“Sinking” Maldives Clear Forests, Pave Beaches, To Construct Four New Airports For Future Tourism!

Reposted from The No Trick Zone

By P Gosselin on 20. November 2020

Despite all the money-generating gloomy predictions of sinking islands, we reported in 2013 on how the Maldives was planning to build 30 new luxury hotels for future tourists.

The resort island of Landaa Giraavaru (Baa atoll), photo by: Frédéric Ducarme – CC BY-SA 4.0.

Underwater in 7 years?

We recall how in 2012, the former President of the Maldives Islands, Mohamed, Nasheed said: “If carbon emissions continue at the rate they are climbing today, my country will be underwater in seven years.”

4 new airports!

Well, today the islands have not gone underwater and remains popular with tourists like never before. And to help with the job of ferrying the 1.7 million (2019) tourists to and from the resort islands, the Maldives have recently opened 4 new airports, according to German site Aero here!.

Long-term investment defies alarmist claims

No, the airports are not designed to evacuate tourists because sea levels are “rapidly rising”, as climate alarmists claim. The airports are a long-term investment aimed at drawing in even more tourists and they are based on the projection that they’ll still be very much in unhindered operation in 30 or 50 years from now. Obviously the catastrophic climate warnings are not being heeded. Most likely these warnings are not really serious at all.

The Maldives comprise 1200 islands, which were made accessible through a total of ten airports. However, they are not enough to handle the expected traffic. So four new domestic airports would open this year alone, announced Transportation and Aviation Minister Aishath Nahula,

Deforestation, paved beaches

The new airports will feature 2200 meter runways, thus allowing commercial passenger jets to takeoff and land. According to Aero, citing the Arabian Business news site, some 52 million dollars was financed by Abu Dhabi to cover the construction costs.

Environmentalists expressed anger at the project because “forests had to be cut down and beaches concreted over”.

Hat-tip: Die kalte Sonne

40 thoughts on ““Sinking” Maldives Clear Forests, Pave Beaches, To Construct Four New Airports For Future Tourism!

    • OMG, and I thought Biden was struggling !

      Thanks for the reminder, that’s an all time classic of depths of environmental awareness. I guess he must have heard someone suggest that Guam may reach a tipping point.

      Now imagine what could happen if arctic sea ice reached a tipping point. It could tip over and sink, creating a tsunami that will take out Europe and N. Am.

  1. How far above sea level are these new airports being built? Wanna bet that the climate change models predict their flooding in mere decades?

  2. These dire warnings have been going on for decades! There are pictures from scientists over decades of a tree well into the water. It’s now way up on the beach. Lots of new beach area now! It once was the battle cry for GW activist!

  3. All of those rich investors pouring billions of dollars into new resorts on those Maldives islands are obviously fools throwing away their money, since the islands will be underwater someday. So spend some time looking at all those pretty Maldives’ resorts pictures online now — because soon everything there will be underwater. … Manhattan will be underwater too. I am a partner in Al Gore’s Wall Street Gondola Line to haul Wall Street executives to their offices in the future. I have a 1 percent share. I was sorry, however, to find out Big Al has already sold 1,372 one percent shares. because I wanted to buy another one percent share.

    • Well Richard, although carpetbags have rushed off the shelves since Al and the IPCC first made their play, I reckon the market for essential accessories for carpetbaggers has been given a new boost by the imminent onset of the Kamala, Bernie & Joe shitshow.

      Wanna take a position in a book-build prospectus for my new line in carpetbags?

  4. I have been visiting and diving in these islands for over 30 years and I have yet to see any evidence of sea level changes. The current main airport next to Male floods in storms but that is nothing new.

  5. Maybe the Maldives helped Joe Bide cheat and win the election because they know he’s dumb enough to spend a zillion dollars to roll back the oceans.

  6. My pipe-dream: when the 2012 president of the Maldives said what he said (I remember that) I had wished that all people took him seriously and that tourism completely stopped. I was hoping to see his backpedaling after that.

  7. Ah… the Maldives…the ground hog day of climate disaster.

    Tourist arrivals in the Maldives averaged 104,737 from 2012 until 2020, reaching an all time high of 173,347 in January of 2020 and a record low of 0 in April of 2020. Doh!

    RIP Dr. Nils-Axel Mörner.

    • All them tourists best be careful to spread out.
      Iffen they all collect on one side of the islands, the Maldives might reach a tipping point and fall over.

  8. Obviously, all the tourists were and will be transported to the islands by some means that will not emit CO2. I mean, these people would not be hypocrites, now would they??

