26, 2021 10:46 am

Texan’s tip =

EE239F20-8D88-43B4-9FB4-A591D744368F.png
Thomas Gasloli
October 26, 2021 12:26 pm

What are the odds Guterrres has ever been to TX? Zero.

What are the odds the US ambassador to the UN fed him this attack for his speech? 100%

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