Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #158

The Week That Was: 2014-11-29 (November 29, 2014) Brought to You by SEPP (www.SEPP.org) The Science and Environmental Policy Project THIS WEEK: By Ken Haapala, Executive Vice President, Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP) National Energy Policy: “You can accurately judge the viability of a potential energy source by the attitude of green activists to…

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The Gruberization of environmental policies

  Accumulation of fraudulent EPA regulations impacts energy, economy, jobs, families and health Guest essay by Paul Driessen Call it the Gruberization of America’s energy and environmental policies. Former White House medical consultant Jonathan Gruber pocketed millions of taxpayer dollars before infamously explaining how ObamaCare was enacted. “Lack of transparency is a huge political advantage,”…

Buoy Temperatures, First Cut

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach As many folks know, I’m a fan of good clear detailed data. I’ve been eyeing the buoy data from the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) for a while. This is the data collected by a large number of buoys moored offshore all around the coast of the US. I like…

A big (goose) step backwards

Guest opinion: Prof Richard Betts, Dr Tamsin Edwards Dr Tim Ball’s blog post “People Starting To Ask About Motive For Massive IPCC Deception” – drawing parallels between climate scientists and Hitler – doesn’t do anyone in the climate change debate any favours: in fact it seems a big (goose) step backwards. It’s especially frustrating to…

The Art of Art

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach With Thanksgiving coming up, I thought I’d write about something other than science. A few weekends ago, I went by kayak across Tomales Bay from Marshall to Lairds Landing, where I lived for nine months or so when I was about twenty-five with a wonderful friend and his lady and…

Claim: A warming world may spell bad news for honey bees

From the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council Researchers have found that the spread of an exotic honey bee parasite -now found worldwide – is linked not only to its superior competitive ability, but also to climate, according to a new study published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The team of…