    • The Maldives are hundreds of miles from the nearest major land mass (Sri Lanka and the southern tip of India). Probably a two-day voyage by sailboat, if the winds are favorable.

  9. Were these ‘Airports’ for Sea=Planes?
    &
    Are these Hotels now disused Covid 19 Cruise ships?

    If not, then I’m calling Malarkey & Shenanigans!

  10. A Pro-Choice, Pro-Choice, Pro-Choice, Pro-Choice, selective, opportunistic, relativistic world. Highly politically congruent, too, if they can sustainibly force the em-pathetic appeal.

  11. On a realted note: ESA’s Sentinel 6 SLR radarsat launched this morning from Vandenburg AFB on SpaceX rocket. The satellite was given the name “Michael Freilich” in honor of deceased scientist and director of NASA’s Earth Science Division who passed away last August 5, 2020.

    From the Press Release:

    “A joint U.S.-European satellite built to monitor global sea levels lifted off on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 4E at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California Saturday at 9:17 a.m. PST (12:17 p.m. EST).

    About the size of a small pickup truck, Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich will extend a nearly 30-year continuous dataset on sea level collected by an ongoing collaboration of U.S. and European satellites while enhancing weather forecasts and providing detailed information on large-scale ocean currents to support ship navigation near coastlines.

    “The Earth is changing, and this satellite will help deepen our understanding of how,” said Karen St. Germain, director of NASA’s Earth Science Division. “The changing Earth processes are affecting sea level globally, but the impact on local communities varies widely. International collaboration is critical to both understanding these changes and informing coastal communities around the world.”

    After arriving in orbit, the spacecraft separated from the rocket’s second stage and unfolded its twin sets of solar arrays. Ground controllers successfully acquired the satellite’s signal, and initial telemetry reports showed the spacecraft in good health. Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich will now undergo a series of exhaustive checks and calibrations before it starts collecting science data in a few months’ time.

    The initial orbit of Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich is about 12.5 miles (20.1 kilometers) lower than its ultimate operational orbit of 830 miles (1,336 kilometers). In less than a month, the satellite will receive commands to raise its orbit, trailing Jason-3 by about 30 seconds. Mission scientists and engineers will then spend about a year cross-calibrating data collected by the two satellites to ensure the continuity of sea level measurements from one satellite to the next. Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich will then take over as the primary sea level satellite and Jason-3 will provide a supporting role until the end of its mission.

    I don’t think we need a satellite though to tell us the Maldives are not sinking. But maybe Sentinel-6 will gives better data on SLR than the Jason-3 it is replacing. If it starts to NOT show what the alarmists want, maybe they will just “disappear it” like the OCO-2 mission was forgotten after it started challenging pre-held assumptions in 2017, assumptions that underpin the IPCC’s and NASA’s Bern Model of CO2 sources and sinks.

  12. Nothing says “I don’t believe in climate change” like investing billions of dollars on sea-level based developments.

    Tourism is the only reason that the vast majority of people who live there get to live there and have anything above a stone-age standard of living.

    The tourists who bring their money to support the economy of the Maldives have to travel thousands of miles, usually by jet aircraft burning vast amounts of CO2-emitting fossil fuels. And then, most take fossil-fueled-powered boats the final miles to their dive locations for their precious few hours of under-water time. For those who are fortunate enough to already live there, their CO2 impact isn’t any better. Nearly everything they need to survive, including food and fuel is brought via aircraft or by diesel or oil-powered shipping.

    If the residents of the Maldives honestly believe that CO2 is solely responsible for ultimately sinking their islands, then I think they have the moral obligation to act accordingly. This means giving up the tourist trade, reverting back to a sustainable stone-age existence, or just leaving altogether. Demanding that the rest of the world pay them money on top of what they earn from tourism just so that they can continue with their unsustainable carbon-subsidized lifestyle unabated is simply self-serving, hypocritical and absurd. And shame on the rest of the world for falling for this.

    This is a prime example of the scam that is “carbon shaming”.

  13. Building airports when the airline industry has been largely destroyed by governments obsessed with COVID is not the greatest of ideas. Whether tourism will ever recover to the levels previously known remains to be seen, but the plans the ‘Davos’ acolytes appear to want to put in places suggests it is unlikely.

  14. Oh yeh, tourists ….. sure, it’s an ocean gateway east of Asia, multi runways, who are the new bank rolled stakeholders, can’t imagine its mum n dad shareholders, insurance companies …

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